Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Gabrielle Reece

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

American professional volleyball player, fashion icon, and model, Gabrielle Reece joins the huddle. We hear from Gabrielle about her transitions through sports and life, her relationship with surfer Laird Hamilton, and her new business! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome to our PODCAST, huddle up with gusts, where we talked to guests about how sports help shape their life. I'm your host, former NFL quarterback, gusts fraud, and I'm joined by my longtime friend and coach, Dave Hagar. We are a RADIOCOM original podcast and you can find us on the new RADIOCOM APP or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcast. Now let's get in the huddle. Hi Everyone, Gust right here with hollow up with gusts and we're excited for another great show and great guests. I'm joined here with my cohost, Dave, and Dave just another incredible guest that we get to talk to and hear their story about how sports shaped their life. One of the most recognizable figures in sports and fashion. Everyone's everyone is well aware of yeah, I think that if you and I played her in beach volleyball, she would beat us single handedly by herself. If you and I are on the same team, there's no doubt in my mind I would be exactly like that right. So, joining us in the Huddle Today, Gabrielle Re's Gabby. Thank you for joining us and we are so excited to have you on. Hi, gentlemen, thank you. And you know it's funny, is I wouldn't you ever have this experience where you like, you do something for a while at a certain time, but then a whole generation goes by and really you have the opportunity to be reintroduced in new ways to new groups because you know you're from another time. Oh, I you know, it's funny. I get that all the time because when I go to talk to kids or or you know, I played in the NFL for fifteen years and right the kids today don't really know me or remember me or you know, unless you were one of the big, big stars. It's just at it. What were they wear? Your shoe, like Michael Jordan lives on in Briand Jordan. But right, I think it's but I think that's kind of I mean, not only is that a typical where every group has their own heroes, you know actually, but I think it's it's just completely natural. Well, you know what you've been you've been redesigning your image and yourself over these last so many years and it's been exciting to kind of read your bio, read your history, what you're doing, because you have been reinventing yourself and transitioning from facetoface, and that's what a lot of our show is about, is how we make transitions through our life to get us to where we are and how really sports started that for us. So right. So we want to start to when you were a child. What was that first influencer, that first love of sports that you had? You know, I was a late bloomer. I grew up in the Virgin Islands and there wasn't a you know, a big infrastructure for organized athletics and so, you know, I would say I lived an active lifestyle by what? But I wasn't, you know, an athlete like tag, like, Oh, this is what you do. And then when I was in the ten grade there was a gentleman named Kenny who was coaching a volleyball team and they were a lot older than I was and he would drive me to practice and I sort of got my first taste for that. When I was in ten grade I was quite tall. I was probably very close to six foot three already, and then when I was fifteen, in my junior year, I moved to St Petersburg, Florida, because growing up in St Thomas was amazing. But there wasn't really I didn't really have a direction, let's say, and so I think my mother decided it might be best for me to to be in a different environment. So I was moved to St Petersburg, Florida. I went to a very, very small, tiny little school that literally if you had any athletic ability or you wanted to be seen or recognized for that, you went to a you would move on. So when I walked in it at fifteen, at six foot three, they were excited, but they know I actually didn't know what I was doing and I had a brilliant basketball coach. They went to states that year. I had never played basketball and he got me up...

...to speed within reason. So my my junior and senior year, I played basketball and volleyball and I was invited to a BC camp for basketball and I think once I went to that, it's about a four day camp. Of It's sort of a yarn. It's an invited camp and it would be all the girls or boys who go on to probably play Division One. Yeah, and I realized then that maybe I wasn't tough enough in a certain way for basketball, and so I had six offers. I had like thirty two offers for basketball and six for volleyball, and I took an eight hour visit. One of them was to Florida State and the coach there, s silver or nod, who actually is still a very dear friend of mine. She came to visit last week. When she dropped me off in the car, she said, well, I think you have a lot to offer Florida state and we have a lot to offer you and I don't know why you wouldn't want to come here. And I was like, Huh, that's a really interesting thing, and I went there and it was a really it was you know, it's like you make those decisions that really end up being the best for you, and being playing under her and learning from her and being mentored as a human being by her kind of set help set the structure up for everything else that was going to happen. Right. So, if we go back to when you're in the Virgin Islands, like so, you're saying there wasn't pete did kids go out and played it. We're like groups of friends where you guys would ride your bikes around like so. A lot of our guests talk about that, that they had these groups and would go right play every week. So it was a little different for you when you were younger. Do you really didn't have that direction? Yeah, you know, I did have a paired in my life, but I was very young, from two to seven, where I lived in a traditional neighborhood in Long Island, New York. I wasn't living with either one of my parents. I was actually living with a couple that grew up with my mother and in that environment I had that you know, it's like I'll ride my bike down to your house and then we'll do whatever. But then once you moved, I moved to the Caribbean. I you know, was I lived in a super remote place. You get you'd kill yourself if you wrote a boat a bike on my hill and you wouldn't be able to get it back up the hill. You have to walk it. So it wasn't that traditional. Yes, we'd meet at the beach and be active, but it's just a really different structure and also what's celebrated or encouraged. You know, in the in the mainland of the United States, athletics is like a sort of a real part of the everyday life and the fiber of the culture and they're not so much. And most of us came from like kind of wonky families, you know. And and so it really came late later for me as far as organized athletics. That had to be a going from the Caribbean to St Petersburg, that it'd be a big transition for you. Oh yeah, and and and also, like I grew up, you know, the the Virgin Islands can be a little bit wild, quite frankly, and then I was put into a school called Kazik Christian school, which was highly conservative. So I was also not only switching locations, I was and cultures even, but now I was switching a whole you know, kind of there were. They had a very specific belief system at Kezik which really ended up impacting me in a very positive way. But it was, it was a very big transition and I think, quite frankly, if, like, I look at the whole landscape of everything, and I've talked about this a lot, was what do you do when you're not groomed to be a champion? And how do you not only accept that and receive it, but, you know, how do you, and especially female athletes, how do you give yourself permission to say it's okay to win, it's okay for things to kind of go your way, and it has taken me years and years and years really to allow that, because what...

I what I say is none of us really deserve anything. Right, like you see plenty of people who work hard and they and it doesn't go their way, and some people work less but they have more physical talent or they have a propensity for something in education and they thrive. It's like, okay, I'm occupying a space right now and I'm going to do the most with with that opportunity, and not like analyze I don't deserve it. Oh, I do deserve it, but, sir, I always just say basically, it's grace and if you're going to occupy that space, that portal, you know, why not do it in a big way? Right, right, exactly. Um, Gabby, going back to when you're in high school and being recruited for basketball and volleyball, thirty two offers for hoops. That's a lot of offers. With a some big schools like the major power fives, or was it a variety of different school yeah, it was variety. was like from West Point to like schools in Oklahoma and you know, things like that. But when you go to those BC camps, that's kind of what happens, right. It's like there you're in a barrel, and so the coaches come and really check out. I mean there were some highly talented athletes there. And and in volleyball I only played two club tournaments, so I just I was so late everything. But again, I was six foot three, you know, coordinated enough, and and what I ended up being actually my biggest strength was was I'm coachable. Right, quite fully right. And so do you think, when you came to the states, that sports really helped you integrate into a different society? Because I believe that, like when my kids went to college, I wanted them all to play sports because you have an instant family. That, yeah, help me through so many situations. It definitely did. It sort of, you know, we all want that tribe, if you will. And even at being six with three is a fifteen year year old girl. It was like, Oh, do you place? You know, volleyball or basketball, and it was like Oh yeah, oh, that's why you're so tall. Yeah, okay, sure, you know, but it does give you that sense of belonging and just help you transition through things that can be hard. I mean being thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, these are this is a hard transition, and then, once again, leaving home and going on to college. I really felt the impact of it in college because I did have a heavy duty system in place right like we had coaches and people who were saying, not only this is your school schedule, here's your practice schedule, here's your study hall twice a week, so you have academic support in that transition of managing your own schedule. So everything was pretty pinned out. And I came in on a twelve person team with seven other freshmen, so I was also going through the experience with a lot of people. It wasn't just me or one other person, and that all makes all of that easier for sure. Right and and I feel the same way because when I left Pittsburgh and went to Tulsa to go to school, I actually grew went there with about twelve people from my area where I grew up. Yeah, it made the transition either. We had a lot of things in common, so you didn't get home sick, so you didn't feel that singled out frustration, which was really nice for me and help me be successful. I really believe that. And the and the workload is a transition. That's the thing. When you went from High School football to to college, the speed of things, the amount of load. Now manager classes, on your own, getting yourself to and from places, but that extra, that athletic load, transitioning to that is also, I think, something that people don't realize is is very challenging. And then again, what if someone has the opportunity go to the pros? You know that athletic load is just one not even heavier, and so people don't realize how much athletes they're playing in college, what they're going through. You know, Guss Gabby...

...and I have something in common that. I don't know if she's certainly not aware of. A grieview. Maybe was that? Um I too was a resident of the Virgin Islands. I live in seeing John. Yeah, you're lucky. Well drives us. Sorry, Boston. Well, I'll say it only lasted about three or four months and I went after college. And you mentioned there was a little lack of direction mine. Yeah, you were drinking a lot and there was working. Well, that was sporadic. The drinking was consistent, the work was sporadic. Absolutely but kind of, like you said, your mom kind of pulled you out of there because of a little my parents did, but I was twenty three at the time and they yeah there, but yeah, so, yeah, that just a little. Do you enjoy it where you're there? I did enjoy yeah. Well, I thought the interesting thing was like where I lived, there's no locks on the doors and no glass windows. It was just screams and, like you just, yeah, asted everyone. And no cars either. was like one car had urs off of it, didn't you met the thing, probably right. I'm sorry, a thing. I think it right. Exactly. What did you mention? They thought you were in the military all the time, everywhere you went. Well, I remember, yeah, like my first day there. I really short hair at that time too, and I remember sitting at the bar and no one would speak to me for an hour and a half and I'm going, well, this kind of sucks. You know, welcome to the island day, if you know. Yeah, and then finally the bartender said, wait, you're not in the military, are you? And I said no, and they go, Oh my God, I'm so sorry, we thought you were. Sometimes a wantry people come and cause a lot of have yeah, and you know, so they were. They wanted me out of there, but that was, yeah, true, that was your that was your interest. And also moving there, not to hog the interview. Moving there, I heard the ratio, the female to male ratio. I heard with seven to one female to males. I think, wow, it's going to be I might have a chance. It's the Oh the way, it's the opposite. Yeah, and so I was not welcome by the other males there because it was like, Oh, here's another one. Great, John's small enough. So you got out of those fast you could, I think. You know, I think my parents pulled me out of there as yeah, the five dollar USA Today is were expensive to trying to keep up with the pirates, you know. Yeah, yeah, we're both pittsburghers and we love anything Pittsburgh, like the pirates, the steelers and and the penguins. But it's been a tough year for us here with the pirates. Yeah, pretty bad. I don't know. I don't know if you get any of the pirate news in Hawaii, but likely, unlikely. The youse said their farm club, the white islander. You mean? I'll have those boys have been inappropriate. You mean? Well, they've been a little bit of that. One of them. They very, really, really bad this year. So it's been tough. Yeah, you've been bad on and off the field. Yeah, I get it. Yeah, and then you got any of you guys just you don't have been and so I know, Oh yeah, for the steelers, you got hurt. So that that's now. It's a tough one, but I think Mason's going to come in and yeah, and they're gonna he's going to find his stride. He's going to do you got it. Definitely. He's gonna find like the consummates sports fan, right, like optimiss some the blind optimism we have said you got to keep. That usually ends in severe disappointment. But as all, right, now it's good. Right. So you're in college, you're you know, I read that you were in college for a few years and then you went on to modeling, like you left and then came back. So that was another transition you went through. How did you handle all that? Well, because I basically was pretty independent, meaning I had to net, you know, navigate life on my own. I went to college at Seventeen and so I was on a scholarship and then the summer after I had gotten offers to model before, but I thought, okay, I'm going to focus on God jointing high school, and then when I got college opportunities, I thought I'll keep that momentum going go to college. And that summer I was really fortunate. It's all about timing and I was working quite a bit lived in New York.

So then I went back to school for my sophomore season to play ball. That went to two days in August and then that December after my sophomore season, I gave up my scholarship and I paid to play because, once I did the math, I was taking a calculated risk it. I could make a decent amount of money in modeling to navigate for my life and I could pay to play and and sort of do do both. And then what my coach did for me was in the January spring season I was allowed to go back to New York to work and then I would come to for summer to have credit, get credits to be eligible under NCAA ruling to play, and so I did that for my remaining two years and my coach and I had a real deal, which is like when you're here, you're here and you can then then you can go for spring and so I juggled that for about two and a half years. And then you still had to go to class as well, right, you have to maintain a certain amount of credit. But no, I had to. Yeah, of course. I mean I was doing the work. What was your major? I was originally, because I didn't know what I wanted to do, a business major because it sounded responsible. And then once I was taking economics and and accounting, I was like, you know, this is stupid. Why am I doing this? And so I I lobby to get myself in the school communications because you needed like a three five. But See, by then I was already working, yeah, and being interviewed and I said, listen, you can put me on academic probation if I don't keep a three whatever, you can kick me out of the school. I go, but who right now is going to use it more than me? And they let me do it and I I naturally was that was probably the right major for me. Yeah, I mean just how many interviews, if you've done in your life since you left Florida? Course, yeah, and then I even like I've written. You know, I wrote columns for years. I've written books, I've in I've interviewed tons of people, you know, doing my own shows, and so it was a skill set and public speaking and such which I know you can relate to. It just was all it sort of was something that I felt really pretty comfortable with. Not Perfect, but comfortable. What was your first paid modeling job? When you when you made it to New York? You know, it's interesting. I was thinking about this the other day because I ran into this guy who's like, Oh, you know, I'm Bob from Ogilvia may there, which is a huge ad agency right, and I was like, Oh my God, Ogilvia may there. So I was the air and I was doing a lot of magazine work which, let's be clear, you get paid nothing. You get paid two hundred dollars a day when you do editorial because it's good for you, right, it's exposure for you, right. So what they say is like, the more editory you get, then your day rate goes up and if people want to use you for advertising, that goes up. So you have to kind of play that game. And so I was doing a ton of editory, like going to meet this woman from Ogilva may there and she says, this woman JV Sutherl, and I'll never forget her, and she goes. You know, I really like you, want to find you a job and there's a brand called to text and I have even though my hands are big and I beat them up and I lift weights and do all this stuff, I have pretty good looking hands at the time. And so they hired me for q text for thirty five hundred dollars for the day. I was eighteen and I like put my hand on some guy's chest and then maybe a little in my face and I opened a bank account got a credit card from that job. So it was great. Wow, it worked. After George Ga stands also, I know, right right, also in New York and right. Yeah, you had to walk around like they have people coming in with white gloves and all stuff, and I was like very hard on my hands, but whatever. But how excited were you to get paid for your first time, like just I mean that would be such a good feeling. I was always very much about survival and and also, so I think I was not only excited, I was very relieved because I it was always very clear to me that I had to...

...figure it out, and so these were just opportunities that sort of helped do that for me. Yeah, because we just we interviewed Morton Anderson, and Morton and I were talking about when he went to college and he got a full scholarship. He had nothing like. Yeah, they paid for his college, but he still had an he can't be laundry. Yeah, can't do laundry. You're not going to go to the movies. You know you're not. If he meets a pretty girl, he's not going to take her on a day and I think that sometimes that's the very interesting part, like going to Florida state, which is a very big football school. Obviously you know Dean Sanders, who's still a friend of mine, was there when I was there. Like you're talking about, these guys come there in this sort of big rich program and they don't also realize some of the other things that the athletes have to navigate, which is like beyond books and the food that you get at school, if your parents, you know, can't really help you, you know, what do you? What are you supposed to do? So yeah, I mean it's an interesting lesson and I think, especially for some athletes, it should I think it would be a reasonable conversation to have on. Like how do we support them also so they don't have to get themselves into situations that maybe aren't good for them? Right? Well, California's trying to figure that out right now. Right. Yeah, they just passed that. So athletes connected to make money off their name or whatever it is. But I remember that my family made too much money for me to get a pail grant, and so my dad said, all I can afford to send you is like fifty bucks a month. Yep, you know, and he bought me a nine hundred dollar car. He said good luck. Can I went to college and I had fifty bucks in my pocket every month. That was it. Yeah, it's heavy and you think about that. That's all I had to do is spend it on gas, because that's you know that. It's just crazy. But yeah, but so many kids came and got Pale grants and things like that, and even that wasn't a lot, but it helped them, as you know, because there are nights that you have to go out be with your friends and social yeah, and do those things, and everything costs money. It does, and I think it's an important balance where. I mean, listen, weirdly, like it's this fine line of like hey, this is how the real world is, to where there's an element of stress around, you know, paying bills and things like that. But you don't want to have somebody who switched their whole life. They've left home. There have a huge workload, not only athletically, now they have it academically. They're also the expectationist for them to perform on some level in school and certainly even a higher level in athletics, and then go oh and now you're going to stay awake at night because you're not sure if you know, because you're managing that other stress. So I do think it is, like I said, worth a reasonable conversation for sure. Um, yeah, so when you got to Florida state, you said that it was a very young team. Did you have pretty immediate success, because I think you own several records and I mean you were obviously very accomplishable about player tod that right away when you got there. Oh No, I mean I had to play right away. My first game, I think, was against Penn State, maybe at the University of Florida, which, if you know anything about sports, you know gators and sminoles. But I just remember thinking, Oh my God, I just want to stay out of the way and I hope I don't the ball doesn't come to me. And so I went through that quite a bit because I was learned. I was learning to play on the fly, like I was in college, and I was like learning on the fly kind of and and I think I got into a groove and then participated, certainly by my freshman year, and then it just went from there. It's weird having records still there because maybe I always felt, you know, when they talked about imposter syndrome or things like that. Maybe I always felt that a little bit, you know, because I was continuously learning, and so I was like am I I don't even know if I'm a good player or not. I know I play, I know I participate, I just I never really knew. Did you play middle? What was your position? Oh, yeah, so the middles like the center on a basketball team.

You're typically the largest player. Now, though, in modern volleyball sometimes you will see like a giant left side hitter that just hits over the block perfect. So they added that dynamic into volleyball, since I play, but typically the middle was sort of the big person that, you know, was protecting the net. My daughter's played high school volleyball and, okay, the one is a middle she's the tallest on a team. She's almost five hundred and ten or so. Yeah, so walking she gets a nice amount of blocks, but she's not what do they call roofing? Is that the roofing Rab a? She's not doing that at all. I'm still learning volleyball. There was a girl who played on the USA team long time ago, like early s Tammy Lily. She was maybe, I don't know, if I've ten to six feet, I don't quite remember, but she played international volleyball for the US team w which you're talking about the best volleyball in the world, and what she had was she read very well and her hands. She had very good hands, and so she wasn't roofing people, but she was closing the block and touching everything. And so sometimes people have to realize, like for your daughter, that it it. You don't have to be six five, because, by the way, they have many girls in the middle now. They're six five, six seven, and yes, there's advantages, but if you can read what's happening and move quickly and respond quickly and close the block and use your hands, you can be really effective. But yeah, hitting also, though, from the middle on the quicks it does help when you're taller because you just have a higher, you know, touch point right, that you're contacting the ball a lot better angle right. Well, maybe Gabby you yes, she can help us out with your question you had because I asked Dave, like what's his biggest pet peeve or what bothers him the most when he goes to the Games, and he said, well, it's in when they call a time out, all the all the girls that are on that what are you calling? Well, like that. So for high school, like the light, they would have like the GE, sort of like Varsi's playing made have GV do the lions, you know, like yeah, in each corner. Oh yeah, but then it like time outs. It's always weird because they like the lion. WHO's the guy who stand is on the stand, like the what's his the judge or whatever? Yep, rough, yeah, yeah, they always come to this guy and then it I only see it from the back and he tells jokes and everyone's laughing. It's like a court gesture type of the day. said, he just wants to know what's going on. In there. You know that's go on with you. My daughter's like I don't know what they're talking about, but everyone's like laughing, having a good time, and I always think it's it's looks sort of odd because the the guys usually like in his s and these are like rols in high school and stuff. But it's just looks odd the but I's sure why had a time out. The lions judges have to go and talk to the upper that's what we don't I should just be there looking at the clock ready to go. No, they would. It never happened. So and then and then he has them like put on the part helping him. What's up? Start Heckling him. Well, yeah, like the other's getting well, they're struggling for playing time as it is, so I don't know they should, but but yeah, and then the girls will like bump back and forth and he'll watch and stuff. It's just a weird thing and it's been going on. They're Jesus. And so it's just Pennsylvania. I maybe volleyball. That wasn't going on in Same Peter. It's Lucy Douce, my coach, would have pitched, you know, she would have been like that's not happening. Unfortunately, it is here and I'm just wondering why. I can tell you that you have a professional id it get it gives your daughter's a chance to meddle up, which is like that shouldn't impact you. Right like, there's all kinds of b ass going on always, whether it's in sports or in life, and it only impacts you if you say I'm gonna get that. Let that thought or that action or what they're doing impact me instead of like, okay, we're in a time out. What's our strategy? What are we going to do? And I'm focusing, not I see that and I could see that it could potentially irritate me, but...

I'm not like and I think because I think if you can do that in your life, it's certainly a lot better. Well, yeah, distractions. If you let things distract you, you're dad. You're done, your dad. And again, we just talked about Heckler's right in in football. Is Well, yeah, whether it's the opposing team or people in the stands, if you let them get to you, you you're not going to be able to focus on what you're doing. And I said, I'm never really paid attention because it was so focused on what I had to do on the field. Yeah, none of that is like white noise. They just D weren't there. We were just having I was just having this conversation with my husband today. He he has had a sort of a misunderstanding with a friend of his and and it's an you know, it's an important friend. It's on a friend he sees all the time, but it's somebody cares for deeply and this friend maybe isn't the best communicator. And by I think, basically laird got to the point where he said, you know, I really care for you and if I need to apologize, let's get on the phone, let's work it out and let's go back to being friends before we die. Like that's what he said and I thought to myself, in a way, that's all we can do, is like we can only control ourselves. So to your point about distraction and and like why are those girls talking? And it's like that has nothing to do with us. And the more you can practice that discipline in anything going on, even it's like hey, I have a conflict with somebody, so I'm going to do my part and whatever they decide to do will be on them, but then I can I can be free of it. I think when things irritate us, or they have the right to irritate us, is when we haven't really actually been responsible for our part. And so your daughter can just use it as an as some exercise in in like mental you know, kind of a mental practice, if you will, or a meditation of like okay, I could see where that really might piss me off, but you know what, I'm not going to. I mean, I do some training like that in the pool, where it's like you can see things, but the thing is you're under the water and so if you react, you actually won't be able to complete your task because your run out of air because of the emotion that you will have used and you will burnt oxygen. So instead you have to be like, Huh, I see it, but I can't actually afford to react to it. And like, if you ask me about sport and training and all of that, that's, for me, the most powerful stuff that you take out a sport. It isn't like I did this and I hit balls and I have records. It's like I use that platform to help myself learn better techniques in trying to help me navigate life right. So you talk about distractions. I can't imagine what your distraction is like, especially when you finish college, you're modeling and then you still want to play the sport that you love, probably at that point where you go on to play be a professional beach volleyball player, but then you're also modeling too, and so I'm sure they're calling you, but you want to play, you know. So how did you handle those two different things for yourself? You know, listen, I always looked at modeling as a huge opportunity and a job. I was really clear with that. I identified more with being an athlete, for sure. So all I did is I fell into playing beach volleyball. Again, here I go like, Oh what, and pick up each volley. Well, after college I had a never I never played. I moved to Miami instead of back to New York. I picked up the beach game with the help of some very nice people and after about eighteen months of that, this woman, Barber Berman, who I played with, was like you should move to California and try to pursue a professional career, and I was like okay. And so, you know, it's great when you don't know better. And then I started playing and once I sign my Nike deal, I actually, I would say, stopped modeling in that obvious way. And the gift to me was I could use all my experience and modeling, like well, who's shooting it and what's the concept, to actually help navigate and construct the image that then I used...

...to help support me as a professional athlete. And so really I only had to model, let's say, from eighteen to twenty two in that traditional way, right, and then after that I tried to do everything as myself, this professional athlete, but the image, it would still sometimes be perceived as more modeli because I was always aware that, for whatever weird reason, culturally that had more impact. Yeah, I can see that, and you know, like and I like how you said that, like you learned to be like the traditional model, but then you wanted to be recognized as who you are, and you know, and you felt probably like you were this. You know, you came up and you had to learn everything about Vol lleyball. You were ingrained in you had a great coach and that's who you were, that's what you wanted to be. But you also knew that there was a side job that I can do, you know, as they say, a side hustle. But yeah, but then you were able to make that I'm a volleyball just like in football. Right, I'm a football player. I'm going to go do a shoot as a football player. Yes, somebody else. So yes, interested to take it one step further because I was in women's sports. I somehow knew if I could pull some of the image over from modeling into sport without I always said if I was training super hard and producing numbers, that that would be okay, that as long as they sort of stayed balanced. Because again, and you know this is a longer discussion, there's always a debate about what's unfair about women's athletics. Right, Oh, you know how you look, and all these things were men. It's just throw up statistics, all the stuff. But also it's like sort of understanding. There's a biological elements going there's a lot of stuff going on around that, and so I just said, okay, well, I recognize this and as long as I am genuinely working hard and really honoring being an athlete and representing being an athlete, then I'm comfortable with playing a little bit that chessboard of like looks and Bs, you know, right, right. Well, we've interviewed so we've interviewed Sally Jenkins, Christine Brennan and Leslie. This are all three of them, and who were kind of the first in what they you knows, sports, cows or yeah, borders, writers, all that stuff, and which was great. But they said the same thing where, you know, I didn't come at this as a woman. I just came at it because I loved it and I worked my tail off at it. Yeah, you know, and I didn't inspect anything to come from my peers or my boss. I just wanted to give a what I love to do and give a really good product. Yes, all three of them set the same thing as you, as you've said. So that's very interesting. You know, I have three daughters and what I teach them is, you know, because everyone could cry until the cows come home about fair and unfair. I think it's an ambiguous and unknown terrain. It's like, who are you? What can you contribute? If there are obstacles, notice them and what is your strategy to get around them? Not Stop and go. There's obstacles. It's like, and by the way, men have obstacles to and I'm going to I'm going to push and say that in some ways, whether we write realize it or not, the advantage of being a female, whether it's in sport or even, I believe, in business, is that if you're really good, there's actually less competition. Then men have to endure right it just that's because there's less women playing sports and in business, if you really have it going on, ultimately there's probably less women participating. And so I always thought, why wouldn't we look at it like that and and recognize like, okay, there's but that's for that's actually for for everyone and rather than giving the energy to the obstacle, it's put the energy into the solution over, through and around. And how do you want to do that?...

And so I've always looked at it at that. But I sort of had this realization that I went to college in one thousand nine hundred and eighty seven on a full athletic scholarship. Title Nine came into effect in about sixty eight sixty nine, so I didn't suffer being a woman there. Then I went into modeling, which pays more than ten times to women then over men. So I was in a reverse universe there. Then when I went into volleyball, I can remember the first two seasons playing foreign for the women's TV ratings were higher than the men, so we were paid more than the men, and so I also fully recognize that I've had a very different experience. Right, yeah, I know, I get that. I think when you talk about seeing the obstacles, going over them, around them, whatever you want to call it, but that's also hard work. Right, I have an obstacle, I got to work hard to get past it, and net hard work makes me better. Yes, and and and things are not fair and maybe people should do things that they don't. And so I do always take the attitude that it is on me to to do the work to get to where it is that I want to because I believe that no one will give it to me, hand it to me, even if they should write exactly. Well, what's from a volleyball standpoint? You now you're now going to be playing professionally on the sand. What's the biggest difference between court and sand? And what was that transition like? Just from a volleyball standpoint, it was pretty brutal because I was so specialized in hitting and blocking, so having the confidence to pass and set in transition and things like that. That was very hard in just the movement. And now you've got an element. You have wind and sand at every chord is different. Sometimes it's deeper. So it will benefit the sort of more compact player that moves very well in the sand. Then sometimes it's harder pack. So if you get a real springing athlete, all of a sudden they're hitting balls that like nobody can hit on a soft surface. So it's just adjusting and adapting to the environment, to the good side, in the bad side, which you don't have an indoor because of the wind and and also in a potentially even the sun, depending on kind of the angle. And for me it was just my all around game had to really improve drastically. So did you get nervous? Did you have butterflies before you played? Yeah, I always had to use the bathroom. I always had to use the ladies room because, you know, you get those butterflies. And but I would go into a pretty deep focus, mostly from an endurance standpoint, to running around on sand. There's a lot more difficult than on the court. I mean that's another yes, big change right, oh, well beyond like you go like I thought I could jump, you can't pop. You know, the great thing is like I would take off several months after each season and then you come back for your first practices and you're just like, oh, yeah, I don't know if I can do this, and then after a couple of weeks, you know, you drop about five pounds. Just naturally the body would go yeah, you got you have to download some of this right. And the great benefit is you are on sand which is soft, so it makes you not only stronger, but it's more forgiving. And then, lastly, you're not wearing shoes, so you're able to use the whole foot, which I think in sports is so important. You know, all athletes that are in shoes, tennis players and football players and basketball players, they're they're being their feet are not only under utilized, but they're getting punished. You see toes cranking over. So the other great gift of Beach Volleyball is you're in an open foot and so everything, the arch, the toes, the ankles, is working and actually getting stronger to so you play. How many years would you play beach as a professional beach I played off and on for about eight or nine years and then I went back when I was forty. They were thinking of bringing back the four person tour and so they asked me to play, which I could play that game again because I was still playing a little bit for...

...fun and I was always training and, you know, conditioning. But they just were not able to organize that. You know, listen, they can't even have two football leagues. How could they have more than one volleyball discipline right to get real estate and in sport and and dollars is so tricky. That is very hard. So you kind of go through your career, eight or nine years, you're getting towards the end, you're saying, okay, I don't know. I mean, did you kind of have a plan what was next, or did you just fall into it, or how was that? Well, I was I was always even early in my career, by by twenty two, twenty three, I started doing MTV sports and I was writing for El Magazine. So I was always weaving the duel. So I was still developing my skill set in, you know, this other side and and so I I think I always was aware that my sport was limiting in that the platform was very small. which, weirdly, in the long run has been a gift to me because it's kept my eyes open and it's kept me developing other skills all along. Like if I played women's tennis and that's kind of all you really have to do. I mean you can make a beautiful living at women's tennis, especially if you're doing well, and so that's what you do. That's what I would do. And instead I was always doing a hustle because beach volleyball, it's great and it's and it's a beautiful sport and you have to work your butt off, but it is not a big platform. So I was always supplementing my volleyball career with this other career and and just kind of naturally saying like kind of having my mind on and well, where do I want to be now in a year and in five and just keeping my mind open instead of like the brick pump the brakes. Your careers over. Hey, what do you want to do now? That's pretty tricky. It is very difficult because that happened to me fifteen years in the same sport. Yeah, playing the sport for twenty five years and then all of a sudden it's over. At thirty eight years old and it's like what do I do now? Yeah, yeah, I coach my kids and New Sports, which is fun, but it's not a career. No. And so then been it's been since two thousand and eight since I've been done. So that transition has been tough and I love how you said I got to figure this out early and start. We yeah, together, and in football the team's the owners. You know, they don't really care if you if you do that, they just want you win games. Yeah, do that, then that's what they need. You there. You're a body filling that spot, and that's the thing is, I think it's we all have to be realistic about the place in space that we occupy and it would be better for us, even if we were at the apex of a part of our career, to think this is unsustainable. And who do who else do I want to be? Naturally not. Let me look over and see what's popular and copy that, because that seems to be cool right now. But like really ask yourself, like well, what other ways do I think I can contribute? What other natural skill sets? I mean, listen, I wasn't I wasn't attracted to gymnastics. Like I'm realistic. So it's sort of like going, well, what what do I think I really could do, and and just keep looking at that and and not thinking I'm important, I'm so great, I crush it, everybody loves me, because that will bite you in the butt when that why it's down. Yeah, and then it's like and the other thing I tell my friends that are athletes, it's like, Hey, when you've got some momentium, people are like, Yay, use that, ask for help, learn things in your offseason. People will want to help you when you're doing well. It's when you're done, you know, I just retire together. That's nice. So weirdly, like try to use that energy for these other things. Yeah, no, I agree totally, because for me, I left the NFL kind of wanted to be...

...with my family more, Ray help my wife raise the kids, do all that. Some be there. Yeah, until except for six month, tils for six months, and then you're like, oh my God, well, no, I actually lie. I love actually like I love being a Dad, I love being a husband. I have my honey do list every day. I mean I do enjoy that stuff. But then it was like, okay, I got to go out and do something else. I gotta, you know, not necessarily earn a living, but just have a contribute, contribute. You have to contribute. So I went back to the NFL's that I'd love to be a coach right after being out for like three years, and they said, Oh, yeah, that's great, but nobody would even bring me in as an intern or want to be a part of it. And it's so true. What you said is if I would have done that my last few years and said Hey, I want to be an intern, I want to do this, this is what I'm thinking for when I retired, it would have been so much easier and I would have been able to weave my way into that scenario. Love. Yeah, it's it's hard to know ahead like it's hard. It's so hard. It's always interesting how life works, right, like when we're our fastest and our strongest, we know kind of the least and as we go through life's experience and maybe we're get a little older than we sort of learn more and it helps us navigate. But I think the ultimate is always to have perspective in this weird way that we are no one right at work from that space, because if, if, meaning we're someone to our family and our friends, but in the grand scheme of it, we are no one. So work from that point because not only is it closer to the truth, it's also like you can come with humility and not be afraid to go hey, I want to try that. And you know, because it's hard sometimes if you get celebrated, it's hard to be like to humble out. Yeah, no, it really is. In the world of endorsements, I think Gabby is one of those recognizable people out there too, and always as with. What was your first endorsement deal? Was it Nike or a Real Big One? Like I mean Nike is a big one. I had. I had shoes, you know, shoe with Nike. I had, you know, a few different bigger ones, but certainly Nike was a very impactful one where they were doing television commercials when that meant, you know, that what that actually had impact at that time and and things and things like that, and and you know they when you have a company like that investing millions of dollars in your image. That's the other thing is like going wait, that's a huge opportunity. They're helping you build your image and so I was. I was pretty aware of of that. That's pretty good, because most people, like for me, if I'm twenty four, I'm not aware of any of that, right. I'm just some kid that's right out of college playing football and just and yeah, doing something I love to do and not aware of all those aspects that I could have been creating or gaining for when I got older. Well, you, you also were in a very on a in a very big stage, right. And so again, if you ask any lifestyle sport athlete, most of them are in tune with this a little sooner because they're pretty realistic about their platform. And so if I was like in the NBA or the NFL or Major League Baseball or again, tennis, it would be harder to learn that lesson. Right, right. So, kind of switching to a different thing. What's the what's the tallest wave you've ever served? Oh, come on me, I don't like small waves. Like I remember one time I was out and it was Hawaiian six feet. So that's a twelve foot face because the Hawaiians measured the back of the wave right, and I was like, yeah, I shouldn't be out here. Yeah, I I was telling day because we were looking at, you know, your bio and your husband and he's doing sixty foot ways. I'm like that's insane. I can't. I don't even like being under water, and one of those small ones when we go to the beach. It's yeah, I know it's it's intense. You get nervous for him. I mean you have to. I don't.

I wouldn't say nervous. You know the expression. You knew the job was dangerous when you took it. I mean I interviewed laird as a big wave surfer for a TV show, so I was well informed. But also you're talking about somebody who approaches their training every day and they're like if the surf is up and they're going out. It has a military type tone to it. Yeah, you know, we always says the bigger it is, a slower we move. It's like everything is meticulous. And he said in a way, if you think about it, like if I was married to a policeman or fireman, there's something a lot more predictable dealing with people. Then there is actually the ocean. Now the ocean. Of course it's dangerous and you can die and you can try and you can drown, but it's also living with a person where their skill set and their destiny, if you will, have connected and and, and I have said this many times, laird would be much more dangerous. It would be much more dangerous to live with laird if he didn't do it because I need just be be a psycho. Yeah, he be. No, from he would be. He be a psycho because it's a calling and we can't get in the way of someone's calling. And I respect him his approach and how he approaches Big Wave Surfing with the most humility and the most preparation, and I've been without almost twenty four years. And the output. Imagine if you played football and you said, well, when's the game and I'm like, I'll let you know, but be ready right and you're dealing with somebody who has to be ready for a really serious thing and you don't know when it's coming. I personally don't know how he does it and you have to have an ultimate respect for it. If you don't have a respect for it, and that's when you make mistakes. He and he hasn't because he's older. He still doesn't approach it like, Oh, I've done this a million times he is so serious and meticulous and his training is so hard and and and that's all you can do and listen. You know, life is not guaranteed for any of us, so I choose not to spend a lot of time worrying. But yeah, I mean it's an interesting profession. It is. Well, when I spend a little bit of time last summer with a Guy, a fellow sure surfing hall of Famer, as Lair it is. His name was chuck Linnen Older Guy, but eighty. Uh Huh. But I sat on the beach. We're just just be asking. But what was interesting was he would he would just stare out. Now, this is North Carolina, so that waves are a little bit yeah, but he he would go, oh, Dave, here ms one and he would just yeah, you would almost he'd go, this is going to be great, watch this, and I don't know all the terminology and waves, you know, want watch this is going to happen there. That's yeah, when I wish I was out there, he would just he would just stare and study these waves. I don't know if when you guys are on vacation or by Your House on the beach, if laird is doing that too, or it's a it's a relationship. It definitely is. I always say laard does have a girlfriend. She's big and blue, and it makes sense to him. When he's out there. He's like, it's fair, it's and you know it. The rules are the same for every person, whether their their gender or their you know, tax returns, and that makes sense to him. Yeah, yeah, I know, I get it. It's there's nothing subjective about it. It's objective. This is how you do it. This is yeah, that's it, and he in this guy would have like flashbacks, kind of like like if you're reminiscing, you through a nine nine or to Randy Moss. He would go, I remember Summer Huntington Beach, summer sixty four. Oh, there was a beauty. I just I took that all the way and he would just remember that as I mean, you know, that's what if it's your profession. I mean every person we've talked to remembers every special date to them or event that's happened to them, and it's pretty astant. Like we asked Morton what was his first kick. He named the the game, the time, the Hash Mark, the distance. Remember, you remember all those things, but you know,...

...you've been making all these transitions. Sports been such a big part of your life. What are some of the things that you're doing now to stay in in the sports business into, you know, to keep going in this for the rest of your life, because I think you've done an outstanding job of doing that. You know, I think it's again following your instincts in your gut and and just being clear with yourself on who you are and and again your strengths time weaknesses. And so, for example, we have a fitness business called xpt and it was really borne out of ten years of training of some stuff that we were doing. There's heat and nice and breathing, but there's also a pretty extensive pool. That's where I just came from arm so it's like, how can I be ballistic and train super hard and not beat myself up more? I already have an artificial knee, and so that just again came out of something Lard and I were doing naturally, and then we just figured out a way to get it organize and also have an incredible team that does that that, you know, got involved. And we have another business. Laird has a company called a layered super food and it's all coffees and creamers and that came out of a habit that laird was doing for about fifteen years. And again it's funny when you really follow your passions. That business, you know, we get these objective reports. It's called the spin reports of grocery store reports. So it's moved into second place as a natural food creamer and it you know, it has n s from it doubled in sales from August to September. And so there's some things that we're doing that it's like, okay, if it's not a movement part, if you're going to drink a coffee each day, could we make that a little healthier? Well, you know, I have to look for it because every morning I have my coffee. So well, if you, if you guys, email me your addresses, I'll send you a total care package and it'll we always say it's like bad drug dealers. You know, we give the first one for free, but we're going to get hooked. I think as you move deeper into a physical practice you start to realize that actually you have to continue to work on the harder things, which is like your emotional practice, your meditative or spiritual practice all your food is. Food is the king, like if people go I want to lose weight or do whatever, it's like you start to realize that really it's what you're eating. And then and just kind of keep trying to fine tune yourself as a human so that you can, you know, function better, because it's great if you're a great athlete, but if you're all out of whack and balance, I kind of I don't know, I've learned like it doesn't really mean anything right now. It really doesn't, because I have. I've had several injuries through my career. I need a new knee, just like you said. And Yeah, when I'm out of whack and a mile of balance, I'm just miserable. I don't even want to be around anybody. And if you can take care of yourself at the optimal level, then you feel better every day. Your better parent, better husband, better, that's right, all those type two things. Definitely, yeah, and I think we see the shiny moments of athletics and we think Oh, but the reality is you have to figure everything out as a as a person, and then keep tweaking it right, like, keep learning and keep trying to improve yourself and I think if you approach it with that and with that, at that sort of level of diligence, the answers just and the new paths, the new roads, I do think they keep they keep showing up. Yeah, it is hard, though, because, like my life started, she went back out her masters and social work. Shoot, you know, she was a stay at home mom for many years and now she's working full time. Yeah, trying to figure out that balance because she leaves home at seven in the morning gets home at thirty at night. Yeah, from our work and she works at a women's Behavioral Health Clinic for women for Postpartum and par needle so it's very important. Works implositive. It's super stressful but like, sometimes she's just so worn out at the...

...end of the day and so she's trying to figure out that balance. How do I continue to work out? How do I change it? How do I have those things? And sometimes it's very difficult. Yeah, I think that's when, you know, when people talk about success and priorities, it's like that. We're always clear about how we define success, and that even means sometimes, like you know, just that it's like okay, well, if I take an extra thirty minutes. This work is important, but if I'm going to do this work for twenty years, I have to figure out how to take care of myself, because I will be good for no one. And and success doesn't necessarily mean, oh, I'm going to work at ten hour day. Maybe it means I'm going to work a nine hour day and I'm going to make sure that I'm three days, I'm in a train or do whatever I need to do. And it's and and it's trusting that you can still get it all done right. Right. That's a hard part. You think that it is. Do it. If if you're not, I gets got to focus on and if I don't, just focus on and I'll never finish all my work I have to do. That's right, Gabby. Are Your daughter's athletic? They are. Yeah, my oldest daughter, my husband came with a four month old, and she's very, very bright, and she is working at a real job and Shews in Birmingham, Alabama of all places. And then my middle daughter is pursuing she enjoys tennis and my eleven year old is very athletic and all very different and I don't push any of them right now. That's great. So no, volleyball players. Were surfers? No, of course, right. Who wants to do what your parents do? Exactly does she miss? I mean your daughter's in Birmingham, but she has the miss home. I mean I would be. I beg graven from he does, but she does. She's in a job right now that she's getting to really challenge and use her skill set. So we know how good that feels. Right, exactly from a lifestyle standpoint of going from where they are customed to living to m yeah, it's probably a transition. Exactly what it is, but it is a small town which she likes. Well, that's good. That's good. Yeah, so one of the last things we do on the show here is we have a segment called no huddle where we just fire, yeah, the questions at you and the okay, and then we appreciate you coming on and telling the true story. But it's pretty easy. We have a lot of fun with it and we do with every guest day. So let you start. Okay, now, even though Gabby looks to be about twenty five years old, she's about our age and she grew up in the s. So my question to Gabby is, what are you? What are your three favorite s bands? Well, okay, I liked DEF LEPPARD, I won't lie. I really like the cars and I liked out cast. Is that? No Way? Who was who did take on me? What was that song? Aha, that was that all hot? Yeah, Oh, yeah, I believe that that's one of them. I'd say that, but I also grew up with Reggae, so I grew up with a lot about Marley. Yeah, Morley's great. Aha, I believe is Belgian like you. Yeah, yeah, so all right, if you have a pet pee, what would that be? A lack of consideration. When I go places and people think it's their world and they're not aware of their surroundings, it really provokes me. Yeah, I can see that. Okay, Gabby, if you were building a mount rushmore of volleyball can be beach and court volleyball, men's and women's. Let's assume you're on the women's. Who else is on there with you? And then who else is on the men's? See you have for men, how many women? Four men, three women. Oh, I wouldn't put myself on there. I would put Carrie Walsh, misty May and Jackie Silva, and on the men's I would put Cartch, Karai St John Smith, and there's a Brazilian player. What about Dusty Dvorak? Dusty DREK's great. I wouldn't put him on my Mount Rushmore, but he's amazing. It just a name I remembered. I just thought going off maybe for names he would be on Mount Right. He'd be a Mount Rushmore. For names, I think who's the...

WHO's the funniest person you know? Oh my goodness, I actually am friends with Sasha Baron Cohen the way, so he's you know what it is? It's not just that he's funny. He's so very intelligent. It's just really fun to watch and he's also a really good person, and so he's just clever and very funny. Oh, his movies are just but yeah, but he's like the best, most conservative person you've ever met in your life. So it's just is pretty fantastic. Yeah, the one the scene in the one movie in Boor at where he, the Big Guy, lays on top of them and they're rustling. Oh, yeah, I know. I'm like, I don't know, how's he do that? Like how he definitely do that. I know he's just he's an artist. Yeah, Gabby, if you could go back in time and tell a young version of yourself one bit of advice, what would that be? Yeah, give yourself permission to win and don't take anything personal. I like that. So, besides the sports movie you were in, what is your favorite sports movie? Let's see, I mean I liked what is the one with Jim's Con Ryan Song? Brian? Oh, Brian Song, Bryan Song, and I mean, of course, a League of their own is great. Yeah, Oh, you know which movie I really loved? Was slapshot. Oh, yeah, we we told him and yeah, we interviewed Dave. He was one of our first guests that we've ever interviewed because he actually worked here in Pittsburgh. Dave Hay said, one of the hands. Yeah, others. I loved. I love that movie. We literally laughed. He told the stories about back screen and like, I bet offset how Paul Newman used to play pranks on everybody. It was so yeah, we had a blast. Okay, it was a great show. So Goss was referring to cloud. Was it cloud nine? Is that the movie? who were, I'm sorry, with Ronald. I don't forget the infamous air above movies too. Okay, you're that's right and and if you blinked you would have missed me and GATTICA. I had a really big acting debut. I had to play a trainer. Can you imagine? And Yep, sweet no, I always I was curious, like what Burt Reynolds was like on set. That was like in his arm, but bird's seminal. So I keep playing. See, yeah, a fellow Samonal, but he was he was a you know, you just go right at people like that and it all works out right. No, I agree with that. Like, if you know something about them or you find a commonality, you just go right. Yeah, a minute, well, you got right out of anyway. It's like I found that if you work with people, that you go at them and then you get away. So you say, Hey, listen, I'm coming in, I'm I'm claiming my real estate, but also I'm not going to sit on your real estate, right, I'm going to get out and then let them decide if they want to come towards you or not. Yeah, no, I love that. I love that advice. All right, so you talked about eighty percent, eighty twenty. Right, eat well, eighty percent of time, twenty percent of time you're going to have some, you know, your off days or whatever. What's your bad food? What do you go after? Hey, I'm craving is this is what I'm going to have. I mean, I love chocolate, but now there's even kind of healthy chocolate. I would guess like something savory like a chip or something salty would probably be my thing. That I went to. Yeah, see him chips with a singular. It's kind of funny. I'm not even heard that before, instead of a bag of or carton of, you know. Yeah, chip. I think you could start there and at least I only go to maybe five or so. Yeah, it's single digits. You'll be fine with with that. Um All right. Last one day. Okay, if you could go back in time and, you know, live for day any time in history, like yeah,...

...where and when would that be? Oh my gosh, I mean it would have been pretty interesting to be around. I guess when someone figured out fire, right, because then we could we all of a sudden, you know, that's why our brains grew, because then we could cook meat and you know, things like that. So I mean I could you imagine, like, even if you couldn't put it into a full words, like seeing fire for the first time. Right, like you, they always show the old the old movies, like we're in their cave man, and there they create fire and then they touch it and they're like they're spreeman like. That would be pretty interesting. Yeah, that or a wheel, like someone going let's carry this and someone going, well, why don't we roll it? I mean that would have been pretty amazing. Right, exactly. Man, we've learned so much about you, given us so much inspiration and just just getting to meet you, I'm really excited and it was. It was such a pleasure to bring you into the huddle with Dave and I and and have our fans listen about how we all come from such different backgrounds and if you work hard and you just keep your nose to the ground, sound good things are going to happen for you. Yes, and and I think, first of all, thank you for having me be a part of your huddle, but also, I want to acknowledge, and you both can relate to this, I had really impactful people along the way that helped me, and so I always think too, that we sometimes don't realize if we help someone, even if it's just a little. Oh, what's that going to do that, it can actually do a lot, and so I'm fully aware that part of my experience has been because I had people who are willing to invest in me and I'm grateful for that. So I try to do that when I have a chance. Wonderful. Will thank you again. Don't forget to email me your addresses. I mean it. I'll send you care package. I'm going to email you some volleyball questions to like that's up with the Lobaro. No one understands, like why they're able to move around the way they do in the rotations. All that. It's a whole nother podcast, but so still get look forward to that email. Gabby. Okay, I can't thank you. We really prel coming on. Hello, we want to thank you for listening to huddle up with gusts, a RADIOCOM original. You can find our show on RADIOCOM, the new RADIOCOM APP or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcast. Please leave us in review or comment if you enjoyed the show. We are on facebook, twitter, instagram and Youtube at huddle up with gusts. You can also visit us on our website, huddle up with gustscom. Huddle up with gusts. Is produced by Cam Holdeman and our media relations director is Terry Shulman. Our show is record at the energy innovation center and Pittsburgh Pa. Thank you for listening and you can hear a new episode every Monday right here on RADIOCOM.

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