Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 10 months ago

DOUBLE FEATURE: Andy Martino followed by Leigh Montville

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to the Gus Frerotte Show with 15-year quarterback Gus Frerotte, who interviews the greatest sports figures, journalists, and supporters with compelling and often humorous discussions. To celebrate the 4th of July weekend, Gus is presenting a double-feature of interviews with two prominent sportswriters. First up is Andy Martino, a longtime sports journalist who has covered the New York Yankees for years and knows the ins and outs of the game like no one else. Then, Gus is honored to host Leigh Montville, author of tons of awesome sportsbooks with his latest being “Sting Like a Bee,” covering the late great Muhammad Ali. 

Hey everyone, Welcome to another episode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, some people say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read. 16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latest news, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favorite podcast. Follow up with Gusts. Check it out today at www. 16 31 digital news dot com. Huddle up with Gusts is brought to you by Vegas sports advantage, clients of Vegas sports advantage are winning big in 2021 you can be a part of the winning two. As of june 1st $100 bettors are up $3700.500 dollars. Bettors are up $18,500.1000 dollar bettors are up $37,000 and $5000. Bettors are up $185,000 become inclined today by clicking the link in the description below and use promo code, huddle up To take 25% off your package today. Thanks to our partnership. Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron at the diamond or on the links, we can only say, okay, welcome to this week's huddle up with gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchises with 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the games are one. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up. Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it's kick off time, so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us. Strange variety, big play two Aleve. Thank you. Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of her show up with Gus, I'm your host, Gus Frerotte, Thanks for joining me here in the 16 31 digital news studio. As you can see it's not real studio, but we appreciate 16 31 digital news for having us all the time. And I want to thank my team, Terry and brian and Ian kissed. Ian is no longer going to be with us, he's moving on to bigger and better things. So, good luck with everything Ian and um I want to thank Sounder FM for always hosting our podcast on their platform and we wanna welcome our new partner. Hold on, I gotta look at, I can't remember their name, Terry, you gotta remind me. Um It's I think it's Vegas sports betting, is that right? Vegas sports advantage? Uh Dot com. So if you're willing to spend some of your money and win someone betting and maybe our next guest will will help you on who you need to choose uh to bet on. But go to Vegas sports advantage, put some money in there, they're helping people win a lot of lot of money and they're doing a great job. So thank you to Vegas sports advantage for that. So our guest today um Andy Martino, he's an analyst and he's a writer for S. N. Y. Network in new york and he covers Major League Baseball. Andy, how are you doing today? I'm doing welcomes, how are you? I'm doing well. So tell us a little bit where you are right now. It's pretty exciting actually. Yes, I'm, I'm in the back of the press box at Yankee Stadium. Uh, almost every zoom, whether it's public or private that I've done or any virtual uh, interview or meeting has obviously been in my basement for quite a long time. So it's nice to be a live sporting event that I get to cover and do. My job was slowly getting back to normal here, which it's a little different than your basement. I assume. A little more energy. A little more energy in the building in my house.

Yeah, so who the Yankees playing today? Yankees have the Royals tonight trying to put some consistency together. It's been a tough year so far. One step forward, two steps back. But Gerrit cole on the mound tonight against Kansas City man. Gary cole. So I live in Pittsburgh. I've always been a pirate fan and you cover, you follow Major League Baseball, you know how hard that is. Um, and Gerrit cole was always one of my favorites and you know, obviously he's with a really good team now, but uh, you know what is going on with gerrit cole? I mean, there's been all this crazy, I've tried to follow it and you know, not, so is is gary cole gonna have a great night, or is he gonna be without without all this crazy circumstance going on with them? You know, I think what you just said gus, that you're trying to follow it and you're obviously a knowledgeable fan and consumer of sports and the fact that it's kind of hard to figure out what the scandal is. I think that's what helps baseball players like coal or anybody else is linked to what's been going on, is it, it doesn't really capture the public imagination, like the steroid scandal or the science dealing scandal. It's definitely been a story. But basically you've got pictures who were using things like pine tar and sunscreen and rosin for years for grip on the baseball right against the rules. But it wasn't enforced. It was kind of one of those gamesmanship, uh, situations and over the past couple of years is the materials that you can use. It improved gluey sticky substances like one called spider attack, which is more than just helping with the grip. It's helping with the spin on the ball. And it's part of the reason why sliders have become so much more biting and forcing fastballs up in the zone, have more spin and it's helped such a high percentage of pictures that, you know, in cole's defense and anyone else's defenses become kind of identified with it. It's like so systemic that the league is just trying to now get this stuff off the baseball in general. Yes. Gerrit cole is one of many pictures for sure whose spin rates have gone down over the past couple of weeks. Maybe not as dominant as, as uh, any picture may have been with some of this stuff, but now following the rules and operating at least in 11 A level playing field with all other pictures because they're really checking, checking belts. Chicken hats, chicken glow. Yeah, I saw they checked the Graham was yesterday or day before. Like they really went over everything. Um, and that's why I never got like, uh, you know, a football, they throw a new ball in, it hits the dirt one time they get rid of it and they get a new ball, you know, and then like they won't let that happen. But they were letting these other things happen. I don't know, I liken it to football in a way that, you know, back in the day, it was like defense, we're gonna win three, nothing. And now it's like 35 to 30, 30, you know what I mean? The scores have gone up. Yeah. And I think in baseball now that the pictures, you know, if they're gonna have less spin rate and throw the ball over the plate a little more and guys are going to hit more dingers, I think it may even help the game. Oh, I agree. That's one of the reasons why MLB decided to crack down on us because we're seeing so many strikeouts that you go to a ball game to take a kid to a ballgame. He's on the basic level, wants to see action, not pitching dominance and stealing strategy, but just hit the ball, run, run from first to second, try to leg out a trip. All the exciting stuff. And there's been not enough of that. So baseball has been really brainstorming, how can we create more contact? And sure enough, since this has been an issue and talked about and pictures have been in theory cutting back on the stuff they've been using over the past couple weeks to see more offense? Yeah. You know, and do you think there will be an a strict on this year? Because, you know, we had some perfect games and things at the beginning of the year, uh, you know, where there were no hitters and things? And do you think so? Do you think there will be in a strict, you know, when you go back and look at, Uh, the history of the game in 2021, do you think there will be an ass trick for this year? It's a good question. I think people in the know, well, no, but I also think us...

...that this was more of like, you know, something can become a new story for a couple weeks, gets all the attention, It's great, it's something to talk about. But again, like, we look back at McGuire and Sosa in 98 that and everyone's mind has an asterisk because it was a steroid taking home run chase. I just don't know if you have to explain For like 60 seconds with sticky stuff. Does to the layperson. I'm not sure how much people right here, not a lion a little different than shoving a needle in your right. So so Andy tell me a little bit about where you grew up and how you fell in love with sports and why you became a writer. Sure, that's great. I love that question. Not when I've had, we're talking about the book. I grew up in Rochester new york where there was one of the oldest ballparks in America called Silver Stadium. It was built in the early 20th century. It's not there anymore. But when I was a kid, my dad would take me to one game after another all summer long every year, triple A baseball affiliate of the Orioles at that time. And what that intimate triple experience if you grew up in a minor league town probably does is you actually get to know the players every year, like the team ran a camp when you were on summer vacation and you met the guys and they tossed the ball before games or whatever. And it was just so much more personal that probably gave me a quicker feel in my life for how much I wanted to be around the game and around sports and interact with the players and learn more. Uh, so that, that was something I also grew up in Rochester, you know, you're just a little, you're not far from from where the Buffalo Bills play and I do remember the painful experience of sitting in that all concrete bowl during like a December game in the early 90s as a kid should be a really warm. Yeah, really ideal conditions. So those are my two sports experiences. Never, yeah, they never had to use heavy equipment to move snow in Buffalo. No, never, never Rochester or Syracuse either that little wing of the wing of the world I grew up in. So you appreciate baseball in the summer. They just have the massive front loaders that got to plow the streets, not like a normal plow truck, just like some big machine that's gotta get so much lake effect snow out of, you know, whatever snow up there. That's one thing we are well versed in. That's for sure. Yeah, that is for sure. So did you play sports growing up? I played baseball, just stopped short of high school. My goal was to be a writer. Uh, I was more than path of right for the school paper, learn everything you can about the game, uh, follow that path of trying to figure out in your in your twenties and in college what you want to write about and just kept getting pulled back To baseball frankly, you know, I went to graduate school ultimately for journalism in my late 20s. Where did you go? I went to graduate school at Columbia University, here in new york and then, you know, everybody wants to be a foreign correspondent or cover the White House or something. And I was like, I want to cover the ball game. So, you know, at a place like that, that creates a niche actually, uh where, you know, maybe not a lot of people want to do that, but that's always what I was pulled toward. I think it does route back to just being a kid and being at those games, seeing how magical it is, getting a little bit of interaction with players and just wanting to learn more wanting to be that guy. So cole's pitching tonight. If he, if he gives up a game winning home run, a game tying home run in the sixth inning, chooses to throw a changeup, which is, you know, his third best pitch. I want to be the guy that can ask him why, what was he thinking? What you can portray uh, then, you know, on the air or in a story, what that what that moment is like why that decision was made, Whatever, what have you, right? So following, there's so many games in baseball, you have to get to know these players pretty intimately and understand them pretty well. I mean, there's, you know, there's five starting pitchers, there's a bunch of other guys, but you're gonna know what Garrett polls like you just said it's the third best pitches change up. Right? So, but when you go and you find out, you do you ever ask him like, okay, right, Garrett, you're facing these guys tonight. How many, how much film have you watched on them? You know? Or is it is it more the is it more the manager is that the catcher, Is it all of them put together that watches the...

...film? It's all of it look in a non covid, totally normal world of coverage. We're not quite there yet. That's you might remember that some sportswriters yourself, the good ones developed trusting relationships with people on the team. You work the room you put in the time. So guys know like if I talked to this guy, he's going to blow it up. This could be a big stupid headline. If I talked to that guy, he's just trying to understand the game. So you try to build those relationships and sure Bill that I don't talk to as many people as you can. Nothing like covering a big game and I've covered all the sports at one point, another, overwhelmingly baseball. So the big game would be the postseason in october and you get to talk to the picture, the catcher, the opposing hitter, the managers and you put together reporting that tells something people your fans, something they might not have known. That's that's very satisfying just to learn for yourself. If you have to support you cover just selfishly to be able to learn that for yourself. First time I saw that you worked for philadelphia Inquire did so what other papers? So philadelphia new york because that's the only two cities you've been in or pretty much I was lucky. I came up out of school, I was at the Daily News in new york, started as an intern and was able to cover nick's Jets, Giants, Yankees and mets and just get the full spectrum. Always baseball was the main goal but would have been happy to do something else. But the job opened up covering the Phillies in their heyday during the jimmy Rollins Chase Utley Ryan, our careers and I jumped at that and then came back to new york for the daily news for quite a few years. So I've been very lucky to work with some great papers, which fans make you more nervous. New york fans or Philly fans. That's a good question that the Philly fans are the Philly baseball fans. That's what I covered in that town. It's such an eagles town that there's a will to have the Phillies do well. But there's there's more of an understanding in that town, I think, of football and baseball. So it's like you if you try to make a point point, maybe not land and you might run into some trouble with your audience in new york, they can be brutal. But many of the readers at least kind of have an understanding. The challenge here is that you might be right into somebody that understands the game of baseball just as well, if not better than you do. So it's like a great test and in that regard, but in Philly it's kind of it was a little more for baseball, at least the team was good, the town was into it, but it was like when lou is good, bad, it wasn't a lot of the subtleties, you know? That sounds a lot like Pittsburgh right, that the Steelers are so good, Everybody football minded here, uh everybody's hockey minded because the penguins have been so good and then we get to the Pirates and we've like we were really good in the seventies and kind of eighties and then we just fell off and I think we lost the whole crazy generation of fans, you know, we're probably true in Pittsburgh. Yeah, unfortunately, no guys, people just want to go to the games that drink beer. They don't want to go to watch like these stars because we don't have any Yeah, we're ashamed because I remember that, you know, a number of years ago when that was McCutchen Neil walker teams did finally break through and get into the postseason. How crazy that ballpark was. People were hungry for it, but then they went right back into their hole. Yeah, it is difficult because I'm one of those people, right, like I playing a professional sport, but always being a fan of like my hometown, a couple other sports is not because I remember the Cueto game and you know, the whole stadium is going crazy and he drops the ball on the mound and we win the it was it was just nuts. And everybody in Pittsburgh realized what it could be. Yeah, but we just could never ever get over the top of that. Yeah, that's gonna be tough, isn't it seems to me to when I watched the games and maybe you can tell me if I'm wrong, but new york has a different atmosphere then like a Pittsburgh, you know, where it's more, it's like you said, it's more, they're more knowledgeable of the game, we're Pittsburgh, it's more like blue, it's almost like blue collar and white collar, it feels like Yeah, no, I think that's probably true. I mean, I don't...

...want to go too far, probably insane, like, like you know, Pittsburgh certainly better than I do, but I will say from here without putting down another market, I would say from here, there is a lot of uh knowledge of what could happen on individual pitch or when something special happens, why it's special or when the team is not doing well, Like there was a game in new york where Gary Sanchez to catch her, not known as the greatest baserunner made a baserunning, blunder, ran from second to third on a ground ball to short, which you're not supposed to do. And the crowd knew exactly why it's that attention to detail. Yeah, I know that that makes, that makes a lot of sense. So tell me, what was the most nervous that you have ever been to go up to somebody and ask them a question because their their points where, you know, like let's say I threw an interception in the last like couple parts of the game I didn't really want, like if anybody came up and asked me a question after the game, I really wanted to wring their neck, you know, but you knew you couldn't, but there's some intimidating people out there. So tell me about a time that you remember where you were super nervous to say, I got to ask this question. You know what? That it's not always the person who was the losing pitcher in the game or whatever. The guy that made the error. Because frankly, you know, that that guy's teammates are looking for, looking at that guy that screwed up to say, are you professional not to take the medicine with the media? Like I do when I screw up, so that that I was always okay with you feel bad sometimes, But it's the job is a job for me. It's the more controversial stuff where someone might really be in trouble. Uh, like something that might affect their lives and well, you might be true. You're like, yeah, this is a big question I'm gonna ask you. I'll give you a concrete example When I was the new york Daily News, we have this investigative team that did a great job investigating steroid or pED kind of stories. I was the Mets beat writer at the time. I was in san Francisco where Melky cabrera the outfielder was leading the league in batting was at that time and nobody knew that there was anything fishy going on. Our paper did know that he failed a P. D. A steroid testing was going to be suspended at some point. So I get a call from the office when you're covering the Mets Giants today, you have to go over the Giants clubhouse. You have to ask Melky cabrera if he failed the drug test. It's only fair. Yeah it's gonna right. Was he holding a bat when you ask them, was he holding a baseball bat when I don't think he was. But now a clubhouse can get like when, I don't know if you guys give like a little bat signal to each other, but when it gets tense you can feel everyone kinda sort of looking at you and it was just like milk. Yeah, sorry to ask you this. And you know, I'm thinking like if this is a surprise to you, this might change the course of your life. But we were failed hysteria test. He lies and no, I don't blame him for lying to me. Who am I in that moment? You know exactly it in that instance. But uh it's things like that where you feel like gee this might be a good person who made a bad decision and here I am about to ask us something major that those are tough. Yeah, I can I can see that that that would be different than saying, oh, you know, you made an error. You didn't throw it right the first base, like what you know? Yeah, I mean that's a lot different. I understand that. So in all of baseball history and all the incredible players that have played baseball, who is someone you, you've always, if you could go back and ask one question and interview somebody who would that be? Oh boy, that is such a good question of people that have covered or anyone in history. Oh no. Anyone in history back before you, before you and I have both been alive. There's some incredible players like that would just be like, because I collect old baseball cards with my sons and like I have a lot of vintage cards and some of them will read the back and it just be like, man, how awesome would it be to sit at dinner with that guy and find out what he's really like because they kind of used to explain it on the back of the cards, you know what I mean? Like they told some incredible stories. So is there something that, that you would think that you would love to interview? It's funny, my God, answer to that is one is probably would...

...be a complete waste because of the way he was with the press. But I like a challenge. And Ted Williams was always known as number 11 of the most cerebral hitters of all time, wrote a book eventually about hitting the retirement and one of the most cantankerous difficult guys that you could ever try to deal with. I always liked that challenge of trying to crack the guy that everyone else is scared of? We had a player in new york for a while, I was covering the Mets daniel Murphy who put off this, don't talk to me vibe you want to try because I'm like, well no one else is talking to the guy, I the only one that would get access to what he has to say if I could somehow crack that became very friendly and now he's retiring me texts and stuff. It took me a lot of work, so I would have liked to have tried to be one of those red sox beat writers in the forties and fifties and crack that ted Williams mood and try to get him to teach me all about hitting. There was no, you have to talk to the media back in that day, right? There was get the f out of my face, kid, I could just see that saying. So it would have been interesting to try to put in the time to see if he could get him out of that. Right? Right. Yeah. You know, and it's amazing because I was talking with Adam Schefter um a little while ago, he came on the podcast when we're talking about when I played for the broncos. The broncos were always known for their linemen never talking to the press, Right? Yeah. Like that was a rule, like, if you caught talking to the media, um uh you know, if you talk to me to you owed money, they find each other and they did all these things, and Adam goes, yeah, they said that out loud. But you know, after, like a meeting, I'd be in going to breakfast with them or something, they'd give me all this inside scoop. As long as I didn't say that I was talking to a line and they gave me all kind of scoop, but I'm like, that's a great thing about anonymous, right? All kinds of people could talk to you when they pretended that information adam is the king of anonymous sourcing. Yeah, right. But trusting relationships, you know, honestly, if you overdo it with anonymous sources in my line of work, you have to be careful, but if you abuse them and use them to take cheap shots or whatever. But if you get people to trust you and say, look, don't put my name on this, don't blow me up, but this is what's actually going on in here. That's that's the relationships of being in good sports writer, I think. Yeah, so you know when you look at the Yankees, I mean if your yankee and almost you become a star, right? Like instant, like you put those pinstripes on, you become a star and there's some pretty famous Yankees, you know? And so when I think about like, you know, people like a rod and you know, they're playing all these games and you get to interview them and he is like almost larger than life just because of the money he's made and the greatness he did on the field. What is that like for you when you go and interview in a rod and we are, when you get close to them, it's kind of cool. Does your people, you know what I mean? It's a great story to tell. Yeah, it is. I had a I really had a lot of fun um Alex wasn't having so much fun at this time, but covering when he was in 2013, august 2013, the big story in baseball, how to imagine how big now, because he's kind of settled in as a broadcaster, But he was given his record suspension for PDS. He was suing the union, he was suing the Yankees, He was suing the league, It was his war in the middle of all that. He comes back because he's appealing the suspension in Chicago game against the white sox. And it's not just sports media at that point. It's cable news, it's everything. It's like the story. And to be someone who can actually be covering the sport, be there, you want to talk to a ballplayer and be in the middle of a major national story like that. We don't always get that with sports. So it's cool. Yeah. And those guys like a Rod is and Jeter in a different way. But guys who uh, they know that their big cultural figures and big celebrities and it's not as easy to get them one on one as it is. But you know, the backup catcher obviously or so it's kind of operating on a different level. It's almost like you're covering a movie star or something. And what you...

...see in the locker room is this can be a performance and uh, it's, which is fine. You understand why people who are that famous have to keep their guard up to protect themselves in some ways. But yeah, when you're right, there is a presence of that in baseball particularly takes a lot for baseball to break through. Obviously it's not the most popular sport in America. So when you've got a huge star, like a writer, a big story like that, uh, from my end of it, you try to have fun with it. Yeah, I mean you have to because it is, it's, it's like, you know, you might be able to, but if I wouldn't ask the normal person name one person from the Yankees name one person from the pirates, I guarantee they're not going to name anybody from the pirates. Right? And they'll probably name McCutchen because there are like three teams sense of pirates, you know what I mean? So it is crazy, you know, and uh you know, it's just, it's just amazing to me that, that, you know, and there's so many games and your work is every day. So how do you focus to where you can go every day, write a new story or you just kind of are you just focus on the data and analytics of the game or you're trying to write a story about, you know what I mean? Like more of a storyline. Yeah, sure when you're a team beat writer traveling with the team that takes up all your energy and time to imagine. Yeah, I try to break a few stories. I did that for years now. I'm in a position where I'm not on the road as much as one of those people, one of those reporters, so I'm able to focus on news really just leave with news. Like I try to wake up with in the morning, what can I report today that people don't know and it doesn't have to be a big adam Schefter style, huge scoop. It can just be a little thing, right? Try to learn something and lead with that is a good way to look at it. And then when you get the chance to write longer things, whether it's features or books, you know, having the time, I don't want game stories anymore. In fact, unfortunately newspapers dying out. That's a bit of a dying art overall, but not doing that frees you up to look at news features go a little deeper Maybe. I don't have to write about the main thing that's going on that day. I can write about something else. That's also interesting. That's going on. Just looking every time you publish a story or go on the air and talk because you just want to be interesting, you want to not repeat the same thing that people that everyone else covering the team does. And that's the beauty of reporting. If you're doing it well and you find out something fresh, then you have something interesting to say. Yeah. And I think you guys are such a big part of uh, you mentioned it like baseball is not the most fan favorite sport in the US right now. You guys have a major part of making it that way, right? That that you can make it sound in seeing with new technologies and, you know, way to get in fan engagement. I don't think that it's only players, but it's the people telling the stories to make those players seem great uh to make the game interesting to to figure out how to get more people involved. Well, please clip that off and send it to the major league baseball players associated, because it's NBA coming up and we're worried about accident. We're gonna put that up for you. Yeah, please do. Yeah. No, it's just it just it is a way like I went, I've always been a big baseball fan and played it in high school and everything, but, you know, I'm an armchair baseball baseball guy, but it does need to figure out and I've been racking my brain, I'm sure you do too, is how do we get people engaged in it better? Yeah, it's tough. It's a very rewarding sport, but it requires a lot of attention and attention to detail. I mean, it's not always, you can have a great time having a beer and half paying attention. Yeah, it's definitely not a Tiktok kind of game. No, no, but I think the pace of it and the fact that, like you look at the field, you know, nothing's happening. You really know the game, you know, there are signs being Given stolen, there are positioning, there's all...

...kinds of strategy going on. The manager's brains always going 100 miles a minute and there's a lot to notice if you learn. But I do think it's tough to, uh, initially introduced it to someone who might not have the attention span for it, unfortunately. Yeah, I'm halfway through my nachos and nothing even happened yet, you know, but like you're saying, but there has been stuff that's happened, right. The coach gave the sign, the guy missed the sign, he got caught. You know, there's all kind of stuff going on. And I mean, I get it, I get it, but it just isn't that, you know, I'm always trying to figure out what can make it, that Tiktok kind of thing now when you do that, it's hard, like maybe more home runs. I told my son he was driving down to go to a camp today and I, and we both watch baseball and we, we love it. And he said, Dad, dad, maybe the games will be like 12, 12 to 10 now lets the pitchers can't grease the balls up. I said, I don't know. I mean, these guys still throw 100 miles an hour. You do, let's start it. That I think we'll get a little more action and that will help. And baseball is trying to figure things out whether it's banning the infield shift someone they thought about or even legislating how many times you can throw over to first, it's a picture for pickup moves to inspire more stolen bases. They know they need more action. But at the end of the day, I think either you love the sport or maybe, you know, do you think there's ever going to be another Ricky Henderson still that many basis? That's tough to see. That's a great question. Teams just know now that it's rare that somebody, major league teams say like if you can't be successful, 75% of the time stealing, it's not worth, it hurts our offense by the percentages. So basically that discourages stolen bases, but baseball MLB is trying to find ways to make teams incentivize them to do that because everyone knows how exciting it is in the ballpark and the guy takes off. So that's something they're trying to encourage in terms of a Ricky Henderson. No, I don't think we go back to the style of baseball is so many stolen bases. So I know we've got a short time to tell us what you're doing now and what we can look for on the internet from you. Sure, Well uh you can look at you can find myself every day at S N. Y. Dot tv. That's where I cover MLB Yankees and Mets have a book out called cheated, which goes into detail, goes on. This stuff that we kind of just discussed in the abstract which is uh the things going on under the surface, the signs being given the science being stolen, not just what the Astros did, but what all teams were doing to a varying degree many teams for for for a long time. But I would have to see the Astros weren't the only one. They were not the only ones. I do believe that they took it to an extent that pushed it past what was kind of the standard at that time. But yeah, the whole point is sign stealing and cheating and gamesmanship have been going on in the sport for well over a century. What is it? I wanted to take the reader inside the game to talk really do all the things and I didn't make this connection on purpose in our conversation Gospel. You asked me good questions and all these things that I love about the game, the access to players. What do they say? What are they doing? What's really going on is what I was trying to portray uh in that book. So it's about the Astros but it's kind of about my love for the game and all the things that happened there too so that you can find that anywhere you buy a book and you can find me on S. And Y. Network if you're in new york or S. M. Y. T. V. If you're online, where can we follow you on social media? It's at Martino nyc on twitter, awesome, you know, you know it's kind of funny, we're talking about the Astros and you know they were using like the garbage can thing and I'm like there's all this new crazy technology out there. Yeah that you could I mean it's just incredible we're creating now regards the technology and the Astros are using a garbage can to bang on and to say like this is a fastball, this is whatever, you know? But obviously they were using cameras, this mother stuff but I just laugh at that. Like this is really a little bit like the thing that sticks in your mind and that's part of why it was. So it's like, as you said, this high speed cameras to get them the...

...live feed that allows them to look at the sign and bang the trash can. But there's a lot of people that were involved in that team then that were like, why are we so stupid to do something that basic bang on a trash can for all the intelligence that was like the most analysts, the organization of I think you're absolutely right. It is kind of funny, right? Like who was the guy in the locker room that came up with the idea? That's what I want to know, like, like you know, I'm trying to think of one of the players just like staying in the locker. Me guys, I got this great idea. Do they all just turn and look at them and their chairs and be like, what are you nuts? You know what I think it was, it was organic the way it was like a green had the signs. They tried to use one of those massage massage guns called the ferry gun where it's like a drill right into the back of the bench. You hear the sound sometimes it was too loud for that. They tried clapping, They tried whistling. I think it was as simple as it is a there's a trash can there in the corner. It's like, how about that evolved like, like that just evolved like that. And you're thinking like, like some in high school I get that. Right? But like major league baseball. Really? Yeah, it's awesome. Well hey Andy, I really appreciate you joining. No, we we we we only had a half hour with you and sorry, we're a little late there. But uh you know, I appreciate your time everyone check out Andy. Um It's at Martino, N. Y. C. Yeah and check them out on the S. N. Y. Network and check out his new book, cheated. Um And it was great and I had a lot of fun. I love talking baseball because my whole life's been football, but uh you know, I appreciate you coming on and enjoy your time back in Yankee Stadium and you know, good luck against the Royals today. Mhm. Yeah. Hey, head off with gusts listeners manscaped. Well they sent me uh they hooked me up with a bunch of tools and formulations for their package three point oh Kit. Uh so you know, I want to show you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We all think we got a perfect package, but they sent me the perfect package, three point oh kid, I want to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy, It came in this great box, uh you know it and you can see what it says, They will thank you because they sent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us uh you know, stuff that makes you smell better and then uh you know, they sent me this great uh boxers, you what you get, right, protect them. And then uh you know, they sent me this cool sack, I guess you want to call it to store all your stuff in. So uh it's been great. Manscaped sent me a bunch of product um you know, and you know, you can see it all on here. Uh you know, you can go to Manscaped dot com and put in the code. Uh Gus Frerotte, that's G. U S. F R E R O T T E. Get 20% off and free shipping when you use that code. But you can get a kit, you can get individual items like um this way cool rumor that has a little led light um ceramic. These things come apart, they're waterproof, you can do a lot with them. So, you know, Manscaped is great. You know, it's funny game, I remember when I was playing with the Denver broncos and I'm not going to mention any names, but there was a gentleman who was playing on our team and uh, you know, if you ever hears the story, you'll know exactly what I'm talking about. But uh he brought his own clippers in one time and he used to trim his beard up, his goatee and everything and he had him there for about two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner, he walks in and there's a person, another player...

...that is actually manscaping with his beard trimmer. So you know, one of the things is, you don't want to use the same trimmer down there that you use up here. So uh, he kind of freaked out a little bit and he said, hey, how long have you been using that tool there? And he said, well, showed up here about three weeks ago and I've been using it ever since. So you know, there is a lesson learned that, you know, don't leave things out and probably if it would have just said manscaped on it, but we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probably one of the funniest, uh, taking care of your balls stories I've ever heard or been around in the locker room in the NFL, so, uh, it's a great story. Um, but you know, I always said there was no way to know, there's no name on it and the guy was just using it and another guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heck of a funny story. So one of the best I've ever heard my 15 years playing in the league, um, but you know, there's so many great things about Manscaped and what they're doing, uh, because guys, you got to take care of yourself even though I got great hair, um, and getting older, but you still have to maintain some sort of grooming, right? And so, uh, you know, we all work out for me, I like we're getting my yard doing those things now that I'm retired. Get a little sweat on and everything. You want to smell good. Uh, you know, you got to take care of yourself. They've got some great products. Um, you know, this one, a little uh, you ball deodorant, we'll need that here and there um, after, you know, working the yard, taking a hike, doing a walk, whatever you do. Um, it's a great thing. But there's so many great products. Um, I want to thank Manscaped for sending them to me. Um, uh, the lawnmower 3.0 Obviously you can use it anywhere in your body, but I'm sure you guys have all seen the commercials, but this is one just letting you know that the lawnmower three point Oh, comes with the perfect kit. You can buy the lawnmower by itself by all these products individually. They even sent me this wonderful shirt, you can see the back, uh your balls will thank you and then here's the front. So it's an awesome shirt. They have great gear and you know what? So sometimes you can just sit back, take care of your balls a little bit and read the paper. So manscaped even has their own Daily news do so, which is great. So don't forget that you can go to the code Gus Frerotte and that's G. U. S. F. R. E R O. T. T E. D. Uh and you can save 20% on any products, the complete the perfect uh package gift set and uh you know, you can save 20% and get free shipping. So use the code Gus Frerotte. G. U. S. F R E R O T T E. Hey, everybody spells my name wrong, they even spelled wrong on the back of my Pro bowl jersey. So you know, I gotta, I gotta help you guys out. So don't forget how important it is that you use these products, take care of yourself down below uh and have some fun, right? There's nothing closer to you than your little buddies, so use the lawnmower. So uh use the code Gus Frerotte save 20% and get free shipping and uh order some great manscaped products, so yeah, Yeah. All right. Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host guest for a 15 year NFL quarterback and I want to welcome you into 16 31 digital news studio. Thank you to 16 31 for always hosting us and I want to thank my team, Terry Shulman brian are super producer and joe corbi...

...down at 16 31 for for always helping us out. And then we want to thank Sounder F. M. For hosting us and hosting our podcast on their platform. Sounder does an incredible job and you know they just with all the new technologies today and the way they transcribe audio, they have just been heads above the rest. So thank you to Sounder FM and want to thank our new partner, Vegas sports advantage, go to Vegas sports advantage and really um you know, uh you can go there uh and hopefully like just like our last guests, uh maybe our next guests guests will give us some insight on maybe who you should pick and bedding and and make you some more money. So today our guest is three times new york times best selling author Lee Manorville. And he's a former columnist for the boston globe and former senior writer at Sports Illustrated. He's written way too many books for me to go through and talk about because I'll screw them all up. But uh you know, his new one tall man in short shorts lee, thank you for joining me on huddle up with gus how are you doing? I'm doing great. Doing great. You can go through all the books if you want. Go right ahead. Okay, ready? Uh sting like a bee evil, the mysterious montague. Uh the big bam ted Williams at the altar of speed minute and why not us? And then your new one. How about that? Is that all right? It's a fine crew of people, isn't it? You know, they're like little toys I could take out and playing in my room. You know? It is, It is. Well, I was kind of laughing because we were before you got on, we were talking about your new book and you're going talking about tall men in short shorts. And I said, wait, I gotta I gotta picture so check this out, lee, this is me. My parents made this back in high school from my basketball and look at those short shorts. I said I had a little moustache and I had braces and one of my ankles was destroyed from basketball. So you didn't see it at all? Yeah. Weird at all. Yeah. I don't know why my parents wanted that of me and then my mom gives it gives it to me in a big box of stuff and now my kids just laugh at it. So, so lee tell me about where you grew up in and like kind of your first realization that you had a passion for sports. Well, I I was like an only child. Um and I hung around with all the guys and you have to figure out, I think when you're an only child, how are you going to get inside with everybody? You know? And in sports seemed like the best ticket. I was the kid, we always knew about the trades that were coming and where the teams were playing and what happened last night and uh, you know, I was like a little blabber mouth kid and When I was in 5th, but this was a new haven Connecticut and when I was in 5th grade, I handed in a book report and the teacher, Maria esposito said, come see me and went after she handed out all the book reports, she didn't hand out mine and I went up to see her and she handed me my book report and she said, you know, you're a very good writer, you should be a writer. Uh that would be, and so I don't know I was that's the only teacher I ever had anywhere at any time who gave me any kind of confidence. But I took it like that's a ticket to my life as a writer and I used to deliver the paper and uh in the mornings and I would get done delivering my papers and there was a kid who sold papers at the corner and we would get together and we would eat eat breakfast like hostess cupcakes and uh grape soda for breakfast. And we would read the paper and there was a guy in my town frank Birmingham, he was the sports editor, he had his little picture in the side of the paper and he was always going to the World Series and the Kentucky Derby and all this stuff, Yale football, which was a good thing. And I said that guy's got the greatest thing in the greatest job in...

...the world. And I said that's that's what I'm gonna be. And so when I was 10 years old, I was thinking of doing this and uh I'm the only guy, you know who was 10 years old and wound up doing what he wanted to do. Yeah, That's amazing that I love that story because when you're young and you have these dreams and you want to figure out what you want to do it, they barely, you know, stay in the same job or even the same field. You know, when you're young, you see a lot of kids were like, I want to be a fireman and all these things. You knew you wanted to be a writer that early. So you must have loved reading the paper if you could remember all those things because I knew a couple of kids like that. It's a lot of work. Yeah. But I was like, I was an indifferent student. Um, but when I got to college I got involved in the, in the paper at the University of Connecticut and wound up as the editor at the end and where I went when you went. So you went to Connecticut, you're the editor of the paper. Now. What was your like, what was your main goal? Was it more sports or was it just all over college? No, I was, I was the sports editor as a junior in college and, and I, I became the editor. I thought that would be a good career move. But I found out I hated all all that real world stuff. I I was going to games. I was covering the UConn huskies, they want the tournament and all that stuff. And now I was kind of current meetings of student government and stuff like that community chest carnival and said, I said, what am I doing? I mean, I want to take other sports and I've stuck with it. I've had chances to become different things. And, and I said, what's better than sports? People pay attention to sports And, and you know, there's, there's that old thing, Microcosm of life. There's everything in sports. I mean, I'm sure you've come across, you know, medical situations, legal situations, life and death situations. It's all in sports. It's like, like a town that we all know about. Yeah, there's a lot of, uh, I mean, obviously sports, there's a lot of intriguing it, uh, there's always a new storyline, every game that's played because there's nothing written for it. Right. It all happens right there and you get to watch it unfold in front of your eyes and I'm sure being an editor of a paper, it's not like, hey, We're gonna go cover the science fair that just came in and it's going to take 12 hours, right? Like happening, and you get to cover all kind of stuff. So what did that lead you onto after college? Like what did you like? Where did you, what was your next step? Well, the first thing I said, where would I like to do this? Where would I like to be a sportswriter? And I said I'd like to go to Sports Illustrated, that's the big place. But I didn't know anything about how you got to Sports Illustrated. So I I I looked it up where the office was and it was in new york city and I called up Sports Illustrated's and I want to apply to be a writer. And this woman from Human Resources said that well you can make an appointment, you can kind of come down. So I got my little Anderson little suit on and and and my little attache case with my clippings and I took the train from New Haven and I showed up and uh the officers were right across from Radio City and I walked in and and they said, well you can wait in the waiting room. And there were two guys waiting there and and they kind of had sweat shirts and blue jeans on and they were talking spanish to each other. And so we're all writing the three of us. And, and and they said, are you waiting for miss. So and so and I said, well, yeah, and they said we are too, we're applying to be custodians. And I said to myself, this is probably not how you get the charts work goes through. Yeah. And lo and behold there wasn't, you know, the world, the woman just hoisted me off...

...and said said, basically, pardon? You know, go someplace really scary coming. So I went back to my hometown, New Haven, I became a writer there and then I went to boston and I was works right there and then works illustrated and uh, and I'm 100 years old. Well how did you get to the point where you wanted to take your sports like you're, you know, when, when you're a columnist and you're writing for the papers, when did you make that switch to say, okay, I want to write books, I want to write full stories. I want to take my time with all of this. You know? Uh, I always, I think in the back of my head I always wanted to be Ernest Hemingway or or some great novelist, you know, away from writing a school because the guy from this guy tom Cali who worked in since he said get right charlie hustle the P Rose story and also write the songs arises, you know what I mean? People don't open it up and see also Ernest Hemingway charlie hustle the Pete Rose, you know, I stayed away from Ready. Um but then it I I didn't worry for Sports Illustrated a minute bowl and he was just fascinating guy. I come across, you know, he'd come here from the Sudan seven ft seven and he couldn't couldn't read or write english and when he got over and uh bob black, you had to learn how to how to hold the pencil, you know, I mean, that's a basic who was and uh and it was just a fascinating story. So I kind of put out a couple of feelers and uh and I wrote a book about the new ball which sold about seven, you know, I think mostly the people from Sudan named bowl, But Bobo has one. Right? Yeah, yeah. That's his son. Yeah. I bet that would have been like very interesting. Did you did you fly over the back to where he was from or did you just do interview actually? Did I I convinced where it's illustrated to send me to the African Basketball Championships where they were going to settle on the one team that was going to play in the olympics. That was in Cairo. Egypt. And I went there. So I was on Sports Illustrated, Sports illustrated's dime to go to Cairo. And then I took my own money and I flew down to the Sudan um Khartoum which which was just a fascinating place you know. And uh they had no no street signs, no phone books, no nothing, you know. And they had you had to be inside your house by 11 o'clock or 10 o'clock at night. It was a fascinating place. Did you get to meet his family? Not really. I met his cousin, his aunt, a cousin who was working in the U. S. Embassy in Cairo. Um But no I met like his coach. I mean the guy the guy was in the jungle. He lived in the jungle and a tribe in the jungle and It was 7.7 and some some Minister for the government went to the part of the jungle where he lived and they took a picture of the minister standing with this guy who was seven ft seven in the middle of the jungle. And they published the paint the the article in in the cartoon paper and the guys that were on the national basketball team in Khartoum said whoa. 7.7 we should find out about this Guy. And sure enough they tracked him down and they brought him to cartoon and and he learned, I mean he he was like 17 years old and he first touched the basketball. I mean you know it was very late in the game...

...and but he had a real aptitude for blocking shots. He couldn't he couldn't really he couldn't palm the ball very well because he had kind of arthritic fingers. So he only dunk the ball holding over two hands. So he was never never a threat like that. But he became a three point threat. Don nelson had him shooting up three. Yeah, it's crazy. I mean I remember him very well. I remember him very well and I couldn't imagine like he was skinny in the NBA. I couldn't imagine that 17 I was skinny he would have been I had to add £50 to. Yeah and and he everywhere he went, everybody loved him, he played at the University of Bridgeport for a year and everybody loved him. Chris mullen's brother played with him and Bridgeport. And then when I when I met him he was playing with the Sixers with Charles, Barkley and Ricky Mahorn and they would they would attack and they would throw them on the ground foot seven, they would take all this tape and they make them like a mummy you know they take their he'd be swearing him in Arabic and uh he was quite a good you know. Oh I can imagine you know and I think that's what's great about what you're doing is that when you take time and you write a book about somebody, you get to know all these incredible details about people. And it lets you people like you bring them really to life with us, right? Because we know Manu Bull is this guy, like you said, blocked shots in the N. B. A. But your books tell us a great story about them and and and it brings them to life for all of us. So I thank you for doing all that. I mean, I mean, you've written an amazing amount of books on on some athletes. So what was your most intriguing one that you've done to you? I don't know that probably, I mean, Ted Williams, he did a book on Ted Williams and he was kind of kind of boyhood idly and he was well he didn't really like to talk to reporters and people did he? It's normal, uh, playing, He was fine. Uh, and he was a guy and he kind of boom things out. Everybody said he resembled john wayne. You know, he was like, I can win. And uh, he, he was perfectly, He eats four better than any man in the tree of swear and he colorful and he was great. Yeah. Well I, I learned my first square word for my dad and I was like six. So I understand that what that means. Yeah, but together in unique, you know, he wasn't just, and when he said, when he said God, He meant Goddammit. I mean, he was calling on God to Damn whatever it was he was, he was a little paprika. He, he was spreading on the night he was eight. He had big loves and big hates. And uh, he was just a big guy. Yeah. That's awesome. That's awesome. So when you wrote about evil can eval, did he let you get on one of his bikes and do a jump? No. If it was he was gone. When I, when I wrote about him, he was gone already. Yeah. Yeah. So did you get to talk to his son? I talked to us. I talked to all these guys he hung around with and he was kind of, he was not the world's greatest person, you know, I mean Really? Yeah. No, I mean he he made it. He borrowed a lot of money that he never paid back and he wound up with other guys, wives. And he was my gosh, he was, it was a kind of con man kind of guy. He wasn't a real good guy. But he had that one thing. I mean he...

...had, he had testicles the size of the Appalachian mountains, you know, that's great and he didn't, I mean the guys that do it now, they figured out all the geometry of how you're supposed to do it when you should take off and when you shouldn't take off, he just didn't, but, But I don't know by the seat of his pants, you know, he would say I'm going to jump these 23 cars and I should kind of get Get the motorcycle up to 85 or 90 mph right about here and he would do it and sometimes he would be short and he would crash and so the next time he would say, well I got to get it up to 95 mph. He would be long and he would crash. You know, I mean he was just a a total seat of the pants guy. Yeah, I think I would break one bone like crash one time, break a bone and be like, yeah, I don't really want to do this. How many bones did he break? He broke? You know he oh he always of course said he broke every bone in his body and right, I mean that that caesar's palace crash, you everybody's seen that you know, lipson goes over and over, he just that was the foundation for all his success. You know that he could go on, go on mike Douglas or johnny Carson show that real and and just say, yeah, I broke every bone in my body and uh you should come out to the fairgrounds on saturday night, it watch me destroy myself. Yeah, I mean and and a wide world of sports, you know, it was a different time back then. Everybody watch. Wide world of sports and and he became a big player on wide world of sports. He he he brought in, he brought in great numbers for them. Oh, I mean my wild world sports memory is the winter olympics. The guy going down the ski ramp and like falling off the side and crashing like that was always what they played because they knew that was going to get people to watch. Yeah. Even even was swallowing off the side all the time. All the time. So tell us about your new book, New book. It's called tall men, short shorts and it's about the 1969 NBA finals. It's uh the Lakers and the Celtics. Um it was the last time that Russell played against chamberlain. Um jerry West and uh and Elgin Baylor played for the Lakers, john Havlicek played for the Celtics. Um, And I was 25 years old. I was just starting out and uh, I am through through a number of circumstances. I wound up covering the whole seven games. I covered the Celtics from the whole playoffs. I had never been To California. I had never seen a palm tree, I've never seen the Pacific Ocean, I've never seen anything. And I was dealing with Bill Russell who was 10 years older than me and from famous and he was the coach, he was the coach. Um, and the and the star player in the boston globe. My paper had hired him to also do a column after every game. Yeah. And he had nobody else. I mean you see the NBA now and you look at those guys, they all wear, they're all wearing those little zipper zipper, Good things now, you know, at the games. All the close up in the assistance, They look like the mormon Tabernacle, the mormon Tabernacle nickel choir there. So where is he? He was the coach and the star and there was nobody else, the trainer kind of kind of made all the reservations and stuff and wrap the ankles and that was it. I mean that was the whole whole operation and, and I'm kind of join joining the fun here and, and in that, in that series television in boston only two of the seven games or on television. That's it. That's...

...amazing. Yeah. I mean they had the concept then of blacking out home games and so in Los Angeles only, only three of the games were on television. Um, and I hate when they do that. Yeah. And I mean they said it ruins the gate. It was, it was a faulty idea, But the idea that there was no, there was no television and the games were starting at 11 o'clock in Los Angeles Eastern time. And you know, you only could hear hear the game on radio guy johnny most, he had a scratchy voice and he'd say, here we are was in this forum in Venezuela And he gave one account and I gave another account. I mean, you weren't getting a lot of information. We were the ones who were telling the whole story. I'm 25 years old and I've never seen a palm tree before. And, and uh, you know, I mean when Bill Russell had been playing, I was in junior high school when they were playing for the Celtics. So, uh, it was an experience. So it's about all the games and went seven games and the Celtics won in the seventh game. They were the big underdog and they won the seventh game. Uh There was strange Mississippi end will took himself out with a knee injury and then wanted to come back in and coach dove on Brenda cough he wouldn't put him back in. And and the Celtics won and in seven games and they had a big a big celebration plan for the forum. They had all these balloons up on the ceiling and they had a ready. They had the U. S. C. Band was there, oh my God gonna play happy days are here again. They were marching on the court and uh they had a big victory cake. They had you know 55 cases of champagne in the locker room. And the Celtics put a damper on the whole thing. And red are backed was just screaming uh He was the general manager and he was screaming, what about the balloons? What are they going to do about where's our champagne? They might still be there. Yeah, Yeah. That's funny. That's that's incredible. So why so long to write this story? Well, You know, I was 25 then. Now I'm 77 years old, I'm 100 you know, and you get to that age and you start telling stories and you realized everybody else in your story is not with us anymore. You know, I mean you said, you know, you start talking about, I was there with George Washington when he got the wooden teeth and uh say, wait a minute. Nobody else was there with George Washington. Got the wooden teeth. So it it's a whole, it's a tale of a whole other era. You know, really? Um, that whole thing about no television and and being a sportswriter was different. I mean they're only there are only like three guys covering the Celtics out on the west coast. And you know, you would just go talk with guys, you go their rooms and talk with them and you hang out hear that. Well. Yeah, 100 people with microphones standing around a big uh huh advertisements just to be uh huh. And it looks anymore. Nobody, nobody really tells a story about, about growing up and into paper and their fifth grade teacher. So you know what you do on the what do you think? But but you were also what the people had to, you know like if the subjects were out of town you were what they had to read and you were the one who explained the whole game. I mean I get that like that. That was what it was when we were when we were a kid, we had we, you know, we had to read the paper, That's it, Yeah, yeah, well, you know, who was the big sportswriter in Pittsburgh when you were a kid? Oh gosh, I couldn't tell you, I just remember we had the Leader Times, that was it, I read The leader times all the time. No, I was a little...

...town outside of Pittsburgh, my town is only about 5000 people, I was just right outside of Pittsburgh was just right outside of Pittsburgh, but yeah, you know, I appreciate it. Um so how can people, how can our fans get your book? I don't know, they know right now the amazon, you know what I mean, like half the books in the world, hold on, amazon now, you know, and you can, you can order in advance and uh it to you and then it's going to be on, you know, Hopefully it's going to be everybody's bookstore. Uh July 13. Some awesome. So tell us again lee what the name of your book is. Um Tall men, short shorts. It's a it's a story about Russell uh Lakers and the Celtics and the Lakers, Russell and West and and one uh very young sportswriter. Right? That's awesome. That's awesome. Well lee, I appreciate you joining us and taking the half hour out of your day and sharing all your stories. So everyone, you can check out Leigh Montville and all his books that he's written in his newest book, Tall man, short, short. Uh just some incredible stories. And lee I liken it to when my grant, my daughter went up to her great grandpa and asked him about World War Two and video, the whole thing so that we always have it. It's a story unless it's written down or video will never know about it. So, thank you. Thank you. All right. Thanks lee everyone. Take care. Thank you for joining us on huddle up with Gus and I look forward to next week. Thank you very much. Take care. Have a great day. Huddle up with Gusts is brought to you by Vegas. Sports advantage, clients of Vegas sports advantage are winning big in 2021 you can be a part of the winning two. As of june 1st $100 bettors are up $3700.500 dollars. Bettors are up $18,500.1000 dollars. Bettors are up $37,000.5000 dollars. Bettors are up $185,000. Become inclined today by clicking the link in the description below and use promo code. Huddle up To take 25% off your package today, thanks to our partnership, and that's a wrap sports fan. Thanks for joining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another to huddle up with GUS, featuring 15 year NFL quarterback. Gus, Ferrand, huddle up with GUS is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available on Apple music.

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