Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Greg Nared

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week, joining me in the Huddle is Greg Nared. He holds the position of SVP Player Relations for the Dallas Mavericks and offers more than 25 years of experience in sales, athlete management, client relations and sports marketing. His primary focus is to provide strategic direction for youth basketball, community, player relations, and Mavs Entertainment. Greg has played an integral role in having one of the most innovative youth basketball programs in the NBA. Greg operated and owned the Greg Nared Agency, where he worked directly with professional athletes in both golf and basketball, including marketing the clients or products in promoting their career within his or her given field as well as any interests off the field of play. Greg is also responsible for meeting with team owners, managers, coaches, and other individuals to develop rapport and partnerships promoting the organization and the clients GNA represents. Much of his day is spent in contract negotiating, working with athlete sponsors, networking, speaking with other professionals and keeping abreast of current trends and information that may affect decisions the organization and agent recommend to the clients. Lastly, Greg's expertise and experience in investments, business management, finance, risk analysis, and trends in sports helped facilitate success in recruiting, developing, and sustaining clients and sponsorships. Before working at the Greg Nared Agency, Nared worked as the Vice President for Golf for the William Morris Agency in Beverly Hills, California. Greg was responsible for working directly with LPGA / PGA executives in helping to promote the athlete's career. Greg also worked on negotiating contracts in the best interest of the athlete. His role included improving salary, making provisions for injuries, and taking other options in place of salary increases. He made a recommendation to athletes regarding long-term as opposed to short-term benefits. Greg also worked on Brand and PR plans for athletes. In doing so, he worked on a short-term and long-term strategy that best fit the overall goals and objectives for athletes. Nared recruited athletes to increase the client base. Lastly, Nared worked very closely with Professional Golfer Extraordinaire Michelle Wie. He was responsible for day-to-day operations with the Wie family. He negotiated corporate sponsorship and appearance fees contracts, coordinated public relations, handled Michelle's schedule, and worked as an adviser to Wie. Nared also delivered 15 years of athlete management and strategic planning to Nike.

First joining Nike as the East Coast Field Representative for professional basketball in 1992, Greg led in the strategic development of NBA brand athletes, including Michael Jordan, Charles Barkley, and Penny Hardaway. Nared was involved in orchestrating Sports Marketing efforts to support all product engines. He cemented the bond between Nike and key players, teams, and coaches through attention to service detail, personal relationship building, basketball knowledge, and intuition. Nared negotiated contracts managed marketing and advertising campaigns. He was promoted in 1995 to work as the Product Line Manager for Nike Basketball, consisting of men's, women's, and Jordan apparel. Two years later, he was promoted to work as the Business Affairs Manager for Tiger Woods. He managed all aspects of business around Tiger, including product development, budget, marketing, promotions, and public relations. He was also a key advisor to Tiger in the non-Nike industry. Nared played a crucial role in new business development for Nike Golf and Tiger, managed relationships with Tiger's sponsors, and helped generate over $10 million in incremental sales with critical partners such as General Motors, Tag Heuer, EA Sports, and American Express, and Upper Deck. Greg played a massive role in developing the Tiger Woods brand today. Before joining Nike, Greg was a Sales Manager for the Washington Bullets (Washington Wizards). He managed a sales representative team that sold season tickets to both individuals and corporations in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. A native of Wilmington, Ohio, Nared holds a bachelor's degree in Communications from the University of Maryland in College Park, where he lettered in basketball for 4 years. Nared founded the Boost Foundation, a non-profit organization serving Portland's at-risk youth. He also served as a board member for Self Enhancement, Inc., a Portland, Oregon-based non-profit organization, for 4 years. Greg speaks around the country at schools and on behalf of corporations about the value and importance of education.

Hey everyone, Welcome to another episode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, some people say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read. 16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latest news, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favorite podcast. Follow up with gusts. Check it out today at www. 16:31 Digital News com. Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron at the diamond or on the links, we can only say, yeah, welcome to this week's huddle up with gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchises with 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the games are. One. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up. Okay, Sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it's kick off time. So snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us two left. Yeah. Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, Gus Frerotte, 15 year NFL quarterback and I want to welcome you to the 16 31 digital news studio. I appreciate you joining us. Also want to thank Sounder FM. Our new podcast platform. All their great technologies have really put Sounder FM ahead of the rest. So thank you to Sounder and their new transcription technology. And also want to say again that we're hoping and we're excited to partner with Manscaped dot com. So go to Manscaped dot com. Put in my co gus Frerotte all caps. G. U. S. F. R. E R O. T. T. E. Get 20% off and free shipping. So go get their new lawnmower four point oh and take care of all your needs. All right everyone. So today's guest is someone who has uh an incredible resume. He's a somebody who's like me, he's been all over this great country of ours and uh sports has shaped his life in an incredible way and and it's shaping his kid's life. So we're gonna get into so much. But today I want to talk with I want to share with you, Greg. Nard Greg has written a book elite. Um And it's about raising high level athletes. So Greg, it is great now you're their senior vice president of the Dallas Mavericks. Uh I mean there's just so much to talk about in your career um but I want to thank you so much for joining me on the huddle up with Gus well guess I sure appreciate it, thank you very much. Uh Yeah it's been uh it's been an amazing journey uh being in sports and obviously started out planning and plant at a young age and then end up going to the University of Maryland, playing basketball there. So it's just been, it's been awesome. It seems like I'm living a dream. Yeah, I mean your your career is pretty incredible. So tell me about where it started and that memory you have of growing up in Ohio where you fell in love with sports because we all have that first time or that whether it was somebody in our family or it was an idol we had and you were telling us a little bit about how you used to go to Bengals training camp. But tell me a little bit about how you fell in love with sports. Well you know it all began really. It's just a sports family. My dad who played basketball at the high school level and had a lot of success and had two other brothers and a sister who played sports as well. So we just kind of part of our D. N. A. Uh that we play sports and we played multiple sports. I end up playing uh playing by played actually I played every sport and then um my high school career I end up playing just football and basketball. Matter of fact I end up getting verbally committing to play football at Ohio State as a quarterback. Oh you got the last hour to play basketball at the university of Maryland. Yeah, they they hit you as hard in basketball as they would have in the big 10. Exactly, that was my thinking as well. Plus that we could stay warm as you know, coming from Ohio where it's cold, cold winters. I wanted to be an area where it was just a little bit more warm but still a buck. I'd heart love the University of Ohio State University, but really that's where it began to begin at, at home with family and that all played sports.

Uh The Cincinnati Bengals used to have the training camp um got getting a chance to kind of watch them really uh in the training camp and getting to know lots of players during that time. Uh One of my role models back then was Gary Williams who played wide receiver for the Ohio State buckeyes and then they're playing for the Bengals. So just really a lot of positive things that happened for me and you know, a lot of, lot of it's just dreaming, you know, being around people who are successful in the sport and um having an amazing community like Wilmington, which is, you know, back back during that time, you had probably about seven that 10,000 people who just just loved on you. And it was kind of like that village, so that's where it all began now. Did you guys go out like when you were a kid, did you go out like have a bunch of other kids that you would go out, ride your bike, go play ball with whatever it was out there, Like that's how I grew up, that whatever we could do every day, we were out playing a new sport, man. Gus you're right on, that's all we did. We played sports all day long. I would be at the park. Uh First of all I would be at home and I probably lived about 15 minutes from the park. I used to take my basketball, would dribble all the way down with my right hand, and then dribble all the way back home with my left hand, and then we would be at the park all day, and then in the evening we will be playing baseball because of the baseball season, so we'll play baseball in the evening. Uh So again, sports in a small town, that's just what we did. We just played multiple sports year around all day long. Yeah, So you talk, you know, your your new book elite is talking about raising kids to be high level athletes. Like, I just remember, like I grew up in a small town of like, you write 5 to 10,000 people, and nobody was talking like that, right? And that's a different way, because I think of social media, the internet, it doesn't matter where you're from, that you can become a high level athlete if you have those dreams, and obviously the talent to get you there. So, tell us a little bit about, like, your childhood was different than what you're writing about now. Yeah, so much, it's so much different. Uh first of all, the name of the book is called, and you guys are first to know the name, and we're gonna drop that in some of the social media platforms, that the name of the book is the ultimate assist, and it's really helping our Children succeed in sports and in life. Uh but gus to your point, you know, when we were growing up, you know, we played multiple sports first and foremost, and um, we didn't have trainers, uh, you know, we didn't, you know, we didn't play one sport year round. Um, We were able to use different muscles today. Um, youth sports today, it's, it's so demanding on our young people and um, in some cases, or in a lot of cases, uh, what I'm trying to do here with this book is really just help parents understand, um, uh and enhance your child's dream while helping them raise a healthy and successful and social, socially responsible person because again, is so demanding. Uh, you know, you're playing your around, you get your own trainer, um, you know, the cost of the sport. Um the travel kids are traveling around the country back in the day when you and I were playing gusts, we didn't travel, we travel, we stayed locally, were playing against, you know, folks in our community today. Kids are not travelling around the US and some are traveling around the world with the USA usa sports basketball, baseball, football and volleyball. So it's, it's a different, different ballgame and what we're trying to do with the book. The ultimate assist is really, it's how can we raise our young people to understand how can we help our parents understand the importance of preparing these young people for life after sport. Use for it as a platform because it's an amazing, but there's so many transferable skills from what we do in sport, for example, communication, teamwork, being a great teammate to back into a great husband, right? And a great co worker. Um that's what we're trying to do. Just tell that story of, of the role and also tell the story of again, how to succeed in the transferable skills. Oftentimes we're...

...learning learning more today and probably over the last 5 to 7 years about the mental health, peace, how mental health has affected uh, athletes. And I can, I know you, you guys have been around for many, many athletes and just like I have and uh, from the high school to the collegian to the pro level of folks who struggle when the sport is all over and it's done. Uh so again, the book is going to talk about that piece a little bit. It's also talk about the role as a parent, you know, as a parent, you know, we gotta roll, you know? Yeah, definitely, definitely. I think that I think that what's significant is that if you can communicate with the parents because they need to understand that there's so many other things that you can do in sports, you may not be the athlete that ends up between the white lines out there, but there's so many other things, I mean I look at your career, even mind when I'm done playing right, that there's so many things that we can do in sports besides that athlete on the field, but sports gives us that base to learn about all that stuff and, and you know, from a trainer to an equipment guy, to the marketing people, to the ticket sales, sport management, there's so many things you can do and I think that's great that the parents need to understand it. You know, Hey, your kid may not be that 1% that goes on to play at an elite level, but, but you can give them such a good base and a foundation that you're gonna let them just grow from there. And I think that what you're doing is incredible because I, I love that, you know, it's not just the kids that we're focusing on. I love that you're focusing on the parents as well. Well, you know, if you can go into a gym over the weekend, um where there's tournaments being playing at every sport and this book is about every sport, not just basketball or football or baseball, it's about just youth sports in general. What we're seeing in the gyms today. It's almost, it hurts. It's sad. It's sad and it's extremely hard because you're seeing parent coaches gone back and forth. You're seeing fights in the, in the stands of parent and parent. You see parents going after referees, what are we teaching our young people today? And to me, one of the roles that I talk about the role as the parent, uh, and your parents, your role is pretty simple. Unless you played at a Khalid inside of play at the probe where you can teach your kid that particular sport. But if you were not, your role is real simple, be that great. Uber driver, B P. M be the nurse, you know, that's your role and then being a stand and support and encourage your kid opposed to yelling at your kid. You would see parents on the sideline, run it up the sidelines, trying to have conversations with their kids with, you're teaching your kid. All right. I'm not going to respect your head coach. listen to me as I was walking up the sideline with you. Just the craziest thing and about and the reason why I'm writing this book seven years ago, I'm like, this has to change. If not, it's gonna get to a point where it's going to be, you know, nobody wants to play. And if you look at some of the research that you're finding today, a lot of kids are walking away from sports. Yeah, That's weird. Yeah, that's the whole point of it, right? You gotta have great coaches, parents are also coaches as well. Sometimes you just need to listen. Yeah, and not say anything that was hard for me. You know, I had to learn how to do that. There was nothing that I ever read or somebody told me because my dad was not that way, right? But I learned how to be empathetic how to understand other people from when we grew up. You know, we didn't have coaches, like you said, we didn't have trainers. We didn't have people tell you went out with 20 of your buddies, you played baseball, basketball, whatever. Guys got knocked down. There were files. You figured it out. But there was no hatred. I don't remember that. Like, yeah, we sometimes, you know, you get a little heated, but we always left the place or came back the next day and played again. Yeah. You know what I mean? And I feel like kids are learning what they need to learn from the bad situations. Like you said about the, from the parents and these gyms and these courts and the parents could have such a big role in keeping those kids because one bad experience for a kid, they don't want to come back and play anymore. They don't want to come back. And I would talk a little bit about the girls, I don't know girls. So we're just losing girls left and right. Because again, it's a girls think a little different than we do. I know for myself because I have two daughters, but just, you know, competitive right in the screaming and yelling girls, they just don't like that, right? And that's okay. I know...

...that because I have to deal with two of them on my own, we're going back to, you know, you you made a really good point about, you know, just going back to the role. Um I was like, you my first daughter man, you know, I wasn't one a great, it wasn't great. I had to learn how to be a great dad uh to my daughter who was a really good basketball player after games, didn't know how to talk to her. And then I sat in a seminar with a group called positive coaching alliance who helped me have conversations to with my daughters after games are doing practices or what to say. You know, the week leading up to the game is one of the best things that probably ever happened to me as a parent because I would think I was going down the same route that a lot of lot of parents go to go down today and I do somewhat understand why parents are going and acting the way they are acting is because they're spending so much money, got their spending, you know, 5000, my God, you know, they're taking, if my dad had to spend that money, I might never put place, I wouldn't be here today. I can tell you that right now, how many times I rode my bike to little League, like, you know, it wasn't like, you know, you were, Somebody was paying you to go, you know, we had to go pay to play like they, yeah, we paid to get in the league like your $20 admission right for the league or something. But and I if my dad would have had to pay like travel and all this gas money, he would have no, you know, I love my, remember my seventh grade year, eighth grade year in the middle school, it's um my older brother just came back from college and he had leather shoes. He says I got some shoes for you bro. I'm like okay awesome, pulled out the leather shoes, they're beautiful. I guess there are three sizes too big for me, but I wore them during games only because the canvas converse, Oh yeah, your point, you know, I like you, I I rode my bike all around town. That's my way of transportation back in the day. And again it's I know it's a different ball game and and there's some amazing parents. Let me, she said there's some amazing parents who are doing amazing things out there too in that youth sports world. So I don't want to take, uh, say that all parents are, have not figured it out. There's a lot of parents who have figured out, but just some of the ones who have seen over the time again, this is going to help every parent who has kids playing in sports, there's going to be a nugget in there that I really believe that you'll take away from the ultimate assist Yeah, The ultimate sit sounds great because that's, that's what it's all about, especially with coaches, right? The coaches need to, it's so hard for coaches because all of a sudden they have to deal with this kid and all the other kids on the team and then they got 25 parents screaming at them, screaming at these kids, coaches need to learn to, you know, you know what I mean? They just because, you know, the X's and oh's doesn't mean, you know how to be a good coach, right? There's a lot that goes into it, so I can't wait to read the ultimate assist. So tell me about when you're in high school now and you're, you talked a little bit about, hey, I signed a letter of intent to go Ohio State to play quarterback and then you decide to go play instead, go play basketball in Maryland. So tell me a little bit about that process for you. Well, it was difficult, it was verbally committed to good to Ohio State to play football. And I actually, I told it was a gym Trussell, who's the quarter coach at the time. Uh, Oh Bruce was the head coach. I told coach Trussell that if I play football, I'm coming to Ohio State. Uh, In the meantime, um Joe B Hall was the coach at Kentucky and he just get let go. And a new coach came in and then at the last hour I get a call the same day, I signed with the University of Maryland, with coach Lefty brazil sitting in my house because I really wanted to go to Kentucky to play basketball. And the reason why, you know, I love all sports, uh football was uh you know, I was probably a better football player than it was a basketball player, especially if you ask anybody in Ohio because they wanted me to go to Ohio State. Uh But at the end of the day, what I wanted to do is I wanted to follow my passion. My passion was I love the game of basketball. I grew up with a basketball.

It just seemed like that would just, that was Denard household basketball in terms of the sport. Uh but I just love, you know, I love being inside, I love the fans kind of hovering over you and um you know, we played in a competitive league and I just thought I was the next magic johnson, I'll be honest with you. Um and I had this, do you remember those Converse magic johnson's came out? They were like £400 but because we were purple and gold, like the Lakers, right? So everybody on our team went and got them the coaches, like, why are you guys so slow today? I'm like, we all got our magic johnson and the way heavier. I loved high school basketball coming out to the music and you, I remember when we finally got the rip off like pants, the sweats like, man, I just was like a big thing. It was, it was amazing. I mean, friday night lights is one thing. It's amazing experience, right? Best ever. Yeah, but when you got, you got a full gym and kids are holding up signs and all your friends from high school or in there and it's just, it's just an amazing feeling. But it is. And again, I love every aspect of the basketball experience, but I tell everybody to this day because again, we played on friday nights as you were alluding to gus um, friday nights, we played the game time with at eight o'clock. Um, and there's nothing like coming from our locker room, walking down. We didn't have a tunnel, but we had a walkway. You had the cheerleaders, she had that marching band, both sides of the stands for full. It was amazing experience in probably the best ever high school experience in terms of just the sport piece of it. I lived right by the football field growing up. So like, I mean from the time I was a kid where I was going to high school football came and I remember when they got the lights, I remember, you know, turning lights on when it started getting dark and just it was just always in a great experience and I've always loved it. And football was all mine was football and baseball years was football and basketball. Um and I knew all these, mine was going to be football, but so tell me, and so now you're in Maryland, what was your experience at like Maryland? And what were your kind of thoughts going through college? Like, am I going to play at the next level? Or like what kind of like, I always wonder how guys were because I wasn't a great student. I wish I would have been a better student now. You know, you don't understand that. Tell me about that for you what that was like. And did you have the forethought to say I'm gonna, you know, because I know you graduated in communications from Maryland. Well you know, it's uh, you know, the reason why I went to university of Maryland one is a great conference uh from an athletic standpoint, uh, on the A. C. C. You got duke north Carolina Virginia, Wake Forest, just great basketball, every re game, right? You had to bring it every game. Uh And I thought if I if I played at that power five conference, the chances of playing in the NBA were pretty amazing. Uh, But when I went on the, when I went on the visit to the university, there's a couple of things that resonated with me and probably the reason why I'm not, probably the reason why I went to the Maryland, went to Maryland. One is the obviously playing the A. C. C. But the academics were amazing as well. But I'm driving that. Let me guess. Let me remind here for a second. Growing up in a small town like Wilmington it's not very diverse. It's probably maybe 2% of people, 1% of people who look like me right? I go into the D. C. D. C. Virginia area and I'm driving driving on the beltway and I'm seeing people who look like me with nice cars. And as you and I were talking earlier we just didn't have a lot growing up. Well if they can do it here why can't I have some success after sport. That was one of the first thing. And then I moved driving around neighborhoods and so black people but like nice cars. I said I can do this right. And that was that was really probably one of the biggest moments for me in terms of going to the university. So when I got there you know it's a huge surprise. A big welcome. I saw athletes who are better than I was. I'm like oh my God this guy could jump out of the gym. I could barely touched the rim exactly what you mean. It's more right. It's like I was an eye opening.

Um But you know it's just you know I was I was there uh at Maryland uh first year I didn't play a lot. Second year played a little bit, third year didn't play at all. Fourth year started uh just a wonderful experience, wonderful university. I was there during difficult times. I was there when uh teammate Meilin bias passed away as well. I mean that was the whole nation was felt that right even in D. C. So we all felt that. Yeah that was you know no 19 year old kid you know uh coming from a small town has to go through that experience. I grew up quick. I grew up fast. I grew up fast because at that time you know we we lost the support of fans, we lost the support of boosters or season ticket holders. Um That was hard. It was hard because uh I wasn't like to your your point earlier I guess I was one of the great student that is okay. Uh never saw drugs before because they're coming from a small town. The the only thing I've ever saw before it was appeal of speed, right right, weed or cocaine or any of your other drugs. Uh So that was all new experience for me. And and then the media just kind of turned around and just talked about us as athletes and said, hey, you know, one everybody's dumb. Number two, everybody does drugs. I'm like, you gotta be kidding me. Uh So that whole next two years after lin lin's passing was it was difficult for for all of us. I transferred, I could easily transfer to another school. Um And I talk about that in the book a little bit too. Just just the importance of maybe understanding loyalty. Uh, I know one of the things that that that that we're struggling with these days with their young athletes is that the transferring from school to school? Uh Not just one school but multiple schools. The transfer portal, both in men's and women's sports. Just talk about basketball for a second. You know, over 1000 kids are transferring and it's probably close to 1500 kids transfer and are in the portal as we speak. Uh, and again, the loyalty piece was a big deal for me and I end up staying at the university of Maryland. Uh, just, Hey, I love the university, I love my teammates. Uh, it kind of felt like, you know, this is the right place for me at the right time and I just felt like I was getting the right results and, and I'm glad I did because I probably wouldn't be having a conversation with you today, right? Yeah. Well, I mean, I think that when you have such a tragedy, like what happened with Len and then you're all under the scrutiny because the media has a real way of lumping everyone together, right? I've been through a lot of situations and lumpy in all these things. Um, and you're not going to really convince anybody that's any different, you have to go. So it feels like your team just got a little closer, right, even though you didn't show it, but your team stays together and you guys went through something that, that you can't explain it, but it keeps you together. Is that kind of how it was? Oh man, you're, you're right. On the point. It's really, it's uh, there was uh, it was myself Tony Massenburg, Dave Dickerson, john johnson. We all came in together, which is a couple other, a couple other players who came in with us, but end up transferring. But to this day, and we just, if we felt like were the four guys who just kind of hung in there and and and got through it and we all had a little success, you know, Dave is head basketball coach is uh south Carolina upstate a master played in the league for what, 50 50 years, john started his career at coca cola. And so again, because of what we went through the experience that we went through, I felt like we can personally, I felt like I could, if I could go through this, there's not anything that I cannot go through, right? Because it wasn't fun, wouldn't it couldn't have been at all. And uh, I'm sorry about your teammate. I mean, I've watched a lot of those shows on him and, and you talk about somebody who could jump out of the gym, right? I mean, I went to Tulsa and when I got there, I'm from a little town that we had 19 guys on my football team. I get to Tulsa with 90 dudes and they're all from texas and Arkansas and Oklahoma. And I'm like, why do I even belong here? You know what I mean? It's like you go...

...from being the guy to being back at the bottom again. And so, but that's a humbling experience and it just teaches you about working hard. So when you, you go through all this in college, so when you're leaving your, in your senior year, you finished the season. What is going through your mind? What were you thinking of? What was your next step? That's a that's a great question because at that point, um, what would happen back in that day? Back in the day, uh, was that your college coach would help you, uh, either one play overseas or get you a tryout for an N. B 18 are college coach was let go from the University of Maryland as bob wade at the time. So you know, let me rewind if I can. The end of my sophomore year, going into my junior year, I realized the chances of me playing in the NBA were a little slim because I was sitting on the bench, right? I wouldn't uh so I started to reach out to and again, it was just basically out of grace and be honest with you, start reaching out to different people. We had a we had a Nike rep at the time, my mentor today who is now the senior vice president, brand Jordan. His name is Howard White or used to be used to call upon University of Maryland. I found out what he did, I'm like, what a cool job. I told our coaches. Every time Mr White came to the university where you call me, I'll do whatever, I'll stop when I do, I'm gonna run up and say hello to him. Fast forward graduating have been in contact with Mr White the last year and a half, um Mr White says, hey, you know, we don't have anything at this time, we don't have any jobs. He said, there's a job in Memphis those at the warehouse, I'm not quite sure that's the right place for you. Ask for it to end up working at working for pity bows in a sold copiers and I love the great industry was in the right industry for me, right, right, with watching grass grow, right? That is hard, like you're you're you're a sports guy and going towards God, yeah, that was not. So I end up, I had a friend who worked for the Washington wizards and I said, you know, right, right up my alley. In the meantime I end up interviewing for the Washington wizards. This is how naive and I guess a little, um, confident. I was at the time. I told the folks at the Washington bullets back in the day, uh, I'm only here temporarily. Nike is going to call me. And when they call me, I'm going to go to work for Nike. They still hired me anyway, wow, I love that. So we get through the first season and I thought it was the best job ever, cussed. I'm selling tickets, having a conversation with lawyers and, you know, C P A. S and doctors about season tickets. I'm the expert. I just finished playing basketball. I can talk to them about the game of basketball. Uh, went through that process. End up getting a call. Uh, that's next summer. It was from Mr White. Keep in mind, I always stayed in contact with Mr with a letter or a phone call just to check in and say, hey, I'm available whenever you're ready. He says, are you ready? Yes, sir. Yeah. You end up working for Nike for 15 years. Uh, here's what's interesting and here's where I tell a lot of young people today because I get a chance to speak around the country is um, you don't know who's watching you, Right? And this is really this message to parents as well, to their kids when you're, when you're in your gym, you don't know if there's coaches around there, You don't know if there's boosters around here watching your kids play. But Mr White knew everybody from the Washington wizards all the way from the Ceo to the President, to the VPs, He asked everyone with them what kind of a person is Greg nerd. They all gave me great reviews. That's why you hired now, right? Yeah. You don't even have to do an interview because I didn't have to do it. Yeah, no that that's amazing story, I love that and I think that's such a valuable lesson is that you never know who's watching, that's why you always have to be at the top of your game. You can't let your guard down. And we've learned that through social media now, right? Like, like at any time anything can...

...happen. But but that's such a good point for all of us because I've had those moments where I probably said stuff and didn't you know what I mean? And coaches would talk to other coaches, they all know each other. The NFL. The NFL is a small world, right? So that's why they always tell you never burn any bridges. You know, I can sometimes you don't understand that until it's too late, but it's always a good lesson if you can learn it before it happens, then uh that's a great point that you know what you just, what you, what you just told us about, you know, somebody's always watching and speaking of that, they are fans are always watching. Hey everyone, we're talking with Greg nerd. I want to thank you for joining us on how to up with gus, we're gonna take a quick break, we'll be right back. Yeah, yeah. Hey, how come up with us listeners? Manscaped. Well, they sent me uh they hooked me up with a bunch of tools and formulations for their package three point oh kit. Uh so, you know, I want to show you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We all think we got a perfect package, but they sent me the perfect package, three point oh kid I want to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It came in this great box uh you know uh and you can see what it says, they will thank you because they sent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us uh you know, stuff that makes you smell better and then you know, they sent me this great uh some boxers, you what you get right, protect them and then uh you know, they sent me this cool sack, I guess you want to call it to store all your stuff in. So uh it's been great. Manscaped sent me a bunch of product um you know and you know you can see it all on here. Uh you know you can go to Manscaped dot com and put in the code. Uh Gus Frerotte, that's G U S F R E R O T T E. Get 20% off and free shipping when you use that code. But you can get a kit, you can get individual items like, uh, this way cool rumor that has a little led light, um, ceramic. Uh, these things come apart, they're waterproof, you can do a lot with them. So, you know, man scape is great. You know, it's funny, G uh, I remember when I was playing with the Denver broncos and I'm not going to mention any names, but there was a gentleman who was playing on our team. And uh, you know, if you ever hears the story, you'll know exactly what I'm talking about. But uh, he brought his own clippers in one time and he used it to trim his beard up his goatee and everything. And he had him there for about two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner, he walks in and there's a person, another player that is actually manscaping with his beard trimmer. So, you know, one of the things is, you don't want to use the same trimmer down there that you use up here. So uh, he kind of freaked out a little bit and he said, hey, how long have you been using that tool there? And he said, well, showed up here about three weeks ago and I've been using it ever since. So you know, there is a lesson learned that, you know, don't leave things out and probably uh, if it would have just said manscaped on it, uh, we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probably one of the funniest, uh, taking care of your ball stories I've ever heard or been around in the locker room in the NFL, so it's a great story, Um, but you know, I always said there was no way to know, there's no name on it and the guy was just using it and another guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heck of a funny story. So one of the best I've ever heard in my 15 years playing in the league. Um, but you know, there's so many great things about Manscaped and what they're doing, uh, because guys, you got to take care of yourself even though I got great hair, um, and getting older, but you still have to maintain some sort of grooming, right? And so, uh, you know, we all work out for me, I like, we're going in my yard doing those things now that I'm retired, get a little sweat on and everything. You want to smell good. Uh, you know, you got to take care of yourself. They've got some great products, um, you know, this one, a little uh, all deodorant, We'll need that here and there. Um after, you know, working the yard, taking a hike, doing a walk, whatever you do. Um It's a great thing, but there's so many great products. Um I want to thank Manscaped for sending them to me. Um the lawnmower 3.0. Obviously you can use it...

...anywhere in your body, but I'm sure you guys have all seen the commercials, but this is one just letting you know that the lawnmower three point oh, comes with the perfect kit. You can buy the lawnmower by itself by all these products individually. They even sent me this wonderful shirt. You can see the back, your balls will thank you. And then here's the front. So it's an awesome shirt to have great gear. And you know what? Sometimes you can just sit back, take care of your balls a little bit and and read the paper. So Manscaped even has their own daily news, so which is great. So don't forget that you can go to the Code Gus Frerotte and that's G. U. S. F R E R O T T E. Uh and you can save 20% on any products, the complete the perfect uh package gift set and uh you know, you can save 20% and get free shipping. So use the code just for a G. U. S. F. R E R O T. T E. Hey everybody spells my name wrong, they even spelled wrong back my pro bowl jersey. So you know, I gotta I gotta help you guys out. So don't forget how important it is that you use these products, take care of yourself down below and have some fun right, there's nothing closer to you than your little buddies. So use the lawnmower. Uh Use the code Gus Frerotte save 20% and get free shipping and uh order some great Manscaped products. Uh huh. Hey everyone, welcome back to huddle up with Gus, I'm your host just for uh thanks for joining us. Thanks for joining us in the Sounder. Uh I'm sorry, let's start over here. Hey everyone, thanks for joining us. I'm the host. Gus Frerotte of huddle up with Gus and I want to thank you for joining us in the 16 31 digital news studio and I appreciate Sounder FM for hosting us on their platform. And I also want to thank Manscaped, go to Manscaped dot com. Put in my code Gus Frerotte all caps get 20% off and free shipping today. Uh We're getting back. Greg has been wonderful. It's his birthday. So let's all wish him as a very happy birthday. Uh We've been talking about your career wholly up to now. You just were with the Washington bullets. So I guess the wizards now, but, and then you just got Howard White said, hey, we want you to come over to Nike. So tell me what that was like and your excitement when you first step into the building Of G seven. So uh again, it's a dream job. My first week on the job, my first week on the job was a trip in Carmel California. Nike does a coaching trip with the top coaches around the country and it was, it was basketball trips with basketball coaches. So my first weekend a job, it's uh and me and my wife at that time on a trip, it's uh coaches. All the top Dean smith, uh, Coach K was not with his lute, Olson, uh, just some top college coaches. And then you have NJ Barkley has Scottie pippen, you have B. J. Armstrong on this trip. I'm like, are you kidding me? Right. First week on the job, Second week on the job, Mr White, because now I'm reporting to mister White because he ended up, he was the East Coast Foot wrap. He goes, moves to Portland and becomes the director of uh, NBA, uh, my second uh, and by the way, Howard White, uh uh was Michael, Jordan's guy, um, business manager for this today for so many years, actually use if you watch the documentary on Michael, you would see Howard in the, in the documentary. Uh, so, um my second week on the job, Howard says, hey Greg, I need you to go to L. A. In work uh, with Michael because I can't be there on the set of space jam. Second week. What? Oh my God, Okay, what do I do? I want you want you to be there. I want you to, you know, kind of be the lease, Hampton MJ and the production company. Okay, perfect. I'm like, you're kidding me. That's what I knew. Yeah. So my first three...

...years at Nike was again, it was amazing. It's uh, I worked as the East Coast Field rep and I worked as a liaison between the NBA players In our corporate office. Uh, and great experience that was when Chicago is on fire. This is what, 90 92-95. Either 95. So Chicago is on fire. Um, uh, great experience. Penny, Penny Hardaway Gary paint. You know, I got a chance to work with all the NBA players at the time. And some of them today to this day are still friends of mine and it just, again, that's the first three years. And I just, again, I tell people all the time, you guys, uh, I didn't play in the NBA, which was a dream, but I work in the NBA. So still a dream to me and it's still amazing. Still get excited excitement every morning that I wake up and get a chance to go in the office and get a chance to watch people like dirk Nowitzki and Luca don check and, you know, christoph praising jesus. It's, I'm pinching myself still. So I go through three years with the, with the, with the N. B. A. Uh, at Nike, they said, if you understand the product side and you understand product processes, which is uh, the, the uh, the life of product from the beginning to the end, which means from the design to the sourcing to development to the factories All the way product in retail stores. If you understand that, you can navigate your way all around the campus, or you can be in different jobs. So how big is their campus? Uh the campus, well back back when I was with Nike and I left Mikey back in 2007, There's about 5000 people on campus. And now I haven't been back in a few years, but I think it's somewhere in the ballpark of maybe 10,000 people on campus, not around the world. They probably have probably 40, people around the world. Don't hold me to that now, I'm just throwing out some numbers. So how do you how do you learn that whole Production, that whole system? What did you do to to figure that out? Yeah. So I left, people thought I was crazy because I left a job that was working with athletes and traveling to and from games and much 67 NBA Games, you're right. But I wasn't, I didn't wanna be comfortable there, right? I didn't want to because I don't want to get to a point where I was ever stagnant. I'm gonna learn this product outside. So I went on the product side and work as a product line manager for basketball apparel. So in basketball player and at this point Jordan apparel, Jordan not his own brand. At that time, I tend to work with Michael a lot then because, you know, I helped create the look of new seasons, new apparel every season, which was just a cool experience because you pick up a piece of fabric and you said it was the right fabric, the tearaway pants that you talked about earlier. Yeah. It's like I created back in the day of tearaway short. Oh, yeah. Really? Yeah. Which was a great experience. I did that for two years. Did Michael look at everything absolutely, very involved. He was super involved through the entire process. And what it's funny because I created for athletes, uh, and also worked with Tiger and I'll talk about that in a second. But what I create is that, uh, some timeline for the product for athletes and the timelines consisted of, we show them rough sample one. We show them almost a finished sample to and then we showed them the final sample three. Before we go to retail. We created. That's what we created for for the athletes and just timelines and for the apparel timelines back in the day, I was about 18 month process now. And I think that the timeline is a lot shorter. So when you, were you just doing, when you say apparel, were you just doing like shirts and shorts and pants and things like that, you weren't doing the shoes, not all. I just focused on the peril. Okay. I did the, I worked a lot alongside with the footwork side, but I don't know the details of, uh, somewhat similar in terms of the product processes in how the timeline, actually, the time lines are shorter for footwear than it is apparel. So I did that for, for two years, I get a call out of the blue from Mr Knight and and Howard and says, hey, we just signed a young guy just coming from stanford, he's decided that he's going to leave college early. His name was Tiger Woods. I'm like, who is that? Okay? And they said, well he's...

...a golfer, Pretty good golfer. Just one, just one, his third amateur at pumpkin Ridge, which is in Portland. Um I heard about it, the pumpkin ridge, the amateur being there, but I didn't know anything about golf at that time. Uh but here's what I understood and here's why Mr Knight and Howard came to me. They understand one, I knew the product processes and number two, I know how to work with athletes just for the fact that, you know, mom, being athlete, been an athlete, won, but also to the first three years working with the NBA players. Again, You don't get asked to do jobs if you don't, you know, if you don't knock it out of park on your previous right, right. That's something else that I get the chance to have conversations with, what people trying to get into the sports industry. Um so yeah so I kind of go through that process and I'm like yeah we should probably sit down and talk. So we sit down, we have good conversations. Tiger and I and his dad and actually Mr Howard at the time and we just we just kicked it off. Great end up working with him from 1997. Two 2000 and 7 2000 and six. Mr. Knight ask if there's the young lady out in um Hawaii. She's um But she was 16, she was 14 at the time. Yeah he's going to be really good. He says I need you to go out, I need you to recruit her and signed her the Nike when she turned to pro did that for two years and up signing the Shelby Michelle uh great experience, you've been with some of the amazing ones. So so were you the reason that Tiger where it's red on sunday? That was pretty Greg that he always has done that. His mom was a big deal for, for his mom and wearing the red. She just thought it was a power color and um she felt like if he were that man, he's going to be a superman on Sundays on final day and he just to this day he was just sunday red. So you must have got to know him pretty well. Was he because I mean did he love playing other sports or was he always just about golf? You know he growing up Tiger played a little baseball because his dad was a baseball player as well. So he played a little baseball. Um but you know he he loved her, he he loved to learn of different sports. You know, he wouldn't learn how to shoot, he wanted to learn how to throw a football. We would we would we would leave a tournament on the sunday Gus and we would go back just the two of us, we will go back to his house in Orlando and you know, we have some time that monday you take off or actually we would we would sorry, we would arrive on sunday night right after the tournament on sunday, get back to Orlando at the time where he was living. Now he lives in a jupiter florida. And um, so we would have the next day and a half, just the two of us and we would be throwing football, man, he want to know how to throw a spiral. I was teaching how to throw a spiral. He would teach me how to, you know, fly fish. We was just, we would play baseball, we would throw a baseball. We just do things brothers would do. So he would, he, you know, he learned how to scuba dive. He learned how the cave dive. Oh, uh, he just, once he sets his mind and he's going to do something, he's all in. Yeah. So what, so what is that like to see somebody rockets so fast, right? Like you were with him, you've seen him like not only mature, but just grow at an extreme rate. I mean, he just took off and you probably got to be with him through all that. And, and that had to be an amazing experience. It was phenomenal, You know, I worked with him his first eight years of his career. I think it was 11 major championships, uh, 10 or 11 major championships. It's phenomenal, phenomenal to see, um, see greatness, got a chance to see a little greatness with Michael. Um, I didn't work with Michael like I worked with Tiger. Uh, but I did get a chance to work with him and get a chance to see him. And this kind of see, see what made him tick. Right. And there's some common denominators between the, you know, greatness and It's just, it was an amazing eight years. You know, get a chance to go to the masters in 97. All...

...right. It's a little country boy from moment in Ohio, who knew nothing about golf is at the Masters and spends eight straight years. That's a master. It's pretty freaking cool. That's the hard, one of the hardest tickets to get in. And uh, not only that, but you know, you talked about when coming from Wilmington, there was a lot of diversity. The masters didn't have a lot of diversity for a long time. All right. Uh, yeah. Guess what? You're, you're right on and here's, here's, here's what I love about Augusta National, The change, the changes that they've made over the years. And one is, it's one is diversity. You know, when, when, when we arrived in 1997 I say we arrive because we arrived together When we arrived in 97, He wins the Masters in 98. Uh, this is, gives me goose bumps to this day. But the Masters, the staff, right. The executives there understand what just happened the year before and opened up doors for people who work there. You know, a lot of people work. There are just people of color, right? And they just kind of said, you know what we have to change our way of thinking and they did. And it was absolutely beautiful. And some of the stories that were told uh things have changed at the Augusta National, it's just it's been pretty amazing and if you think about sports and you've seen it personally how sports can unite us and bring us together from people from all different backgrounds, even when there's animosity or hate or whatever, um sports has a way of kind of pushing that divide and bringing us all together, I feel like and you've probably seen it that you've seen it at the highest level, I'm sure, yeah, you know it's my life right? And uh you know been with the Mavericks Dallas Mavericks the last seven years and you know, just sitting in the stands and you know, we got our capacity, there is about 19 5, 19 1 or something like that. And just to see see everybody come together, especially you know, over this last year has been pretty, I just think it's spectacular in terms of when we were able to allow fans back into the arena man. The joy, the excitement of just being in the arena Watson sports, seeing people man, they were cheering, we hadn't wanted, oh my gosh, cheering their dancing. It was amazing. And I think to your point, uh, I guess it's just, that's what sport does. It just just unites people, brings everybody back together. So are you gonna have your boss read your book? Because sometimes I watch him when, during a game and he's like one of those dads in the court, right? He's so excited. Mark markets. So I mean, he just loves the Mavericks, right? He just loves it. Like when you watch him, he's just so involved and I don't know how many owners you see doing that. Well, there's only two that I know and Mark is one and then the new owner at the, for the clippers is another one who does who? They're just passionate about. The Marcus. Mark loves this. You know, he loves his team, he loves, you know, these players, um, you know, if you talked to players around the league, they'll talk about, you know, how he treats players different than any other owner. Uh, and again, that's not coming from me and this just coming from this conversation that I've had with different players who have come through the Mavericks organization. But he's, he's amazing. He just gets it. He likes it, he has fun with it. Uh, and he's, he's like, you know what man? We might look like nice people, but we're pretty competitive. You want to step on my neck and I want to step on your right? Yeah. He's such an enamel ring figure because of shark tank and everything else. I mean, you see that he's competitive, smart, um you know, and he's got a lot of Pittsburgh and when I watch them, it's kind of funny, like, you know, it doesn't leave you once you go away and so I'm waiting for him to come and bring back a Pittsburgh basketball team because we, you know, we could use another sport here because our pirates haven't been doing so well, but so, so you're at the Mavericks, tell us a little bit about what you do for the Mavericks. Yeah, so I'm I'm a senior vice president, this is my seventh season um with the Mavericks and I oversee uh this four departments that oversee. Now, I oversee our youth basketball, which includes our camps or...

...clinics are combines, we touch about Probably 20,000 kids a year. Yeah, basketball. Do you just stay in the Dallas Fort Worth area basically, with NBA teams and uh probably similar to NFL teams as well, but you can only work within 75 miles north west of the arena. Yeah, we're staying in the DFW area. So I I I managed the youth basketball space and I'm proud to say that we're probably, if you talk to anybody in the NBA, one of the most innovative youth basketball programs in the N. B. A. And just really just because our breath of different programs, you know, we got programs from many MAvs which are four year old, four year olds all the way up to kids at the high school level recreational kids. We have elite kids. The other area I oversee is really the player relations side, The player relations side is really working with players uh to help them just get out in the DFW community, uh, work with our community partners in love. And a lot of this comes from, from Mark and our, our Ceo sent marshal. They just do a phenomenal job bringing in the right people, right and helping them understand the importance of giving back to your community, get back to these fans and our players. I probably, I'm not exaggerating and that's probably best in class when it comes to community appearances this last year, last year with Covid, you know, at the beginning of the hiatus, NBA High, we probably did 60 appearances with the players, which is off the charts, which is, guys just want to give back one to help, want to do anything we can for this community of Dallas, which is rich, is really cool. And then I, uh, I obviously Mavs gaming, which was R. E Sports, NBA two K team uh four years ago, the NBA created this NBA two K league. Yeah, I know about it, yeah, so there's there's 23 teams in the league. It's craziness, man, I wonder that probably one and I told someone this maybe a couple of weeks ago, one of the great things that happened to my career at this time, it helped me understand this, this space of the social platforms, it helped me understand viewership in the different analytics and what it means to really, at the end of the day, just, you know, someone sponsorship to um understand the importance of uh you know, the different social platforms twitch, which is yes, yeah, N F. L. A year ago I had the Super Bowl and twitch and what what it is, you're touching the consumer that I'm not familiar with, but I've gotten to know and gotten a chance to grow with over these last three years that I've kind of oversee oversaw this two K team, but it's two coaches, we've got a head coach together, assistant codes and we've got six players, you know, remotely against different teams and it's amazing their their ages, right? Like, like E sports is like almost that 15 to 22 like after 22 years old, you're almost done. Like you're, you're too old and I'm like, what? And they're like, yeah, it's like your reaction time, you're, you know, the way you play and, and, and you have to do it. Uh, it's E sports is in a, it's really come a long way in like five, you know, probably from when we were playing Atari. You know, it's a billion dollar industry. Yeah. For us, it's our target consumers a little older. Um, you know, you have to be uh, in order to play in particular, you have to be 18 years old and you know, our oldest players, I think 28 29 years old. That's the best to K players in the world. You know, the the two K league in Brendan Donahue who's our commissioner for the league. It really has done a tremendous job in terms of just the growth side. Not only hear from a domestic standpoint, but also from an international standpoint. The sponsorship has grown our partners overseas twist numbers continues instagram ticktock all the numbers that have increased significantly over the last four years or since the uh since we started to leave. Well, I mean it that's what's the way to get fan engagement and then all the data and analytics and all the impressions that you get and trying to bring all that together to tell you how many actual people are falling the Mavericks but NBA total you know because it's not just the Mavericks that are big for you guys but the whole NBA right? Um my my...

...son Gunnar said dad you gotta get NBA dunk, it's like an app that you can get all the play your cards on right? And so I've always collected cards. I'm like oh this is cool, I don't have to go by and you can just get a pack of them every now and then on NBA dunk and it's pretty cool stuff and it's just an incredible way. And I'm sure like when you have you have hard data and analytics like it's phenomenal. Oh yeah but I mean with Mark doing ai and all this stuff right now. I mean he's probably got I mean you probably hit a button you know, it's probably like what I could say when I first started in the NFL, we had to watch video tapes and put a tape in and tapout, tape in tapout. Now, it's all right on your ipad and you get every play you want, right? Yeah, we probably can look at the data anyway. You want now anyway, anyway, you want however you want uh, you know, we got dashboards, you know, dashboards of data and data. You know, folks going into the arena two or season ticket holder base to what we do on the mavs gaming side, our social platforms. It's like, that's again, that's how you're one, you're telling your story to your selling sponsorship, three to your point fan engagement. You know, that's what it's all about. And I would think that you have a boss who loves new technology, loves new experiences, whatever he can do to connect, you know, where a lot of people aren't like that marks an innovator. You know, he wants, he wants to be best in class. Uh, he wants to, you know, he wants to be the first to come out with new products, new ideas, new thoughts. That's just who, you know, I've been so lucky. I guess it's like Phil Knight mother phenomenal in there. Mark is a phenomenal innovator. They just think they just think they think in a different planet, which is really, really amazing. And then we got to say, I got the Ceo who just phenomenal too and sent marshal and what she has done since her arrival 3.5 years ago. We just, just a great organization. What's really great people. Yeah, well, what an amazing career you've had. You have a book coming out, tell me the name of the book again. The ultimate assist, the ultimate cyst you can, will launch It will be released probably sometime in early um, early july right now and send the hands of designer some this week for the designer to come back with all that. Yeah, yeah. Now you get to tell the designer what you like and what you don't like your guys, you write all the apparel. Well, I mean, I don't think we have enough time to go over everything. I think we hit it fast as we could today, Greg and uh, you know, you just have an amazing career and I'm sure that that Mark hired you because he found out from Phil, from Howard, from, you know, the guys that everybody, you know, like they said, they know about you, they know that the kind of person they're getting, because I can just tell it from talking and we didn't get to talk about your, your daughters and their careers and like it just has to be great and you gotta have a smile on your face every day when you wake up. Yeah, I'm super, super blessed, gus I really appreciate that and you know, I just, every day I enjoy what I do, passionate about what I do, and the doctors who uh you know, I have one daughter who's married and she's the assistant coach, recruiting coordinator at the University of Oregon at Netherland Place, Professional basketball, so it's just, you know, it's it's still living a dream. Yeah, yeah, what a birthday it's gonna be. So, yeah, so it's it's amazing. I appreciate you. Um I hope we can stay in touch because there's some things I have coming up with the NFL alumni that I would love to talk to you about going out the high school kids all over the country. Um, and I think that I've been dying to try and get the NBA involved, uh, you know, Mark's doing stuff back here in Pittsburgh that I know of with uh, with the readiness Institute and Penn State University. So there's a lot of connections Greg. But for you to come on my show, I really appreciate it. Uh, you know, obviously you're amazing person because those people that you've been with to have faith and put their um, time and effort into you, tells me that what kind of person you are, because you're not going to be around those people if they don't trust you and they don't know what kind of character you have. So this little farm guy from Wilmington has really made a big, so it's awesome. And that, that goes, doesn't matter where you're from, you put in hard work, it's gonna happen, right? Yeah, that's part of one of my core values is this hard work and growth growth mindset. So we'll tell tell our fans how they can find you and how they can follow you. Yeah, you know, again, for the book, if you get a graveyard dot com, you can get updates on the book linked in, you can find me...

...on linkedin social media platforms. I'm on instagram, I'm on twitter facebook. Uh, I'll accept you come, come and join me. Awesome, awesome. And I look forward to the mavs going a long way into the playoffs. Well, thank you. So do I. And I hope that's the case guys. Thanks for having me on here. I really appreciate it. Thank you too. Yeah, it was great meeting you too and I appreciate you joining me on how to up with Gus. Hey everyone, that's another show. What a great talk we had today with Greg nerd, you know, and happy birthday Greg. And so I wanna thank 16 31 digital news dot com for for hosting us. And also uh Sounder FM for hosting us on their podcast platform. And then also remember, go to Manscaped dot com, put in my coat, Gus Frerotte all caps and get 20% off and free shipping. So everyone have a great day and thank you again, Greg. Thank you and that's a wrap sportsman. Thanks for joining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another to huddle up with Gus featuring 15 year NFL quarterback. Gus, parent huddle up with Gus is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available at the music.

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