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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Gabrielle Reece

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

American professional volleyball player, fashion icon, and model, Gabrielle Reece joins the huddle. We hear from Gabrielle about her transitions through sports and life, her relationship with surfer Laird Hamilton, and her new business! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome to our podcast huddle up withGus, where we talk to guess about how sports help shape their life. I'm yourhouse, former ANFL, quarterback, Gusfrad and I'm joined by my longtimefriend and Cos Dave Hager. We are a RADOCOM original podcast and you canfind us on the new RADIOCOM, APP or anywhere you listen to your favoritepodcast. Now, let's get in the huddle hi everyone Gusrou here with Holl upwith gus and we're excited for another great show and great guess. I'm joinedhere with my coost Dave and Dave just another, incredible guess that we getto talk to and hear their story about how suport shake to life, one of themost recognizable figures in sports and fashion everyone's everyone is wellaware of getinand. I think that if you and I played her in beach volleyball,she would beat US single anly by herself. If you and I are on the sameteam- There's no doubt in my mind, ihav being exactly like that right, sojoining us in the huddle today, Gabriell Rees Cabby, thank you forjoining us and we are so excited to have you on hi. Gentlemen, thank youand you know it's funny is'. I wouldn't you ever have this experience where youlike you do something for a while at a certain time, but then a wholegeneration goes by and really you have the opportunity to be reintroduced innew ways to new groups, because you know you're from another time. Oh I youknow it's funny. I get that all the time, because when I go to talk to kidsor or you know, I play the NF for fifteen years and right the kids today.Don't really know me or remember me or you know, unless you were one of thebig big stars, it's just arounit. What are they wear? Your shoe, like MichaelJordan, lives on in brand Jordan, but right I think it's, but I think that'skind of I mean not only is that a typical whereevery group has their own heroes. Rg know exactly, but I think it's it'sjust completely natural. Well, you know what you've been you've beenredesigning your image and yourself over these last so many years, and it'sbeen exciting to kind of read your bio reach, your history. What you're doingbecause you have been reinventing yourself and transitioning from phaseto face and that's what a lot of our show is about, is how we maketransitions through our life to get us to where we are and how really sportsstarted that for us. So right so we want to start to when you were a child.What was that first influencor that first love of sports that you had you know I was a late bloomer. I grew up in the Virgin Islands andthere wasn't a you know, a big infustructure for organized athletics, and so you know I would say I lived in activelifestyle by what, but I wasn't you know an athlete like tag like. Oh, thisis what you do and then, when I was in the tenth grade there was a gentlemannamed Kenny who was coaching a volleyball team and they were a lot older than I was, andhe would drive me to practice and I sort of got my first taste for that.When I was in tenth grade, I was quite tall. I was probably very close to sixfoot three already and then, when I was fifteen in my junior year, I moved toSt Petersburg Florida because growing up in Saint Thomas was amazing, butthere wasn't really. I didn't really have a direction, let's say, and so Ithink my mother decided it might be best for me to to be in a differentenvironment. So I was moved to snt Petersburg Florida. I went to a very,very small, tiny little school that literally, if you had any athleticability- or you wanted to be seen or recognized for that you went to a you-would move on so when I walked in it at fifteen at six foot three, they wereexcited, but they know. I actually didn't know what I was doing and I hada brilliant basketball coach. They went to states that year. I had never playedbasketball and he got me up to speed...

...within reason. So my my junor and senior year I playedbasketball and volleyball and I was invited to a BC camp forbasketball and I think once I went to that. It's about a four day camp ofit's sort of a your it's an invited camp and it will be all the girls orboys who go on to probably play division. One Yeah- and I realize thenthat maybe I wasn't tough enough in a certain way for basketball, and so I had six offers. I had like thirtytwo offers for basketball and six for volleyball, and I took an eight hourvisit. One of them was to Florida State and the coach there Si Silvernodd, who actually is still avery dear friend of mine. She came to visit last week when she drophim out in the car shesaid. Well, I think you have a lot to offer Flori state and we have a lot tooffer you, and I don't know why you wouldn't want to come here and I waslike Huh. That's a really interesting thing and I went there and it was areally it was. You know it's like you, make those decisions that really end upbeing the best for you and being playing under her and learning from hera and being mentorrd, as a human being by her kind of set help set thestructure up for everything else. That was going to happen right. So if we goback to when you're in the Vergin islands, like so you're saying therewasn't P, did kids go out and play werelikegroups of friends where you guys would ride your bikes around like so a lot ofour nest. Talk about that that they had these groups and would go right playevery week. So it was a little different for you. When you wereyounger, you really didn't have a direction yeah. You know I did have aparent in my life, but I was very young from two to seven. where I lived in atraditional neighborhood in Long Island, New York, I wasn't living with eitherone of my parents. I was actually living with a couple that grew up withmy mother and in that environment. I had that. You know it's like I'll ride.My bike down to your house and then we'll do whatever, but then, once youmove, I moved to the Caribbean. I you know was I lived in a super remoteplace. You D, You kill yourself. If you wrote a boat, a bike on my hell and youwouldn't be able to get it back up the hill. You have to walk it, so it wasn't that traditional, yes,we've meetad the beach and be active, but it's just a really different structureand also what celebrated or encouraged you know in the in the mainland of theUnited States. Athletics is like a sort of a real part of the everyday life andthe fiber of the culture, and there not so much, and most of us came fromlike kind of Wonky families you know, and and so it really came Le later for me,as far as organized athletics, thatthat had to be going from the Caribbean to St BPetersburg. That ould be a big transition for you, Oh yeah, and andand also like I grew up. You know the Virgin Islands can be a little bit wild.Quite frankly, and then I was put into a school called Kesic Christian school,which was highly conservative, so I was also not only switching locations. I was and cultures even butnow it was switching a whole. You know kind of there ere. They had a veryspecific belief system at Kezak, which really ended up impacting me in a verypositive way, but it was. It was a very big transition and I think, quite frankly, if, like I lookat the whole landscape of everything and I've talked about this, a lot was:what do you do when you're not grooamed, to be a champpion? And how do you notonly accept that and receive it? But you know how do you, and especiallyfemale athletes? How do you give yourself permission to say it's, okay,to win it's okay for things, to kind of goyour way, and it has taken me years and years and years really to...

...allow that, because what what I, what I sayis none of us really deserve anything right like you see plenty o people whowork hard and theyre and it doesn't go their way and some people work less,but they have more physical talent or they have a propensity for something ineducation and they thrive. It's like okay, I'm occupying his space right now,and I'm going to do the most with with that opportunity and not like analyze.I don't deserve it. Oh, I do deserve it, but sor, I always just say basicallyit's great and if you're going to occupy that space that portal, you knowwhy not do it in a big way right right, exactly yeah be going back to when you were inhigh school and being recruited for basketball and volleyball thirty twooffers for hoops. That's a lot of offers. We weth they some big schoolslike the major pour fives or was it a variety of different school yeah? Itwas variety t was like from West Point to like schools in Oklahoma, and youknow things like that. But when you go to those BC camps, that's kind of whathappens right. It's like the're you're in a barrel, and so the coaches comeand really check out. I mean there were some highly talented athletes there and and in Volleybal I only played two clubtournaments. So I just I was so late to everything. Butagain it was six foot three you know coordinated enough and and what I ended up being actually mybiggest strength was. Was I'm coachable right, CIT plang right and so do youthink when you came to the states that sports really helped you integrate intoa different society? Because I believe that, like when my kids went to college,I wanted them all to play sports because you've have an instant familythat yeah help you through. So many situations. ITIT definitely did it sort of you know.We all want that tribe. If you will, and even at being six or three is afifteenyearyear old girl, it was like. Oh do you play, you know volleyball orbasketball, and it was like Oh yeah. Oh that's why you're so tall yeah? Okay,sure you know, but it does give you that sense ofbelonging and just help you transition through things. That can be hard, Imean being thirteen fourteen fifteen. These are this is a hard transition andthen once again leaving home and going on to college. I really felt the impactof it in college, because I did have a heavy duty system in place. Right likewe had coaches and people who were saying not only this is your schoolschedule. Here's your practice schedule! Here's your study hall twice a week, soyou have academic support in that transition of managing your ownschedule. So everything was pretty pinned out andI came in on a twelve person team with seven other freshmen. So I was alsogoing through the experience with a lot of people. It wasn't just me or oneother person and that all makes all of that easier for sure right and I feelthe same way because when I left Pittsburgh and went to Talsa to go toschool, I actually went there with about twelve people from my area whereI grew up yeah it made the transition either we had a lot of things in common,so you didn't get home six, so you didn't feel that singled outfrustration which was really nice for me and help me be successful. I reallybelieve that and the and the work load is a transition. That's the thing whenyou went from high school football to to college the speed of things, theamount of load now manageur classes on your own, getting yourself to and fromplaces, but that extra that athletic loadtransitioning to that is also, I think something that people don't realize is very challenging and then again what?If someone has the opportunity to go o the pros? You know that athletic loadis just one notch, even heavier, and so people don't realize how much athletesthey're playing in college. What...

...they're going through you know Gus Gabban. I have somethingin common that I don't know: She's, certainly not aware of n Avew, maybewats Thatday. I too was a resident of the Virgin Islands. I live in same N,yeah, Oh you're, lucky wol GI is ARY vasten. Well I'll tell you. It onlylasted about three or four months, and I went after college and mentioned.Thit was a little lackindirection mind, yea thet Yo were drinking a lot andthere were wor. Well that was fradding. The drinking was consistent, the Workanwas spratic, absolutely but kind of like you said your mom kind of Pullesyou out of there because it was a little my parents did. But I was twentythree at te time and they yeah t there but yeah so yeah that just little didyou enjoy it whene you're there I did ejoy yeah whyl. I thought theinteresting thing was like where I lived: There's no locks in the doorsand no glass windows. It was just screams and, like you, just yeahustedeveryone and no cars either. There's like one car at the boers off of itdidn'. You atha probably right, I'm sorry a thing, a thing it right exactlydid you mention they thought you were in the military. All the time everwhere.You went wha, RMEMBER yeah, like my first day there. I really short hair atthat time too, and I remember sitting at the bar and no one would speak to melike an hour and a half and I'm going well, this kind of sucks. You knowwelcome to the island Dav, you know yeah and then finally, the bartendersaid: Wait you're not in the military. Are you and I said no and iy go? Oh, myGod, I'm so sorry we thought you were sometimes ea Wen rat people come andcause a lot of have yeah and you know so they they wanted me out of there,but that was yeah. True, that is Youre. That was your interest and also movingthere not to hog the interview moving there. I heard the ratio, the femaletemil ratio. I heard with seven to one female to males I thougt wow. This isgoing to be, I might have a chance, it's teyeah the way it's the opposite,yeah, and so I was not welcome by the other males there, because it was likeo here's another one, great johns, small enough, so you got out of thissfast. You could, I think, e. I think my parents pulled me out of this as yeah.The five dollar USA Today is were expensive to Tryin to keep up with thepirates. You know yeah yeah we're both pittsburges and we love anythingPittsburgh like the pirates, the steelers and the penguins. But it's been a tough year for us here forthe pirates, Yeh pretty bad. I don't know, I don't know if you get any ofthe pirate news in Hawaii, but likely unlikely they? U To their farm club. Wyyou mean Ha. Those boys have beeninappropriate. You mean well they've, been there a little bitof that one of them they's very, really really bad this year. So it's beentough yeah ey've been bad on an AWSOL field. Yeah I get it yeah and then yougot and Yan you guys. Just you don't have been so I know Oh yeah fo ses. Yougot hurt so that thats nouts a tough one, but I think Mason's goingto comein and yeah and they're Goinna he's Goingnao find his stride he's Gonne.You got it. Definitely he's Goinna find like the consiment sports fan right,like optimistm the blind optimism. Yea H, you got to keep that usually ends insevere disappointment, ut as right. Now it's good right, soyou're in college you'r. You know, I read that you were in college for a fewyears and then you went on to modeling like you left and then came back, sothat was another transition you went through. How did you handle all that? Well because I basically was prettyindependent, meaning I had to you know: navigate life on myown. I went to college at Seventeen, and so I was on a scholarship and thenthe summer after I had gotten offers to model before, but I thought: okay, I'mgoing to focus on gadduating high school and then when I got college opportunities, I thought I'llkeep that momentum going go to college and that summer I was really fortunate.It's all about timing and I was working...

...quite a bit lived in New York. So thenI went back to school for my sophomore season to play ball. Ow went to twodays in August and then that December after my sophomore season, I gave up myscholarship and I paid to play because once I did the math I was taking acalculated risk. I could make a decent amount of money in modeling to navigatefor my life and I could pay to play and and sort of do do both and then what mycoach did for me was in the January spring season. I wasallowed to go back to New York to work and then I would come for summer tohave credit, get credits to be eligible and your NC a ruling to play, and so Idid that for my remainding two years and my coach and I had a real dealwhich is like when you're here you're here and you can and then you can gofor spring, and so I juggled that for about two and a half years, and thenyou still had to go to class as well right. You have to maintain a certainamount of cred. No, I had to yeah and I of course I mean I was doing the work.What was your major? I was originally because I didn't knowwhat I wanted to do: A business major because it sounded responsible and then once I was taking economics and and accounting I was like. You knowthis is stupid. Why am I doing this? And so I I loby to get myself intheschool communications, because you needed like a three five but see bythen I was already working. You know and being interviewed- and I said,listen you can put me an academic probation. If I don't keep a threewhatever you can kick me out of the school I go, but who right now is goingto use it more than me and they let me do it and I I naturally was that wasprobably the right major for me. Yeah, I mean just how many interviews haveyou done in your life since you left Florida, eor yeah and then I even likeI've written you know. I wrote columns for years, ive written books, I've inI've interviewed tons of people, you know doing my own shows, and so it wasa skill set in public speaking and such which I know you can relate to it. Justwas all it sort of was something that I feltreally pretty comfortable with not perfect but comfortable. What was yourfirst paid modeling job when you, when you made it to New York? You know it'sinteresting. I was thinking about this the other day because I ran into thisguy who's like Oh, you know, I'm bought from Ogilvia Mater, which is a Huga adagency right and I was like, Oh my God, Oglvia may ther. So I was the air and Iwas doing a lot of magazine work which, let's be clear, you get paid nothing.You get paid two hundred dollars a day when you do editorial, because it'sgood for you righ it's exposure for you right B. What they say is like the moreeditory you get than your day rate goes up, and if people want easy foradvertising that goes up, so you have to kind of play that game, and so I was doing a ton of meuditory likegoing to meet this woman from Olgilvia mayther, and she says this woman, Javy Suttleand, I'm neverforget her and she goes. You know I really like you want to find you a joband if there's a brand called CUTEX- and I have even though my hands are bigand I beat them up and I lift weights and do all this stuff. I have prettygood looking hands at the time, and so they hired me for Qtext for thirty fivehundred olar. For the day I was eighteen and I like put my hand on someguys chest and then maybe a little of my face and I opened a bank account andgot a credit card from that job. So it was great wow. It worked after GeorgeGastans also, I know right IG, also new workxtyeah. You had to walkaround like theyhav people coming in with white gloves and all h stuff, andI was like very hard on my hands but whatever. But how excited were you toget paid for your first time? Like just I mean that would be such a goodfeeling. I was always very much about survival,and- and also so I think I was not only excited. I was very relieved because itwas always very clear to me that I had to figure it out, and so these werejust opportunities that sort of helped...

...do that for me, yeah, because we justwe interviewed Moretin, Anderson and Morton, and I were talking about whenhe went to college and he got a full scholarship. He had nothing like yeah,they paid for his college, but he still had yea. He can't be laundry Yoa a dolong tree, you're not going to go to the movies. You know you're, not if hemeets a pretty girl, he's not going to take her on the date, and I think thatsometimes that's the very interesting part like going to flor state, which isa very big football school. Obviously, you know deonce Sanders who's. Still afriend of mine was there when I was there like you're talking about theseguys, come there in this sort of big rich program, and they don't alsorealize some of the other things that the athletes have to navigate, which islike beyond books and the food that you get at school. If your parents, youknow, can't really help you, you know what do you? What are yousupposed to do so yeah? I mean it's an interesting lessonand I think especially for some athletes. It should. I think it wouldbe a reasonable conversation to have on like how do we support them also, sothey don't have to get themselves into situations that maybe aren't good forthem right. Well, California's trying to figure that out right now, right,yeah, you just pass that so athletes can actually make money off their nameor whatever it is, but I remember that my family made too much money for me toget a pil grant, and so my dad said all I can afford tosend. You is like fifty bucks a month Yep, you know and he bought me a ninehundred dollar car. He said good luck and I went to college and had fiftybucks in my pocket every month that was it yeah hemvy and you think about that.That's all I had to do is spend it on gas, because that's you know it's crazy,but yeah, but so many kids came and got pall grants and things like that, andeven that wasn't a lot, but it helped him as you know, because there arenights that you have to go out be with your friends and social yeas and dothose things in it. Everything costs money. It does, and I think it's animportant balance where I mean listen, weirdly like it's. This fine line oflike hey. This is how the real world is to where there's an element of stressaround you know paying bills and things like that. But you don't want to havesomebody who switch their whole life they've left home. They have a hugeworkload, not only athletically. Now they have itacademically they're, also the EXPECTATIONIS for them to perform onsome level in school and certainly even a higher level in athletics and then gooh and now you're going to stay awake at night, because you're not sure ifyou know because you're managing that other stress, so I do think it is like.I said worth a reasonable conversation for sure yeah be so when you got toFlorida state. You said it was a very young team. Did you have prettyimmediate success because I think you own several records and I mean you wereobviously very accomplishedf. All about players did Dhat right away when yougot there, oh no, I mean I had to play right away. My first game, I think, wasagainst pen state, maybe at the University ofFlorida, which, if you know anything about sports, you know gators andSomminals, but I just remember thinking, Oh my God. I just want to stay out ofthe way, and I hope I don't. The ball doesn't come to me, and so I wentthrough that quite a bit because I was learn. I was learning to play on thefly like I was in college and I was like learning on the fly kind of and and I think I got into a groove andthen participated, certainly by my freshman year, and then it just wentfrom there. It's weird having record still there,because maybe I always felt Yoyou know when they talk about impostur syndromeor things like that. Maybe I always felt that a little bit you know, because I was continuously learning, and so I was like am I Idon't even know. If I'm a good player or not, I know I play, I know Iparticipate. I just I never really know. Did you play middle? What was yourposition? Oh yeah, so the middles like...

...the center on a basketball team, you're,typically the largest player. Now, though, in modern volleyball, sometimesyou will see like a giant left side hitter that justhits over the block perfect. So they added that dynamic into volleyball.Since I played, but typically the mintal was sort of the big person thatyou know was protecting the net. My daughter's played high schoolvolleyball and Kay the one's he middle she's, a tall son, a team she's, almostfive Tener, so yeah so walking. She gets a nice amount of blocks, but she's.Not What do they call it roufing is that the Oreal fing that she's notdoing that Ei'm svolleyball there was a girl who played on the USA team longtime ago, like early S, Timmy Liley. She was maybe I don't know five ten to six feet. Idon't quite remember, but she played international volleyballfor the US team, which you're talking about the best holliyball in the worldand what she had was she read very well and her hands. She had very good hands,and so she wasn't roofing people, but she was closing the block and touching everything, and so sometimespeople have to realize, like for your daughter that you don't have to be sixfive, because by the way they have many girls in the middle now they're, six,five, six, seven and yes there's advantages. But if you canread what's happening and move quickly and respond quickly and close the blockand use your hands, you cand be really effective, but yeah hitting also, though, from themiddle on the quicks. It does help when you're taller, because you just have ahigher. You know touchpoint right that you're contacting the ball a lot betterangle, right, wellmmaybe Gabby gets she can help us out with R your questionyou had because I aske Dav, like what's his big as pet peeve or what bothershim the most when he goes to the Games, and he said well it's in when they calla time out all the all the girls that are on the what you calling well likethat so for high school, like the Lin, they would have like the G so likeVarse's playing they' have JV. Do the lions you know like on in each corner.Oh, but then it like time out. It's always weird because t the like thelion who's, the Guy Stn, is on the stand like the what's his the judge orW at Yeah Brath r yeah. They always come to this guy, and then I always seeit from the back and he tells jokes and everyone's laughing. It's like a cork,gestun type of thing Dave said he just wants to know. What's going on in there,you that's Goina long with you, my daughter's, like I don't know whatthey're talking about, but everyone's ays laughing having a good time and Ialways think gess. It's looks sort of odd because h, the guys usually like inthis S- and these are like roles in high school and stuff. He just looksodd. The but Isaurt a time out. The lins judge have to go and talk to theUPRIGH. That's what we don't e should just be there. Looking at the clockready to go, no WBUT, it never happens so and then and then he has him likeput on the hard. What's that start heckling him welllike,there's Ketis well they're struggling for playing time as it is so I don'tknow if I should but yeah and then the girls wil like bump back and forth andhe'll watch and stuff. It's just a weird thing and it's been going on therGeusan. So it's just Pennsylvania, hiamins volleyball that wasn't going onat Sant Peter his Lucy S. my coach would have pitched you know she wouldhave been like that's not happening. Unfortunately, it is here- and I justwanie wondering Li Canti. Now you have a professional life. Ait gives yourdaughters a chance to metal up, which is like that. Shouldn't impact you right, like there's all kinds of bsgoing on, always whether it's in sports or in life, and it only impacts you if you say I'mgonna, get that let that thought or that action or what they're doingimpact me instead of like okay, we're going to time out. What's our strategy,what are we going to do? And I'm focusing that? I see that and I couldsee that it could potentially irritate...

...me, but I'm not like, and I thinkbecause I think, if you can do that in your life, is certainly a lot betterwel Yohav distractions, if you let things distract you, your dad, you'redone they da in the game. We just talkd about hecklers right in football, iswell es, whether it's the opposing team or people in the stands. If you letthem get to you, you're not going to be able to focus onwhat you're doing- and I said, I've never really paid attention because Iwas so focused on what I had to do on the field yeah. None of that it waslike white noise that just they weren't there we were just having is. I wasjust having this conversation with my husband today. He he has had a sort of a misunderstandingwith a friend of his and and it's an you know, it's an importantfriend, it's Ot, a Friende seas all the time, but it's someony cares for deeply,and this friend maybe isn't the best communicator and, but I think basically,lar got to the point where he said. You know I really care for you and if Ineed to apologize, let's get on the phone, let's work it out and let's goback to being friends before we die. Like that's what we said and I thoughtto myself in a way that's all we can do is like we can only control ourselves.So to your point about distraction and and like why are those girls talkingand it's like that, has nothing to do with us and the more you can practicethat discipline and anything going on? Even it's like hey. I have a conflictwith somebody, so I'm going to do my part and whatever they decide to dowill be on them, but then I can, I can be free of it. I think when thingsirritate us or they have the right to irritate us as when we haven't reallyactually been responsible for our part, and so your daughter can just use it as asome exercise in in like mental, you know kind of a mental practice if you will or ameditation of like okay, I could see where that really might piss me off,but you know what I'm not going to right. I mean I dsome training likethat in the pool where it's like, you can see things, but the thing isyounnder the water, and so, if you react, you actually won't be able tocomplete your task because you'l run out of are because of the emotion thatyou will have used and you will burntd oxygen. So instead you have to be likeHuh. I see it, but I can't actually afford to react to it and like if you ask me about sport andtraining and all that, that's for me, the most powerful stuffthat you take out of sport. It isn't like. I did this and I hit balls and Ihave records. It's like. I use that platform to help myself learn bettertechniques in trying to help me navigate life right. So you talk aboutdistractions. I can't imagine what your distraction is like, especially whenyou finish college you're, modeling, and then you still want to play thesport that you love. Probably at that point where you go on to play, be aprofessional beach, volleyball player, but you then you're also modeling toand so I'm sure they're calling you, but you want to play you know. So howdid you handle those two different things for yourself? You KNON, listen!I I always looked at modeling as a huge opportunity and a job. I was reallyclear with that. I identified more with being an athlete for sure. So all I didis. I fell into playing beach vollyball again here I go like Oh what and pickup each vollyball after college. I had a never. I never played I moved toMiami. Instead of back to New York, I picked up the beach game with the helpof some very nice people. And after about eighteen months of that, thiswoman, Barber Bieirman, who I played with, was like you should move toCalifornia and try to pursue a professional career. And I I was likeokay, and so you know it's great when you don't know better and then Istarted playing, and once I sign my Nike deal, I actually, I would say,stopped modeling in that obvious way, and the gift to me was. I could use allmy experience in modeling like well WHO's, shooting it and what's theconcept to actually help, navigate and construct the imagethat then I used to help support me as...

...a professional athlete, and so really Ionly had to model, let's say from eighteen to twenty two in thattraditional way, and then after that I tried to do everything as myself, thisprofessional athlete, but the imageit would still sometimes be perceived asmore modelly, because I was always aware that, for whatever weird reason,culturally, that had more impact, Yeah Ike see that and you Hanow like, and Ilike how you said that, like you learn to be like the traditional model, butthen you wanted to be recognized as who you are, and you know, and you feltprobably like you were this. You know you came up and you had tolearn everything about volleyball. You were in Grain Din, you had a greatcoach and that's who you were that's what you wanted to be, but you alsoknew that there was a side job that I can do. You know, as they say, asidehousole but yeah, but then you were able to make that I'm a volleyball justlicond football right, I'm a football player, I'm going to go, do a shoot asa football player yeah somebody else so, yes iinterest to take it one stepfurther, because I was in women's sports. I somehow knew if I could pull some ofthe image over from modeling into sport without I always said if I was trainingsuper hard and producing numbers that that would be okay, that as long asthey sort of stayed balanced. Because again- and you know this is a longerdiscussion- there's always a debate about- what's unfair about women'sathletics right. Oh, you know how you look and all these things where menatesjust throwup statistics and all this stuff, but also it's like sort ofunderstanding, there's biological elements going, there's a lot of stuffgoing on around that, and so I just said: okay. Well, I recognize this andas long as I am genuinely working hard and really honoring being an athleteand representing being an athlete, then I'm comfortable with playing a littlebit that chess board of like looks and BS. You know right right. Well, we'veinterviewed so we've interviewed Sally Jankins, Christine Brennan and Leslievis are all three of them and who were kind of the first in what they you know:Sports Cator, yeah porders writers, all that stuff and which was great, butthey said the same thing where you know I didn't come at this as awoman. I just came at it because I loved it and I worked my tail off at ityeah. You know, and I didn't xpect anything to come from my peers or myboss. I just wanted to give a what I love to do and give a really goodproduct. Yes, all three of them said the same thing as you, as you said. Sothat's very interesting. You know I have three daughters and what I teachthem is you know, because everyone could cryuntil the cows come home about fair and unfair. I think it's an ambiguous andunknown terrain. It's like who are you? What can you contribute if there areobstacles notice them, and what is your strategy to get around them? Not Stopand go. There's obstacles it's like and by the way men have obstacles to, andI'm gonna I'm going to push and say that in some ways, whether we ritrealize it or not, the advantage of being a female whetherit's in sport or even, I believe in business- is that if you're really good, there's actuallyless competition than men have to endure right it just that's, becausethere's less women playing sports and in business, if you really have itgoing on, ultimately, there's probably less women participating, and so Ialways thought why? Wouldn't we look at it like that and I'd recognize like okay there's,but that's for that's actually for for everyone, and rather than giving theenergy to the obstacle, it's put the energy into the solution over throughand around, and how do you want to do...

...that? And so I've always looked at that,but I sort of had this realization that I went to college one thousand ninehundred and eighty seven on a full athletic scholarship. Title Nine cameinto effect in about sixty eight sixty nine, so I didn't suffer being a womanthere. Then I went into modeling, which pays more than ten times to women thanover men. So I was in a reverse universe. There then, when I went intovolleyball, I can remember the first few seasons playing for and four thewomen's TV ratings were higher than men, so we were paid more than the men, andso I also fully recognize that I've had a very different experience right. Yeahknow I get that. I think when you talk about Fi, seeing the obstacles going overthem around them, whatever you want to call it, but that's also hard workright. I have an obstacle. I got ta work hard to get past it. A that hardwork makes me better, yes and and, and things are not fair, and maybe peopleshould do things that they don't, and so I do always take the attitude thatit is on me to do the work to get to where it isthat I want to, because I believe that noone will give it to me hand it to me,even if they should right exactly w. what's from a volleyball standpoint,you now you're now going to be playing professionally on the sin: What's the biggestdifference between court and sand and what was that transition like just froma volleyball standpoint? It was pretty brutal because I was so specialized inhitting and blocking so having the confidence to pass and setin transition,and things like that. That was very hard in just the movement and nowyou've got an element you have wind and sand at every cord is different, someof the Times it's deeper, so it will benefit the sort of more compact playerthat moves very well on the sand. Then sometimes it's harder pack. So if youget a real springing athlete all of a sudden they're hitting balls that, likenobody, can hit on a soft surface, so it's just adjusting and adapting to theenvironment to the good side of the bad side, which you don't have an indoorbecause of the wind and and also and potentially even the sun, depending onkind of the angle, and for me it was just my all aroundgame had to really improve jrastically. So did you get nervous?Did you have butterflies before you played yeah? I always had to use thebathroom. I always had to use the ladies room because you know you getthose butterflies and but I would go into a pretty deep focus, mostly from an endurance standpoint. Tworunning around on the CND is a lot more difficult than on the court. I meanthat's another yea big change right, oh well, beyond, like you go like, Ithought I could jump O caN'TA. You know. The great thing is like I would takeoff several months after each season and then you come back for your firstpractices and you're. Just like Oh yeah, I don't know if I can do this and thenafter a couple of weeks, you know you drop about five pounds just naturallythe body would go yeah you got, you have to onload some of this and thegreat benefit is. You are on sand, which is soft, so it makes you not onlystronger, but it's more forgiving and then lastlyyou're not wearing shoes, so you're able to use the whole foot, which Ithink in sports is so important. You know all athletesthat are in shoes, tennis players and football players and basketball playerstheyre there being their feet, are not only underutilized but they're gettingpunished. You see toes cranking over, so the other great gift of beach.Voleyball is you're in an open foot and so everything the arch, the toes theankles, is working and actually getting stronger too. So you play how manyyears did you play beach as a professional beac I played off and onfor about eight or nine years, and then I went back when I was forty. They werethinking of bringing back before person tour, and so they asked me to play, which Icould play that game again, because I...

...was still playing a little bit for funand I was always training and you know conditioning, but they just were notable to organize that you know. Listen. They can't even have two footballleagues. How could they have more than one vollyball discipline right to getreal estate in sport and and dollars is so tricky. That is very hard. So you kind of gothrough your career, eight or nine years Youre getting towards the endyou're saying, okay, I don't know I mean, did you kind of have a plan? Whatwas next, or did you just fall into it or how was that? Well, I was. I wasalways even early N, my career by by T thousant anotwenty three, I starteddoing MTV sports and I was writing for l magazine, so I was always weaving theduel, so I was still developing my skill set in you know this other sideand and so I I think I always was aware that my sport was limiting inthat the platform was very small, which weirdly in the long run, has been agift to me, because it's kept my eyes open and it's kept me developing otherskills all along like if I played women's tennis and that's kind of all,you really have to do. I mean you can make a beautiful living at women'stennis, especially if you're doing well, and so that's what you do, that's whatI would do and instead I was always doing a hustle, because beach vyeballit's great and it's and it's a beautiful sport and you have to workyour butt off, but it is not a big platform. So I was always supplementingmy volleyball career with this other career and and just kind of naturally saying likekind of having my mind on well. Where do I want to be now in a year and infive and just keeping my mind open instead of like the bpump, the breaksyour careers over hey? What do you want to do now? That's pretty tricky t. Itis very difficult because that happened to me fifteen years in the same sport,yeah playing the sport for twenty five years and then all of a sudden, it'sover T, thirty, eight Yas old, and it's like what do I do now right. I can Icoach my kids, an new sports which is fun, but it's not a career now and sothen been it's been since two thousand and eight since I've been done so thattransition has been tough, and I love how you said. I got to figure this outearly and start weeen together and in football, the teams, the owners. Youknow they don't really care if ou, if you do that, they just want you t wingames. Yeah, do that then that's what they need. You there, your a bodyfilling that spot and that's the thing is, I think it's we all have to berealistic about the place and space that we occupy and it would be betterfor us, even if we were at the apex of a part of our career, to think this is unsustainable and who d? Whoelse do I want to be? Naturally not? Let me look over and see what's popularand copy that, because that seems to pee cool right now, but like really askyourself like what other ways do, I think I can contribute what othernatural skill said. I mean listen, I wasn't. I wasn't attracted togymnastics like I'm realistic, so it's sort of like going well. What what do?I think I really could do and and just keep looking at that and notthinking I'm important, I'm so great. I crush it. Everybody loves me becausethat will bite you in the butt when that wuiits down yeah and then it'slike and the other thing. I tell my friends that are athletes. It's likehey when you've got some Omanimum people are like yea use that ask for help. Learn things in youroffseason. People will want to help you when you're doing well. It's whenyou're done you, like just retired Togethe, that's nice, so weirdly like try to use that energy for these other things yeah! No, Iagree totally because for me I left the NFL kind of wanted to bewith my family. More help. My wife...

...raise the kids, do all that some bethere yeah until except for Sixmhtil for six months and then you're like, oh,my God. Well, no, I actually live. I Love I actually, like I love being adad. I love being a husband. I have my honey do list every day I mean I doenjoy that stuff, but then it was like okay, I gotto go out and do somethingelse. I gotta you know not necessarily earna living, but just have a contributcontribute. You have to contribute. So I went back to the NFL Shat I'd love tobe a coach right after being out for like three years, and they said Oh yeah,that's great, but nobody would even bring me in as an intern or want me tobe a part of it and it's so true. What you said is if I would have done thatmy last few years and said Hey, I want to be an intern, I'm woint to do this.This is what I'm thinking for when I retired it would have been so mucheasier, and I would have been able to weave my way into that scenario. o Yeah, it's a it's hard toknow ahead like it's hard, it's so hard.It's always interesting how life works right like when we're our fastest andour strongest. We know kind of the least and as we go through life'sexperience and maybe we'rd get a little older, then we sort of learn more andit helps us navigate. But I think the ultimate is always to have perspectivein this weird way that we are no one right at work from that space, because,if meaning we're someone to our family and our friends, but in the grandscheme of it we are no one so work from that point, because not only is itcloser to the truth, it's also like you can come with humility and not beafraid to go hey. I want to try that and you know, because it's hardsometimes, if you get celebrated it's hard to be like to humble out yeah. No,it really is in the world of endorsements. I thinkGabby 's, one of those recognizable people out there to and always has twhat was your first endorsement deal. Was it Nike or a Real Big One? Like Imean, Ike was a big one. I had a I had shoes, you know shoe with Nikeye. I youknow few different, bigger ones, but certainly Nike was a very impactful Lon,where they were doing television commercials. When that meant. You knowthat what that actually had impact at that time and and things and things like that andand you know they when you have a company like that investing millions ofdollars in your image. That's the other thing is like goingwait. That's a huge opportunity, they're helping you build your image,and so I was. I was pretty aware of of that.It's pretty good because most people like for me, if I'm twenty four, I'mnot aware of any of that right, I'm just some kids, that's right out ofcollege playing football and just Indyeahi'm doing something. I love todo and not aware of all those aspects that I could have been creating orgaining for when I got older well, you you also were in a very on Ain a verybig stage right, a d. So again, if you ask any lifestyle, suportathlete most of them are in tune with this a little sooner because they'repretty realistic about their platform, and so, if I was like in the NBA or theNFL or Major League Baseball or again tennis, it would be harder to learnthat lesson right right, so kind of switching to a different thing.What's the what's, the tallest wave you've ever served. Oh, come on me, Idon't like small waves. Like I remember one time I was out and it was Hawaiiand six feet. So that's a twelve foot face because the halins measure theback of the wave right and I was like yeah- I shouldn't be out here- yeah. I was telling Davive because wewere looking at you know your bio and your husband and he's doing sixty foot ways. I'm likethat's insane. I can't I don't even like being under water and one of thosesmall ones. When we go to the beach, it's yeah, no it', it's Intang, you getnervous form. I mean you have to...

ID. I wouldn't say nervous. You knowthe expression you knew. The job was dangerous when you took it, I mean Iinterfuwd laird as a big wave serfer for a TV show, so I was well informed,but also you're, talking about somebody who approaches their training every dayand they're like if the surf is up andthey're going out. It has a military type tone to it. A you know. He alwayssays the bigger. It is the flower we move. It's like everything is meticulous and he said ina way, if you think about it like if I was married to a policeman or a fireman,there's something a lot more inpredictable dealing with people thanthere is actually the ocean. Now the ocean, of course it's dangerous and youcan die and you can tu and you can drown, but it's also living with aperson where their skill set and their destiny. If you will have connected and and- and I have said this many times,Lard would be much more dangerous. It would be much more dangerous to livewith Lard. If he didn't do it, because hi need mo be NMEA Psyo, he beno fon, he would be. He be a psycho because it's a calling and we can't getin the way of someone's calling- and I respect him his approach and how heapproachhes Big Wave Surfing with the most humility and the most preparationand I've been with Er, almost twenty four years and the output. Imagine ifyou play football- and you said well, when's the game and I'm like I'll, letyou know but be ready, right and you're dealing with somebody who has to beready for a really serious thing, and you don't know when it's coming. Ipersonally don't know how he does it and you have to have an ultimaterespect for it. If you don't have a respect for it and that's when you makemistakes hedand, he hasn't because he's older,he still doesn't approach it like. Oh I've done this a million times. He isso serious and meticulous and his training is sohard and and and that's all you can do and listen.You know. Life is not guaranteed for any of us. So I choose not to spend alot of time. Worrying but yeah I mean it's an interesting profession, itiswellon. I spent a little bit of time last summer with a guy, a fellow sure,surfing hall. FAMER AS LARD is. His name was chuck Wynnan Older Guy AboutEighty Uhuh, but I sat on the beach. We're just o just be assing, but what was interesting was he wouldhe would just stare out now? This is North Carolina, so the waves are alittle bit different, but he he would go dave here comes one and he wouldjust yeah he would almost you'd go. This is going to be great watch thisand I don't know all the terminology and waves Hesar Wat watch. This isgoing to happen. there. That's yeah fick. What I wish I was out there. Hewould just he would just stare and study these waves. I don't know whenyou guys are on vacation or by Your House on a beach if Lard is doing thatto or it's a it's a relationship. It definitely is, I always say: Lard doeshave a girlfriend she's, big and blue, and it makes sense to him when he's outthere he's like it's fair. It's and you know the rules afe the same for everyperson, whether they're their gender or their. You know tax returns and thatmakes sense to him yeah yeah. I know I get it, it's there's nothing subjectiveabout it. It's objective. This is how you do it. This is yeah, that's it andhe and this guy would have like flashbacks kind of like, like if you'rereminiscing Y, through a ninety nine noter to Randy Moss, he would go. Iremember summer, Huntington Beach Summer, sixty four! Oh there was abeauty I just I took that all the way and he would just remember that an yeahI mean you know, that's what it's your profession, I mean every person we'vetalked to remembers every special date to them or event. That'shappened to them and it's pretty inttant like we askd Morton. What washis first? Kick. He named the the game, the time the Hashmark, the distance.Remember you remember all those things...

...but yea now you've been making allthese transition sports been such a big part of your life. What are some of thethings that you're doing now to stay in in the sports business and to you knowto keep going in this for the rest of your life, because I think you've donean an outstanding job of doing that. You know, I think it's again followingyour instincts in your gut and just being clear with yourself on who youare and and again your strength and weaknesses, and so, for example, wehave a fitness business called xpt and it was really born out of ten years oftraining of some stuff that we were doing. There's heat, nd, nice andbreathing, but there's also a pretty extensive pool. That's where I justcame from arms. So it's like how can I be ballistic and trained super hard andnot beat myself up more? I already have an artificial knee and so that just again came out of something leard and I were doingnaturally and then we just figure out a way to get it organize and also have anincredible team that does that that you know got involved and we have anotherbusiness. Lard has a company called Laird SuperFood and it's all coffees and creamers, and that came out of a habit that Lardwas doing for about fifteen years and again it's funny when you really followyour passions that business. You know we get these objective reports.It's called the spin reports of grocery store reports, so it's moved intosecond place as a natural food creamer and it you know it has ninty from itdoubled in sales from August to September, and so there's some thingsthat were doing that. It's like okay, if it's not a movement part, if you'regoing to drink a coffee each day, could we make that a little healthier? We youknow Meani have to look for because every morning I have my coffee so well,if you, if you guys email me, your addresses I'll, send youa total carepackage and it'll, we always say it's like bad drug dealers.You know we get the first one for free, but we're going to get hooked. I think, asyou move deeper into a physical practice, you start to realize thatactually you have to continue to work on the harder things which is like youremotional practice, your meditative or spiritual practice. All your food is food. Is the king like if people go, Iwant to lose weight or do whatever it's like. You start to realize that reallyit's what you're eating and then and just kind of keep trying to find tuneyourself as a human, so that you can, you know,function better because it's great, if you're a great athlete, but if you'reall out of wack and balance, I kind of I don't know I've learnedlike it doesn't really mean anything right now. It really doesn't because Ihave I've had several injuries through my career. I need a new knee, just likeyou said and yeah when I'm out a whack and Amile of balance, I'm justmiserable. I don't even want to be around anybody, and if you can takecare of yourself at the optimat level, then you feel better every day, you're,better parent, better husband, better! That's right! All those types of thingsdefinitely yeah a ND. I think we see the shiny moments of athletics and wethink Oh, but the reality is. You have to figure everything out as as a personand then keep tweaking it right like keep learning and keep trying toimprove yourself, and I think if you approach it with that and withthat tthat sort of level of diligence, the answeris just and the new paths, thenew roads, I do think they keep, they keep showing up yeah. It is hard,though, because, like my wife started, cheapshe went back to her masters insocial work. She you know she was a stay: Ang home mom for many years d,now she's working ol time, yeah, trying to figure out that Baance, because sheleaves home at seven in the morning, gets home at fivethirty a night yeahfrom her work, and she works at Women's behavial health clinic for women forPost partem and Paranadal, so it Eah very important work inplosiit. It'ssuper stressful, but like sometimes...

...she's, just so worn out at the end ofthe day and so she's trying to figure out that baance. How do I continue towork out? How do I change it? How do I yeah those things and sometimes it'svery difficult yeah? I think that's when you know whenpeople talk about success and priorities, it's like that. We'realways clear about how we define success and that even means sometimeslike you know, just that. It's like okay! Well, if I take an extra thirtyminutes, this work is important. But if I'm going to do this work for twentyyears, I have to figure out how to take care of myself, because I wuld be goodfor no one and and success doesn't necessarily mean. Oh I'm going to worka ten hour day. Maybe it means I'm going to work a nine hour day and I'mgoing to make sure that on three days I'm Goin a train or do whatever I needto do, and it's and and it's trusting that you can still get it all done rightright, that's e, hard port. You think that it I do it if you're, not, I guet got to focus on an if I don'tjust focus on it. I'll, never finish all my work, I have to do that's right,Yabby or your daughter's athletic. They are yeah. My oldest daughter, myhusband came with a four month old and she's very, very bright, and she isworking in a real job. She lives in Birmingham Alabama o allplaces, and then my middle daughter is pursuing. She enjoys tennis and myeleven year old is very athletic and all very different, and I don'tpush any of them right, no at's great. So no volleyballplayers were surfers. Now, of course, right on do what your parents do rightexactly. Does she miss? I mean your daughter's in Birming ambis. She hastom his home, I mean I would be. I would be craven throug hm he does, butshe does she's in a job right now that she's getting to really challenge anduse her skill set. So we know how good that feels right exactly from alifestyle standpoint of going from where the are customed o living toWerme yeah, it's probably transition exact, but but it is a small town whichshe likes e. that's good, that's good, yeah! So one of the last things we do on theshow here is: We have a segment called no huddle. Were we just fire yeofquestions at you and okay and then we appreciate you coming on and tellinga true story, but it's pretty easy. We have a lot of fun with it and we dowith every guess Dave. So wanct, you start okay. Now, even though Gabbylooks to be about twenty five years old she's about our age and she grew up inthe s. So my question, Ogabby, is what yeah, what are your three favoriteeites band? Well, okay. I liked deaf leopard. Iwon't lie. I really like the cars and I liked outcast is t't no way who was whodid take on me. What was that Song Aa? That was that Aho yeah? Oh yeah,Weieeeah, that's one of them. I say that, but I also grew up with Reggae,so I grew up with a lot about marling yeah, a Omaris Great Ahayeah, I believe,is Dulgen like you yeah yeah. So alright, if you have a petpeeve, what would that be? A lack of consideration, whent to go places and people thinkit's their world and they're not aware of their surroundings? It really provokes me yeah. I can seethat okay Gabby, if you were building a mout rush, mor of volleyball, can bebeach and cort volleyball, mens and women's. Let's assume you're on thewomen's who else is on there with you and then who else is on the mens, see af four men Y Wuld, four men, threewomen. Oh, I wouldn't put myself on there. I would put carry Walsh, mistyMay and Jackie Silva and in the mens I will put Carch Kari Sinjen Smith and there's a Brazilican player. What aboutdusty, Devora Dusty, deworcs great? I wouldn't puthim on my Mount Rushmore, but he's amazing. It's just a name. I remember Iustmaybe for names. He would be onrighte BEA mount rusowore for names.I think WHO's, the F who's, the...

...funniest person. You know, Oh, my goodness. I actually am friendswith Sasha Baren coin. Ono Way so he's you know what it is. It's not just thathe's funny he's so very intelligent. It's just really fun to watch and he'salso a really good person, and so he's just clever and very funny. o His movies are just ibutyeah, but he's like the best most conservative person. You've ever met inyour life, so it's just its pretty fantastic yeah, the one the scene inthe one movie in Dorat, where he, the big guy, lays on top of them inherRustling, Oh yeah. I know I ' like. I don't know howd's. He do that like howdo ye guy only do that. I know he's just he's an artist Yeah Gabby. If you could go back in time andtell a young version of yourself one bit of advice. What would that be? Yeah give yourself permission to win anddon't take anything personal. I like that. So besides Tha sports movie, you were inwhat is your favorite sports movie? Let's see, I mean I liked what is theone with Jims Con Ryan Song, Brian O'Brian Song, Ryan Song, and I mean, of course a League of their own is great yeah. Oh, you know which movie I really lovedwas slapshot. Oh yeah, we anoll him an yeah. We interviewedDave. He was one of our first guest that we've ever interviewed because heactually worked here in Pittsburgh. Dave Hason, one of the hands yeahthers.I love. I love that movie. We literally laughed. He told US stories aboutbackscreen and, like I, that upfset how Paul Newman used to play pranks oneverybody, it was yeah. We had a blast, it was a great show. U So guss wasreferring to cloud. Was it cloud nion? Is that the movie room? I'm sorry withO Anaevidon't, forget the infamous arbub movies to okay, nthat' rightand. If you blanked, you would have missedme an GADACA. I had a really big acting debut. I had to play a trainer. Can youimagine and yeah sweet now? I always. I was curious,like what Ber Reynolds was like on set that was like in his Si but birts aseminal, so r Fella Saminal, but he was. He was ayou know. You just go right at people like that and it all works out right.No, I agree with that like if you know something about them or you find acommonality. You just go right, Yeaho a minute. Well, you got right out emanyway. It's like. I found that if you work with people that you go at themand then you get away so you say: Hey, listen, I'm coming in I'm I'm claimingmy real estate, but also I'm not going to sit on your real Estaterg, I'm goingto get out and then let them decide if they want to come towards you or notyeah. No, I love at. I love that advice all right. So you talk about eightypereight. Twenty right eat. Well, eighty percent of he time twentypercent of time you're going to have some. You know your off days orwhatever what' your bad food. What do you go after? Hey, I'm craving this.This is what I'm going to have. I mean I love chocolate, but nowthere's even kind of healthy chocolate. I would guess like something. Savorylike a chip or something salty, would probably be my thing that I went toyeah son ships with a singular its kind of funny. I'm not I've never heard thatbefore, like instead of Bagof or carton of Yeah Shit, Thatcship yeah, I thinkshe could start there, and at least I only go to maybe five or SOM singledigi she'll be fine with it withthatall right last oneday. Okay, if you couldgo back in time- and you know live for day any time inhistory like yeah where and when would...

...that be? Oh, my Gosh I mean it would have been prettyinteresting to be around. I guess when someone figured out fire right becausethen we could we all of a sudden. You know that's whyour brains grew because then we could cook meat, and you know things likethat. So I mean I could you imagine like, even if you couldn't put it intoa fullwords like seeing fire for the first time right like they always showthe old, the old movies like Whein, their cave man and t they create fire,and then they touch it and they're like they' treaman like that, would bepretty interesting, yeah that or a wheel like someone going.Let's carry this and someone going well. Why don't? We roll it, I mean thatwould have been pretty amazing right exactly man, O we've learned so muchabout you, giving us so much inspiration and just just getting tomeet you really excited, and it was. It was such a pleasure to bring you into the huddle with Dave,and I and have our fans listen about how we allcome from such different backgrounds and if you work hard and you just keepyour nose to the grind, sound good things are going to happen for you, yes, D and I think first of all, thankyou for having me be a part of your huddle, but also I want to acknowledge and you bothcan relate to this. I had really impactful people along the way thathelp me, and so I always think too that we sometimes don't realize if we helpsomeone, even if it's just a little, oh, what's Ha going to do that it canactually do a lot, and so I'm fully aware that part of my experience hasbeen because I had people who are willing to invest in me and I'mgrateful for that. So I try to do that when I have a chance, wonderful, well, thank you again nowforget to email me, your addresses, I mean it I'll, send you a care package,I'm going to email, you some volleyball questions to like yeah TAT's up withthe Labero. No one understands like: why are they able to move around theway they do and the rotations and all that it's a whole other podcast, butyeah ih so still get look forward to that email? Gabby? Okay, I can't wait.Thank you. We Really PEO coming on o. We want to thank you for listening tohuddle up with Guss a RADIOCOM original. You can find our show on radiocom thenew RADIOCOM HALP or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcast. Pleaseleave us on review or comment. If you enjoyed the show, we are on facebook,twitter, instagram and Youtube at hotdl. Up with us, you can also visit us onour website. Hutdo up with GUSCOM HUDDL UP WITH GUS is produced by Camhaldeman,and our media relations director is Terry Shilman. Our show is recored atthe energy innovation center in Pittsburgh. PA. Thank you for listening,and you can hear a new episode every Monday right here on RADIOCOM.

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