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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 5 months ago

Greg Nared

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week, joining me in the Huddle is Greg Nared. He holds the position of SVP Player Relations for the Dallas Mavericks and offers more than 25 years of experience in sales, athlete management, client relations and sports marketing. His primary focus is to provide strategic direction for youth basketball, community, player relations, and Mavs Entertainment. Greg has played an integral role in having one of the most innovative youth basketball programs in the NBA. Greg operated and owned the Greg Nared Agency, where he worked directly with professional athletes in both golf and basketball, including marketing the clients or products in promoting their career within his or her given field as well as any interests off the field of play. Greg is also responsible for meeting with team owners, managers, coaches, and other individuals to develop rapport and partnerships promoting the organization and the clients GNA represents. Much of his day is spent in contract negotiating, working with athlete sponsors, networking, speaking with other professionals and keeping abreast of current trends and information that may affect decisions the organization and agent recommend to the clients. Lastly, Greg's expertise and experience in investments, business management, finance, risk analysis, and trends in sports helped facilitate success in recruiting, developing, and sustaining clients and sponsorships. Before working at the Greg Nared Agency, Nared worked as the Vice President for Golf for the William Morris Agency in Beverly Hills, California. Greg was responsible for working directly with LPGA / PGA executives in helping to promote the athlete's career. Greg also worked on negotiating contracts in the best interest of the athlete. His role included improving salary, making provisions for injuries, and taking other options in place of salary increases. He made a recommendation to athletes regarding long-term as opposed to short-term benefits. Greg also worked on Brand and PR plans for athletes. In doing so, he worked on a short-term and long-term strategy that best fit the overall goals and objectives for athletes. Nared recruited athletes to increase the client base. Lastly, Nared worked very closely with Professional Golfer Extraordinaire Michelle Wie. He was responsible for day-to-day operations with the Wie family. He negotiated corporate sponsorship and appearance fees contracts, coordinated public relations, handled Michelle's schedule, and worked as an adviser to Wie. Nared also delivered 15 years of athlete management and strategic planning to Nike.

First joining Nike as the East Coast Field Representative for professional basketball in 1992, Greg led in the strategic development of NBA brand athletes, including Michael Jordan, Charles Barkley, and Penny Hardaway. Nared was involved in orchestrating Sports Marketing efforts to support all product engines. He cemented the bond between Nike and key players, teams, and coaches through attention to service detail, personal relationship building, basketball knowledge, and intuition. Nared negotiated contracts managed marketing and advertising campaigns. He was promoted in 1995 to work as the Product Line Manager for Nike Basketball, consisting of men's, women's, and Jordan apparel. Two years later, he was promoted to work as the Business Affairs Manager for Tiger Woods. He managed all aspects of business around Tiger, including product development, budget, marketing, promotions, and public relations. He was also a key advisor to Tiger in the non-Nike industry. Nared played a crucial role in new business development for Nike Golf and Tiger, managed relationships with Tiger's sponsors, and helped generate over $10 million in incremental sales with critical partners such as General Motors, Tag Heuer, EA Sports, and American Express, and Upper Deck. Greg played a massive role in developing the Tiger Woods brand today. Before joining Nike, Greg was a Sales Manager for the Washington Bullets (Washington Wizards). He managed a sales representative team that sold season tickets to both individuals and corporations in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. A native of Wilmington, Ohio, Nared holds a bachelor's degree in Communications from the University of Maryland in College Park, where he lettered in basketball for 4 years. Nared founded the Boost Foundation, a non-profit organization serving Portland's at-risk youth. He also served as a board member for Self Enhancement, Inc., a Portland, Oregon-based non-profit organization, for 4 years. Greg speaks around the country at schools and on behalf of corporations about the value and importance of education.

Hey everyone, Welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback GusFrerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, somepeople say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read.16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latestnews, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favoritepodcast. Follow up with gusts. Check it out today at www. 16:31 Digital Newscom. Welcome to what surely will be a doozyof a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron atthe diamond or on the links, we can only say, yeah, welcome to this week's huddle upwith gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has takenhim on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchiseswith 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the gamesare. One. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterbackup. Okay, Sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios,it's kick off time. So snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle upwith us two left. Yeah. Hey everyone, welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, Gus Frerotte, 15 year NFLquarterback and I want to welcome you to the 16 31 digital news studio. Iappreciate you joining us. Also want to thank Sounder FM. Our new podcastplatform. All their great technologies have really put Sounder FM ahead of therest. So thank you to Sounder and their new transcription technology. And alsowant to say again that we're hoping and we're excited to partner with Manscapeddot com. So go to Manscaped dot com. Put in my co gus Frerotte all caps. G.U. S. F. R. E R O. T. T. E. Get 20% off and free shipping. So go get their newlawnmower four point oh and take care of all your needs. All right everyone.So today's guest is someone who has uh an incredible resume. He's a somebodywho's like me, he's been all over this great country of ours and uh sports hasshaped his life in an incredible way and and it's shaping his kid's life. Sowe're gonna get into so much. But today I want to talk with I want to sharewith you, Greg. Nard Greg has written a book elite. Um And it's about raisinghigh level athletes. So Greg, it is great now you're their senior vicepresident of the Dallas Mavericks. Uh I mean there's just so much to talk aboutin your career um but I want to thank you so much for joining me on thehuddle up with Gus well guess I sure appreciate it, thank you very much. UhYeah it's been uh it's been an amazing journey uh being in sports andobviously started out planning and plant at a young age and then end upgoing to the University of Maryland, playing basketball there. So it's justbeen, it's been awesome. It seems like I'm living a dream. Yeah, I mean youryour career is pretty incredible. So tell me about where it started and thatmemory you have of growing up in Ohio where you fell in love with sportsbecause we all have that first time or that whether it was somebody in ourfamily or it was an idol we had and you were telling us a little bit about howyou used to go to Bengals training camp. But tell me a little bit about how youfell in love with sports. Well you know it all began really. It's just a sportsfamily. My dad who played basketball at the high school level and had a lot ofsuccess and had two other brothers and a sister who played sports as well. Sowe just kind of part of our D. N. A. Uh that we play sports and we playedmultiple sports. I end up playing uh playing by played actually I playedevery sport and then um my high school career I end up playing just footballand basketball. Matter of fact I end up getting verbally committing to playfootball at Ohio State as a quarterback. Oh you got the last hour to playbasketball at the university of Maryland. Yeah, they they hit you ashard in basketball as they would have in the big 10. Exactly, that was mythinking as well. Plus that we could stay warm as you know, coming from Ohiowhere it's cold, cold winters. I wanted to be an area where it was just alittle bit more warm but still a buck. I'd heart love the University of OhioState University, but really that's where it began to begin at, at homewith family and that all played sports.

Uh The Cincinnati Bengals used to havethe training camp um got getting a chance to kind of watch them really uhin the training camp and getting to know lots of players during that time.Uh One of my role models back then was Gary Williams who played wide receiverfor the Ohio State buckeyes and then they're playing for the Bengals. Sojust really a lot of positive things that happened for me and you know, alot of, lot of it's just dreaming, you know, being around people who aresuccessful in the sport and um having an amazing community like Wilmington,which is, you know, back back during that time, you had probably about seventhat 10,000 people who just just loved on you. And it was kind of like thatvillage, so that's where it all began now. Did you guys go out like when youwere a kid, did you go out like have a bunch of other kids that you would goout, ride your bike, go play ball with whatever it was out there, Like that'show I grew up, that whatever we could do every day, we were out playing a newsport, man. Gus you're right on, that's all we did. We played sports all daylong. I would be at the park. Uh First of all I would be at home and Iprobably lived about 15 minutes from the park. I used to take my basketball,would dribble all the way down with my right hand, and then dribble all theway back home with my left hand, and then we would be at the park all day,and then in the evening we will be playing baseball because of thebaseball season, so we'll play baseball in the evening. Uh So again, sports ina small town, that's just what we did. We just played multiple sports yeararound all day long. Yeah, So you talk, you know, your your new book elite istalking about raising kids to be high level athletes. Like, I just remember,like I grew up in a small town of like, you write 5 to 10,000 people, andnobody was talking like that, right? And that's a different way, because Ithink of social media, the internet, it doesn't matter where you're from, thatyou can become a high level athlete if you have those dreams, and obviouslythe talent to get you there. So, tell us a little bit about, like, yourchildhood was different than what you're writing about now. Yeah, so much,it's so much different. Uh first of all, the name of the book is called, and youguys are first to know the name, and we're gonna drop that in some of thesocial media platforms, that the name of the book is the ultimate assist, andit's really helping our Children succeed in sports and in life. Uh butgus to your point, you know, when we were growing up, you know, we playedmultiple sports first and foremost, and um, we didn't have trainers, uh, youknow, we didn't, you know, we didn't play one sport year round. Um, We wereable to use different muscles today. Um, youth sports today, it's, it's sodemanding on our young people and um, in some cases, or in a lot of cases, uh,what I'm trying to do here with this book is really just help parentsunderstand, um, uh and enhance your child's dream while helping them raisea healthy and successful and social, socially responsible person becauseagain, is so demanding. Uh, you know, you're playing your around, you getyour own trainer, um, you know, the cost of the sport. Um the travel kidsare traveling around the country back in the day when you and I were playinggusts, we didn't travel, we travel, we stayed locally, were playing against,you know, folks in our community today. Kids are not travelling around the USand some are traveling around the world with the USA usa sports basketball,baseball, football and volleyball. So it's, it's a different, differentballgame and what we're trying to do with the book. The ultimate assist isreally, it's how can we raise our young people to understand how can we helpour parents understand the importance of preparing these young people forlife after sport. Use for it as a platform because it's an amazing, butthere's so many transferable skills from what we do in sport, for example,communication, teamwork, being a great teammate to back into a great husband,right? And a great co worker. Um that's what we're trying to do. Just tell thatstory of, of the role and also tell the story of again, how to succeed in thetransferable skills. Oftentimes we're...

...learning learning more today andprobably over the last 5 to 7 years about the mental health, peace, howmental health has affected uh, athletes. And I can, I know you, you guys havebeen around for many, many athletes and just like I have and uh, from the highschool to the collegian to the pro level of folks who struggle when thesport is all over and it's done. Uh so again, the book is going to talk aboutthat piece a little bit. It's also talk about the role as a parent, you know,as a parent, you know, we gotta roll, you know? Yeah, definitely, definitely.I think that I think that what's significant is that if you cancommunicate with the parents because they need to understand that there's somany other things that you can do in sports, you may not be the athlete thatends up between the white lines out there, but there's so many other things,I mean I look at your career, even mind when I'm done playing right, thatthere's so many things that we can do in sports besides that athlete on thefield, but sports gives us that base to learn about all that stuff and, and youknow, from a trainer to an equipment guy, to the marketing people, to theticket sales, sport management, there's so many things you can do and I thinkthat's great that the parents need to understand it. You know, Hey, your kidmay not be that 1% that goes on to play at an elite level, but, but you cangive them such a good base and a foundation that you're gonna let themjust grow from there. And I think that what you're doing is incredible becauseI, I love that, you know, it's not just the kids that we're focusing on. I lovethat you're focusing on the parents as well. Well, you know, if you can gointo a gym over the weekend, um where there's tournaments being playing atevery sport and this book is about every sport, not just basketball orfootball or baseball, it's about just youth sports in general. What we'reseeing in the gyms today. It's almost, it hurts. It's sad. It's sad and it'sextremely hard because you're seeing parent coaches gone back and forth.You're seeing fights in the, in the stands of parent and parent. You seeparents going after referees, what are we teaching our young people today? Andto me, one of the roles that I talk about the role as the parent, uh, andyour parents, your role is pretty simple. Unless you played at a Khalidinside of play at the probe where you can teach your kid that particularsport. But if you were not, your role is real simple, be that great. Uberdriver, B P. M be the nurse, you know, that's your role and then being a standand support and encourage your kid opposed to yelling at your kid. Youwould see parents on the sideline, run it up the sidelines, trying to haveconversations with their kids with, you're teaching your kid. All right.I'm not going to respect your head coach. listen to me as I was walking upthe sideline with you. Just the craziest thing and about and the reasonwhy I'm writing this book seven years ago, I'm like, this has to change. Ifnot, it's gonna get to a point where it's going to be, you know, nobodywants to play. And if you look at some of the research that you're findingtoday, a lot of kids are walking away from sports. Yeah, That's weird. Yeah,that's the whole point of it, right? You gotta have great coaches, parentsare also coaches as well. Sometimes you just need to listen. Yeah, and not sayanything that was hard for me. You know, I had to learn how to do that. Therewas nothing that I ever read or somebody told me because my dad was notthat way, right? But I learned how to be empathetic how to understand otherpeople from when we grew up. You know, we didn't have coaches, like you said,we didn't have trainers. We didn't have people tell you went out with 20 ofyour buddies, you played baseball, basketball, whatever. Guys got knockeddown. There were files. You figured it out. But there was no hatred. I don'tremember that. Like, yeah, we sometimes, you know, you get a little heated, butwe always left the place or came back the next day and played again. Yeah.You know what I mean? And I feel like kids are learning what they need tolearn from the bad situations. Like you said about the, from the parents andthese gyms and these courts and the parents could have such a big role inkeeping those kids because one bad experience for a kid, they don't wantto come back and play anymore. They don't want to come back. And I wouldtalk a little bit about the girls, I don't know girls. So we're just losinggirls left and right. Because again, it's a girls think a little differentthan we do. I know for myself because I have two daughters, but just, you know,competitive right in the screaming and yelling girls, they just don't likethat, right? And that's okay. I know...

...that because I have to deal with two ofthem on my own, we're going back to, you know, you you made a really goodpoint about, you know, just going back to the role. Um I was like, you myfirst daughter man, you know, I wasn't one a great, it wasn't great. I had tolearn how to be a great dad uh to my daughter who was a really goodbasketball player after games, didn't know how to talk to her. And then I satin a seminar with a group called positive coaching alliance who helpedme have conversations to with my daughters after games are doingpractices or what to say. You know, the week leading up to the game is one ofthe best things that probably ever happened to me as a parent because Iwould think I was going down the same route that a lot of lot of parents goto go down today and I do somewhat understand why parents are going andacting the way they are acting is because they're spending so much money,got their spending, you know, 5000, my God, you know, they're taking, if mydad had to spend that money, I might never put place, I wouldn't be heretoday. I can tell you that right now, how many times I rode my bike to littleLeague, like, you know, it wasn't like, you know, you were, Somebody was payingyou to go, you know, we had to go pay to play like they, yeah, we paid to getin the league like your $20 admission right for the league or something. Butand I if my dad would have had to pay like travel and all this gas money, hewould have no, you know, I love my, remember my seventh grade year, eighthgrade year in the middle school, it's um my older brother just came back fromcollege and he had leather shoes. He says I got some shoes for you bro.I'm like okay awesome, pulled out the leather shoes, they're beautiful. Iguess there are three sizes too big for me, but I wore them during games onlybecause the canvas converse, Oh yeah, your point, you know, I like you, I Irode my bike all around town. That's my way of transportation back in the day.And again it's I know it's a different ball game and and there's some amazingparents. Let me, she said there's some amazing parents who are doing amazingthings out there too in that youth sports world. So I don't want to take,uh, say that all parents are, have not figured it out. There's a lot ofparents who have figured out, but just some of the ones who have seen over thetime again, this is going to help every parent who has kids playing in sports,there's going to be a nugget in there that I really believe that you'll takeaway from the ultimate assist Yeah, The ultimate sit sounds great becausethat's, that's what it's all about, especially with coaches, right? Thecoaches need to, it's so hard for coaches because all of a sudden theyhave to deal with this kid and all the other kids on the team and then theygot 25 parents screaming at them, screaming at these kids, coaches needto learn to, you know, you know what I mean? They just because, you know, theX's and oh's doesn't mean, you know how to be a good coach, right? There's alot that goes into it, so I can't wait to read the ultimate assist. So tell meabout when you're in high school now and you're, you talked a little bitabout, hey, I signed a letter of intent to go Ohio State to play quarterbackand then you decide to go play instead, go play basketball in Maryland. So tellme a little bit about that process for you. Well, it was difficult, it wasverbally committed to good to Ohio State to play football. And I actually,I told it was a gym Trussell, who's the quarter coach at the time. Uh, Oh Brucewas the head coach. I told coach Trussell that if I play football, I'mcoming to Ohio State. Uh, In the meantime, um Joe B Hall was the coachat Kentucky and he just get let go. And a new coach came in and then at thelast hour I get a call the same day, I signed with the University of Maryland,with coach Lefty brazil sitting in my house because I really wanted to go toKentucky to play basketball. And the reason why, you know, I love all sports,uh football was uh you know, I was probably a better football player thanit was a basketball player, especially if you ask anybody in Ohio because theywanted me to go to Ohio State. Uh But at the end of the day, what I wanted todo is I wanted to follow my passion. My passion was I love the game ofbasketball. I grew up with a basketball.

It just seemed like that would just,that was Denard household basketball in terms of the sport. Uh but I just love,you know, I love being inside, I love the fans kind of hovering over you andum you know, we played in a competitive league and I just thought I was thenext magic johnson, I'll be honest with you. Um and I had this, do you rememberthose Converse magic johnson's came out? They were like £400 but because we werepurple and gold, like the Lakers, right? So everybody on our team went and gotthem the coaches, like, why are you guys so slow today? I'm like, we allgot our magic johnson and the way heavier. I loved high school basketballcoming out to the music and you, I remember when we finally got the ripoff like pants, the sweats like, man, I just was like a big thing. It was, itwas amazing. I mean, friday night lights is one thing. It's amazingexperience, right? Best ever. Yeah, but when you got, you got a full gym andkids are holding up signs and all your friends from high school or in thereand it's just, it's just an amazing feeling. But it is. And again, I loveevery aspect of the basketball experience, but I tell everybody tothis day because again, we played on friday nights as you were alluding togus um, friday nights, we played the game time with at eight o'clock. Um,and there's nothing like coming from our locker room, walking down. We didn't have a tunnel,but we had a walkway. You had the cheerleaders, she had that marchingband, both sides of the stands for full. It was amazing experience in probablythe best ever high school experience in terms of just the sport piece of it. Ilived right by the football field growing up. So like, I mean from thetime I was a kid where I was going to high school football came and Iremember when they got the lights, I remember, you know, turning lights onwhen it started getting dark and just it was just always in a greatexperience and I've always loved it. And football was all mine was footballand baseball years was football and basketball. Um and I knew all these,mine was going to be football, but so tell me, and so now you're in Maryland,what was your experience at like Maryland? And what were your kind ofthoughts going through college? Like, am I going to play at the next level?Or like what kind of like, I always wonder how guys were because I wasn't agreat student. I wish I would have been a better student now. You know, youdon't understand that. Tell me about that for you what that was like. Anddid you have the forethought to say I'm gonna, you know, because I know yougraduated in communications from Maryland. Well you know, it's uh, youknow, the reason why I went to university of Maryland one is a greatconference uh from an athletic standpoint, uh, on the A. C. C. You gotduke north Carolina Virginia, Wake Forest, just great basketball, every regame, right? You had to bring it every game. Uh And I thought if I if I playedat that power five conference, the chances of playing in the NBA werepretty amazing. Uh, But when I went on the, when I went on the visit to theuniversity, there's a couple of things that resonated with me and probably thereason why I'm not, probably the reason why I went to the Maryland, went toMaryland. One is the obviously playing the A. C. C. But the academics wereamazing as well. But I'm driving that. Let me guess. Let me remind here for asecond. Growing up in a small town like Wilmington it's not very diverse. It'sprobably maybe 2% of people, 1% of people who look like me right? I gointo the D. C. D. C. Virginia area and I'm driving driving on the beltway andI'm seeing people who look like me with nice cars. And as you and I weretalking earlier we just didn't have a lot growing up. Well if they can do ithere why can't I have some success after sport. That was one of the firstthing. And then I moved driving around neighborhoods and so black people butlike nice cars. I said I can do this right. And that was that was reallyprobably one of the biggest moments for me in terms of going to the university.So when I got there you know it's a huge surprise. A big welcome. I sawathletes who are better than I was. I'm like oh my God this guy could jump outof the gym. I could barely touched the rim exactly what you mean. It's moreright. It's like I was an eye opening.

Um But you know it's just you know Iwas I was there uh at Maryland uh first year I didn't play a lot. Second yearplayed a little bit, third year didn't play at all. Fourth year started uhjust a wonderful experience, wonderful university. I was there duringdifficult times. I was there when uh teammate Meilin bias passed away aswell. I mean that was the whole nation was felt that right even in D. C. So weall felt that. Yeah that was you know no 19 year old kid you know uh comingfrom a small town has to go through that experience. I grew up quick. Igrew up fast. I grew up fast because at that time you know we we lost thesupport of fans, we lost the support of boosters or season ticket holders. UmThat was hard. It was hard because uh I wasn't like to your your point earlierI guess I was one of the great student that is okay. Uh never saw drugs beforebecause they're coming from a small town. The the only thing I've ever sawbefore it was appeal of speed, right right, weed or cocaine or any of yourother drugs. Uh So that was all new experience for me. And and then themedia just kind of turned around and just talked about us as athletes andsaid, hey, you know, one everybody's dumb. Number two, everybody does drugs.I'm like, you gotta be kidding me. Uh So that whole next two years after linlin's passing was it was difficult for for all of us. I transferred, I couldeasily transfer to another school. Um And I talk about that in the book alittle bit too. Just just the importance of maybe understandingloyalty. Uh, I know one of the things that that that that we're strugglingwith these days with their young athletes is that the transferring fromschool to school? Uh Not just one school but multiple schools. Thetransfer portal, both in men's and women's sports. Just talk aboutbasketball for a second. You know, over 1000 kids are transferring and it'sprobably close to 1500 kids transfer and are in the portal as we speak. Uh,and again, the loyalty piece was a big deal for me and I end up staying at theuniversity of Maryland. Uh, just, Hey, I love the university, I love myteammates. Uh, it kind of felt like, you know, this is the right place forme at the right time and I just felt like I was getting the right resultsand, and I'm glad I did because I probably wouldn't be having aconversation with you today, right? Yeah. Well, I mean, I think that whenyou have such a tragedy, like what happened with Len and then you're allunder the scrutiny because the media has a real way of lumping everyonetogether, right? I've been through a lot of situations and lumpy in allthese things. Um, and you're not going to really convince anybody that's anydifferent, you have to go. So it feels like your team just got a little closer,right, even though you didn't show it, but your team stays together and youguys went through something that, that you can't explain it, but it keeps youtogether. Is that kind of how it was? Oh man, you're, you're right. On thepoint. It's really, it's uh, there was uh, it was myself Tony Massenburg, DaveDickerson, john johnson. We all came in together, which is a couple other, acouple other players who came in with us, but end up transferring. But tothis day, and we just, if we felt like were the four guys who just kind ofhung in there and and and got through it and we all had a little success, youknow, Dave is head basketball coach is uh south Carolina upstate a masterplayed in the league for what, 50 50 years, john started his career at cocacola. And so again, because of what we went through the experience that wewent through, I felt like we can personally, I felt like I could, if Icould go through this, there's not anything that I cannot go through,right? Because it wasn't fun, wouldn't it couldn't have been at all. And uh,I'm sorry about your teammate. I mean, I've watched a lot of those shows onhim and, and you talk about somebody who could jump out of the gym, right? Imean, I went to Tulsa and when I got there, I'm from a little town that wehad 19 guys on my football team. I get to Tulsa with 90 dudes and they're allfrom texas and Arkansas and Oklahoma. And I'm like, why do I even belong here?You know what I mean? It's like you go...

...from being the guy to being back at thebottom again. And so, but that's a humbling experience and it just teachesyou about working hard. So when you, you go through all this in college, sowhen you're leaving your, in your senior year, you finished the season.What is going through your mind? What were you thinking of? What was yournext step? That's a that's a great questionbecause at that point, um, what would happen back in that day? Back in theday, uh, was that your college coach would help you, uh, either one playoverseas or get you a tryout for an N. B 18 are college coach was let go fromthe University of Maryland as bob wade at the time. So you know, let me rewindif I can. The end of my sophomore year, going into my junior year, I realizedthe chances of me playing in the NBA were a little slim because I was sitting on the bench,right? I wouldn't uh so I started to reach out to and again, it was justbasically out of grace and be honest with you, start reaching out todifferent people. We had a we had a Nike rep at the time, my mentor todaywho is now the senior vice president, brand Jordan. His name is Howard Whiteor used to be used to call upon University of Maryland. I found outwhat he did, I'm like, what a cool job. I told our coaches. Every time Mr Whitecame to the university where you call me, I'll do whatever, I'll stop when Ido, I'm gonna run up and say hello to him. Fast forward graduating have been in contact with MrWhite the last year and a half, um Mr White says, hey, you know, we don'thave anything at this time, we don't have any jobs. He said, there's a jobin Memphis those at the warehouse, I'm not quite sure that's the right placefor you. Ask for it to end up working at working for pity bows in a soldcopiers and I love the great industry was in the right industry for me, right,right, with watching grass grow, right? That is hard, like you're you're you'rea sports guy and going towards God, yeah, that was not. So I end up, I hada friend who worked for the Washington wizards and I said, you know, right,right up my alley. In the meantime I end up interviewing for the Washingtonwizards. This is how naive and I guess a little, um, confident. I was at thetime. I told the folks at the Washington bullets back in the day, uh,I'm only here temporarily. Nike is going to call me. And when they call me,I'm going to go to work for Nike. They still hired me anyway, wow, I love that.So we get through the first season and I thought it was the best job ever,cussed. I'm selling tickets, having a conversation with lawyers and, you know,C P A. S and doctors about season tickets. I'm the expert. I justfinished playing basketball. I can talk to them about the game of basketball.Uh, went through that process. End up getting a call. Uh, that's next summer.It was from Mr White. Keep in mind, I always stayed in contact with Mr with aletter or a phone call just to check in and say, hey, I'm available wheneveryou're ready. He says, are you ready? Yes, sir. Yeah. You end up working forNike for 15 years. Uh, here's what's interesting and here's where I tell alot of young people today because I get a chance to speak around the country isum, you don't know who's watching you, Right? And this is really this messageto parents as well, to their kids when you're, when you're in your gym, youdon't know if there's coaches around there, You don't know if there'sboosters around here watching your kids play. But Mr White knew everybody from theWashington wizards all the way from the Ceo to thePresident, to the VPs, He asked everyone with them what kind of aperson is Greg nerd. They all gave me great reviews. That'swhy you hired now, right? Yeah. You don't even have to do an interviewbecause I didn't have to do it. Yeah, no that that's amazing story, I lovethat and I think that's such a valuable lesson is that you never know who'swatching, that's why you always have to be at the top of your game. You can'tlet your guard down. And we've learned that through social media now, right?Like, like at any time anything can...

...happen. But but that's such a goodpoint for all of us because I've had those moments where I probably saidstuff and didn't you know what I mean? And coaches would talk to other coaches,they all know each other. The NFL. The NFL is a small world, right? So that'swhy they always tell you never burn any bridges. You know, I can sometimes youdon't understand that until it's too late, but it's always a good lesson ifyou can learn it before it happens, then uh that's a great point that youknow what you just, what you, what you just told us about, you know, somebody's always watching and speakingof that, they are fans are always watching. Hey everyone, we're talkingwith Greg nerd. I want to thank you for joining us on how to up with gus, we'regonna take a quick break, we'll be right back. Yeah, yeah. Hey, how come up with uslisteners? Manscaped. Well, they sent me uh they hooked me up with a bunch oftools and formulations for their package three point oh kit. Uh so, youknow, I want to show you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We allthink we got a perfect package, but they sent me the perfect package, threepoint oh kid I want to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It camein this great box uh you know uh and you can see what it says, they willthank you because they sent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us uh youknow, stuff that makes you smell better and then you know, they sent me thisgreat uh some boxers, you what you get right, protect them and then uh youknow, they sent me this cool sack, I guess you want to call it to store allyour stuff in. So uh it's been great. Manscaped sent me a bunch of product umyou know and you know you can see it all on here. Uh you know you can go toManscaped dot com and put in the code. Uh Gus Frerotte, that's G U S F R E R OT T E. Get 20% off and free shipping when you use that code. But you can geta kit, you can get individual items like, uh, this way cool rumor that hasa little led light, um, ceramic. Uh, these things come apart, they'rewaterproof, you can do a lot with them. So, you know, man scape is great. Youknow, it's funny, G uh, I remember when I was playing with the Denver broncosand I'm not going to mention any names, but there was a gentleman who wasplaying on our team. And uh, you know, if you ever hears the story, you'llknow exactly what I'm talking about. But uh, he brought his own clippers inone time and he used it to trim his beard up his goatee and everything. Andhe had him there for about two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner,he walks in and there's a person, another player that is actuallymanscaping with his beard trimmer. So, you know, one of the things is, youdon't want to use the same trimmer down there that you use up here. So uh, hekind of freaked out a little bit and he said, hey, how long have you been usingthat tool there? And he said, well, showed up here about three weeks agoand I've been using it ever since. So you know, there is a lesson learnedthat, you know, don't leave things out and probably uh, if it would have justsaid manscaped on it, uh, we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probablyone of the funniest, uh, taking care of your ball stories I've ever heard orbeen around in the locker room in the NFL, so it's a great story, Um, but youknow, I always said there was no way to know, there's no name on it and the guywas just using it and another guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heckof a funny story. So one of the best I've ever heard in my 15 years playingin the league. Um, but you know, there's so many great things aboutManscaped and what they're doing, uh, because guys, you got to take care ofyourself even though I got great hair, um, and getting older, but you stillhave to maintain some sort of grooming, right? And so, uh, you know, we allwork out for me, I like, we're going in my yard doing those things now that I'mretired, get a little sweat on and everything. You want to smell good. Uh,you know, you got to take care of yourself. They've got some greatproducts, um, you know, this one, a little uh, all deodorant, We'll needthat here and there. Um after, you know, working the yard, taking a hike, doinga walk, whatever you do. Um It's a great thing, but there's so many greatproducts. Um I want to thank Manscaped for sending them to me. Um thelawnmower 3.0. Obviously you can use it...

...anywhere in your body, but I'm sure youguys have all seen the commercials, but this is one just letting you know thatthe lawnmower three point oh, comes with the perfect kit. You can buy thelawnmower by itself by all these products individually. They even sentme this wonderful shirt. You can see the back, your balls will thank you.And then here's the front. So it's an awesome shirt to have great gear. Andyou know what? Sometimes you can just sit back, take care of your balls alittle bit and and read the paper. So Manscaped even has their own daily news,so which is great. So don't forget that you can go to the Code Gus Frerotte andthat's G. U. S. F R E R O T T E. Uh and you can save 20% on any products, thecomplete the perfect uh package gift set and uh you know, you can save 20%and get free shipping. So use the code just for a G. U. S. F. R E R O T. T E.Hey everybody spells my name wrong, they even spelled wrong back my probowl jersey. So you know, I gotta I gotta help you guys out. So don'tforget how important it is that you use these products, take care of yourselfdown below and have some fun right, there's nothing closer to you than yourlittle buddies. So use the lawnmower. Uh Use the code Gus Frerotte save 20%and get free shipping and uh order some great Manscaped products. Uh huh. Hey everyone, welcome back to huddle upwith Gus, I'm your host just for uh thanks for joining us. Thanks forjoining us in the Sounder. Uh I'm sorry, let's start over here. Hey everyone,thanks for joining us. I'm the host. Gus Frerotte of huddle up with Gus andI want to thank you for joining us in the 16 31 digital news studio and Iappreciate Sounder FM for hosting us on their platform. And I also want tothank Manscaped, go to Manscaped dot com. Put in my code Gus Frerotte allcaps get 20% off and free shipping today. Uh We're getting back. Greg hasbeen wonderful. It's his birthday. So let's all wish him as a very happybirthday. Uh We've been talking about your career wholly up to now. You justwere with the Washington bullets. So I guess the wizards now, but, and thenyou just got Howard White said, hey, we want you to come over to Nike. So tellme what that was like and your excitement when you first step into thebuilding Of G seven. So uh again, it's a dream job. My first week on the job,my first week on the job was a trip in Carmel California. Nike does a coachingtrip with the top coaches around the country and it was, it was basketballtrips with basketball coaches. So my first weekend a job, it's uh and me andmy wife at that time on a trip, it's uh coaches. All the top Dean smith, uh,Coach K was not with his lute, Olson, uh, just some top college coaches. Andthen you have NJ Barkley has Scottie pippen, you have B. J. Armstrong onthis trip. I'm like, are you kidding me? Right. First week on the job, Secondweek on the job, Mr White, because now I'm reporting to mister White becausehe ended up, he was the East Coast Foot wrap. He goes, moves to Portland andbecomes the director of uh, NBA, uh, my second uh, and by the way, Howard White,uh uh was Michael, Jordan's guy, um, business manager for this today for somany years, actually use if you watch the documentary on Michael, you wouldsee Howard in the, in the documentary. Uh, so, um my second week on the job,Howard says, hey Greg, I need you to go to L. A. In work uh, with Michaelbecause I can't be there on the set of space jam. Second week. What? Oh my God, Okay,what do I do? I want you want you to be there. I want you to, you know, kind ofbe the lease, Hampton MJ and the production company. Okay, perfect. I'm like, you're kidding me. That'swhat I knew. Yeah. So my first three...

...years at Nike was again, it was amazing.It's uh, I worked as the East Coast Field rep and I worked as a liaisonbetween the NBA players In our corporate office. Uh, and greatexperience that was when Chicago is on fire. This is what, 90 92-95. Either 95.So Chicago is on fire. Um, uh, great experience. Penny, Penny Hardaway Garypaint. You know, I got a chance to work with all the NBA players at the time.And some of them today to this day are still friends of mine and it just,again, that's the first three years. And I just, again, I tell people allthe time, you guys, uh, I didn't play in the NBA, which was a dream, but Iwork in the NBA. So still a dream to me and it's still amazing. Still getexcited excitement every morning that I wake up and get a chance to go in theoffice and get a chance to watch people like dirk Nowitzki and Luca don checkand, you know, christoph praising jesus. It's, I'm pinching myself still. So Igo through three years with the, with the, with the N. B. A. Uh, at Nike,they said, if you understand the product side and you understand productprocesses, which is uh, the, the uh, the life of product from the beginningto the end, which means from the design to the sourcing to development to thefactories All the way product in retail stores. If you understand that, you cannavigate your way all around the campus, or you can be in different jobs. So howbig is their campus? Uh the campus, well back back when I was with Nike andI left Mikey back in 2007, There's about 5000 people on campus. And now Ihaven't been back in a few years, but I think it's somewhere in the ballpark ofmaybe 10,000 people on campus, not around the world. They probably haveprobably 40, people around the world. Don't hold me to that now, I'm justthrowing out some numbers. So how do you how do you learn that wholeProduction, that whole system? What did you do to to figure that out? Yeah. SoI left, people thought I was crazy because I left a job that was workingwith athletes and traveling to and from games and much 67 NBA Games, you'reright. But I wasn't, I didn't wanna be comfortable there, right? I didn't wantto because I don't want to get to a point where I was ever stagnant. I'mgonna learn this product outside. So I went on the product side and work as aproduct line manager for basketball apparel. So in basketball player and atthis point Jordan apparel, Jordan not his own brand. At that time, I tend towork with Michael a lot then because, you know, I helped create the look ofnew seasons, new apparel every season, which was just a cool experiencebecause you pick up a piece of fabric and you said it was the right fabric,the tearaway pants that you talked about earlier. Yeah. It's like Icreated back in the day of tearaway short. Oh, yeah. Really? Yeah. Whichwas a great experience. I did that for two years. Did Michael look ateverything absolutely, very involved. He was super involved through theentire process. And what it's funny because I created for athletes, uh, andalso worked with Tiger and I'll talk about that in a second. But what Icreate is that, uh, some timeline for the product for athletes and thetimelines consisted of, we show them rough sample one. We show them almost afinished sample to and then we showed them the final sample three. Before wego to retail. We created. That's what we created for for the athletes andjust timelines and for the apparel timelines back in the day, I was about18 month process now. And I think that the timeline is a lot shorter. So whenyou, were you just doing, when you say apparel, were you just doing likeshirts and shorts and pants and things like that, you weren't doing the shoes,not all. I just focused on the peril. Okay. I did the, I worked a lotalongside with the footwork side, but I don't know the details of, uh, somewhatsimilar in terms of the product processes in how the timeline, actually,the time lines are shorter for footwear than it is apparel. So I did that for,for two years, I get a call out of the blue from Mr Knight and and Howard andsays, hey, we just signed a young guy just coming from stanford, he's decidedthat he's going to leave college early. His name was Tiger Woods. I'm like, whois that? Okay? And they said, well he's...

...a golfer, Pretty good golfer. Just one,just one, his third amateur at pumpkin Ridge, which is in Portland. Um I heardabout it, the pumpkin ridge, the amateur being there, but I didn't knowanything about golf at that time. Uh but here's what I understood and here'swhy Mr Knight and Howard came to me. They understand one, I knew the productprocesses and number two, I know how to work with athletes just for the factthat, you know, mom, being athlete, been an athlete, won, but also to thefirst three years working with the NBA players. Again, You don't get asked todo jobs if you don't, you know, if you don't knock it out of park on yourprevious right, right. That's something else that I get the chance to haveconversations with, what people trying to get into the sports industry. Um soyeah so I kind of go through that process and I'm like yeah we shouldprobably sit down and talk. So we sit down, we have good conversations. Tigerand I and his dad and actually Mr Howard at the time and we just we justkicked it off. Great end up working with him from 1997. Two 2000 and 7 2000and six. Mr. Knight ask if there's the young lady out in um Hawaii. She's umBut she was 16, she was 14 at the time. Yeah he's going to be really good. Hesays I need you to go out, I need you to recruit her and signed her the Nikewhen she turned to pro did that for two years and up signing the ShelbyMichelle uh great experience, you've been with someof the amazing ones. So so were you the reason that Tiger where it's red onsunday? That was pretty Greg that he always has done that. His mom was a bigdeal for, for his mom and wearing the red. She just thought it was a powercolor and um she felt like if he were that man, he's going to be a supermanon Sundays on final day and he just to this day he was just sunday red. So youmust have got to know him pretty well. Was he because I mean did he love playing other sports or washe always just about golf? You know he growing up Tiger played alittle baseball because his dad was a baseball player as well. So he played alittle baseball. Um but you know he he loved her, he he loved to learn ofdifferent sports. You know, he wouldn't learn how to shoot, he wanted to learnhow to throw a football. We would we would we would leave a tournament onthe sunday Gus and we would go back just the two of us, we will go back tohis house in Orlando and you know, we have some time that monday you take offor actually we would we would sorry, we would arrive on sunday night rightafter the tournament on sunday, get back to Orlando at the time where hewas living. Now he lives in a jupiter florida. And um, so we would have thenext day and a half, just the two of us and we would be throwing football, man,he want to know how to throw a spiral. I was teaching how to throw a spiral.He would teach me how to, you know, fly fish. We was just, we would playbaseball, we would throw a baseball. We just do things brothers would do. So hewould, he, you know, he learned how to scuba dive. He learned how the cavedive. Oh, uh, he just, once he sets his mind and he's going to do something,he's all in. Yeah. So what, so what is that like to see somebody rockets sofast, right? Like you were with him, you've seen him like not only mature,but just grow at an extreme rate. I mean, he just took off and you probablygot to be with him through all that. And, and that had to be an amazingexperience. It was phenomenal, You know, I worked with him his first eight yearsof his career. I think it was 11 major championships, uh, 10 or 11 majorchampionships. It's phenomenal, phenomenal to see, um, see greatness,got a chance to see a little greatness with Michael. Um, I didn't work withMichael like I worked with Tiger. Uh, but I did get a chance to work with himand get a chance to see him. And this kind of see, see what made him tick.Right. And there's some common denominators between the, you know,greatness and It's just, it was an amazing eight years. You know, get achance to go to the masters in 97. All...

...right. It's a little country boy frommoment in Ohio, who knew nothing about golf is at the Masters and spends eightstraight years. That's a master. It's pretty freaking cool. That's the hard,one of the hardest tickets to get in. And uh, not only that, but you know,you talked about when coming from Wilmington, there was a lot ofdiversity. The masters didn't have a lot of diversity for a long time. Allright. Uh, yeah. Guess what? You're, you're right on and here's, here's,here's what I love about Augusta National, The change, the changes thatthey've made over the years. And one is, it's one is diversity. You know, when,when, when we arrived in 1997 I say we arrive because we arrived together Whenwe arrived in 97, He wins the Masters in 98. Uh, this is, gives me goosebumps to this day. But the Masters, the staff, right. Theexecutives there understand what just happened the year before and opened updoors for people who work there. You know, a lot of people work. There arejust people of color, right? And they just kind of said, you know what wehave to change our way of thinking and they did. And it was absolutelybeautiful. And some of the stories that were told uh things have changed at theAugusta National, it's just it's been pretty amazing and if you think aboutsports and you've seen it personally how sports can unite us and bring ustogether from people from all different backgrounds, even when there'sanimosity or hate or whatever, um sports has a way of kind of pushing that divide and bringing us alltogether, I feel like and you've probably seen it that you've seen it atthe highest level, I'm sure, yeah, you know it's my life right? And uh youknow been with the Mavericks Dallas Mavericks the last seven years and youknow, just sitting in the stands and you know, we got our capacity, there isabout 19 5, 19 1 or something like that. And just to see see everybody cometogether, especially you know, over this last year has been pretty, I justthink it's spectacular in terms of when we were able to allow fans back intothe arena man. The joy, the excitement of just being in the arena Watson sports,seeing people man, they were cheering, we hadn't wanted, oh my gosh, cheeringtheir dancing. It was amazing. And I think to your point, uh, I guess it'sjust, that's what sport does. It just just unites people, brings everybodyback together. So are you gonna have your boss read your book? Becausesometimes I watch him when, during a game and he's like one of those dads inthe court, right? He's so excited. Mark markets. So I mean, he just loves theMavericks, right? He just loves it. Like when you watch him, he's just soinvolved and I don't know how many owners you see doing that. Well,there's only two that I know and Mark is one and then the new owner at the,for the clippers is another one who does who? They're just passionate about.The Marcus. Mark loves this. You know, he loves his team, he loves, you know,these players, um, you know, if you talked to players around the league,they'll talk about, you know, how he treats players different than any otherowner. Uh, and again, that's not coming from me and this just coming from thisconversation that I've had with different players who have come throughthe Mavericks organization. But he's, he's amazing. He just gets it. He likesit, he has fun with it. Uh, and he's, he's like, you know what man? We mightlook like nice people, but we're pretty competitive. You want to step on myneck and I want to step on your right? Yeah. He's such an enamel ring figurebecause of shark tank and everything else. I mean, you see that he'scompetitive, smart, um you know, and he's got a lot of Pittsburgh and when Iwatch them, it's kind of funny, like, you know, it doesn't leave you once yougo away and so I'm waiting for him to come and bring back a Pittsburghbasketball team because we, you know, we could use another sport here becauseour pirates haven't been doing so well, but so, so you're at the Mavericks,tell us a little bit about what you do for the Mavericks. Yeah, so I'm I'm asenior vice president, this is my seventh season um with the Mavericksand I oversee uh this four departments that oversee. Now, I oversee our youthbasketball, which includes our camps or...

...clinics are combines, we touch aboutProbably 20,000 kids a year. Yeah, basketball. Do you just stay in theDallas Fort Worth area basically, with NBA teams and uh probably similar toNFL teams as well, but you can only work within 75 miles north west of thearena. Yeah, we're staying in the DFW area. So I I I managed the youthbasketball space and I'm proud to say that we're probably, if you talk toanybody in the NBA, one of the most innovative youth basketball programs inthe N. B. A. And just really just because our breath of differentprograms, you know, we got programs from many MAvs which are four year old,four year olds all the way up to kids at the high school level recreationalkids. We have elite kids. The other area I oversee is really the playerrelations side, The player relations side is really working with players uhto help them just get out in the DFW community, uh, work with our communitypartners in love. And a lot of this comes from, from Mark and our, our Ceosent marshal. They just do a phenomenal job bringing in the right people, rightand helping them understand the importance of giving back to yourcommunity, get back to these fans and our players. I probably, I'm notexaggerating and that's probably best in class when it comes to communityappearances this last year, last year with Covid, you know, at the beginningof the hiatus, NBA High, we probably did 60 appearances with the players,which is off the charts, which is, guys just want to give back one to help,want to do anything we can for this community of Dallas, which is rich, isreally cool. And then I, uh, I obviously Mavs gaming, which was R. ESports, NBA two K team uh four years ago, the NBA created this NBA two Kleague. Yeah, I know about it, yeah, so there's there's 23 teams in the league.It's craziness, man, I wonder that probably one and I told someone thismaybe a couple of weeks ago, one of the great things that happened to my careerat this time, it helped me understand this, this space of the socialplatforms, it helped me understand viewership in the different analyticsand what it means to really, at the end of the day, just, you know, someonesponsorship to um understand the importance of uh you know, thedifferent social platforms twitch, which is yes, yeah, N F. L. A year agoI had the Super Bowl and twitch and what what it is, you're touching theconsumer that I'm not familiar with, but I've gotten to know and gotten achance to grow with over these last three years that I've kind of overseeoversaw this two K team, but it's two coaches, we've got a head coachtogether, assistant codes and we've got six players, you know, remotely againstdifferent teams and it's amazing their their ages, right? Like, like E sportsis like almost that 15 to 22 like after 22 years old, you're almost done. Likeyou're, you're too old and I'm like, what? And they're like, yeah, it's likeyour reaction time, you're, you know, the way you play and, and, and you haveto do it. Uh, it's E sports is in a, it's really come a long way in likefive, you know, probably from when we were playing Atari. You know, it's abillion dollar industry. Yeah. For us, it's our target consumers a littleolder. Um, you know, you have to be uh, in order to play in particular, youhave to be 18 years old and you know, our oldest players, I think 28 29 yearsold. That's the best to K players in the world. You know, the the two Kleague in Brendan Donahue who's our commissioner for the league. It reallyhas done a tremendous job in terms of just the growth side. Not only hearfrom a domestic standpoint, but also from an international standpoint. Thesponsorship has grown our partners overseas twist numbers continuesinstagram ticktock all the numbers that have increased significantly over thelast four years or since the uh since we started to leave. Well, I mean itthat's what's the way to get fan engagement and then all the data andanalytics and all the impressions that you get and trying to bring all thattogether to tell you how many actual people are falling the Mavericks butNBA total you know because it's not just the Mavericks that are big for youguys but the whole NBA right? Um my my...

...son Gunnar said dad you gotta get NBAdunk, it's like an app that you can get all the play your cards on right? Andso I've always collected cards. I'm like oh this is cool, I don't have togo by and you can just get a pack of them every now and then on NBA dunk andit's pretty cool stuff and it's just an incredible way. And I'm sure like whenyou have you have hard data and analytics like it's phenomenal. Oh yeahbut I mean with Mark doing ai and all this stuff right now. I mean he'sprobably got I mean you probably hit a button you know, it's probably likewhat I could say when I first started in the NFL, we had to watch video tapesand put a tape in and tapout, tape in tapout. Now, it's all right on youripad and you get every play you want, right? Yeah, we probably can look atthe data anyway. You want now anyway, anyway, you want however you want uh,you know, we got dashboards, you know, dashboards of data and data. You know,folks going into the arena two or season ticket holder base to what we doon the mavs gaming side, our social platforms. It's like, that's again,that's how you're one, you're telling your story to your selling sponsorship,three to your point fan engagement. You know, that's what it's all about. And Iwould think that you have a boss who loves new technology, loves newexperiences, whatever he can do to connect, you know, where a lot ofpeople aren't like that marks an innovator. You know, he wants, he wantsto be best in class. Uh, he wants to, you know, he wants to be the first tocome out with new products, new ideas, new thoughts. That's just who, you know,I've been so lucky. I guess it's like Phil Knight mother phenomenal in there.Mark is a phenomenal innovator. They just think they just think they thinkin a different planet, which is really, really amazing. And then we got to say,I got the Ceo who just phenomenal too and sent marshal and what she has donesince her arrival 3.5 years ago. We just, just a great organization. What'sreally great people. Yeah, well, what an amazing career you've had. You havea book coming out, tell me the name of the book again. The ultimate assist,the ultimate cyst you can, will launch It will be released probably sometimein early um, early july right now and send the hands of designer some thisweek for the designer to come back with all that. Yeah, yeah. Now you get totell the designer what you like and what you don't like your guys, youwrite all the apparel. Well, I mean, I don't think we have enough time to goover everything. I think we hit it fast as we could today, Greg and uh, youknow, you just have an amazing career and I'm sure that that Mark hired youbecause he found out from Phil, from Howard, from, you know, the guys thateverybody, you know, like they said, they know about you, they know that thekind of person they're getting, because I can just tell it from talking and wedidn't get to talk about your, your daughters and their careers and like itjust has to be great and you gotta have a smile on your face every day when youwake up. Yeah, I'm super, super blessed, gus I really appreciate that and youknow, I just, every day I enjoy what I do, passionate about what I do, and thedoctors who uh you know, I have one daughter who's married and she's theassistant coach, recruiting coordinator at the University of Oregon atNetherland Place, Professional basketball, so it's just, you know,it's it's still living a dream. Yeah, yeah, what a birthday it's gonna be. So,yeah, so it's it's amazing. I appreciate you. Um I hope we can stayin touch because there's some things I have coming up with the NFL alumni thatI would love to talk to you about going out the high school kids all over thecountry. Um, and I think that I've been dying to try and get the NBA involved,uh, you know, Mark's doing stuff back here in Pittsburgh that I know of withuh, with the readiness Institute and Penn State University. So there's a lotof connections Greg. But for you to come on my show, I really appreciate it.Uh, you know, obviously you're amazing person because those people that you'vebeen with to have faith and put their um, time and effort into you, tells methat what kind of person you are, because you're not going to be aroundthose people if they don't trust you and they don't know what kind ofcharacter you have. So this little farm guy from Wilmington has really made abig, so it's awesome. And that, that goes, doesn't matter where you're from,you put in hard work, it's gonna happen, right? Yeah, that's part of one of mycore values is this hard work and growth growth mindset. So we'll telltell our fans how they can find you and how they can follow you. Yeah, you know,again, for the book, if you get a graveyard dot com, you can get updateson the book linked in, you can find me...

...on linkedin social media platforms. I'mon instagram, I'm on twitter facebook. Uh, I'll accept you come, come and join me.Awesome, awesome. And I look forward to the mavs going a long way into theplayoffs. Well, thank you. So do I. And I hope that's the case guys. Thanks forhaving me on here. I really appreciate it. Thank you too. Yeah, it was greatmeeting you too and I appreciate you joining me on how to up with Gus. Heyeveryone, that's another show. What a great talk we had today with Greg nerd,you know, and happy birthday Greg. And so I wanna thank 16 31 digital news dotcom for for hosting us. And also uh Sounder FM for hosting us on theirpodcast platform. And then also remember, go to Manscaped dot com, putin my coat, Gus Frerotte all caps and get 20% off and free shipping. Soeveryone have a great day and thank you again, Greg. Thank you and that's a wrap sportsman. Thanks forjoining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another to huddle up withGus featuring 15 year NFL quarterback. Gus, parent huddle up with Gus isproudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available at the music.

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