Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Herbert Lang

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Former Harlem Globetrotter Herbert "Flight Time" Lang joins the huddle! Listen to Herb discuss how he got into basketball and who was his idol growing up. Plus, Herb and Gus discuss so much more about their passion for life and the sports world! Join the huddle with Herb and Gus this week by listening to the episode! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey everyone, we appreciate you joining us in the huddle. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback Gust Rod, alongside my longtime friend and Co host Dave Hagar, where we talked to guests about how sports shape their life. Be sure to check us out on our website, how up with Gustscom, where you can listen to more episodes just like this. Now let's join the huddle. Welcome everyone to another edition of Huddle up with us. I'm your host, gust far out, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and I'm usually joined by my friend and longtime co host, Dave Hagar. Dave's not here with us today, so I'm going solo on this one, but if you like our podcast, visit us at a huddle up with Gustscom, where you can subscribe check out our store. You can find us on twitter at huddle up with gusts. We're on facebook at huddle up with gusts. So in the future you can find us on the sport circus presented by amp TV. So today, joining me in the Huddle is a Harlem Globe Trotter, former Harlem groat trotter, just like I'm a former quarterback. But you know what, I am so excited for this interview. It's something that I watched my whole life growing up, where the globetrotters and it was just in a I can't wait to ask him some of the questions I've always wanted to ask. So joining us in the huddle today is none other than herb flight time sang's. He just wrote a great new book called projects, pops and presidents, and so we're going to talk about all that. What an amazing guy, and especially all the reality TV he's been on. So her thanks for joining us in the huddle. Hey, thanks gus. Thank you, guys, for having me. I appreciate looking forward to chatting with you. So let's get started. So when you go back to Brinkley Arkansas, you know, I don't know how close that is the Tulsa, but I went to Tulsa University to play football and you should go right across the border to my tight ends house in Arkansas and we do a lot of fishing down there. So where is Brinkley Arkansas compared to Tulsa? What Brinkley Arkansas Com compared to Tulsa's probably about a three and a half for hour drive. I think it may be short and now since they several years ago fixed that highway going up through Fayettville. But it's not that far away. I actually have some family out in Tulsa. I spent, you know, playing up times performing there and Tulsa. But break there's a little bitty small town. It actually sits right between little rock and MEMPITS. We had a population. Had A population probably of about for five thousand people. When I graduate to ninety four we've slowly dwindled down to about twenty five hundred. But a great little town with great people who made me who I am today. Yeah, so let's talk about that little town a little bit. You know what, in that little town, was it your family? Was it an idol? What made you fall in love with sports? Well, the first person to really introduce me to support it was it was a game of basketball. It was my younger three brothers and sisters. It was their father. He was a really good basketball player around our town and he was really well known for playing basketball. So I spent a lot of time following them around, planning in the park, watching them playing, you know old timers tournaments and things like that, and that's just kind of how I fell in love with the game of basketball. I saw the way that it connected those those guys, how happy they were when they were playing, how they communicated, even the conflict, and how they problem solved during the conflicts or at a young age, sport taught me a lot of different dimensions of my life that would prepare me for things that would happen down the road. Well, you know, one of the things I love about basketball is it's a sport where I got one thing, I got to I could take it to any court. I can shoot all day by myself and be as as happy as you could ever be. I mean that's all I did growing up as well. We had one little court in my little town and Fort City, Pennsylvania, and you know, people came, you could have a game. If you were by yourself, you could have a lot of fun and work on your skills. So tell me about that growing up that did you have a court that everybody came to, that you had a lot of you know, learning things on the playground is way better to me than trying to get taught some by somebody when you're five, six, seven, eight, nine ten years old. But we certainly had what you call though dust bows, when you stick to stick in the ground and you put a you know, a board up and maybe an old tier Ram. We had things like that. But in the House and project where I grew up until I was about ten, we had an old middle school that used to be the the high school for the Africanamerican kids in the town. So that gym was typically always open. So it was always a place where we could go in and run up and down the court and probably one of the first places where I realized that one day I may be able to dunk. So we didn't have the the YMCA's, the boys and girls clubs and things like that in my town, but we had enough to introduce us to the basketball, game of basketball and enough to, you know, help us find interested in and coaches that were good enough to take interest in us and take time out to make sure that we became the best basketball players, students...

...and athletes. Right. So did you play other sports growing up? Yeah, yeah, I played. So in my talent you start to play organized sports around Seventh Grade, so at twelve years old, and I was telling your producer Terry my story, my football story of the very first time that I replay football in seventh grade, coach actually called my number. I was a running back. I was fired for too. I was fast and the very first time I ever played organized football, coach called sweet left. So I take the ball, I'll start running to the left and I realized there's way too many people on that side of the field. So I reverse the field and I see nothing but open space. I turned up the feeling. I see nothing but open space and I'm running forward the end zone and I'm getting there and I get to the point and I put the ball down. I turn around, begin to point and to the audience at the eighth and ninth grade team who would be playing next, and they were pointing back at me, only to tell me that I had fumbled and came up a little bit short and my best friend recovered the bumble. So I didn't score that touchdown on my very first play and I learned from that point on that it was necessary to run to the back of the end zone right, right, run the whole way through. So very first experience. Is it that what you sports all about, though, is just having fun and and and learning. You know, I feel like a lot of times today, the coaches want kids to be, you know, Emmett Smith or some great person when they're six and seven years old. That's not what it's about. So tell me about when you were kid. You know, you played football, you were playing basketball, all those skills you learned out and you would just go with your friends and play. How did that translate for you when you got to like Middle School and then you start playing some organized games? Right? I mean so for me, when you talking about learning the game and growing up, the guys that I looked up to at that time in the Mida's when I became really into into sports, for guys that were doing well. You know, you had super bowl guys like Walter Payton, the Super Bowl shuffle the fridge. Those are guys who are watched them. was like man, I'm really starting to get a grass and I'm just spent understanding of what sports can do. And also, around the same year that the the mets one of the world series, I had an hunt living up in queen. So that was like my connection to sport and I just remember around that time, you know, getting into seventh grade, one to be like Walter Payton, you know, wanted to be like Joe Morris, who played for the for the giant. So those were guys who I looked at and wanted to be like and wanted to emulate. Yeah, I hear you. I mean I grew up in Pittsburgh and you know, the steelers were the thing in the S, you know, everybody watch them and and the power reports big. Yeah, and then the the penguins, weren't as big. We didn't have basketball here, you know, and so I had to watch a lot of basketball and TV from other other cities, but I was definitely a steelers fan and and you really love to be what you watch, right. So who was the guy in basketball that you would watch and say that's who I want to be like. Well, coming from Arkansas, was Scottie Pippen. It was it was Scotty Pippen. It was Scottie Pippen. Coming up, you know, universal central Arkansas and small town guy like myself, just and playing with, you know, the best basketball player in the world that time in the late S. I'm getting into my teens and just knowing that this guy came from a small rural community like myself in Arkansas, which is Hamburg, Arkansas. I just knew that anything as possible. You know, I knew his story, I followed the story, I walked on the campus where he went to school. I knew he was here and I believed in him. I saw what he was doing on television and it really gave me a launch and patent and inspiration to show me that I can, you know, do do something with the game of basketball and beyond right now. That's awesome that, you know. I think we all feel that way. We're right when you see somebody come out of the same small town that you came out of, right, or the same area that you came out of. For me it's the same thing in the country. I mean I grew up probably twenty miles from where Jim Kelly grew up. So you get those connections that, hey, it's possible. Right, it's possible. If I have the skills and the talent, can I work hard enough to go out and do that? So, you know your nickname is flight time. So tell me about the first time you dunked. I know you still remember the first time I dunked. It was the last game of my junior in high school. I was five eight, five nine and of course it was one of those ones. Why? I can barely dunk. So my friend he's like, all right, just stay at half court, I'll get the rebound and throw it down to you, and that's exactly what happened. He got the rebound, I leaked out and I came off one leg and I dunked it and I feel like I was dreaming for a week. I don't even remember the week after school. What happened? The week after that, people would I remember people like telling me that I dumped because a lot of people weren't Duncan. But it just felt like a dreamed that lasting for a week. Yeah, it was something like some coaches were like, yeah, we don't want you to Duncan, you're right where, you're going to miss and all that, but I'm like, why not try it every game? You know, wofull, your coaches cool with it. I high school coach. He encouraged...

...it. We through all the hoops and practice. We designed plays for Duncan, you know. So he would say, we may not win every game, but we will be entertaining. Yeah, we will have some fun. That's awesome. That wall that kept you coming back right. that. That's yeah, did you want to go to practice and and and I've had old school coaches that were all about we're not doing that, which lay and I'm like, man, this is not fun exactly. And I mean I think that's a lot of like you said, that's the reason why why I continue to come back, because he made it fun and this day and time a lot of kids get discouraged from from sports because the parents, as well as the coaches make it not for him, because they continue to try to live by creissly through the things that they were not the things that they did when they were their age or sort. And you know, with my kids is something that I share and I'll tell them that for me, okay, I was a decent basketball player, but look at what I'm creating now. You know, I want to show you what I can do now. I'm still physically fit, I can still play one on one basketball with my son. I promised him that by the end of this year I would dump again. So that's one thing I'm working on. He's fourteen and he sent me a video just the other day and I think he may have dumped one. So I may be in for allow. Wow, hey listeners, thanks for joining. David I in the huddle. We invite you to join our exclusive huddle through Patreon, where you can get access to content made just for VIPs like yourself. Head to our website. How Dole up with gustcom and hit support our podcast on the pop up ad once again. That's huddle up with gustscom. Now let's get back in the huddle. I need one of those hoops. It's adjustable right, eight to ten, eight, nine, hundred and ten. I'm not Duncan ten t anymore. And Guts. You could switch the camera angles on those two and make it really look like you left the ground. I would need a lot of different camera angles, that's for sure from me. But so, so you get into high school. Did you play football in high school as well? I did. I played play football Askeley. I actually I played basketball all the way through. I only played football my junior year of high school and it was a it was a tough year for me because it was a year in which I had I was growing and I was having a lot of ankle issues. I mentioned I was about five eight, five nine that first time. I dumped between my junior and senior year. I grew from that five a five nine to the high I am now, which is about six three, six, two and a half, and I couldn't figure out that the time while I was having such struggles on the football field. So I opted out my senior year to not play football. But football was fine. I love it, you know, coming from a small town, we only had like twenty people on the whole team, so I deep snapped up kick field goals, I played defensive back, I played wide receiver, I never left the field. It's something about Friday Night Lights. I mean I love I love Basketball Games, putting my you know, we all had the same outfits, whatever you want to call it. I remember when we were we were purple and goal, so we were the Lakers, and I remember I got my pair of, you know, Magic Johnson shoes, as things must have weighed like twenty pounds and we had the pull off on. That's and you come down to the music and you're running around, and I mean those were good, but to me Friday night lights was just something different. I agree. I mean, even to this day, being a former professional basketball player, my favorite sport to watch is football, without a doubt. I mean, no matter how brutal it is, although it's becoming safer. Is Just my favorite sport to watch. I Love Basketball, I love the many different forms of it, but at the end of the day I love the Camaraderie of like college football and the Sunday morning waking up and getting with the guys and putting in my fancy football line up for NFL football. Is Not anything ever really compares to it right now, besides hanging out with my kids and having a good time. Right, right, yeah, I do fantasy football with my kids. We have a blast doing it. We have a whole family league, ten of us in it. So I wanted the last two years and they're saying I cheated. I said, how do I cheat? I just picked the same same guys. Get all the good players. Yeah, I know, you got to pick them. You got the we got a draft. Right, I don't let me. That's what they tell you when you win. They figured that there are some way because I wanted to feel am out. I like, man, you rigged it. I know you did something right. Exactly we sir? Yeah, so you get into you're in high school, right, you're having a good you know, senior year. When did you start getting recruited or were you were you getting some looks by colleges out there? Well, for me in Arkansas, the schools that that recruited me during that time when I was actually playing were hardening university, which is in AI. School at the time had a small school called University Arkansas Monicello. But a strange thing happened. I won't say strange, but interesting thing happened. There was a guy from my from my town, named Walter Camper, who had who had went to little rock for his last years of high school and he had got his basketball scholarship to sitting there college in Street port, Louisiana. His...

...first year he got injured, so he had kind of a year off and he ended up coming back and see me play basketball in high school for the first time and after watching two or three games he told me that he would go back and tell them about me and sitting every college actually offer mell scholarship without ever really seeing me play a game of basketball. It was just word of mouth. My grades were good, my character was good and you know, somebody took a stand for me and it paid off. That's awesome to growing up all this time in Arkansas and through high school. Did you have a mentor a teacher, somebody who you could confide in or look up to? Yes, it was my high school basketball coach. His name was Herbert Williams and he actually coached me all the way from seventh grade to twelve grade and basketball and his his son, Marlin, was my best friend. So anything that Marlon did, as far as traveling to play AU I was included. So I mean it was it was just somebody that had to look up to. He was a person who had a degree in health and physical education. Myself, I ended up getting my degree in health and physical education just like him, and he just really prepared me and showed me the way. He prepared me for everything in college that I was faced with, like everything that I was face within college. I can remember sitting in the audience in the bleachers times when we thought that we should be running up and down playing basketball. He was actually mentally teaching us about things that were to come and when I was faced with those obstacles, thanks to him, I knew exactly what to do in most of those situations. Yeah, because that transition from high school to college, you may think you're ready for it, but I don't think any kids ever ready for it. So tell me about with first time you go and you get to college. What was that first time? You really felt like fell a little adversity, like, man, I don't know if I should be here and you know I'm away from home. What was that first experience like for you? Well, it probably happened within the first few days. You know, it wasn't that far away from where I lived. That was about a four hour drive, but just and I went to a small school. So what there wasn't the thousands of students that you know, some students typically would be used to as a small school division. One sitting there college, Robert Perish probably the most famous Alumna to graduate from sentinary. But it was just a different, different culture for me because I had graduated from high school that was probably ninety eighty five percent, eighty twenty percent African American and then to go to a small school like sitting area where pretty much to act, these are the only you know, African American culture on the campus and it was great. It just it was nerve racking at first because I was homesick. I had a girlfriend back home and I end up, you know, going back home as much as I could, but during that time I was able to realize that it was time for me to transition to something new. I begin to, you know, make new friends from different cultures, Chinese friends, you know, Middle Ease and friends French, from Europe like I had never met people, you know, that weren't black or white and my hometime. The most part, it was an opportunity for me to grow, the first sign that there's more of the world and what's in your immediate bubble, and so that experience was scary at the same time, but it's something that I'm glad that I had and I got had a chance to grow from it. Yea. So how did you feel like? You, you know, you go from high school where you played multiple sports. I know you played mostly basketball, but then you go to college here and it's a job now, right, it's full time lifting, going to class. Don't be late, I got meetings. I know football was always like that. How how did you deal with that? Well, I just had to figure out a way to protor PRIORITA, or prioritize, and figure out how to wait, to take as many naps as I could. I was a master napper again, you know, ten to fifteen minute naps in but it was totally different. Like you said, in high school I had, you know, maybe a physical education class and then you had practice. Know, when you got a scholarship, you got individual workouts in the morning, you got, you know, you got weight training, then you got three on threes and then you got, you know, classing between, you got lab and it's a shocking to beginning and so you have to hope that you have a group of guys who have kind of been through it and kind of ease you into it, because it become can become overwhelming. But I was lucky enough to have a good support system and had, you know, a good group of people who had prepared me beforehand, like I mentioned, my coach and some of my other teachers in high school, so I knew exactly what to do in face with the obstacles. Who was your coach at, how do you say it again? Sent Cent Terran, Centenarian Terry College, sitting there a college. My first coach my first three years, his name was Tommy Barderman, and after that, going into my senior, you're my last coach was billy Kennedy, who was recently coaching that I Texas and them. That was his First Division One head coaching job and he was the person who actually helped me get into the college dunk contests. In one thousand nine hundred and ninety eight. That, you know, probably launched me into get in Oportween it with the globe raters. So were you the guy like that everybody came to see in college because you were going, to put it, at least, you know, five, six, seven, eight dunks down a game? Well, my freshman year not so much. There was a bunch of did not plays, coaches decisions beside that, but I'd probably say my junior year because the guys who were there before there was a...

...heavy senior class my sophomore year, once those guys up and kind of became my team. So I went from averaging like seven point two game to lead in the Transit America conference in scoring. And Yeah, I did kind of becoming that guy who you knew if you came to see me, to see, you know, two or three dunks there maybe somebody you know that would be getting dunked on. But yeah, I'd say it I probably was that got to come to come to see. It was a lot of fun. So when you go to the Dunk Dunk contest that at you know, at the tournament, and you're there, you know you're at us. You're from a smaller school and sometimes that's intimidating, you know, because these other guys have been on through the press right. A lot of these guys that come from dunk contests are big schools and you know they've been recruited heavily all those types of things, and here you are coming from the small school in Louisiana. So what was that whole experience like for you? My whole experience was I was thinking I've been watching these guys play on ESPN for four years, you know, guys like Ruben Patterson, belief, a Lowpez, Mike James, who played that Du Cane. He was my roommate there at camp, and so it was like I've seen these guys. Now it's my opportunity as a person who came from a small school, who may have been on television once the show ESPN, and the world what they've been missing out on. And I just remember getting there and Curtis Staples from the University of West Virginia, he was one of the shooters over there. He ended up winning the Division One, you know, the three points shoot out contest. But right once he saw lit a couple of practice dunks, he was like all, you got this, it's over, you know, and that gave me a boost of confidence and going into that night I was one of the short of guys at six to along with, you know, Corey Brewer and Mike James. But I knew that I had to represent for the small schools and that's what I've always tried to do. I come from small background, you know, small town community background, went to a small school, so I try to represent for the small people. But as a globe trial, of course, I was undefeated for a while, so I begin now to get the represent for the world. Yeah, so you get to do this. So you win the dunk contest. What was the dunk that you that want it? For you, the dunk that wanted? I would probably say the three hundred and sixty that got me into the final. The dunk that I wanted to do for the final was not the executed the way that I wanted to wanted it to come off, but I was still able to make it and ruin pattison. End Up missing two dunks. So I kind of wanted by De Fall Don. I had a real good group of guys who were around the court support me and it was at that time I was probably my best, most memorable sports sports moment, you know, to win on ESPN and have dig bytell calling me the big man on campus and you know if I like I had arrived. Yeah. So last question before we take a little break. You know the dunk contests are everybody loves watching them and it's like, okay, how can you Redo all these dunks? So what do you think separates somebody now, because I mean a lot of dunks are just kind of done over and over again and these guys were trying to use props and all these things. What makes it special for you when you see a really good dunk? Well, one thing I'll say. I do have an appreciation for these athletic guys, I mean bigger, faster and stronger. I can remember, you know, winning the dunk contest and ninety eight and looking at the guys compete two or three years later and thinking I wouldn't have probably wouldn't have a chance because but the things you mentioned, the props and the creativity, I was never a prop dunker, but the thing that I like to see the most is I like to see elevation. I like to see hike, you know, let me see you fly, let me see you come from the free thrown. It doesn't necessarily have to be anything underneath. These are things that I couldn't necessarily do as far as a free throw line, but as far as bouncing off the ground, show meet the distance between yourself in the rim, you know, and make it look easy. That's those are kind of dunks that are impresent to me. You know, hard but simple. Yeah, when you see A guy's head is up at the rim, it's just amazing. It's like, man, that is some hops. That exact is just absolutely insane. Hey, let's get let's take a little break here. We'll come back and on the other side we're going to talk to herb flight time Lang again a little bit more and we're going to find out what he's doing. All is reality TV and you can catch US always at RADIOCOM or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. Start Your Day sunny side up at the Weston Bonnaventure hotel and suits and enjoy breakfast for two on us, no matter how you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles? Start every day with a hearty meal to kick start your morning. Enjoy breakfast for two on US each day you stay for reservations, be sure that Promo Code S for B appears in the Promo codebox when making your online reservation at Marriottcom. BACKSLASH LAX BW or call one eight hundred two to eight one thousand two hundred and ninety and ask for a promotional code s for B. Hey everyone, we're back on huddle up with gusts. Thanks for joining us today. We have a great guest. 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Gusts Ofcom and on RADIOCOM or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. CHECK US out on twitter at huddle up with gusts, facebook at huddle up with guests, and even on Linkedin at my personal linkedin page, Gust Farrat. So her we're back. You know now you just won the dunk contest. You're finishing your college career. What was that next step for you? Because we know you became a globe trotter. Your famous. You did it for eighteen years. But how do you get there? Because I'm assuming that you know there was a little in between the dunk contest and figuring out what I'm going to do next in my life. But I'm that's a great question, Gust what happened for me was at the win in the dunk contest, I went back to campus and I was that, you know, the big man on campus that Dick by tail was talking about on the broadcast that night. But as far as opportunities to go and trout for NBA teams, it was something that didn't happen. It was a year in which they had a lockout. Not to say that I would have made the NBA, but I know that I didn't get the opportunities to going to the camps and work out like traditional guys, you know, typically get to do and non unlock out seasons. So for me, I also had opportunities to go overseas to play. I had offers to go to places like Cyprus, but I decided that since I had a semester of school left and I wasn't going to the NBA to make millions of dollars, it was important for me to go back and finish my degree, which sent theyver had degree to can pay for that semester. So I went back and I finished up my degree and health in Physical Education. She now taught at the student taught at the biggest high school there in streeport, Southwood High School. And after I completed that, I worked as a personal trainer for for eight to ten months before joining the globe charters. And that happened by chance to a friend of mine went to a globe charter game and came back with the program telling me that I could, you know, do the things that he saw them doing. As a result, I sent the video in and invited me to their training camp. So it was a little bit of a roundabout process, but it was a process that was meant for me and I know the NBA just wasn't in the column for me. I had no opportunity to play for eighteen years and, you know, travels almost ninety different countries and I have to pay for so I'd say that my professional goals were pretty good. As far as where his dreaming camp for the Globe Trotters, you know, there's no your new city, you know, trying to figure out where it is well, when I joined the team to training camps were held up in Prescott, Arizona because at that time Mandy Jackson, who was the owner of the team, that's where they were based out of there in Phoenix, downtown Phoenix. So that's what we would have our training camps. But in two thousand and seven, when the ownership transition, we actually moved up to up on Long Island, New York. We were trained at Garden City, I think on Guarden island up there in New York. We did that for about a decade before relocating to Atlanta where they actually trained now. So there's been several different training facilities. Prescott was allowed to fun. We had a chance to go up there and get our long used to the elevation as well as an opportunity to stay out of trouble for the course. Right now, we that we were up there, but I mean it was all great memories. He's training camp was different, but he's crank training cramp was fun and people may not realize that when you go to a global chart of basketball training camp, it's not just tricks. You know, you got guys out there really wanted to show that they can play the game. Of Basketball, and that's something that the globe childs have also been known for, being the basketball players you know, and you can look at the history and see the NBA guys who have played to know that there have been great basketball players. Well, there, you guys all obviously have the talent, right. It's all. I mean it's amazing what you get, the skill set you guys have, but there has to be some showmanship built into that as well, right. So tell me, how do you train? Like you have talent and the skill set and they say, okay, here's what, here's what flight time is good at. Do you have people that are working with you saying we think you can improve on these skills, we want you to work on these like and then it's got to be you're working with. Now, look, you're going to be involved with the audience more, you're going to being people down on the court, your teammates, you're going to have a lot more fun. How was that first year for you learning how to do all that? Well, when I came in I can for for sure say that I was I was shot, I was laid back. I came in and my job was I was a dunker. So you have a position like a Dunker, a dribbler. Then the Showman, that's the metal Ark Limon, the geese ows be the sweetlo dumb aarre, the guys who speak on the mic and you know, really are the stars of the show. But then you also have, you know, the Co characters, who are the drillers, the guys who are currently knew, who slide on their knees, and then you have the dunkers like, you know, Michael Wild thing, Wilson and even will chamberlain went, he played. So the thing about it is when you first come in, maybe they bought you in for one specific reason, but if you want to have an extended career, and I'd say that's probably with anything, you want to learn as much as you can within that job. And for me I think that the ability to develop the capabilities of speaking to large audience, the willingness to travel,...

...the willingness to go on to different schools and hospitals and try to change the lives and make people feel good just by simply spending the basketball are things that extend to my career and allow me to play for eighteen years, because you can believe I was not flight time for eighteen years. About it. Last nine to ten years at the backside of that, there was a lot of finger rolls and lay ups going in. Yeah, there's a lot. I mean I watched a lot of your videos. I mean you you learned a lot of skills. I'm sure you weren't spinning the ball when you do this one, it's around, you're going around. I mean you probably weren't doing that when you were a rookie with the GLOB draters. There's a lot of skills you had to learn. When I came in, I couldn't even spend the basketball on my finger. You know, when I first joined the team, I couldn't even spend the basketball in my finger and I just remember when I got home from training camp, just working on this so much to the fingertips of my fingers were actually raw, like aren't like bliss through. So, I mean from working a regular job making seven dollars an hour, which I enjoyed as a person's trainer, I knew that I had more to offer the game of basketball. So my determination, you know, once I made the team, was to make sure that I did this for as long as I could and then, once I begin to see the impact that the globetrotters have on the world and the type of guys that were involved in the organization, I knew that I wanted to do it for as long as I could. Hey, hoddle up, fans, this is producer Logan Carney. We thank you for listening to another great episode. If you want to hear more about how sports can change somebody's life, be sure to check out my novel our seats and left field on Amazon. Our seats and left field is about Andy Smith, a sixteen year old kid who grows up a big pirates fan with his dad. Right before the pirates two thousand and thirteen magical season, he loses his dad to cancer. Read all about how Andy overcomes his depression while the pirates find a way to win. That's our seats in left field on Amazon. You can buy it right now. Now let's get back in the huddle. How many people are on the globe trotters? What typically, if you look at the at the the robster on their website, you probably see thirty two eight the thirty players, because there's two teams traveling at the same time, sometimes three. So you know, sometimes you'll see a team in Pittsburgh and they'll be another team in in Los Angeles and then another maybe another team him over in Paris, France. It's just kind of kind of the way it works. But all the pieces work well together. All the guys know each other and it's, you know, pretty easy to mix mix guys in, just depending on what kind of what kind of show you want to create at the moment, because all the guys don't have the same, same personality, but they can still give you the same just of a great show that people have traditionally become accustomed to listening to or going to see. So how much influence do you get in a show right say hey, I think we can do this, you know, because there's there's another team playing against you. Obviously they're they're not out to really try to beat you. Guys. There is some basketball being played, but you know, there are times when you're doing you're dribbling and they're all following you like ducks, you know what I mean. How much of that do you get to bring and your imagination into what's going on the globetrotters? But one thing about the organization is that as I got you know, became longer into a longer tenue. They did value our opinions even more. So we did get to get on in on some of the meetings and kind of let them know how we felt on the court when we deliver certain things. You know what things were working and what things were not working. But at the end of the day, you know, you sit on the bench over the course of years and you're in the game, you can kind of get a feel for what's working. Just about looking into the audience how they react to some of the things that we're traditionally were known for doing, and it's it's a lot of fun. You know, we we actually have training camp sessions where we just add Lib, we just somebody says something in the person reacts and just just kind of how it makes it more not scripted per se and makes it more authentic for the crowd, and that's always our favorite part and where are able to be authentically ourselves and just really interact and know that we're putting on the greyest greatest basketball show that's ever been put on the basketball court. Well, I saw, I mean the trick skills that you guys do are amazing right, and I'm sure that if if people worked on. You have to work on some of those things. Like curly neal wasn't good at that half court shot just because he could do it all his life right. He had to work really hard. So what were some of the the tricks that you really learned from when you started to you know, through your eighteen years eg that you're really proud of? Well, the one I think that you show was me taking the ball around my head around the world and then later on in my career, as I begin to bald, I begin to work on the spin on the head. And when you talk about know the different arenas and the trick shots, the hook shots, one of the things that I became pretty pretty decent that was going into the audience and shooting the granny shot. So once we would arrive to into the cities for practice, I would go and try to find a nice, safe spot to where I can actually launch myself and do the granny shot and just pray that it goes in heat off the...

...backboard or net. But when you get into the gym ahead of time it's it's a different kind of practice. You got guys working on trick shot, you got guys, you know, throwing a half court shops, from court to court, full court from the wrap. So you have to definitely have your head on the swivel. But those are the things that people have grown accustomed to. Expect them from the globe charters. So what that's you're jobbing your craft and you don't willing to do whatever it takes, you know, to let people know that that's what you're doing. You can google globe, try to youtube videos and world records that they've been setting recently if you just want to see a little bit more of what they've been up to these days. So is the big guy last name Loftin? Is that your buddy? Be Easy? Yeah, that was my amazing race partner. Yeah, so he did some hook shots. I think he'd be dude perfect on a hook shot, you know, because they beat him and he gant it. He said no, you're not breaking my record, I'm coming back at breaking yours. So, you know, I think he did it. I don't know how far was. It was a long way though, right. They have. I mean go try to have a great youtube page. I mean you got guys in there like Bull Bullard, who's shooting from from airplanes and helicopters and Bungee chords, some stuff that I probably wouldn't do. I mean my limit was on the top of the Nassau Coliseum. They're in Long Island, after they started, you know, coming out airplane shoot. That was a little bit too much concentrating for me. But it's the new generation and I enjoyed it. You know, they're pushing the limits there, you know, changing the game, as they have for the past hundred years. So it's it's exciting, always going and still looking. Try To make sure I support these guys. Yeah, I mean the globe, try to organization. It's such a it's such a wellknown brand and you guys have to like kind of you know, when you play for a brand or kind a team, you got to you got to live up to those standards and I think you guys bring it every show and I would think about it like a comedian, right, your job is there going to see everybody smile. Have you ever been a part of a show where it was just a tough day and people weren't laughing or smiling? You know, because I got to think that happens a little bit. There has been days like that and I'll say you an experience over and I remember first time we travel to it was a Stoneya and Latvia and being over in the stone. I think the culture was it was a little bit different. This was early s and I mean we're out there doing our best, dunce making hook shots. Everything is working, and at halftime we get in and we like man, what what can we do to make these people actually, you know, stand up and clapping a plot for us, you know, and coaches like just keep doing you're doing, guys. I don't know, you know what it is. Maybe it's a cultural thing. And so we go out in the second half, we continue to perform, put on a great show and once the show was over with, the crowd got up and gave us a standing ovation. And so I think that the culture was that you sit and you watch the show and at the end you show your appreciation, where as opposed to in the states, you you know, you kind of go for I think that culture has changed since then, but that was then awkward experience, you know, going out there. I'm three hundred and sixty in and guys are backwards dunking a course of shots are going in and there's just looking like you know. So I would say yeah, now, that would be that would be pretty tough to play in front of like all these special things you guys are doing and nobody's even like standing up and clapping. You're like, wow, this is strange. What do I do next? So now, I mean I heard similar stories from, you know, older guys. They talk about early experiences, maybe in the Soviet Union and China as well, but I'm pretty sure these coaches have changed a lot since then. But that, I was kind of weird. Right. So you're going through your career as a globe trotter. You've been in a long time. What part of your career did you start looking for other things, like where you said, I'm going to go out and try to whether you know, I mean you've been on reality TV a bunch. where I'm going to go try out for all these different things. So when did you start kind of broadening the scope of what you wanted to do? Well, when the organization change hands in two thousand and seven and new ownership came in and it got Kirk Snyder, who had come in from the wwe. He wanted to create new stars. You know, he grew up on Krill Middle Ark, just like myself and probably you did, and his question was, you know, those guys are great, but why didn't we create some new stars? So he came in. Would have pushed to create new stars. So that's when you get guys like big easy lot and who you asked about my cell phone shows like the amazing racet. He wanted to glow, tries to become relevant with pop cultures. So that's when we begin to expand and that's, you know, part of why I want to try to get my guys back into a situation where they get to go back on stage and tell their stories and inspire people. So when you're on the Bachelorette and you come back into the locker room after doing the Bachelor Laurette, did you get a little ribbon or not? Or they you know what? What was that lear? I know if I would winning the football locker room, they would give me a lot of crap. Back to the red experience was one in whish. There was, I think there was five of my teammates. We actually just went out to Venice beach to play against the guys who were competing to get the date when the maca. We weren't actually competitors. We were the one. You were a competitor. Get to go on a date...

...with her. So we play a little basketball with them, rough them up. I think we had our seven foot gut, seven foot eight guys out there. He was blocking shots. So it was a lot of fun. That was the experience on that. But probably people remember me with your friend big easy, often for me, losing for him, making us lose three times on the amazing race. Valet stay and play on your next getaway to Los Angeles. The Weston Bonaventure Hotel and sweets offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotels just moments away from all the action and accessible to Hollywood, beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room and valet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code PSF in the code box when making your online reservation or call one two hundred and three six, two four one thousand and asked for Promo Code PSF. So tell me about the amazing race. What what did you like about it? What didn't you like about it? Oh Man, what I liked about it was when it was all over and I got to sit back and watch with my friends and family, who wanted to know what the outcome was, but I couldn't tell him and I didn't want to tell him. But I mean it's secret. To be honest with you, it was just a great experience. The people that the whole crew, the people that we travel with with, you know, from the camera people to the producers. I mean it was, it was, it was all a one. It was a great experience. I mean otherwise we wouldn't have, you know, done it three times if we didn't enjoy it. But to be able to be put out and able to represent the globe charters at that time, who had already been around for eighty five years and people had count almost forgotten that the globe charge was still around, to be able to know that I had a part in, of course, with big easy with bringing a sense of relevance for a short period of time back to the brand, something I'm thankful for, that they trusted me with. And you know, still people recognize me today, probably more from the amazing race than they do from the globe charters. By always try to make sure I combind the two, because I know without one that wouldn't have been the other. Right. So tell me, how much does big easy make you laugh? How much is Oh, he makes me laugh all the time. He just called me the other day for my birthday and you know, we had a couple things that we probably can't discuss here on on our little call. But I mean he's a funny guy. He's naturally funny. He's naturally gifted, which is why he was put in the position that he is right now as the you know, the main showman for the globe charters, and he's also one of the main reasons why we were able to come back and continue to do the amazing race three times, because he's a great guy with a great personality that people just warm up to and love. So great friend of Mine and he actually played for the same coach that I play, that coach Billy Kennedy, who coach at Texas am. He was big easy's coach at Southeast Louisiana, which was the second job, and it all kind of came circle, came full circle. So tell me a little bit explain to our fans what like the premise of the amazing races the race, the amazing races, the race around the world for a million dollars. You know you have obstacles. You never know what's coming. The course of the filming last a little bit over a month. Some of the things that people probably would have a hard time letting go of during the course of that races that they have no communication with outside world via your social media or your phones, because those are things that they take away from you up on your arrival. It's like military. You're against the wall there, you know, go through your bags and all right, go to your rooms and we'll let you know when you take off, which could be a week from now. Wow, what's the total? Three things that just qualify or you made you get out of the race? Well, actually, we had one of our teams, one of my favorite teams, EVN, Justin they actually end up getting disqualified because they lost their passports. So basically what you need for this race to survive is passport and whatever amount of money that they give you at the beginning of each leg. So little things like because if you don't have your passport, you can't travel to the next country. Right, right. So how did they feed you? Guys have to go to restaurants or what you guys do today, have food for you everywhere you went. What each leg of the race they give you a certain amount of money. You decide in your mind, no, kids, this going to be enough for me to have enough for the taxis. There's going to be enough for me to, you know, provide food. And me I got big easy. He's six foot nine. So you go to McDonald's. We more than one, you know, one double cheeseburger. So you have to decide what you're going to do with the money. But typically when you would end the leg of the race, they would have a nice meal prepared for so we can kind of relax and get our Barings back together and prepare what, who knows, next is coming up on the on the race. So are you doing any reality shows currently all right now? NOPE, nope, no reality shows right now, just a bunch of zoom calls other than the ones that I'm working on. I have a sports game show that I actually am pitching to a bunch of different networks, hoping to get some some momentium on that. You know, things are kind of slow right now, but hopefully next year, early next year, we'll be able to get people back in groups again, document around,...

...working on with some of my some of my teammates, trying to get them a platform again to continue to do the things as they did for the globe trotters. I have a sport. It's brand called Swag Ball that I just got my trademark on. Do Lot of twenty first which I plan to hold a lot of basketball clinics and retreats to change the lives of young folks and adults. So yeah, I have a lot of things going on. Building a new home in Florida right now, which I plan the whole some of those clinics. So, during a pandemic, I decided I would be a person sitting around and waiting for the pandemic to end and get through it. But I'll be a person that comes out of this pandemic as a person who's done the research and figured out how people, you know, advanced or got on the other side and become a better person. At the same time. Right, there's a new normal, right, and you wanted to be out in front of the new normal. But so, tell us about your book that you wrote. You also wrote a book. Yes, I my first book I wrote. It was called a projects, popes and presidents and some memoir about my experience, as we talked about earlier, growing up and bring the Arkansas. My mom had me at seventeen years old, pregnant at sixteen. By the time she was twenty five, she had six of us and grew up in wow, the projects until I was about ten. But you know, often tell people we we didn't necessarily have everything that we wanted, but she gave us everything that we needed in the community of grandparents and uncle's and just people in and my community in the churches are the people who who helped raise us. And you know, we get to get back to that. It takes the community to raise people and you get to see things from different, different perspectives. Like my high school basketball coach gets all the credit in the world. My Dad's a great a great dad and a great man, but situation didn't allow him to be there as much as he probably had wish you. So thank God for my coach, who was exactly what I needed at that point in my life. Yeah, so, all right, till there's two more things. are going to really ask you about all this. Your book is called. You know, there's projects, pope presidents. The pope. You know, everybody knows the pope, whether you your Catholic or not, everybody kind of knows who the pope is. What was it like meeting the pope? I know you went to the Vatican and you tried to spend the balls finger, but what was it? How was he what was it like for you? And people ask me this question all the time about meeting the pope and I compared to meeting President Obama because I had a chance to meet him twice, which is the president's part of the of the book, but meeting the pope was the most nerve racking experience during my globe tarter career or, for one my dad. He's a preacher now. And secondly, the night before Kirk Snyder are you know, president at the time, had informed me that I was going to be the person to have to attempt to spend the basketball on the pope's finger. So didn't have a good, nice sleep before that because I'm realizing that this goes wrong and I actually spend the ball off of his finger and hits him in the head, I will be viral for the wrong reason. I'll be known as the guy, you know, gave the pope of black eye, but I took on the challenge. I mean the the experience was amazing and I can't even explain just the experiences of seeing him come in in its car and the thousands of people in the back, just knowing that some of those people have way of their whole lives and some of them have spent their life savings just for that opportunity, and just realizing how lucky y'all was to just be there and knowing that I'll have a chance to me I'm see, those are experiences for me that I don't take for granted. A lot of people don't. Just knowing that so many people just live their whole life and they'll never forget that, and I've had a chance to have many experiences like that similar to that in my life. So so then, what was it like? Did you go to the White House to meet the President? Yeah, I went to the White House to meet the President twice for the other annual Easter Egg roll event that they have their here's a cool little Pifil I have of me and the pope right here. Awesome. Oh yeah, and that's big easy behind you right. Big Easy or big ugly. I don't know which one you want to call will come. Well, I'M NOT gonna say big Ay. He's way too big for me. I think I can get him out of the picture. Yeah, so you know I've been to the theory roll when I was playing for the reds kids. I did it with Bill Clinton. So I went there for that until you got to meet President Obama. I'm sure he could spend it on his finger because I know he's pretty good at basketball. Oh yeah, Obama, I know I have a couple of pictures of me standing over him doing push us because we had a we had a little deal out there. Was Bruce Boyne was out there, used to play for the Spurs, and a couple more guys out there playing around on the court. We had a couple tenis players on the backside. SOLEBOMB, of course, you know he loves a game of basketball, and he comes out there taking this little left Pani shout and we're like, Mr President, the rule that we've been having with the kids who are here for these are roll if you missed the shot, you have to do file push up. So he shot a couple bricks up there. He got about ten push ups and you know, broots. Now we stood over to make sure that he was, you know, doing them right. But I mean it was great just to be able to say that you had an opportunity to meet them, you know, somebody who saw acomplished once, not not only twice, as something I could have never imagined growing up in a small town in Arkansas, where the...

Great Mr Bill Clinton came from as well. Right. Well, yeah, fellow Arkansas right cans, I don't know how you say that. Right, and our hands and there you go, there you go. So I see you're also sitting with a Dak press Scott's at a Dak Prescott Jersey behind you. That's right. Is that your man? That's my man. You know, I lived in street port in Louisiana for ninety four to two thousand and seventeen before I moved out the Sacramento and you know, Daky's from that area. So I kind of begin to root for the for the local hometown guys, even though he was at Mississippi State and I'm a razorback Fan, but I'm a cowboys fan and that is my guy, wherever he's going. Actual I'm getting ready to move down to the Tampa area. So I'M gonna be a I'm going to be a cowboy and a Tampa Bay book in Your Fan Oh well, I coached Ezeki Elliott and high school, so I'm a little bit of a Cowboy Fan, even though all my redskined fans hate me saying that. So you know Ezek was a great guy and also coached foy a Lucan, who's a linebacker for the Atlanta Falcon. So you know football runs deep in my blood. I'm glad it runs a little bit in your blood. You know. I think this was a great interview. You know, one last thing we'd love to do. We do a two minute drill. It's a lot of fun. It's really easy. We'll see how many you get through and and maybe you'll score touchdown in two minutes. Before we go real quick, I got another book coming out tomorrow. It's up called cracking the rich coade. I'm not sure how that's getting in there, but it's with a Jim Brittain, Kevin Harrington would afford at the bottom there with Tony Robbins. But this book be of should be available tomorrow, I think on Amazon. It's called cracking the rich coat. Awesome Bridge. Allum for yeah, so have two minute droll. After the two minute drill, will I'll bring you in. Let you tell everybody how they can find you. All right, all right, let's go. All right, you ready, son, are all right, here we go. All Right, here we go. GAS OR ELECTRIC CAR? Electric. Would you rather fly or drive? Fly bytime back. I love it. I love it. What's your biggest pet peeve? People not admitting when they're wrong. Yeah, well, I think that's a lot of people these days. All right, you got a Mount Rushmore of Globe trotters for that. You look up to that have come before you. WHO WOULD THAT BE? Oh Man, I'll have to go sweet, loud, dumb bar. I would go Michael Wild thing, Wilson, curly Neil and one of them that I play with, key ron, sweet, peace shine. I Love Sweet pee. There you go. All right. Hot or cold? Cold, All right, favorite sports movie? Build a dreams all right, what recommend recreational sport do you play now? Well, HMM, I'd have to say's right. I've been skiing. I've been skiing. There it, we love it. Yeah, all right, I took up king, I took up school, but I've and I'm certified. All right, keep going, man. Yeah, that's good. Okay. If you could change places with one person for a day at any time in history, who would it be? Oh Man, I used to say Bill Gates, but maybe I'll stray play some Marchael Jordan for a day, see what that's like. That would be pretty fun. All right, your favorite QB. I think I know this one. My favorite quarterback, Oh man, does for rot, you liar. You know the back press. Gotta come on, just rock. Yeah, here, liquor, wine or other other. All right, travel to where you've been. Everywhere, so I don't know where else you could travel to. been too brands. been to Argentina, Brazil, Australia, China, India, Canada, Mexico. I don't have good game on ninety that you've been up. All right, last one. This is for your field go we didn't make it in the end zone, but this is for your field goal. Jordan, Kobe or Lebron Jordan? Why? Because he was the greatest I seen during that time. But if I was a kid today, I would say is Lebron James for sure, because they didn't see Jordan during my time. So it's our relative. I love it. I love it. Hey, flight time man, thank you so much for coming on my show. It was a great interview. Why don't you let all my audience and fans now how they can find you and how they can get your books? All right, guys, Hey, I appreciate all you guys who want to find me. You can find the book actually on Amazoncom. is also on barns and noble. You...

...can find me on twitter. You can find me on instagram. I am duck trotter for. That's at Da Trotter for. Also, you can find me on Linkedin, wherever you find some something going on, Tick Tock, and you can find me there. But one thing before I go after let everybody know that kindness is free. It don't cost you a dime, so let it go. You have it in abundance. You'll never run out of it, so give it away. Kindness is free. Well, Hey, thank thank you here for joining me on huddle up with gusts. Everyone, please listen to us on RADIOCOM. Wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, you can go to our website. How do up with Gusscom? You can subscribe, check out our store. You can find us anywhere you want. At Huddle, walk with gusts on social media, and soon you can find us on in the sports circus presented by AMPTV, a MP TV, so so in our thank you for the wonderful show her. Thank you for joining us and until next time, we'll see you again. All Right, thanks, HR man. I appreciate it. That was awesome. Thank you. We'll see. We'll see what your cowboys will have this year. Man, I don't know. Hey, thank you, guys. lowing forward to it a vis. Anything I can do field, free to hit me up. All right. Thank you, we will thank you again. Take care of guy, free be all right. Definitely. Thank you. Thank you for joining Dave and I in the huddle. We hope you enjoyed our podcast. If you'd like to hear more podcast just like this, go to Hullo up with dustcom, where you can find our social channels, subscribe to hear more by our merchandise and join our exclusive huddle through Patreon. Please join us next week when we talk to more guests about how sports shape their life.

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