Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

George Teague

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to Huddle Up with Gus with 15-year NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte! On today’s show, it’s a full hour with one of footballs nicest guys off the field, yet when on the field, was able to do serious damage to running backs skeletal structures. We are speaking of course of George Teague, who played with the Packers, Cowboys, and Miami and broke records and bones in each city. George shares is youth with Gus and what brought him to the gridiron, having grown up as an Air Force Brat. When his family did settle in one place, Gus and George discuss how life was like living in a small Alabama town, especially issues of race, competitive sports, and his education. Then, it is onto the NFL when Gus and George go through some of the best and the worse their careers offered them at the time. As mentioned, George is an awesome guy who you just want to hang out with and you’ll enjoy your time with him on today’s show. Thanks for tuning into Huddle Up With Gus!

Hey everyone, Welcome to another episode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, some people say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read. 16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latest news, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favorite podcast. Follow up with Gusts. Check it out today at www. 16 31 digital news dot com. Huddle up with Gusts is brought to you by Vegas sports advantage, clients of Vegas sports advantage are winning big in 2021 you can be a part of the winning two. As of june 1st $100 bettors are up $3700.500 dollars. Bettors are up $18,500.1000 dollar bettors are up $37,000 and $5000. Bettors are up $185,000 become inclined today by clicking the link in the description below and use promo code, huddle up To take 25% off your package today. Thanks to our partnership. Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron at the diamond or on the links, we can only say, okay, welcome to this week's huddle up with gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchises with 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the games are one. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up. Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it's kick off time, so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us. Strange variety, big play two Aleve. Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of huddle Up with Gus, I'm your host, 15 year NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte. Hey, I want to thank 16 31 digital news uh for hosting us in the studio again, as you can see, we're not in the studio, but They do all of our producing and engineering. So I want to thank 1631 digital news for that. I want to thank our team Brian and Terry and I want to thank Sounder FM for hosting us on their platform. We also want to thank Vegas sports advantage uh for for coming on and working with us and and if if you wanna win some real money and betting, I'm not good at it because I don't think I ever wanted anything especially betting, but go to Vegas sports advantage, Those guys are great, they'll they'll they'll improve your odds will help you and hopefully you can win some cash and put it in your wallet. Uh Today's guest I'm really excited about. But before we get to that I had uh you know, we've been doing this thing, where are our fans have been asking us questions. So I got a question from Jacob, Julius uh Jacob is out of Qattan in pennsylvania and he wants to know what's the greatest athlete I've ever played with? Uh that's hard because, You know, there's so many incredible people that I've played within the NFL over 15 years and seven teams and just seeing guys do some amazing things on the practice field uh on a in a game, uh you know, seeing it in the weight room, uh, you know, just, just incredible people and what they can do. And my job was always dropping. But I will say this, I did see Dante culpepper walk on his hands for about 30 yards one time and he, and randy Moss used to have incredible competitions where they throw 100 bucks down and they would have all these crazy things they would do. And, and uh, I saw Dante beat randy in a, in a 40 yard dash. I saw Dante uh Walk on his hands for 25 yards, but my man was a...

...credible athlete. He was a lot of fun. So, uh, I would say that was definitely one of the guys for a big guy. He was definitely incredible athletes. So joining us today is a guy that played in the league for a long, long time, Uh was the safety, was my nemesis on the other side of the ball. Uh you know, went to Alabama. Uh they have him as growing up as a as a a navy brat is a military brat where an air force, I don't know where you were George, but you were in Kansas and you moved to Alabama. But I always hated that term that you were a brat because I know you weren't a brat because if you were a brat, your dad would have put you in your place. So joining me today is George Teague. He has a great podcast out called Teague's Take uh and he does it with his son jay. Mhm. You're froze their second gust. But okay, keep going. Could you repeat that list a little bit? Yeah, yeah. Hey, where do you, where do you, where do I stop at? Yeah, just as a military brat. Yeah, Can you hear me? George? Yes, I got you. Okay. No, I was just saying like, I hate to turn brat right? They always say these guys are military brats and when I was doing some research on you and I'm like, I'm sure that if George was any kind of brat, his dad would have been like, huh? You weren't out of place at all. Right. And then you guys moved around. Uh, I think you were in Kansas moved to Alabama. Uh, and then the rest is history. But you know, I was just saying that that you were my nemesis out there. You were the guy that, that was on the other side of the ball, reading me and I was the one watching you. So it was pretty cool and I'm really excited to talk to you today. How are you doing? Well, I appreciate it. I'm doing well. Um coaching high school football now in texas. Um And yeah, I did grow up as a Military Brandt. I guess we would call it. My dad served in the Air Force Air Force for 25 years yourself. So I grew up pretty much all of my, you know, youth on an Air Force base. Uh up until the time I got to high school in Alabama, then we act that was my first time actually living off base. Uh once I got to 10th grade essentially. Um so that was a little bit different for me, but I love the growing up the way that we did as well. And I got to say also when you were talking about that one, some of the best people that you had ever played with, the most athletic person that you played with, I'm glad you brought in randy Moss. It's a great story about coal paper, but I really eventually went to randy Moss I guess just because I was in the second area, The scare that we had when he was out there. Yeah, culpepper wasn't running by you. Yeah. So that, that didn't intimidate me as much. But uh, you know, just seeing what well that guy and and others uh, could do. There's so much talent and that's football league and guys that we've played with, you know, being on multiple teams. Um, It is very hard to try to find, you know, one person you could say it's the most, Yeah, you can't really do it. I mean, you've seen some incredible feats by people, right? Like you've seen some amazing things happen in the practice field and, and everywhere else, but to name just one person as the greatest athlete. Um, my favorite thing always was George is that uh, I would get in arguments with other professional athletes from other sports and they would try to talk like they're the best athletes. Like most of time, I think it may be the only one that can compete with us is basketball, but, but I always like, come on, there's no way like football is definitely the best athletes out there. Well, we are and I'm saying that socially, but I think you have to look at how many true football players, if I can say that were true football players that actually can do multiple sports versus...

...the other way around. You know, when you look at the Diaz bo Jackson's, you know, many of people that can do baseball and football, you know, uh Russell Wilson, these are athletic guys that were there. They opted to play football. I mean, that makes you incredibly there's a lot of basketball players that can't play basketball football. There's a lot of soccer players play, you know, So we were definitely when you have the makeup of International football league player, there are some dudes that are just amazing. It can be good at everything. Probably like how you're good at golf. I don't know if you're a good golfer. I'm okay. I'm okay. I'm not I'm like a 10 handicap. I'm just okay. Uh What's the so if you're not very good, what's the highest handicap you can have? I don't know like uh you know, if you shoot 100 every round, that'd be like a Like a 28 handicap. All right, well, I'm gonna take a 31 handicap, but there is a number two. Well, you know, it's not for me, golf is just like, I don't work at it. You know, if you want to be great and unbelievable, you gotta be out there and practice all the time. I just, I love just being out and going to play and laughing and having a good time and you know, sometimes you get to compete against some good buddies, put some money on the line or whatever, but most of the time it's, I go out with my sons now, you know, and we have just the blast. I haven't, I haven't figured out the golf, uh, endurance. I know we're not running, you know that, but you know, four hours or longer out of the course. I just well, that's where the swing oil comes in to play George. You need a little swing oil to get you through to keep your engine nice and lubricated the whole way through. So that's what gets you through for four hours of golf, especially, you know, you're probably playing a bunch of when you're playing those golf tournament, like the pro, you know, with Charity events and all that. And then all of a sudden there like six hours Man, you're just wore out at the end of those. That's right, that's right man. Hey, I see your producer said that 54 is a max handed Catholics could have. So I'm, Yeah, I'm definitely hiding the 31 I believe, but I I really got speaking of the charity things, I tend to go put me on one hole, let me put, let me drive or whatever. It is. Not necessarily play the whole thing so I can see everybody talked to everybody then that can really get good at the green. If I shoot the same green. Yeah, then you know, we're the ball where you gotta put it where you got to chip it or whatever. Yeah, I hear you there. Um so George, when you're growing up in the military, I know a bunch of people that um, you know, there's a good friend of mine, Ron coder, he played in the NFL here, he's older. He actually grew up in on a military base in Japan and played football over there and then came over here and went to Penn State. But tell me about what it was like playing sports on the military base. It was um, I want to say different in the sense of um, you know, you knew everybody right from the, from the beginning because the basis tend to be smaller kind of classes and people um you pretty much did everything. So I grew up playing really every sport baseball, basketball, football, you just went from one rec team to the next because your parents were trying to keep you involved as well. So that was kind of cool and I was being coached by my dad because you know, it wasn't like you were dealing with some of the fortunate and blessed today, we're being taught by military personnel um you know, on the base. Um so it was cool because I was around, you know, my dad a lot with that. The one thing that I don't think I mentioned this to you before we talk about, I had my one super highlight I would say is that I...

...actually played on a german soccer team when we were state in Germany for four years. I was wow, good enough to be able to play on the german soccer team. So that really opened my eyes as far as, you know, we were in their culture already, but trying to be on a team where I was really kind of the minority, you know, most of them which I was trying to learn how to communicate with them and play and learn their systems um as a you know, 5th grader, 6th grader, that was it was fun, but it was super challenging because that was when I really had to get off the base, you know, and start to tell with people in a different way. Yeah. Then you kind of kind of feel what it's like to be different, right, that you're over there and you got to fit in and and uh I think that's pretty cool like but you know you said you were you were young but when we're young we adapt so fast like well how do you think you would adapt now? It's like you had to go over there now and being that same situation would be way harder. I think it would be a lot harder in this day. Especially I wasn't on the base. I think that was an advantage for me personally, just because I was always exposed to different things and people and you know, moving, it was just kind of way of life and it wasn't something that was just what we did. So you had friends, you had to fit in, you had to, you know, just just what we did. So going from team to team or city, the city or country to country, whatever it was, it just made me a different person. So even when I got the National Football League and you get drafted by one team and you get traded to another and then you get cut and then you go to another team, you know, whatever it, it didn't feel. Yeah. Yeah. It was like if you're just going to another place and you dive in, you fit in and you get in. Um, So did did your dad, like you guys moved a bunch and military people move a lot. Do you still have friends from those times? So your parents still haven't talked to those people that they were on the base with? Or do you kind of just move on because you know, it's, you're, you're moving around so much. It's unbelievable how many friends I have from youth that we either reconnected some kind of way, whether it's social media or something because you know, we all had that kind of struggle. There's just um family, Um, that really I just reconnected with because when I was in 3rd grade, you know, I remember clearly uh, this girl's dad that always, or whistle, you know, super loud. I was just amazed about this whistle, but that was his way. You gotta bring your butt home and get to the house right now. And I mean that's a little thing, right? But it's something that was really impressionable on me and we kind of have that connection is military families because we're all having to move and leave each other. And so we're always trying to find out how I wonder where they went or what they, what they do. And our parents tend to really be in touch with their parents and then therefore asked the question. So it's really cool. I think it's like a fraternity almost uh like reunions. I bet we probably could have Air Force base reunions if someone would ever think about it, because it probably be pretty cool to go back and see people we grew up with. Right? Yeah, that would be pretty cool. So you were in Kansas for a while, right. I think your dad was stationed in Kansas that therefore stay there. And then how old were you when you finally kind of moved? It, was it like high school age to Alabama in middle school? Um, and then I moved to Alabama for high school? Yes, so I would have been going in my ninth grade year, middle, my ninth grade year we moved to to Alabama. Mm I ended up going to school and school called Jeff Davis High School in Montgomery Alabama.

Um there was an Air Force base there called uh Maxwell Air Force, so my dad was stationed there, but we lived off base. That was your first time living off base, right? Yeah, it's my first time living out well what was the difference between being off base and being like no gates to go through, nobody checking on you all the time? Was it? Was it way better for you? Gus it was probably one of the hardest times in my life for multiple reasons. Uh If I could share one first time being off base um But we ended up moving to predominately black neighbourhood, which was you know, it's not bad, it's just it was different. We always had mixture of people, right? Uh And at my age at that time and being in Alabama, they had these um a state rule that was called a majority minority rule, right? Which is a a time where integration, we're still trying to happen. So where I lived at, remember I said that was in the predominantly black neighborhood, I was bussed all the way across the city to go to white school. Yeah essentially. Uh It's kind of weird to be talking about that right? But that's really how I was. And so that was you know that was troubling for me just because I didn't understand, you know why why are we going to? You know I've never really been experienced with racism or trying to fit in or in that type of way. And that was the hardest part because you had basically two different worlds. You know what do you got white friends? You know you two black or whatever it is, you're all the way across town. So trying to go see friends, you know somewhere else. You you couldn't do it. Yeah. So it was a really challenging time for me emotionally I think because I didn't understand racism. I didn't it just was not in our D. N. A. So on the military, so on the military basis, you didn't really experience any of that. Like everybody is just we're all military were just together, right? And then you get out there and you're like what is this stuff like that had to be had to be really emotional for you. The military is like our football teams the way I put it, we're all in there for the same goal. Yeah right. It doesn't matter what color we were. Whatever we want to win games, you want to win super bowls, you know, and all you did was rely on the coaching staff and the people that were next to you to do what they were supposed to do and you didn't care whether or not they were white, black mexican asian whatever it is, that's where the military was. You know, they were serving their country and it doesn't matter what religion you were, what color you were. We all had the same goal, you know, for the country. And so that's the way it always had been for me until that time when it wasn't. And then you started seeing different things or hearing different words of, so it became really, really as, as people see it well, you got to go to University of Alabama and you got, you know, you go to win a national championship. Yeah. But it took a little little different type of work ethic I guess from that sense of overcoming some of the other things that I had to overcome. Yeah. So did you ever like truly experience some really terrible racism, you know, like where you, you had because I can never imagine what it's like to walk in your shoes. But I think to give people an understanding of you know here's a guy that played in the NFL was at the top of his game and it probably was a moment in your life where you were kind of nervous right? That that this racism is real. Yes because I have experienced very specific things in the south um from you know the but as much as we said getting pulled over specifically because you know it was african...

...american and whatnot that happened to me that I was actually driving um a motor coach. You know we used to have this little camper kind of thing and got pulled over because the the mud flower was a quarter of an inch too short and I don't know how anybody knows that when they're driving around and looking at the thing and so you can't help but go you know and then you know everybody out you know who you got in the deal like bro really was was a speeding whatever. No you know you got to you know so you know when your profile you can see right right I've been not allowed into him restaurant or a bar and you know you know it's on purpose you know the words yeah allowing other people to come and you know everybody goes there's a wait how long is the wait 20 minutes and you know you see people come up after you and you you know your bypass bypass bypass bypass you know and after a while you kind of go oh come on now um and it hurts you because we don't want people judging you just better color your skin especially right now. Yeah definitely definitely. Is that something that you could talk to your parents about? It was um but it still was difficult because now you have to think we're the generation that my parents came from when my dad, we had to pick and actually couldn't drink out of the water fountain, you know, And so it was still, even though it was growth and because he had the military piece, you know, I wasn't raised that way to think like that was amazing considering what my folks had to go through, you know, for your military. Um, but he really just preached and talk to me about work ethic and not worrying about that stuff. You know, you've got to be a good person. Yeah. My mom was about charity. You gotta help people, you know, you gotta have some change. You've got to be charitable, you gotta give money. Um, and these types of things and so they really shifted everything that, yeah, you got to go all the way over here to this other school, but network, meet people, you know, do something, you got to get over there, we'll drop you off or roger bike man, you know, get and do what you need to do, just be smart, get educated and you know, it'll all work out. Yeah, no, I mean, I'm just trying to kind of give our audience like uh you know, that we always talk about transitions and hard things and adversity in her life, right? Uh that was adversity for you, things that you were talking about and still you go on to be an incredible athlete and play in the NFL and that's what I tell kids all the time too, is that, look, you're gonna have a roadblock or there's something that you don't like or something that bothers you and you got to find a way around it, over it, under it, whatever it is, and just just keep moving forward And you may not be happy. You may not like it, but it's there for a reason. It's teaching you something, learn from it. Move on. Yes, I 100% agree to all your listeners and any parents that are dealing with kids, or if there are any Children who are listening um to be successful, you do have to do exactly what he's saying there there. You're gonna have some obstacles. If you're going to be successful. If you're just looking for the easy path, then you're just gonna be over there on that road with the average or less than the average person, because if you're not faced with adversity, um then we're not necessarily progressive. Some people shy away from that adversity. Um but that's how we get, you know, how we get better and we have to figure out things. We've got to lean on people, We got to learn. We gotta try to figure out...

...what's the best strategy to to move past those things. And it could be something like what we're talking about or it could be an injury or it could be anything teacher that don't like you or whatever you got. Well yeah, we all had those things, death in the family, all that stuff, right? We've all dealt with all those types of things and you just gotta kinda it's tough and you go through it. Um And hopefully you have some good support. Sounds like you had some really good support in your time with your parents. Um And uh you know that they really helped you through things. You know they pushed you in the right direction. They gave you good advice. So when when you say go home and you say, hey mom and dad, I'm gonna go to Alabama, what was the reaction, what were, what did they help you? That decision was that all you? Um, the decision Alabama was mine. Um, they're all very happy. We were, Alabama fans are not necessarily auburn fans. So I did the heartburn as well. Um, but again, because we weren't there, I didn't have that emotional attachment to say man, you know, that I'm going to grow up and I want to go play for the crimson tide. That, that wasn't even it because I didn't know where I was going to be, you know? Um, and the only reason I was there gus is, so even when we got to Alabama, my dad was actually re stationed the two years, so it would be my junior year. Yeah. To Turkey. Oh wow, okay. And so that was another decision that had to be made. Okay, where is George kind of graduate from? Because Turkey is going to have to graduate in Turkish school on a military base or or whatever it is or we're going to go split family. Um And that's where my parents decided to do. So my mom stayed back stateside. He went over so that I could finish high school. Uh Obama. Yeah, so it was, now I can tell you this though. I'll give you a good story about that though. What was a good thing about it was so I don't know if Tulsa what to any ball games or whatnot, but you know, you get those bowl checks when you have to travel or whatnot. Well, my residency was listed in Turkey. Uh Alabama is like what? I write a check for how much? Uh Yeah. So to get back to Turkey, I was like, hey man, yeah, that's my daddy. We had all the papers and all that kind of stuff was like, you know, I don't I don't live in Montgomery. You know, I live in Turkey. It's it's 11,000 miles away. That'll be $2 a mile. That's how George got his first car. Yeah. So what was your first car? That was my first that I bought afford probe, anybody, whatever weight was it a stick shift? Yes, it was a stick shift. You know, I had a red line, that thing as much as possible. They were like front wheel drive machines. Those four probes, yep. That was my very first car that I actually purchased. That would have been right after my senior year, right before I got drafted. Actually. I think what we just said, I said, did you drive a stick shift and you said yes. Nobody says that today. I don't think they make cars with stick shifts anymore. No, unless you're a trucker. Yeah, I don't know how to drive them. Anyway. Uh man, I learned I used to take this kid's car at Tulsa baba bubbles from Oklahoma. He had a stick shift. I said, Bubba, let me borrow your car, can you drive a stick? And I'm like, yeah, I didn't know how to drive. Me and this kid from philadelphia with his nickname was fish head. So fish had, I would take his car.

We taught each other how to drive a stick on bubbles car and we bring it back and bubbie. Like how'd it go? We're like, oh, it was great. You know, growing up, oh my God, we clutch was slipping. And he's like, what's wrong with my car? I don't know. But that's how I learned to drive a stick. It wasn't from my dad. Oh, there you go. I like it. That's a great one. And my black, I didn't have the purple one. So we all the viewing. It was not a purple one that was not flashed. I wasn't from florida. So I didn't go with purple. Yeah. Well I had, my first car was a Camaro 1977 Camaro. Z 28. Oh that's bad. I paid 900 bucks for it. You can't get anything for 900 bucks now. So in high school, the cars I had to drive. Why? I really considered the upgrade because I also drove a mercury zephyr. The Z. E. P. H. Y. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. The four door terrible car. But that's the parents about for me and I was happy to have it. Um But you know what it didn't have a reverse. So I was driving to school here. I am this big time football player right? Trying to get all this stuff done. And I had strategically I had to get to the school at the right time so I could pull all the way through. Um So yeah you couldn't pull out. So what would happen if you had to go back up? You just put it in neutral and push it. And I I got a really strong left leg and my best buddy was a £300 linemen. Just uh and his nickname was reversed. Yeah. Okay look at that baby. Oh man is that a zephyr? Yeah but I didn't have that one. Didn't look like that, that one has reversed. You didn't have that one. Yeah. You never so tell your now you're at Alabama right? You've been through a lot in your life, uh you've faced all kind of adversity moving around um and you go to the school that has a lot of history and that's one thing, like, you know, tall says history, but not like Alabama's football history. Like how did that kind of hit you? Like when you walk in there? And I mean there's just such history that hit you in the face when you go into Alabama. Yes, uh it did and I was, I knew I was blessed to be able to get there. Um and this goes into the theme of our story here, I guess because my first year there, so I didn't get red straight, it's red shirt. I was one of two people who do not get red shirted this freshman. So um when I came in, it was all business and went to school when the football practice and that was kind of it, you know, did well in class and I was overwhelmed with everything. We had bill curry was my coach at the time, he was, you know, kind of all Bryant bear, Bryant ish, kind of dude in the tower phone and it was just like, man, this is Obama, you know, this kind of thing. Well after my freshman year, they got fired, so my coaching staff was gone and that's, you know, another form of adversity that felt like I'd hit things like, oh gosh, who's coming in, they're gonna write, what are we gonna do, You know, blah, blah, blah. And that man, I was terrified um about that. It didn't matter, it was Alabama just knew at that point, it was now we got new coaching staff and we know how people, you know, go after their own people. Um uh you know, I kind of went into a slump there for a minute just because, I mean, I still played well, I ended up starting. Um but it was the, I think I'm saying this to others is that goes into the mindset of what you could have, it was very easy for me to go, man, I need to...

...transfer, I need to leave, coach is gone. I don't know what's going in, you know, like maybe what could happen today, you know, new collegiate rules, but that wasn't really the option. It was, I want to Alabama because one I wanted to graduate from there, uh, to I believe that everything they told me about the networking, uh good football education. Yeah, and so I said, well I'm gonna stay here and I'm just going to grind it out and try to win this spot, you know, again. Um, and so, um, did work out obviously that ended up playing that year, but that was another tough time for me, sophomore junior. You're just trying to make sure I was their guy. Yeah, that's, it's never easy. It's never easy. That's for sure. Hey everyone, um, we're gonna take a quick commercial break, but we're talking with George t gonna come back and I want to hear about how he trans transitioned from corner to safety because I have a good friend that I coached that plays for the falcons on transition from corner to linebackers. I want to talk to George a little bit about that, but we'll be right back. Yeah. Hey, how come up with us listeners? Manscaped. Well, they sent me, uh, they hooked me up with a bunch of tools and formulations for their package three point oh kit. Uh, so, you know, I want to show you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We all think we got a perfect package, but they sent me the perfect package three point okay. And I want to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It came in this great box. Uh, you know, uh, and you can see what it says. They will thank you because they sent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us, uh, you know, stuff that makes you smell better. And then, you know, they sent me this great, uh, some boxers, you what you get, right, protect them. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this cool, you sack, I guess you want to call it to store all your stuff in. So, uh, it's been great. Manscaped sent me a bunch of product. Um, you know, and you know, you can see it all on here. Uh, you know, you can go to Manscaped dot com and put in the code. Uh Gus Frerotte, that's G U S F R E R O T T E. Get 20% off and free shipping when you use that code. But you can get a kit, you can get individual items like uh this way cool rumor that has a little led light, um, ceramic. Uh, these things come apart, they're waterproof, you can do a lot with them. So, you know, get Manscaped is great, you know, it's funny, um, I remember when I was playing with the Denver broncos and I'm not going to mention any names, but there was a gentleman who was playing on our team and uh, you know, if you ever hears the story, you'll know exactly what I'm talking about. But uh, he brought his own clippers in one time and he used to trim his beard up, his goatee and everything, and he had him there for about two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner, he walks in and there's a person, another player that is actually manscaping with his beard trimmer. So you know, one of the things is, you don't want to use the same trimmer down there that you use up here. So uh, he kind of freaked out a little bit and he said, hey, how long have you been using that tool there? And he said, well, showed up here about three weeks ago and I've been using it ever since. So you know, there is a lesson learned that, you know, don't leave things out and probably if it would have just said manscaped on it,...

...but we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probably one of the funniest, uh, taking care of your ball stories I've ever heard, or been around in the locker room in the NFL, so, uh, it's a great story, um, but you know, I always said There was no way to know, there's no name on it, and the guy was just using it and another guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heck of a funny story. So one of the best I've ever heard in my 15 years playing in the league. Um, but you know, there's so many great things about Manscaped and what they're doing, because guys, you got to take care of yourself even though I got great hair, um, and getting older, but you still have to maintain some sort of grooming, right? And so, uh, you know, we all work out to me like we're going in my yard doing those things now that I'm retired, getting a little sweat on and everything you want to smell good. Uh you know, you got to take care of yourself, They've got some great products, um you know, this one, a little uh all deodorant, we'll need that here and there um, after, you know, working the yard, taking a hike, doing a walk, whatever you do. Um it's a great thing, but there's so many great products I want to thank Manscaped for sending them to me. Um the lawnmower 3.0. Obviously you can use it anywhere in your body, but I'm sure you guys have all seen the commercials, but this is one just letting you know that the lawnmower three point oh, comes with the perfect kit. You can buy the lawnmower by itself by all these products individually. They even sent me this wonderful shirt, You can see the fact that uh your balls will thank you. And then here's the front. So it's an awesome shirt to have great gear. And you know what? Sometimes you can just sit back, take care of your balls a little bit and and and read the paper. So think Man's Cape even has their own daily news, so which is great. So don't forget that you can go to the code Gus Frerotte and that's G. U. S. F. R. E R O T. T. E. Uh and you can save 20% on any products, the complete the perfect uh package gift set and uh you know, you can save 20% and get free shipping. So use the code Gus Frerotte. G. U. S. F R E R O T. T. E. Hey everybody spells my name wrong, they even spelled it wrong back my pro bowl jersey. So you know, I gotta I gotta help you guys out so don't forget how important it is that you use these products, take care of yourself down below and have some fun right? There's nothing closer to you than your little bugs. So use the lawnmower uh use the Code Gus Frerotte save 20% and get free shipping and uh order some great manscaped products. Mhm. Hey everyone, welcome back to the huddle up with Gusts podcast. I'm your host, Gus Frerotte. We're talking with George Teague today, but I also want to remind you that you can check us out at 16 31 digital news. You can check us out on sounder dot FM and you can find our new partner Vegas sports advantage. So check them out and hopefully you can go win some money there. But we're talking with George, uh George, I want to know uh really? Because it's it's very interesting. I think the transition from safety or from corner to safety is not easy because it seems like corner, you're you're doing a lot of back peddling one on one where safety your your back there and you're reading, was that a hard change for you? Yeah. Um Honestly, I'm going to say it...

...probably wasn't as difficult as it could be um because I was, I I always made sure I knew what everybody was doing even when I played corner, you know? Uh and so I think that's really why they moved me into the safety position because Uh one I was already physical enough to, I kind of knew how to line everybody up already. Um so it was a natural piece for me to be a signal caller or the defense. Um Now physically it changed what I had to do in the mindset that you've got to have because now you're, you know, looking at big gaps and see gaps and run and depending on what it is, you have to drop down, you know, something in that nature, that was um that is probably the hardest part for a corner to have to try to move into the safety is the run game. The feeling of runs, you know, for being in the middle of the field, word corners, you're always outside, your angles of tackle are limited, but its safety now you've got more space. So, um there's a lot of work that you have to do. Uh huh there, that makes, makes it kind of difficult to go in. I know the NFL now they kind of move older guys into the safety position, right? Yeah, switch them around a little bit. Yeah, we've seen that with other like Rod Woodson Charles would like, they've all moved a little bit, but tell me who was the running back for you? That, that when you're watching a film this week and you were saying, I don't know coach, I think covering two looks pretty good. I don't feel like feeling that that big gap when he's coming through there. Well I'm going to answer this from the pro level first and then I'll tell you the college one, but this is easy for me and the professional level. There's no way I ever wanted to taco barry Sanders, so you don't want to be on the highlight? No sir, I don't want to be away from him as much as possible. Um, so I know I gave linebackers and defensive lineman a lot of incentives to make sure they didn't get into the secondary or that he didn't get to the secondary. You're going to be on that. Uh Dude was amazing. Oh my gosh! And yeah, I missed him a few times and uh you know, shoestring tackle them once we were in Detroit, I was playing with the packers, right? We're playing quarters. So I got to see gap, They run that stretch all the time. That was their deal, right? I'm sure you remember that and uh He shoots through the sea gap. But here I am 10 yards away from him, 12 yards away from him. My heart is just going right. So everything we worked on was don't dance with him. It's one on one you're probably gonna miss. We got it. You just gotta take your shot. That's what that was our coaching from the coaches. Just take your shot, hope for the best, you know, this kind of thing. So what do I do here he comes, He's running, I took my shot gus now I think I hit the little plastic tip on his uh he and so I'm on the ground and I'm looking because he's stumbling, boom, boom, boom, boom, he falls down, falls down gus, I got up and cheered like, yeah, my favorite ever player, everybody, I like really George. Yeah, yeah. Really? You see all the highlight tapes making people look stupid. I mean, yeah, I hear you, man, that that is that is good, you know, because I think like you were a hitter, I think with the big guys like contact, like knowing they're coming at me, it...

...was probably okay for you. It was more of those guys like barry that. Yeah, I'm gonna give you that and go the other way and yeah, so a lot of teams and people would ask me because once I moved into safety, we still had to play man to man on those slot guys, if they didn't have a tight end of the game or something. And that was so I was always more afraid of the smaller shifty type guys that, you know, really could embarrass you. I'd rather have a cover Michael O'brien who was, you know, big right? And you can get your hands on it. I'd rather fight with him, sterling sharps, uh, even chris carter, you know those types of views where you, you know, I'd rather be up in their face and these guys, I'd rather do that because if I could bang and, and put my shoulder pads on you and get down close enough to the line of scrimmage or press, I always felt like I could I could win guys, you could enjoy Galloway's rocket dish miles and all these other dudes. I really well he randy Moss. I mean he was big too. What his speed was just yeah, it's great. Well, I would think that and the game has changed from when we played to even even more, you know, back probably when we first came in, you know, it was still a lot of run game power football. You know what I mean? Like and because that's like you you think about moose johnson kicking out Emmett smith. And and I mean that was what it was back in the old Redskins, john Riggins like all that now. It's like five wives all the time. Our pos, baby, our pos, you know how you went to the provo you know how many profiles you went to with this R. P. L. Stuff that you have? Three record player? Uh huh. All right. So, well there was there was a highlight up of Moss the other day and he commented on it since I follow randy and it was everybody was in it was three tight ends and Mosses only receiver and he's tightened down and he's the only one going out in the route. And Darren Sharper was playing safety for Packers at the time. And Dante just runs a little fake Takes like you know 10 10 yard drop. He just waits for randy to run past everybody and girls as far as he can. Like jesus dude was crazy. But the game has changed a lot. Like you watch like I watch like Big Ben play from when he first came in the league to what he did was doing now. I mean he used to throw 12 times a game, now he's throwing it 50 times a game. It's crazy to me. It was crazy and that makes it hard for from as a defensive player, you know, I guess it is, it's fun for this because it seemed to be geared towards offense more and more points, this kind of stuff. Um, and even as a, as a coach, as a high school coach now, what we used to have for goals, you know what our goal board looks like. It's different now. It's not necessarily even about, you know, it used to be if you can hold an X amount running yardage and passing. Now it's really about Score. You know, we were happy if you could hold them to 17 points, you know, 21, No, it's not like that man, hey, you just got to get, we're not even putting those type of things on our board. We need to make sure we have enough three doubts. You know, we're just trying to get off the field now. Anyway, we can yes, we got to get off the field. How do we flip the field and not really talking about points and stuff anymore because they're gonna score if there were or salt and you really can't, you know, stop anybody. Well, yeah, well, when I coached in ST louis, so Ezekiel Elliott was my running back in high school, right? And then I had foyer louis Kahn, who was a receiver. Now he's a linebacker for the falcons. That's he...

...went from corner, he played at Yale, Now he's outside linebacker. The Foul because I had these two incredible athletes. We only had like 25 kids on my team. But we would play these like wing T teams and all this stuff in the playoffs And they would hold the ball for like five minutes right? And everybody be getting nervous. Oh no. And I'm like look we're gonna score once or twice. They're going to get nervous. They can't catch up because they can't throw it. You know what I mean? Once you get ahead they those teams that never practice that stuff, they can't come back on you. You know, and that's what I would that's what all we did. I said don't worry is he's gonna get his two touchdowns. It will be fine. That cat was good, pretty nice to be able to coach. It's easy to coach with guys like that toss, right? Oh yeah. And then he always tried to tell me he could throw it. I said you cannot throw it. We ran one time where he threw a touchdown to foyer and ends on that was it. We were on the five yard line of like that's all the further. You love to throw it because I know you can't throw it all. But it was fun coaching high school football. But it took me a while to learn how to connect with them because you know, in your, in the NFL, you have a language, you talk a certain way with guys and everybody understands you. And then you get to a kid who's in 10th grade, you know, he doesn't know anything. Yeah. And then all of a sudden you, I told you he has no clue what you're talking about. So I had to learn to adjust a little slower, make sure I go into the weeds a lot more with details. Yes, absolutely. You have to do more, you know, especially now these, this age of kids that there's a lot of because a lot of kids are playing starting to play later. Right? Um, you know, so they may not even know how to tackle hit proper forms, different things because, you know, parents may be worried about or what not. And then you got how the kids or the families may not necessarily be playing for your brand. You know, they're trying to position themselves. I hate this part of our game in high school now transfers people moving high schools, you know? Yeah, it's tough. I think we talked about that and I'm sure you're in texas, correct? Yeah. And I'm sure in texas it's even harder. I mean, those kids probably move all the time. There's a ton of high schools. I mean, the city just north of us. Uh, you know, they got 11 high schools, you know, and kind of open enrollment move around if you want to, you live in the city, But yeah. You know, so you could be moving around and uh, it's just tougher for us to try to handle certain parts of that, especially when you take away from what we really want to do at this age, mentoring kids try to help them through the adversities, understanding, you know, and preparing them for life after football or life after high school. Um, yes, they have their dreams and they should have their dreams about, you know, Oh, yeah, yeah. And then you have to, like, my first question to my kids was always, do you want to play football after high school? I don't care what level is, do you want to, Right? And then if I had kids come up to me, I don't care who they were. I said, all right, then, well, whatever your level is of what happens in your career, we'll find a place for you to play football, might be Division three, might be whatever. And if you don't want to, that's cool, too. And, and you know, then I'll then that helps you, that helps me. There's no pressure, you know, like, because sometimes the parents are so bad, like, the kid doesn't want to play, but the parents are like, we're, you know, we got to get him a scholarship and I'm like, it's not gonna happen, don't work like that. Yeah, yeah. You know, and um so, so you're there, what do you think that the mole the coach that taught you the most that helps you coach now, Like, that you learned from, was it college, was it? Um You know, somebody in the...

NFL who taught you, like, where you get your, kind of coaching skills from your dad from way back when, uh, you know, there's actually, I think I moved myself after a few people. Um, I'll tell you one of them is in high school was my high school defensive court name. His name is Bubba Lewis, but he probably had the biggest impact on me early on because he really showed what you were talking about, Hey, what do you want to go to school? What do you want to do? Hey out, you know? And so we're always talking about off the field stuff, but he really dove into really trying to help me. Um, so that helped me as a coach to being able to do like what you said, that was a high school, uh, college. Um, I had a couple of really good coaches, but Bill Oliver, who is our defensive coordinator at the Alabama, really taught me about film study how to actually do it the correct way and how to get the statistical stuff and and things of that nature. So I try to preach that the kids now and how to watch film. Um and then in the pros there's a couple mike Zimmer who is the head coach of the Minister right now. Clancy Pendergast. Yeah, I remember that name. And Arizona Cardinals playing cowboys, He's being with us sea cow. Anyway, all those guys really started to, you know, show me about coaching and how they related to players even at that level, how you could actually, You know, mentor a 30 year old, right? You shouldn't mouth um you know, high level football. So I still talk to them a lot now. That's good. I still talk to Clancy a lot now I do call when I'm playing them option teams man, you know, because we were all texas, then we got to play this one option team. Like all right, there's this new veer out now, you know, How do we stop this and single wings making its return? Well, you know, it's amazing to me that that that you're doing that. I think that comes from what your mom said, you got to give back, you know, and what a better way. I always say like we got our PhD in football, right? I mean that's what we did for a long time. I don't know how many years you were in. I was in 25 total with going through, you know, when I was young, hold up through the NFL it's a lot of years that we spent a lot of knowledge that we gained and I always say like, if I can go and share that with somebody, it's, it feels really good to teach a kid, um something new that they haven't learned guys, Let me tell you this and you made me think about this and my mom has passed away, okay. But she was getting into football, So I got six older brothers, two older sisters. Um but I didn't know if I was going to play football or not really, actually, I'll tell you why because I want to be pay late, remember? Oh yeah, on the german soccer team and I was really good at it. And how many times you practice a bicycle kick? Oh man. All the time. I think that stretch marks about that. Um but I'm saying that because when I came, when I came to Alabama was the first time that I had to make a choice, a decision in high school, I couldn't play football and you couldn't play soccer, that was just a rules. So we had to choose. Um I was smaller at the time, it's about 100 and £55. I thought it was gonna be running back if I played football with all these dudes that Jeff Davis high school running back to 185 192 £100 I'm 1 55 like this ain't gonna work right? Um So I decided to play soccer. Gus I did really until I got home and told my folks that and my mom pulled me aside. It's a...

...let's talk about this and she talked through this and convinced me to go play football and not soccer. And she actually talked me into going into playing defensive back. That's how she got it. So she was really step so well what are your strengths? What are your weaknesses? You know? So we talked about speed and physical illness and that's okay if you can't be the running back, you're worried about running running back, where else can you go? You know, how do you catch? You know, these are the kind of questions. No, so it all lead over to this defensive back thing she said, so well, didn't you need to go out there and you need to go play try out for the team as a defensive back? See if that will work for you? Well, your your mom sounds like a heck of a woman because I don't think and she must have understood football to see your skill sets to say this is what you should be doing instead of soccer because most moms would be like soccer is going to be way better. You're not gonna get hit as much. Yeah, And I just think that, you know, so I'm thankful and when I talk to people like this about our parents, you know, oftentimes we as kids don't want to listen to our parents, particularly our moms or whatever it is. And in this case, hey, my mom was right. You know, a couple of years later I am getting a scholarship to the University of Alabama. Four years later, I'm getting drafted into the National Football League. I don't know what it would have been. You know, if I went down to soccer out. But I know I had some parents where, you know, they could guide and talk and say, okay. So my encouragement to everyone is a man. Sometimes our parents, they really do know what they're talking about, right? Yeah. Well they, you know, it's called life experience. You know what I mean? They've made a million. Your parents especially made a ton of choices and decisions because of all the movies you make and it's not easy, you know, I can't imagine what it was like for them with all those kids moving all the time. I mean I kind of know, I mean we moved a lot, but we only had three. Well yeah, no it was it was very difficult. I mean you were probably always the last one. Like it's George here, there probably always wondered where you were, where is he, what's going on there? So I wanted to, you know, kind of the, when you got six older brothers, I had to pick on somebody. They yeah, they probably helped with some of my toughness. Uh I know it helps with some of my toughness because you have to catch, you know, a bunch of balls being thrown at you um or at least knock them down. I think that's why I became a good defensive back because I had to find a way to make sure I didn't get hit. Um So anyway, it was just, you know, I want to make sure I shared that because it was, you know, that's a big critical point in my life. Yeah, no, that's great. I think it's that's, you know, as a parent and I'm sure you've done this with your kids, I've done this with my you try to not tell them what to do, but you kind of give your uh kind of what you see, you know, that's kind of what I feel like she did to you, this is what she saw and let's sit down and talk about it, you know, I'm not gonna tell you what to do, but I'm gonna give you more choices than maybe you think you had. That's right. That's exactly right. There were so many experiences because I didn't have so many older siblings too. At that time, I wasn't looking at through that lens. They saw what happened when my brother graduated in Germany, have my brother, they graduate overseas. Uh he's fine. He's successful. But his, his he was a very, very good football player. He was awesome. But his career stopped at that point because yeah, when going to college, play college, you know, there and he couldn't get back in the States to, to make it on the team. So um wisdom, knowledge above the elderly, I'm scoring it right here. That's us now, That's us, that's us. Where's JT jt listen to this? You should be...

...listening to this. Yes. You know, Jt is an old soul. Is he does help me with our with our podcast and things of that nature. He's is way more mature at his age and you know, I could ever imagine To be, I do have a daughter who is 21. You didn't get a chance to meet her. She just graduated from U. T san Antonio. Oh wow. She would be a media as well. So she's going to come in at some point on teague steak. Oh absolutely. Yeah. Yeah, she's good. She's she's good. She's going to be the one running the show pretty soon. Yeah. Yeah. So you play in the NFL for a long time, You play with some incredible people. Like I have, what's your favorite memory of your time playing in the NFL? What's the one thing like if somebody like I like I'm asking you now, what is your memory that you go to that you say this is what I kind of think of when I think of my career um I think I go early into my career because I had the opportunity to play with Reggie White and he's showed me a different side of I want to say people football players I guess being a minister that he brought a dynamic into that locker room that he was so tenacious and you know what you're talking about, he's hip toss and all these kind of people that he could come back in and come to my house and literally start talking to me about financial growth. You know how to be a good man um introducing you to people and my family, my wife, you know had a newborn that you know he when he walked into my house and when I did not know into there and he's like man T. G. I need to talk to you man, I need to get you on the right path in the um that I always go back to. Its not a play, I've had some place, you know, and doing those things uh yeah, I can talk about that all the time, but with that part of my early part of my career and having someone really trying to pull you aside and say, hey man, take care of your business this way and you can be successful. That that helped me a bunch because it carried me when I had adversity, you know, when I got when I did get traded from Green Bay to get cut from the falcons. It's so true though. Like you coaches aren't talking to you about that stuff, General managers aren't talking to, you know, there's people they bring in to talk like the guy, you know, the team has like Stafford to help the players and all that. But it's people that have been there that are veterans that kind of show you the path and what you should be doing and just know that like, dude, your money can be gone in an instant if you don't take care of it, you know what I mean? Like and and then you need to have, because it's about your career isn't long. You know, when we're 20, we think we're going to play forever and all of a sudden we're in our thirties and we're like, how much longer than I got. Yeah, it's over. But now I love that, I love that I played with Reggie and a Pro Bowl and and it was like every time he sat in the bus, I just tried to sit by him, you know, because I know we're on the same team so he wasn't going to hit me. I was pretty happy about that. I cannot imagine being a quarterback boss. Uh, I commend you for that and all the quarterbacks to do that. But that Russia getting the child and have their telling you standing there and take the hit and throw the ball. Well, your own defense boss. Uh, what's his name? Who was a defensive tackle for you guys at Dallas Big Cat? Yes, leon. Leon Lett So leon trey johnson sets them short, sets them trade, johnson's are left guard. Big dude leon just swiped him across like this. Like he was not even there. And I just remember, I still talk about this. He's running directly at me with...

...his hands up in the air. He had to be 10 ft tall, doing that. And I think I threw it to like the back, but it was incomplete or something, you know. And then he hit me and north goes, the guy was wide open. Why don't you throw it to him? And I stopped the film and I said, do you see who's like run ahead me? Like you need to tell the receiver to get open faster, that dude's massive. It's some good times. But uh, it is tough sometimes. So George tell all of our fans, everybody what you're doing now and how they can follow you. Yeah. So I am a high school football coach of john paul, the second high school and playing on texas. But I do have my own podcast. It's called Ticks Take Me and my son and instagram at Teague Teague football, Teague football both on twitter and instagram. You can follow the podcast that takes take podcast on twitter, instagram and facebook. Um, so we do that. We have guests on. We really enjoyed, we'll be in a full year into it now. So we're calling this the knicks Series. This is the season to write season two coming up. I was, was I the last guy in season 1? Uh, your first down Susan to know you're the last one. So we're switching, we're going to start up. Yeah, in july you guys finished in style. I like it. Yeah, we always say that last. But yeah, I loved it. It was, it was, it was, we had a great time. I love how you do it. Um, and I love that you have your son on there. It's it, that was a great thing. You know, you guys have a good, good command. He does seem like an old soul. Jt yeah, yes he is. And thank you for having me on man for inviting me to come be a part of this too. I do appreciate it very much. We'll catch up again. We'll definitely, definitely thanks George and maybe next time I'm gonna wear my, my little Washington football team hat and I'll wear my Washington gear so that we can kind of match up what, what I'm going to tell you what we're gonna do for the family and now we're, we're not, but we're going to do something between when the Redskins play the cowboys, we can also do Minnesota and Green Bay to All right, There you go. So we, we think outside the box and we'll do something fun. Alright buddy. Alright. Hey everyone, thanks for joining us and huddle up with Gus. I want to thank my guest today. George. Teague, check him out on his podcast, takes take podcast and you can follow him on twitter at Teak football. So um I really appreciate everyone listening. Uh don't forget to submit your questions to me. Any questions you have about the NFL or other sports. So Jacob Julius was our guy this week, jake. Hey buddy, thanks for submitting your question. Please go to my uh website, huddle up with Gusts dot com and subscribe and like and we really appreciate everyone listening. And don't forget to go to Vegas sports advantage. Put in my code, huddle up and save 25% when you bet now. So thanks Digital. 16 31 Digital news. Thanks brian. Thanks terry and thanks Sounder F. M. And thank you George for joining me on how to up with Gus and that's a wrap sportsman. Thanks for joining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios For another actually, huddle up with Gusts featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parent huddle up with Gus is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available on apple music.

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