Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode 162 · 4 months ago

Huddle up with Gus: Andy 'Drano' Lano

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

25 year former PGA Tour Caddie worldwide...Caddied in 40 plus majors....9 Masters, 2 British Opens, 14 US Opens, 16 PGA's ...caddied for 9  PGA Tour Wins which includes 8  wins with Kenny Perry

Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddle up with Guss. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback gusts Farad. I want to thank you for joining us today. You can check us out at huddle up with gustscom. You can go to wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. We will be on there were on every network, so we appreciate you. We want to thank all of our sponsors today, the little blue pill credit guard, new T genics, sixteen thirty one digital news, always a big plus. Go to sixteen thirty one digital news. Check out their sports news, information entertainment. They do a great job with that. And definitely check out to our PODCAST, is held at Sounder FM. Go to sound or DOT FM and check out our podcast, along with many, many others, and we appreciate you listening and please go to our youtube channel so you can watch the video, not just listen to the show, but now you can watch our shows on our great youtube channel huddle up with gusts. So I appreciate you listening and get ready for the show. It's a great one. Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a match up. Brian here sports fans, whether your game is on the Gridiron, at the diamond or on the links, we can only say get up off your seats and get ready for some real action. Welcome to this week's huddle up with us. Fifteen year NFL quarterback, Gust Barack Passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the benches. Playing for seven NFL Franchisees. With one hundred fourteen TD's under his belt, Gust knows who the players are and how the Games are. One he go every day get the hang out with an Heni quarterback up. Okay, sports fans, from the decked out and plush sixteen forty one digital studios, it's checkoff time, so snap your two straps on and can't ready to huddle up with us here everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddle up with Gusts. I'm your host, guests for out fifteen, your NFL quarterback, and I'm want to welcome you to another show. You can check us out wherever you listen to your favorite podcast or go to huddle up with guestscom and like and subscribe. We appreciate you. Make sure that you share your all your views with us and what you think of the show and send us some emails. We love to hear from our fans. So I want to thank all of our sponsor six thirty one digital news. Appreciate you. MFN, multiformat network, MFN dotnet. Check them out. There are guys that help produce our show. They're wonderful and you know, we just appreciate all the people that are involved, especially sounder dot FM. Go to sounder, check out PODCASTS, see what they're doing. They have incredible new technologies that will help you with your podcast if you want to do one. All right, everyone today my guests we've had on before. The show didn't record as well as we wanted it to, so we're going to go back and Redo it all and I think will even be better this time. But my guest today is drain no Lano. Dreno was a twenty five year caddy on the tour all over the world. He's worked with incredible player is. I went to school with Kenny Perry. But Andy, you know, I'm excited for this because I have a lot of questions, a lot of stuff that happened in the golf world and last since we talked even and but I want to get to those, but let's talk about you a little bit. How are you doing it doing great gusts and again great to be back on back in the huddle, so to speak, and looking forward to today and shared some fun things with the folks and always appreciate the opportunity to do so. Oh Yeah, you got a lot of stuff going on. You're up on the East Coast Getting Ready for your big charity event. Obviously you have your golf mastery dotnet where you help people out do a lot of things there. We'll get into all that stuff, but, you know, let's get into a little bit about your history first. Give us a quick rundown. I know you grew up in Portland Maine. Tell me what that was like growing up there and how you got into Gulf. Yeah, I mean I born in Portland Maine. My folks were born here as well, so we are family lineage has been here roughly now, about a hundred years. So this is really been home to the Lano family. And Yeah, my dad, who was a very athletic guy himself. He played three sports and he passed that on us like or I should say gave us that opportunity, and he put plastic clubs out there and we you know, for me, when I was two years old and I grabbed them and I made her walked around and banged a few things off tables, etc. But eventually I ended up swatting at the ball and that's pretty much all where it started. Yeah, do you do you? I mean you think back to when you were little? I'm sure you have a lot of memories of like, you know, clubs are way too big for me or and all these things. But do when you see kids today doing and playing? They're more and more like Peter Jacobson's really trying to do diversity inclusion. He's working with the HBCUS and doing different thing. You see all these new people and how golf is trying to expand its boundaries. Yeah, it's incredible the awareness to golf. Now you got us kids, you got all getting these kids started at a young age because you,...

...and I know obviously you are great athlete playing a tough sport and football, but it comes a time where you can't do that anymore and you can play golf for a long, long time. I mean it's a worldwide sport. Anybody can play it and it just makes it really unique. Making great friendships and actually you can do business. I mean it has a lot, a lot of parallels with life. Yeah, you know, and and you see a lot of people when they play they get angry, you know what I mean, like because they're not playing well. But for me, I never would. It really was like that. Like I just love being out, being with the guys or my son's. I put with my son's a lot and just being out. And, like you said, you know, once football is over, there's no adult men's league. Bring go play quarterback anymore. Right, so the golf course is like the competition for us now, right, and no matter. You know, like I tell a lot of my friends, you know, these guys that are coming to the end and you know, I'm I'm sure you may have had to take this on, and I did, to really getting away from full time candy. And you know, no, what he really wants to come irrelevant. And with that, I mean it's a tough deal. But you know, golf is so great because you, and I know you, don't need anybody to throw a ball to or retrieve any you know anything, or etc. You can go out, you can practice, but you can hit Paul's you can do all that on your own, get better on your own. You can take it really wherever you want. Yeah, I know, it's an amazing game. It's a mental game. It's also you can be physical. It doesn't have to be. I mean, not many people that has that fretty couples Nike Smooth Swing. Right, every see people out there hacking away. My favorite thing to watch, though, is like when somebody like gets thrown with a single and the guy has like this weird set up to like the drive and every you know what I mean, and then then it's just a normal swing and it's like, okay, why did you do that for five minutes and then just have a normal swing? Yeah, I mean, it golfish unique and there's lots of ways, like I tell phones, to get, you know, to impact, I mean, and there's not everybody, as you know. You can watch the tour guys, the LPGA, the college kids, they all ride at the same place, but they don't necessarily all do it the same. So that's what makes it kind of unique. And you and I know the hand I coordination is huge. I think that's really what makes like players like yourself, hockey players, pictures, whatever. Those guy they seem to pick it up really, really quick and I mean it's a challenging sport. You know. I never forget I was talking to Kenny Lofton one day when he was in our PROAM. He got up on this whole and he was nervous as you can ever believe. And here's a guy that I think they just won the world series in and he hit the bonness and Kenny has and what's the problem? Because man, he goes, I don't like this game because the ball doesn't move. You know, he like that by itself and then he had to get it going. So he still ended up doing pretty well. I was interesting comment he made playing obviously of all that moves. Yeah, I mean it is. It is kind of wildlike as balls sitting still and all you got to do is hit it with his club. And yet it's the like one of the hardest things ever. And even the pros, you know, you think they do it all the time and they're still Shankin drives and you know for them it was a Shank if they're twenty feet off the fairway. That's to me it's like, Oh, they thank that one. Like you know, we watch it all the time. So when you were in high school, you know, I'm sure that you played on a golf team and did all that. What was that like for you? Did you want to be a perfect I'm obviously you wanted to be a pro player, or what was that? Those steps for you? Yeah, that was a tough time for me because I was a really good baseball player and those two seasons ran together. So when I came by freshman year, I kind of had to make a decision and I was really doing well in junior golf. I was winning some junior tournaments locally, but it's it's main it's not high level, but it was fun that, you know, be winning and the be getting better and lowering your handicap all that. So it was tough for me to give up baseball because I really was good at it. I Love Dib playing on all star team, aren't you know? I'm not bragging, but I'm just saying it was that big decision for me and so with that I did go with the golf and was, you know, pretty good. We played individual matches and we also played with our partner. So like the one and two guy who play the one and two guy from the other high school. So it was fun competition and you know that I was aspiring to try to be out there on to the tour, but I didn't quite make it. Yes, what is a golf offseason like here? Well, like you know, you play I golf. Happens in high school a certain time of the year. So then when you for me, it was on to basketball. So I basketball and I obviously played football prior to that. So I mean I was a three sport guy and I was always busy with sports. So in the summer really golf was kind of the getaway from me on baseball and Little League, senior League all that, because it's a great release to get out away from all that, be by yourself and be with a totally different bunch of friends. Yeah, so,...

I mean you've been on a tour, you've caddy for a lot of big names and you probably know these guys. Do they are a lot of them like athletes as far as like playing other sports, or a lot of them just they've been like just golf for so long. You know what I mean? Like you talked about being a three sport athlete. Do a do you know if a lot of guys have done that? Or they just been golf. If you start poking around on their past, most of them have at least played one or two to at least. I mean, Dustin Johnson, you probably very tremendous basketball. I mean you could do anything. I mean this is there's several of them out there that might surprise you, but you'll find that a lot of them had another sport where it was baseball, was basketball, you know, because I know in this day and age now we're all specializing. I still encourage the folks that asked me in the young kids that I speak to. I'm all about, you know, sharing it up and trying to play some other sports, because there's other sports that bring certain things. He may be to golf that they bring things to your coordination, all that kind of thing, and I'm sure you experience that yourself. Oh yeah, there's no doubt about it. I believe that everyone Lee should try most sports. Right. You may not stick with it, but try and see if you like it. I think that's how people fall in love with things. Yeah, so then you go to Kentucky for school. How did you get to Kentucky from me? So that's an interesting story because playing basketball we used to play some after the season was over. We used to still go in a certain night to the local gym and guys would get them with still some really good games for some of us that didn't really want to quite drop it yet. And there was a gentleman there, teacher around here actually at Wk you alumni, and I had indicated to him that I was looking to go south to try to play golf. Obviously that season short here, and he connected me down there with Murray stick, well with Western Kentucky, and I'd also been in touch with Murray state. So I got in touch with the coach. The coach didn't have any money, but he invited me to come down and try out and if I was good enough, you put me on the team. So I went down there blind, you know, because back then you didn't have these videos and everything. You had a pamphlet and you had phone calls and that kind of old school stuff. So my parents were great supporters. They got in the car and they drove the one hundred miles down to bowling green and dropped me off and and that was you know. You know, I ended up qualifying being on the team. That's how I met Kenny Perry and it was a great experience. All my best friends, some of my best friends today, are from from college. So between you and Kenny Perry, who can draw the ball further? It's not even close. Kenny, you know I played, but I played in a tournament when I was playing in the League, but I was young, I didn't really know what I was doing in golf. I only started playing my senior in college and will late bloomer. Yeah, yeah, I was. And but I played in this tournament, a rebuck tournament up in the Cape Area, and we had like we had three like people that sponsored it, was myself. And then you have to play the Professional Golfer and carry. Kenny Perry was with us. Kenny Perry was with us and I'm teaming off with the guy wrote the other guys right, and I'm kind of hitting it further them than they are, and then Kenny's back at the proteas, which is like fifty yards behind us, and he's hitting it fifty prds past me and I'm like wait a second, I mean, I know this is a big dude, but he's not. There's no way he's stronger than I am. You know what I mean? Then it does it. It took me so long to correlate that. It's not about like how muskuly m muscular. You are right, it's timing and and all of that. It's using those big muscles. And you know what, canny never was a weight room guy. He never was any hit that. What you saw with Kenny is what he developed from hitting a ton of balls and building up his huge forearms. And you know, he figure. He also there's a guy right there. So he was pretty good in high school of basketball. So again, you know good, good, long. We used to have games in the gym, you know, shooting, three point shooting, you know that kind of thing, and he could fill it up in two thousand and twenty two feet. So again, you know, VI's your athlete piece. For him, did he play football? Note he play baseball? No, but for him, who was coops and golf. So they all had it. Most of them had their hand in something else. So then you know, you you caddy for Kenny. How did that come about? Me, I know you played in college with them. I'm sure you've got to be really good friends. How did it come about to where you start caddying for him? So he left school in eighty two. He was two years ahead of me and graduated. I I. I didn't graduate to lady five, and then when I graduated I wasn't quite sure what I wanted to do and I had had some catty and experience, obviously, growing up here in the area by Caddy for my dad. I Caddie at the club. was A it was a great way to make cash those it was only a few ways to make...

...cash back on my day and that was doing that shovel and driveways in the winter and cutting cutting lowns in summer. So they used to put some cash in our pocket. But anyway, getting back to that, I decided in nineteen eighty seven I called a friend of mine, Brian Claire, who I met coming up here traveling through the mini tours. He had made the tour and I said, Hey, I want to come out there and caddy. Do you know anybody that needs someone? He says, actually, I do, and I packed my bags left Portland Maine in nineteen eighty seven. Believe it or not, my first tournament TPC at Scottsdale. Wow, you know now what that's turn into. I was there the first year that that course open and then, you know, I just kind of I only really intended to do it a couple of years but, you know, ended up turning into twenty five, twenty five years and over forty majors right like that. I mean there, yeah, yeah, it was more than I really thought. I mean, but it just kind of had this snowball effect where I got kind of better at what I was doing. I had better players asking me to work for them. And the nixt thing, you know, you know, I get so getting to Kenny. All of a sudden, five years into it, I kind of cut my teeth. Kenny. It kind of because Kenny came out on tour in nineteen eighty seven. Finally got his card that year to trying like six times. So him and I unbelievably having to come out the same time. We saw each other, but, you know, we set a lot but we were always like I was always working with someone else. He always has somebody. But Anyway, ninety one he had an opening in he called me up and I said sure, and you know, I'd cut my teeth and got experience and he had finished second or third a couple times and then seven weeks later, you know, we get some memorial and he ends up when his first tournament. That's awesome. That's awesome everyone. We're talking to drain O Lano. You can check them out at golf mastery dotnet. We appreciate you listen to huddle up with gusts. So you know we we say drain a Lano. So tell me where drain no came from. How did you get that nickname? So aroun on the course where I grew up, you know, I'll you know I wasn't the best when it came to hitting Greens. I'd get it around the green, but I was always around the green a lot. But I could chip and I could get it up and down a lot. I'd make a lot of six, eight, ten, twelve, fifteen foot as, whether they for Power Bertie. And one day this guy looked at me and I was on a run that day. I was making a bunch of punch. He goes, he goes, I'm going to start calling you drain no Lano because you make everything. It doesn't hurt that it does. Obviously the RHYMES, as you know, always goes with a nickname pretty good and it stopped. So anyway, I used to fuck great. I wished I could fult like that now, but as you know, when you get old, man, the nerves that just not there. Oh my gosh, I know that. But you know, this year was the first time one of my son's ever beat me and it was the first time we went out this year, so it was first time playing and my son Gabe finally beat me. I shout, I didn't shoot well at all and and you just see the smirk on his face, like I and he is dad, you must be getting old. I'm like, and maybe that's it. Maybe that's it. I said, that's all right, I'm not going to let them beat me anymore. This year, like they had their fun, like it's okay, we're going to we're going to go back at it. But you know, speaking of drain and puts, like how how does the caddy help a guy like that may not be having his best day, but you know you've been in a situation because, like you said, you were great around the Green. You do all the team. So how does it caddie help a guy when he's not having his best day's not hitting the ball like he wants, but he can still stay in it? Tell me about like what the mentality of the caddy has to be well. I mean you have a lot of posts out there. Like I say, you're giving yardage or a psychologist, you're supporting, you know, you got to be a coach. You got it. I mean again, but in that situation you're talking about, you just gotta keep reminding him how did they are. And it might not be happening today and that might be just that time that you tell him that, all of a sudden one goes in and those guys, honestly, they're so good out there they could run five in a row. So really it's just keeping that kind of in the present kind of thing going on and just reminding them and Ain reassuring them. That's really what all the great caddies do, like I've said. You know, we've watched the PGA tour for or whatever it is, sixty five, seventy years, and I've never seen a caddie in a shot. But with that it's a lot of caddies that have some great influence with their players and their players trust them. So that's the big thing. Once you build that trust with your player, then it makes it real easy for them to do well, especially in the heat when you know it gets down to the last nine holes on Sunday. Well, I think this past week we heard about a caddy from, you know, the PJ championship who came on. It used to be another you know, was Phil Nicholson's Caddie. Came and Caddie for Justin right and and like Justin talked about him after the tournament like I wouldn't have been able to do this without them. Right and he he said how important he was to him. But like when you hear...

...about the story from Phil and his Caddie, it's like there's a complete opposite situation. It's it's really nuts about that thing. and honestly, you know, speaking to that, I mean I was fortunate over my years to have guys that I work for. I mean Kenny, he couldn't be He'd be the first guy to give you credit for anything that you might have helped him where it got him over the edge or what it whatever it may have been. I mean I remember that the first week that you know, he won his first tournament, he was seven under par on this Friday cut day, standing on the sixteen tea and I you know, it's one of those days where you know as a caddie, you stay out of their way. Well, he'd given I give him the yardage and he'd pulled the club and he'd gotten over the club and he's ready to go and all of a sudden you looked up at me. I'm ten feet away, and he says you like this club and I said, well, I go. You know, was laying at the winners. I really think you can get the sixth there. So he came over and put the five in, pulled out the six and hit this beautiful drag on right at the pin. What a couple two hops rolled in for a hole in one and underbroke the course record and went on to be hallow in a playoff. So I mean that was a great scenario for him. He trusted me there in those kind of days. Happen a lot for these guys that you don't hear about, but that's kind of what your job is and that's what you're there for. Is that? Like they were talking about the tradition where like, if you're the caddie of the guy who wins the tournament and one of the big majors, you know the eighteen flag, the eighteen green flag. Is that they give that to you. And that was one of the big grapes was that Phil Minicholson wasn't doing that. He was like, you know, not kind of carrying through on tradition. Right, traditions a big thing, like even in the NFL, like we take care of our own and we take care of like the equipment guys and the the the athletic trainers and the strength because, yeah, they get paid, but they do so much for you that you want to take care of them right. And and tell me about that tradition a little bit. Yeah, well, I'll look. I mean I'm with every one of my nine wins. As you know, the caddie gets the pins. So I mean basically you get the flag and some players want you to get the flag for them. I don't know what bones is deal was with Nicholson. I never did realize that. I just know with me I was able to get the flags and I always gave to my pro and he wrote a little note on there about the week and I framed him up and I have them. That's awesome down for me. I mean I only at nine bones. Is Probably got forty, five fifty wins and Jane fill a room up with them. But anyway, with that, I was surprised to hear that story. I anestly knew nothing about any of that, to be honest with it, and it surprised me and I guess you know that's just a choice that Micholson made. I'm not sure why because, like I said, bones was very, you know, influent, you know, he was very effective and and helped bill a ton out there. So that must have been a decision that he made. But obviously jat he's got a different perspective on it. He had the same perfect perspective with his previous Caddie, Jimmy Johnson, and who he won several tournaments with. So it's all in the Golfer. Well, I mean, I mean you got to have some help, like you know, he jt was talking about, like he's down seven coming in the final round and he wins the thing. I mean you got to have some help, you got to have some like you said, you got to build them up. You know, it's like if they're doing well, you eve them go, but there's times it said, hey, don't worry, you're great, you're going to be good. You just just keep doing what you're doing and you're going to be there and he talked a lot about that. Yeah, and you know what, these guys it's hard for them to like believe that, like I'm sure Justin believe, you know, a jt believe in his talent that day, but when you look up and think about seven down, I mean that's not easy to overcome. Now, did he have a little help? Yeah, the boys came back to him a little, but he did his job. He shot, I heard, I think it was for under on the back. So he met him at the past and he did his deal alone. Behold walked away with a trophe. That's right. Tell people, I mean golfs really hard a game, even for those guys that know that know where they're generally going to get it every day. If you could say, how could you compare golf to life? What do you tell people about that, because I think there are metaphors in it right like about it, and so tell me your experience with it and how you kind of have compared it to life. For me, I mean one of my highest things is honesty and integrity, and you know you're your own referee out there in golf. I mean, obviously, if the ball rolls and you're in the woods and there's no one there, but you know it rolls. There's only one person that knows it's got to call that penalty shot. So with that the honesty and integrity is huge. You know, the etiquette, being a gentleman, I mean golfs and gentleman's game, and having the etiquette and respecting the course, respecting the player. It was all the kind of things you're going to have to do in life when you're dealing with people business. You know, when you move on to do things. That's what's going to get respect back for you. You know, when I play a course...

...and you see people that don't fix her ball marks and I think about my dad when I he seell me about tearing his grass up, I'm like, oh, he would be fists people for just fix your ball your spot, like it's not that hard. It's like they give you all the stuff to fix it. Just do it. It takes two seconds. Yeah, there was a friend of mine like we played this really nice course and you know, I generally try to fix because it's just in my blood. I try to fix two or three green whether they're mine or not, and we're playing this really nice country club and I'm looking around and I'm the Greens are perfect, but I'm going, you know, there were three or four there and I don't know if you know my friends in the chronums to go me. He told me, Andy, if they don't fix those, those things take six to eight days to heel. If you don't get it. Kind of right there. Yeah, so imagine if everybody teat off and did two or three that day at Your Club, you Greens, and be immaculate. I mean they just would. Yeah, kind of a neglected thing, like you said. Yeah, I think you know, when you play public course is obviously people. They all it's public, you know, we just crash it, we don't care. But it's the same thing. If you just did that, like the next time you came back to play, the Greens would be so much better. Like, people just don't get it and I get upset about that side. I tried, you know, when you talk about a gentleman's game and etiquette, all that that was. I've always been big on that. I try to teach my son's that and they've gotten better, but like when they were learning, you know, and they'd walk across somebody's line or you know, they they didn't know. Like okay, now truth like your closest or your first way. So you pull the pan. It's just different things that you got to learn. I think it helps even with parenting, like if you go out with your kids and you just teaching them how to be a good person. Yeah, and it's about respect to I mean, you know with that like you know, moving further, replacing a DIV it, breaking a bunker correctly so that like men the bunker and then you hit it in behind me, you don't get a bag rate job and technically, by the rules on tour, those guys can't touch it. But we play a lot of local rules now because that it's neglected so bad. It's not fair. If you get it in a hazard someone didn't rank it. Why should you be at that beckoning and call? So they've made certain better local rules. But yeah, I mean it's all about that. That's all part of it. Keeping your opponents score in a tournament. That's all part of the game. That's how it all started back in the day. Yeah, that's that's amazing. So if you had to go out and caddy right now, all the incredible courses throughout the world that you've been on and you said, man, I just want to walk this one course with my guy. So who would what would be the course and who would be the guy you'd want to go back with? That's a great question. I mean, you know, for me it would be probably pebble. You know, I really enjoyed the walk at pebble. I figured the other day I think I'd probably caddied fifty rounds there. I'm actually getting a bucket lift list Chet next month. I'm actually getting to play it, so I'm looking forward to that. I mean the Golfer, you know, it might be my dad. You know, my dad is the reason that I am who I am today with sports and everything else, and he didn't get to play pebble. So with that I would probably have to give him the nod and look for him. Now would your dad go? You don't know what you're talking about. Just give me the five iron. I got to tell you we played some father and sons along the way. You we won couple here in the state eight. You know, they had one every year. There was an every year they had the father's Day father and son and they'd have different age and he started me at a young age and you know we'd kind of towards the end when I started learning. You know, we'd go back and forth, but I mean generally, you know, he knew what he was doing and I followed his lead. I remember, five years old, we came to a par three with a lake and I couldn't hit it over, so he told me to tap it. So I tapped it three feet. He hit it over onto the green. We made our pop game move gone. So, you know, those kind of things. They seem small, but just the strategy of the game and getting out there and doing that stuff. I always encourage parents now to try to do those things with their kids. You know, girls end boys. Yeah, yeah, it's amazing how golf is changing kind of in that way. It's becoming more diverse and culturally it's changing to right where we're getting different people in there, which I love. Incredible, I mean incredible. Like I said, it's worldwide now more than it ever has and I mean, you know, I don't really like to give covid any credit, but I can awesome say in the United States covid saved the golfing jury. I mean golf is booming now and it was kind of laying quiet right about the time it happened and all the my friends, a boy I talk to you, said, yeah, it's insane. Now, I mean, I'm crazy busy and it's great because it got people out that played golf. It got people out that figured they'd never even try golf right get out the doors and now they're hooked because you and I I know...

...it's addictive. Oh it's very once you start playing and you get like if you go out, like I couldn't play for the last months because I had my goal letter out and you know I'm in shore to get back out there this weekend. I can go back out and play again. But you know, once you get going and like you had that shot that you just keep thinking about, like that man that was you know, you chip it in like I drink. I drain old one right like that just keeps you coming back. Right. I always say you can have the worst day, but it's that one time, if you have that shot, that's going to just make it come back. I mean I had one the other day. I was playing great, but I hit one and I made a long pot and I'd happy to be working on this chip shot and actually executed it like I used to do years ago, and I'm, you know, because I'm trying to play a little more golf this year try to get my rounds up well I have in the past, so that's kind of my goal this year. So, yeah, it's exactly what you said. I mean it's crazy. You're never ever going to quit chasing it. Yeah, no, and so I wanted to talk to you. So in football, you know, we play Sunday's right, you could play Monday or Thursday or whatever, but you play Sunday, Saturday night. You know, you get down your meetings and you're in your hotel room by yourself and all you're thinking about the plays and the defense and other everything, and sometimes you got to call somebody to calm yourself down, or you know what I mean, like there's people that are in your space that help you with all that stuff. Now, you've obviously been a lot of majors. You Him with guys who won big tournaments. That that Saturday night for those guys when they know they got a chance to go out and win. Like, do you have some crazy stories about them, like, Hey, I don't you know what I mean, like, or do they usually pretty calm in that scenario. I mean what I try to do for them personally is I always try to search for some for what I call fresh stuff that they might not have heard from me. Try to give them. It's a from for me, it's all going to be out the mental side of it, because generally the physical side big going to be pretty ready there. You know, they've played well for three days in a less they got an injury or something happened. So for me I focused on the mental side. I mean that's what made Tiger Woods, I mean, obviously is one of the greatest players ever, but his mental game we never seen anybody as strong as in because there's a guy that didn't have to have his a game and he could win as he did. You know, he was just so stop and so strong mentally. So for me I tried to have some preparatory things from my player, whoever it was something fresh, something encouraging, something positive, so that if we got to that point we could see things maybe starting to get away, you remind him and throw that in there and you hope it gets you, you know, further down the road. Yeah, that's such. That's always a good point because anytime you're with someone, I think that when you can give them energy and lift them up in a positive way, it's a great thing. And where did you ever? Were you ever Catt and for guys who didn't want like you know what I mean, like there. I know there's people that don't want people saying stuff to him. Or usually when you catty they know that you're safe until they'll let you say whatever. Yeah, so generally you have that figured out. Like they're all, I always tell people, they're all different. Like Kenny Perry was different than Tom Wats, who's different than nick folds, to them Michelle Wei. So they all want their information a certain way and you kind of learned that. I mean obviously spending fourteen years with Kenny Perry. He knew me like a book and I knew him like a book. And you know, I knew how to read puts for him because I knew exactly how he would hit them and he would want me to. I you know, I would looking straight in the honest it look, this put is really, really fast. I mean he wanted that information. Then there was other pros that they might not want that information because it might scare them or take them off their game. So you just kind of figure that out and no kind of where you can go, and that's what bones does so great. Joe Lacava does it great, Ted Scott, they all do it great with their players because they know where they can go and where they needed. Well, you've known, you knew Kenny for so long. You had him for a long time. Was it like, okay, Kenny hits a long drive, we got a long walk. You guys just start bullshitting about life and family and stuff, or is it just always focus? Oh No, no, no, we talked about sports and you know, he's a big sports guy and I was a big sports guy and you know, obviously we had different teams along the way, but he loves sports. That was kind of his outlet. You know, done, you know where you watching the game tonight, all that kind of thing, because once you get away from that arena, those guys need a break from that arena. They don't need know, off golf, golf and take a home with them and all that, good or bad, sixty five or seventy five. So the ones that can leave it there and then go and kind of do something else and come back, you'll find those are the ones that are really kind of rocking and rolling out there and are able to get in. Plus it saves him a bunch of energy. Oh Yeah, because if your mine is focused on like my next shot all the time, like I would think, after eighteen holes and four days straight, like you're spent, you're exhausted. And you know,...

...like Kenny, he didn't even carry an art each book. You know, I basically had that. You know, a lot of these guys now they're looking at the maps and all that, but they don't, not all of them, do, the numbers. So with that, the maps, the pictures, is so great, but Kenny, all he wanted to do is play. He was a feel, what I call a field player. So, you know, he would get the number and everything, but he was a field play it wasn't so much a technical player. This technical and feel out there. And they all get it done, you know, they all can get it done in a rabbits the same place, but with Kenny's feel, you know that that's all. It work best for him and that's what he knew work best for him. And you know, I think, you know, I think it's important that each player like knows their limits and knows who they are and maintains that doesn't try to be anyone else. Yeah, Hey, everyone, we're talking with Dreana Lano. Check them out of golf mastery dotnet. You can go there and really get a field for the game. He helps you out with it. He has tons of experience on the golf court or helping people. So check them out at golf mastery dotnet. So I think one of the biggest things about the game is, you know, we look at these guys just like when I play, people want to play that sport like and and, but you just can't go out and play football. What's great is I can go out and try to mimic somebody that I've watched on TV right and I can go out and try to hook a ball. I go out, you know, and do all that work where that's not happening. I mean that's a small percentage of football, but anyone can go out and golf. And so with with what you're doing now, how do you how do you work all that in and everything that you've learned about the game and been across the world and put into what you're doing personally now? So what I try to do first of all is you know, people are interested in the game and I try to tell them that not to worry too much about score, basically just trying to get the fundamentals, the grip, the stand, you know, just the basic stuff. So if you teach them something and they drop a club and then they pick it up a year ago, they're going to know I need, you know, to hold the club this way or whatever, because some people, I found it's different. They didn't maybe want to take it up and run with it at first, but then on the second run they grabbed it and they did run with it and they did really take to golf or whatever. But I think it's that and I think it's you know, I always do emphasize that it's a really tough game and if you really want to get good at it, it's a muscle memory game and you're going to have to put some practice time. And if you've got, you know, young people with parents, I mean with kids, work, etc. Stuff, to juggle all that, you know, to be quite honest. So you know, there's a lot of golf widows out there because the guys they decided to go ahead and go to the golf course not be there for the kids or whatever. But anyway, with that, that that's where I try to start and then from there I just try to remind them that it's a lifetime sport. You Got Fifty, sixty years. You had to figure it out, so you don't have to know it by Monday. So if they're patient enough and they can have the right, at least the right guidance to get it airborne, generally they run with it. Yeah, so, you know, obviously golf, ever, most courses you can go to, besides like the all the private courses, but most, even some of the private courses, you can ride a cart, right, you can get in a cart and go and play and and you've walked so many courses. What do you tell people, like if they want to walk and they're not sure, like you know, because it is kind of far if you haven't done it, and they can't carry their bags though, they ride a cart. But tell me, like your advice on the difference between riding in a cart and playing and walking and playing. Okay, so what I find with that? So there's a couple things. One, so I don't like a cart myself. I like the walk. For a couple things. One, the game's pretty demanding. So the time that you have, the recovery time of fitting a shot, good battery different. Some times getting in the cart and getting in there too soon and you're not ready to regroup. That's not a good thing. I mean it happens at certain courses in the certain people that just can't not use a car. But I'm a walker for that reason, because I think you need to kind of digest everything as you're going and kind of be able to have time to regroup, and sometimes the car doesn't allow you to do that. Yeah, just thinking story. I think Nick, Jack Nicholas came up to Arnold Palmer when he turned fifty and they were talking about the champions to what's now the champion tour. None for this story, but so he went up to Arnold. He said Arnold, and they were talking about this and the first thing I'll looked at him and said Jack. He said, don't get in that car and Jack looked at him. He goes, he goes. I'm just telling you, don't do it. He goes. Walk as long as you can and it's not like Jack probably didn't know that, but Arnold knew. Arnold walked. Honestly, I think he walked. He's like eighty two or three years old. I mean he never because he knew if you gotten that...

...car it was only going to go one way. You aren't gonna do you know, you were not going to be as strong. He just kind of knew that and that was an interesting tidbit that he's shared with Jack, and Jack Never got in a car until recently, Ni hundred and eighty two or whatever. He walked all the time out there. What you think and the cart thing, though? I would still encourage someone that they can't walk, the cards the next best thing. That's a great vehicle for them to be able to get around. They're still outdoors and they're doing it. What do you think people think of professionally? Now, not the fans, because the fans do it up, but when the pros, what do you think? The or what if you heard when you see John Daily ride in the cart on a you know on the tour? I mean John Day, John Daly is one of my favorites. You know, I got to know him. I was there that week that he came. You know that he put himself up to the forefront of golf when he surprised the world a crooked stick and ninety one. Yeah, you know he right now he kind of has to use it. I can tell you if he didn't have to use the cart, he wouldn't. I know he's having some, you know, physical problems, some health problems, and you know it stinks for him because he's such a he really is pretty good for the game, in my opinion, because he's one of the good old boys. Have talked to the crowd and you know he liked being with the caddies and you know, I I pray for John and hope that, you know, things work out for him, but that I can tell you that he doesn't enjoyed being in the cart, but I know he hates being penalized not being able to play in certain tournaments because they're going to make him walk. So it's a kind of a two edged sword there, I guess. But with that I mean it's I hope that they can. You know, it's just like the Casey Martin thing or whatever, but some guys when they get to a certain time, you know, they have to ride the cherry or they can't play at all. I'd rather see John Daily hit shots and getting a cart the not see him at all right, right, well, I could be the twenty five coke, stike cooked drinks the day. Fact that he doesn't drink water. I's like, come on, JD, you got to change that one for all. That was the best after that one turn. Was it last week or the week before? That guy, they followed him around and they said what he had during the turn. It was like twenty five die cokes, couple snickers. So credible folk, like a Pakistretts whatever. He's amazing and I thought a lot of people know that he's won two majors. I mean, you know, he wanted to. You know, it's St Andrews and he weren't want it crooked stick and could have maybe want a few more, you know, if he had maybe a little more you know, Focus Direction. But he's still great for the game and you know, I always appreciate the Times I was able to you know, play, you know, being the group with John and talk to him. Yeah, you know, I when I was in Washington, they're playing I think it was tpc at Avenue there, and I follow him around just because I wanted to watch him hit. You know, he was young and man, it was just it was a different level of watching guys hit the ball. Oh No, incredible. And this was before they did all this stuff to the golf ball and before they did all this launching stuff to the new drivers and all that. He was hitting this stuff with, you know, with Wood. I mean you know, metal woods were there, don't get me wrong, but he won the one thousand nine hundred and ninety one PGA with a Kevlar driver from Cobra. I actually got a model at home in my bag and I had him sign the top of it and if you look down at this thing, it looks like a five would out. Wow, and I mean it didn't have a big hitting area, but it did that week, because I can tell you that course crooked stick that that win was, I mean with no practice round again. So another caddie story. He was able to get nick price's caddy and nick price at the time was one of the top players in the world. His wife was having at one of their I believe, having a baby, and so he was unable he had to withdraw. So his caddie was there who knew the course and he he bird dog daily around the place and next thing you know he's he's taking an eighteen fig off and daily signing that for him. You know, Jeff squeaky Medland, great caddie, no longer with a card rest is soul, but another unbelievable story. Yeah, I mean there's there's so many and it's been so much fun to watch all the people that have come through the sport of Golf. And it's great too, because then you could still have mean, if you've been a fan of a person, then they get I mean it's a long time to be a fan of someone because then all a sudden they go to champions tour and they're still playing. You can watch them, you can check them out. It's interesting to see all that. So now you've been through your kind of career as a caddie, you get done. So tell me, like what golf mastery dotnet is about, why you started it and and kind of who your kind of target market is. So I you know, I see after taking a couple of years. You know, my wife you know, and a few people talk...

...to me a little bit. You know, twenty five years. You know, walking next to and you know, you know, the best players in the world and seeing how they prepare and seeing, you know, what they do against adversity versus what they do when they're playing good and just being able to see all that like firsthand and be there and witness it. So basically just trying to take that and share that with folks in and then, in the meantime, to while they're doing that, they're maintaining an incredibly high level in competition and playing golf for money. So I mean it's an incredible thing in trying to transition that into folks that hey, maybe this someone that wants to try to do that too, or maybe this someone that wants to go and play college golf or whatever it may be. I mean, I'm pretty much seeing all the you know, the secrets. I don't know if you want to calm secrets, but there's some some pretty, you know, interesting stuff that these guys do to maintain that and you know, it's it's definitely worth you know shit. I mean I want to share it with folks. Golf, the game of Golf's been great with me and I want to pass that on. So basically I'm just trying to share all that, those nuggets and those knowledge with folks, and I mean it's my target market is anywhere from anyone that's, you know, ten years old to you know, anyone that's even fifty plus that wants to hear some great stories, I can fill them up with them too and get them going on the game as well. Yeah, so if I sign up at Golf Master, you done it? Tell me like how I what a I get like when I sign up and what how do I? How does drain no come into my life and affect my game? So the first thing we do is we have we have free zoom meetings, you know, and we get acquainted with like what your goals are, where you want to go with golf. We get to kind of know each other, obviously through this, you know, Zoom, which has been obviously quite popular for all that, to all this. So then you kind of figure out we kind of work together on like what's your plan, and I'll input what I think might be good. So together you kind of create a plan, you start the plan and then you kind of get going on the plan and then we check in as time goes by. Yeah, I know that's awesome. And so do you have other things on there, like new technology for the rules, like what are you teaching people on there? I mean I have like the caddie experience I have. I have you know how you prepare a course prior to playing in a tournament. I have fighting tips, reading Greens, you know how you you know how what your mental you know preparation should be or could or should it could be when you enter a tournament where you kind of want to be with that. So there's lots of areas. It just depends on the level with that, but I can honestly say that there isn't probably an area that I couldn't help someone with, depending on whether they're beginner and even experience player. You know, I can help them too, obviously. I mean caddy. I have a caddie experience on there. I have come and play with your members, come out there and just caddy for all for your members at your club. I mean there's lots of options. They're on the menu. So and that's pretty much what it is. It's really no real limit. You guys can you can pretty much draw up whatever you want and that's what we discuss in the zoom calls. That's awesome. You go to golf mastet dotnet and get some real personal right coaching, some understanding of the game which helps you and every aspect of it. So if I was a guy walk up to see you and I walk up to Darano and I said drain, now, I need one tip to help my game, what's the one tip you're given me? So my one tip would be the CRIP. So the biggest thing that I see with folks when they start golf is they don't have the proper grip. So I really focus on that because, guess what, that's where it all starts, that's what you're grabbing and that thing there is what's going to make as we talked about earlier, that fall that's not moving that you know being able to have the correct grip and for you to be able to square that club up, whether it's now or five days from now, it's important to have that grip. So just sounds very simple, but you'd be amazed the people that just grab it like a baseball bat or they have one hand under whatever. Not Every grip works for everybody, I mean, but generally if you've got the general grip, that's that's my one thing that I go with, because otherwise you're not going to be hitting it, you're not going to get an airborne a lot and you're probably not going to be very accurate. Then you're going to lose patients. So then there's like a there's a little bit of a kind of an avalanche that happens if you don't get that grip right, in my opinion. Right, I love that. I love that. All Right, so you've cadding for a bunch of incredible people. I'm going to say one term to you and tell me, like, who it makes you think of. Right, they had there's and saying, you know, drive for show, put for dough, and so, like what who comes to mind when I when I say that phrase to you, try to drive for show, put for dough. So I mean, I would say daily...

...on the driving and budding would be I mean, one of the best pudders I've ever seen out there would have been. I mean, in his day, believe it or not, it was Tom Watson. I mean, the guy was incredible, and that's obviously I mean he was he was a he was amazing, not only with the short game. So the other thing that we really haven't touched on, but does it really the short game? So what the other thing about golf to is people are realize that's forty percent of your game so the pin and the putting. That's kind of where it's out. If you got a really practice something. That's what I always push, not being a you know what I call arrange a range rat helps, but to me that's forty percent. Think about that. Forty percent of games. If you're good at that, it makes up for a lot of bad days. So again I'd have to go with daily on the smashing. Obviously this guy's now and I'm thinking my ear when I can right want probably Watson with the pudding. Yeah, you know, the putting. I tell my son's I said, if you really want to see what your score could be and like where you need to work on, just put a every hole. How many puts it took? Right? One, two, three, one, right, and then you add those up at the end and you're like, okay, that I had ten foot puts. It took me three times to get in a hole if it takes me one to think about what my score could be like. The putting is so important. Like most times, even if you're not a great golfer, you can get to the hole to make car right. That's these guys on TV. How many times have you seen them? where? I mean it's one makeup shot for them. Obviously they're at the best one percent in the world, but that still works for you and I. If we have that one shot, we're probably not making much worse than a Bogie on a whole, and that's always good. I always try to coach my young kids out stay away from the doubles. If you hit it in the tree, take your penalty, kick it out, get your Voguie and move on or whatever, but to stay away from those doubles. Yeah, the doubles will kill you, that's for sure. They had me too fast. Yeah, so tell me what you're doing up in Maine right now. So Um came in here. We're in our eighth year. We have the Lano family foundation and every year, well the last for the last eight out of ten years, we give a scholarship in my dad's honor at his high school. We give it tenzero scholarship to to a student athlete at Portland high that you know, that best emulates to cry Tier Tierrier for the Handy Indy Award. The know family foundations a hundred and one, see three public charity. So we decided after my dad passed away that we would do this in his honor. And so we just had our eighth recipient and he's fantastic. He's actually going to be our first recipient to play INCAA football. So we've had several baseball players, couple, one basketball player, a softball player we've had. We've had eight recipients so far. Close to all of them. I stay in touch with them. They're all doing really great and, as you know, because you had kids and you've already, you know, done the deal, college is super expensive this year and we're just trying to help him, you know, on their road to their dreams. Yeah, I know that's awesome. And so how many years have you been doing the tournament? So this is this we've been the Lano family foundation in existence for ten but this is the eighth coming up in July because obviously with Covid we got put to the corner with state rules, etc. We couldn't, yeah, generally have a hundred and sixty folks at ours. So we have a pretty big event. We raise a pretty good amount of dollars, you know, not only for that, but we also give to the main State Golf Association in the girls and boys club youth basketball. So again, these are all things that my dad loved. He actually we actually give to the same boys club that he was in when he's twelve years old. Oh that's awesome, and we support their girls and boys clubs. We pay their jersey, he's in their entry fees but them so they can play the you know, winter basketball. So what is that? The site for the Lano Family Foundation? So it's www. The it's the Lano family dot Org. It's under construction right now but it will be up soon. We had some issues where the actually were still rebuilding it, but yeah, that's to you know, it's got a lot on there and once you get it back up and running. That's where it is now. But with that they can if there's anybody that interested, they can contact me or anything involved. The name of our tournament is right here. It's the action Andy Memorial classic. My Dad like to have some action when he played golf, whether it was a couple bucks, five bucks whatever, and his nickname was action Andy. So that we named the tournament after him and it's been great. What was his favorite game to play? Baseball, now I'm talking about like on the course, I wolf or all that. Okay, well, Oh, no, he just liked any kind of assaw with presses. Okay, it so they...

...play, you know, ten dollar automatic tunes is what it was called. So if you got two down, you didn't even have to talk about it on the card. Just read itself at the end. So that and then they'd play, you know, they play, no three pots and and all that. I mean there was every game possible that you can include in that four hours. So yeah, it was great. I mean it was just, you know, it rubbed off on me. I mean I you know, we always like to have a little competition. It's just it's good. It helps you keep sharp and it helps, you know, make eat shot important in my opinion. Yeah, I know, I love the playing the Games because it does keep it interesting and it doesn't have to be for crazy, insane money. It's just about like, okay, there's four of us out here. We all get to play against each other, we all get to play with each other and there's different ways to go about that. Do you talk about that all golf? AASTY DONNET, for sure. I mean I think that walk that you have that four hours. I mean I played with someone today. You know, small world, that's that's like he he's very good friends with my center in high school. Oh Right, quarterback, my center. Yeah, he goes. You know, you know quality and I yeah, of course I know Paul. And just that today, like golf, brings everybody together. And again, getting back to your question, yeah, I mean just just having that that Camaraderie, that four hours of being outside and everybody playing from the same teas and everybody having the same opportunity. Really now, some better than others, but still, you know, that's what makes golf unique and makes it so cool that one day Joe might be you, but the next day you might be Joe, and so on so forth, and that's what keeps everybody kind of keeps their energy high and everybody, you know, keeps chasing, as I say, they keep chasing that whatever it is they're doing to shoot that low score. Like I got a side bet with a friend of mine. We each have two hole in ones right now. We're stuck on to so we've agreed that the next one that makes one, we have to give the other guy hundred bucks. So with that, you know, I had a close call week or two go. He had a close comment. We had made it yet, and you know, the odds of that I might pad to myself. So I know it's not easy. So just little games like that you can have within I think it's great and I think it. I think it's great after when you're sitting in there and you're reviewing the card and everybody kind of Hey, what about what? How about that up and down you had, or how about that shot you hit on that pole? I mean it's the same on all levels, whether you're just starting or whether you're these guys. These guys don't don't think that. These guys on tour, they don't see each other in the locker room say hey, that shot you played on sixteen, I was incredible. Yeah, they're saying that. They're still having those conversations. So before we go, what happens on tour when somebody, I mean we see it quite often, is when a guy gets a home of one. What is like the precedent? What happens? Like gim mean, because it's even for the pros. It's it doesn't happen that often right. So with that, I mean, you know, they kind of shake it off. You know, Kenny had he was up in the team and we'll last I check, he was. He well over twelve. But like funny story. Recently I was at TPC, at this most recent one, and I was up in the caddie room getting some things signed for our tournament and I had a you know, I had an open flag that I that I wanted Shane lowry to sign, right and unbelievably comes around the corner, sits in there and he he can's walking in. I had the flag and I said Hey, Shane, I go, can you sign this? You know, I used to caddy out here. I go, I got a fund now, and he said sure, he could bet nicer and signed it or whatever in the next day. Next Day, what does he do? He makes it on seventeen and I remember that it was awesome. Well, but then what does he do after that? He set up the press room with be you know, the whole like he bought like several cases of beer and the whole thing and whatever. So to answer your question, that's what Shane lowry did. I don't know what some of the I think Cam Smith did something too, for the for the media as well when he won that week. So I know he did something for a lot of the caddies that week as well. So it's all in the holder of the individual, in the individual. It's all different. But, like I always joke when they make when I go to you have hole in one insurance. Yeah, right, exactly. People don't even know that's in existence, but yes, it is in existence. Well, you know, when you go in afterwards, anybody makes a whole one and you're in the bar area afterwards, it could be a lot of fun. Yes, again, and I'll tell you what, if I can get there the next time, I'll be happy to buy him until the sun comes down, because they don't happen very much. My last one was thirty years ago. Oh my gosh. Yeah, that mine was I was playing the quarterback challenge out in Quarterla and Idaho hops and I had get on the island green. No, no, I wasn't the island green. It was the shorter part three. I want number was it, but it was only like a one hundred forty. So this is a crazy story. And he that was the only place in the course where they put they could put the...

Cadillac right. So there's a cadillac on the whole. I'm playing with with Rick Dixon, who was the ad of the Washington state at the time, and then I was playing with Dan McGuire, marks brother, and so where. There's four of us, right, and my wife is actually pregnant in the cart and she's riding around with us. So there and they're filming the hole and it bounces hit. The stick goes right in, like going crazy, and at that point, like I was like okay, I don't care what happens. The wrestle the around, right, but I was having fun, you know. And everybody's come up to me saying, Hey, what are you gave? How you gonna get home? Sonny Jerkinson's like how you gonna get it, that car home, and all this stuff. And so we're at the banquet afterwards and my wife sitting and we're sitting with Sonny Jergensen and billy kilmer and a bunch of other guys we knew. And so they're kind of announcing all the winners, right, long drive and all the stuff, right, and they said, Hey, we had a hole in one today. You know, Guss Frado had a hole in one on number three, whatever it was, and it's funny. He's like how, here you go, you're going to get the car and they said, all right, come up claim your prize. So I get up and I walk up and they gave me a picture of the hole right and everybody started standing up and booing. But they're like no, the hole was too short. There was no one sure we couldn't insure that hole. But the head car and everything on that hole. And I'll ever, I was like, boom, give them, give them the car. Oh No, you've getting that's funny. You mentioned that because in our tournament we've had some local sponsors that that will put a car on there. But but the whole last to be a hundred fifty plus yards for the insurance coming. So that all man, I'll that. That's a bummer and I'm actually I'm headed up that way where I got our Irish. We've got a group go to Ireland and we're going up to play six days up there, six out of seven days, and that that's one of the courses we're playing. We're playing, you know, playing there and the Raven Circling Raven when gambles is the whole thing so beautiful up there, and that's happened in September. Yeah, it's going to be awesome. None of them have ever played any golf in Washington all Idaho. I've played Chambers Bay. That's about it. Yeah, it's just beautiful courses. And then when you play that island green, if it's windy at all, forget it. Yeah, forget. It's like four or five. Always kind of wonder. I'm like, where's the drop zone? It's over afty. Get off the boat right. Yeah, yeah, it's insane like it. And then they can move it. It's like it can go. They'll change. Right, it's ony. Right, I heard yea. Yeah, so it can be one from like thirty whole way out to like one, you know, two hundred. Yeah, I'm in the day that we're there. I'm hoping it's no more than eight, because I'm like you, I don't want to have to try to steer job one of Oh yeah, no, no, there's no doubt. There's no doubt. So so, dre know you're doing some amazing things. You're going back to your community, you're doing things with your family. The foundation is amazing. You trying to help people kind of gain knowledge like you've gained your whole life with golf mastery dotnet. And so tell me, tell our fans, obviously, where they can find you, how they can follow you and check out what you're doing. The instagram at drain no Lano, so that one's pretty easy. Twitter. I'm on twitter at at a Leo too. Not On facebook, and I'm mean on Linkedin, so you know they can go there. I do some occasional stuff. I'm working with someone better to be better at that, to be honest with you. But that and, of course, you know golf mastery dotnet. That website's up and running and that's really kind of my betted place. It's got a lot of areas on there that you can check and see, you know, where I've been, what I've done, you know, that kind of thing, you know, just for folks just to say hey, you know they you know, trying to figure out where they may or may not want to go. But I definitely at least recommend to at least try that in have that Ab that have the zoom call. I mean seven, you know, ninety nine bucks for a subscription. You know, it's like six dollars a month to have that at your fingertips. So with that, you know, that's kind of where it's at. Again, I love Golf. Golfs be great to me and you know, for the you know, the maining years that I'm here, I want to try to give back and share the stuff that I've been fortunate enough to witness and learn. Yeah, so you heard them. Six Bucks a month to get full access to drain o Lano and all his mastery in golf. So so one last question. Who's your favorite Golfer today that's currently on tour? So, yeah, I mean, you know, I like. I'll tell you what I like, Scotty Cheffler, and I could tell you a little story, backstory behind him. So I lived in Dallas prior to moving to Vancouver for twenty two years and I met Scott, met and saw Scotty cheffer's sixteen years old and they come out to the Byron Nelson which was right there where I lived and Dallas, in our backyard, and I met and he was, you know, he's I know his coach Randy Smith, and you know, you know a lot of Randy Smith other pupils Justin Lenter, you know. You know he's...

...had some Ryan Palm Anyway. So God to meet this guy, you know, and I kind of always remembered that name and I followed him. You know, read a bottom at Texas, read a bottom, you know, doing well and on the corn fairy. And then, you know, when I when he got his card and I saw what he was doing and I was like man, I go I just kind of think this guy's really going to do well. But what I like most is I really like his demeanor. I love the way his his kind of soft delivery and he's kind of real easygoing. And now he's got Ted Scott One, a good friend of mine that's helping him and he's in really good hands and as you can see, that done some serious damage the last four, you know, four wins in the last whatever eighty days. But I love his demeanor and I like his attitude. You know, whether he shoot sixty six or seventy six, he knows that there's other things that are in life and golf is, you know, it's just a game, and I don't mean the discount it, but you and I know it's way more valuable things in life than that. But I just love his approach. Yeah, you heard it right here. You got to follow Scotty Scheffler. I agree with you. His approach is great, his demeanor, his poise, and you got to have that. I think on the golf course to be viable today, because otherwise you get yourself stressed out and you know how stress is on a golf course. It's not a good thing. It's kind to shorten your career. But I don't know if I agree with that. Like it you got. You got to be able to relax and do that and good caddies like Draino will always do that. So, Hey, drain I appreciate you joining me again and finally getting this podcast back out with you on it. So go to golf mastery dotnet. Check them out, check out the their family foundation, and you know he's putting a website out soon. But follow them on Instagram, twitter. Right, you're on Instagram, twitter and Linkedin for sure. I thanks Gust and we got to get together. I want to get my way up there so I can get a get a skin of swing it out on. I've caddie there but I never played it, so it's kind of my list. Do Well, when you come in, we'll play the tips. You're punishment. Yeah, exactly, and we just need to drink after that just because you played the tips. So that sounds like it's right. All right, buddy, we won't tell the caddies otherwise either. Yeah, definitely appreciate it all right, take care, enjoy, enjoy Maine and and the rest of your summer. Thanks for joining me on huddle up with Guss. You got it, you got it. Thank you. That's a wrap sports. Thanks for joining in the fun at the sixteen thirty one digital studios for a number two puddle up with gus, featuring fifteen year NFL quarterback gustler. Rock. Huddle up with GUS is probably produced by one thousand six hundred thirty one digital media and disavailable happy music.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (167)