Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Fred Funk

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Professional golfer, Fred Funk joins me in the Huddle this week. I talk to Fred about his time growing up in Maryland and how working at the University of Maryland golf course starting at age 10. He was a multi-sport athlete growing up but golf eventually became his passion. He attended the University of Maryland, studied Law Enforcement and was on the golf team. After college, Freds journey to the PGA was not easy but he never gave upon his dream and eventually eatrned his PGA Tour card.  

Fred has had such a long and illustrious career that there is to much to write. Here is his PGA Bio.... https://www.pgatour.com/players/player.01381.fred-funk.html

    

...welcome everyone to huddle up with Gus. I'm your host, 15 year NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte. We're here in the new 16 31 digital news studio. If you wanna learn Mawr or listen to previous shows, you can check us out on our website huddled up with gus dot com or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts. While in the huddle, our guests describe how sports shaped their life. Now let's join the huddle. Hey, everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddle Up with us. I'm your host. Gust for about 15 year NFL quarterback, Um, and I wanna welcome you to our new studio 16 31 digital news studio, and you can now find us on Sounder FM. So sounder FM, we joined their team were so excited to be a part of sounder because of the ways that they're really using technology and moving podcasting forward. So I'm excited to be part of sounder FM as well. Today's guest. I'm really excited for, uh, you know, he played in a PGA Tour, one major events. Uh, he's on, uh, PGA Tour of Champions now, and you know, he's just had an amazing career. I was so excited to talk to him. I watched his, uh, chicken soup for the soul for golf. And it was amazing to hear some of his stories. And it brought back a lot of memories of from when I was a kid. Just seeing my parents worked hard. So today, joining us from Colorado, getting ready to go out and build his golf courses. Fred Funk. So, Fred, how are you doing today? I'm doing good. You excited beyond Yeah, I know. You grew up in Tacoma, Maryland. I'm not sure if you were a Washington football team fan or not. Uh, but most people in that area, we're back in the days. Well, big time. Yeah. I grew up in College Park, Maryland, right by the University of Maryland. I was born in Tacoma Park, but from 87 on, I was in College Park and I was a big Redskin fan, and then I was a big Oriole fan, so I never really was a raven fan. Um, although I root for him now because it's just the Maryland connection, But I'm more of a Jacksonville Jaguar guy Now. I'm all in on them and we've been dying but I think we've got a pretty bright future, I hope with ah, huge cap room and Trevor Lawrence coming in. Yeah, my friend, my one of my old coach is now the offensive coordinator there. Darrell Bevell. So he's pretty excited about it as well. I think that if they do get Trevor Lawrence, they're gonna have a great team. It's somebody that you could really build a good team around. Uh, I feel bad for Gardner Minshew because he came in a little bit like me, You know where he came in and no name and accept. I never had a mustache, mustache and a mullet. So, uh, I think that that that's a little difference for us, But, um So, Fred, tell us about when you were a kid you're growing up in in College Park there. Um, I know you played multiple sports. You were in boxing. You played football, baseball, everything. But what was that first real moment for you, where you fell in love with sports? Well, I always love being outside, and I had a great street we grew up on. It...

...was back in the day when all the kids just met out on the street and we played pick up football in the middle of the street. We had a basketball hoop in the court, up down the street, and we have paddle tennis. That that was really fun, because up in the court, uh, they put a strong a tennis net and, you know, it was hooked to the tires like you used to for the volleyball nets and and the tennis nets and all the adults. All the parents came out and played as well, so it was really a great sports street. We probably had about, Oh, jeez, 12 to 15 kids that were all about the same age, and we just hung around together. And then I ended up getting introduced to golf, a 10 years old with my dad, and I started working at the University of Maryland golf course when I was 11 and, um, started that gave me kind of access. While they gave me kind of accent, I had access to playing and hitting balls, and that got me going in the golf. But during that time I was like the typical kid and boys club, playing, uh, peewee football on and, um boys Club baseball, basketball. Um, I did box, uh, from eight years old. I was 16 when it was junior Golden Gloves, which is age and weight. And then the next step was just wait. And I said, I'm out. Um, and the irony of that is I grew up in the same county, P g county, which is where Sugar Ray Leonard grew up. And he was in on on the boxing team down in the Southern PG County. And we had a big tournament Andrews Air Force Base every year where we would have a like a double elimination tournament. And we were the same age Sugar Ray and I and I never fought him. I in hindsight, I wish I did it. Just say I got my butt kicked by Sugar Ray, Um, when I was a kid, but but he was something else because he got in the ring at eight years old, you kind of put your head down and you have no boxing skills at all. You just kind of windmill your punches. And then you learned the art of boxing and Sugar Ray was a little different. He got in the ring and and had ring presence and just had this skill level. And, uh, his, uh, hand speed was ridiculous. So, uh, you know, he went on the obviously great things. Arguably one of the best. Definitely one of the best boxers of all time and especially in a welterweight and middleweight. So, uh, he was really fun to watch, but it was kind of need to grow up and watch. That guy developed, and I just had a a really good childhood. I had, uh, you know, the opportunity with all the kids on the street and then growing up at the University of Maryland Golf course and and starting the work there when I was 11 as a CART guy in a range guy and just did that, you know, cleaning the carts and picking up balls. And and I was always around the game, so it was fun. You don't really see that anymore. Golf courses where there's 11 year olds bringing your cards and things. E think a lot of those rules have changed. So I...

...think you got kind of lucky being able to do that, which I would have loved it. But I live close to golf course either. Yeah, I did that. I had a paper out since I was eight years old. And then, uh, you know, that was where I got money, too. So I was always was working, and I kind of followed the examples that my mom and dad and my brother, um, just had a huge work ethic, and I was never afraid of working. And and I think that really helped. May I? My work ethic to when I finally did focus in on getting better golf, which I was a late bloomer. But, um, you know, I love the game, and I love the aspect of being, uh, you know, practicing on your own and you develop on your own rate, and nobody know. Coach will tell you whether you're good enough or not. You either are or you're not based on what you shoot. So I like that aspect of the sport and and the camaraderie and everything else that went along with it. Right? So, um, you talked about delivering papers. I mean, I used to help my buddy do it, and I don't know. I think we had 200 papers. We had a delivers but they came flat and we had a fold them all. And by the time we were done, fold them all. Our fingers were completely black from folding the papers. I don't know if you remember that, but then we'd fold them. You took him in, And then then it was like, how hard did you throw from the street? Up to the door? Yeah, I did that kind of unique because I would put the papers between the storm door and the door and not bad, or let the animals get him or anything else. So I I was always e don't know why I did that. I kind of went over the top with that. But then, at age 18, I was still delivering papers at 18 years old and and my drop manager who was dropping the papers to me. So you wanna do Saturday and Sundays and drop the papers to the carriers? And I was making $8 an hour in the seventies, Um uh, driving the truck. But I had to leave it one in the morning on Saturday morning and Sunday morning to go downtown and get the papers. So my dating life was, uh, pretty horrendous. E usually go out one night and then sleep it from dinner until one o'clock and then go to work. Yeah, that was a lot. So through your high school experience that you only play golf for Did you always played multiple sports sports All way through high school? I played the boys club level, but mainly golf. I were really wasn't big enough or fast enough for for the football team in our golf coach was I love to play football, but, uh, my golf coach was the football coach and he said, There's no way you're gonna play football because hey needed me on the golf team. He didn't want me to get hurt. And, uh, basketball was just too short. And, uh, you know, I think the only sport I play above the rim miss...

...golf. So it's, uh it's pretty good. Well, we all have something we're good at. So do you feel like playing all those other sports? Growing up and learning all these other different skill sets helped you with golf because we know today that a lot of kids just play kind of one sport. Do you feel like multiple sports really helped you be better in Gulf. Oh, no question. I think, uh, there's a lot of parallels and a lot of things you can draw from other sports that that just help your hand eye coordination and help your, um, you know, muscle tone and everything else. But, you know, you got a lot of guys that are really great athletes that, uh or that a really good athletes I should say that play golf. Now, Dustin Johnson is known as being a great golfer if you go back in the day. Um, you know Russ Cochran? He's left hander. Um, he was an all state basketball player in Kentucky. Now, you know, if you're a basketball player in all state in Kentucky, you're really good. And actually, we played a pickup game 11 day the tournament of Byron Nelson, and and he was ridiculous how good he was. But there's a lot of guys that are really good at sports. Thanks. Sorry I was getting delivered. And what do you My breath. Yeah. There you go. There. Yeah. Yeah. You're a little bit behind us here. Um, yeah. So you know, one of the things for me because I always focused on football. Um played multiple sports my whole life. Then when I got to college, just focused on football. Only you would play some of the other sports on the side. But I always felt like everything enhanced my game a little bit. When you got to the college ranks, I know that you went toe Maryland and you went to community college and came back to Maryland. You said you were a late bloomer. What was that transition like from high school to that college aspect for you? Well, it was funny because I was a good, good high school player, but I wasn't a great high school player, and I go toe Maryland my freshman year and we go toe. At that time, they had a golf coach named Dave Ziegler, and he had a really good team. He had to all American, honorable mention guys on the team that were one and two, and then they had. They had some depth, but I was plenty good enough to make the team, but I didn't they we had 12 rounds of qualifying and he kept 12 guys and I finished 13th. I made a e Think I made like an 11 on this part Three number two on the second last round and I just hit it left in the dry creek and I e got I went to commit to it and I just couldn't get out of the daggone thing. And I ended up missing by one. And then I ended up not having good grades. So I went to PG Community College and we had a great team there. We ended up having I just call him all the derelicts. I was one of the derelicts, but all the number one golfers, for whatever reason, ironically showed up at PG Community College for two years there and we went...

...from just a scrub p g county, uh, community college golf team, Thio World national ranking team. And we went to the nationals both years and and then I went back to Maryland, and I was top two players on the team from the last two years. And then I went broke on the mini tour in 1981 went belly up, came back. I was working manpower in January, cleaning out this burned out warehouse and and actually December of 81 really cold and my coach got promoted Thio assistant a D, and he offered me to coaching job and that's how I ended up coaching because I just want to get out of that warehouse. So I did. I did that until I got on tour in 89 but during that time as a club pro and the golf coach, my game really progressed. I kept qualifying as a club pro for PGS and US Opens and and making the cuts and that I just made me realize I'm better than I thought. I waas and I really just wanted to see how good I could get. And if it was good enough for the PGA Tour great and if not, I wanted to know I gave it a shot and I could live with myself that that point, Um, if I had not made it, but I end up making it in 89. I did lose my card that first year, went back to Q school and got it back and never had to go back to school. So I rolled that into a a really good career. Overall. When I look back. You know, there's times I wish, uh, I did things a little different, and I believe in myself a little more. I think I would have played a little better a times. Um, but at the same time I looked at it, I overachieve, So it's kind of, uh, cheese. I don't know. It's a two edged sword on that. Where in one hand, I really feel great about my career and I over achieved and other ones. I feel like I could have done better. Um, but I don't regret anything. It was It was a great ride, A lot of work. Um, but I really enjoyed it. It was It was fun. Well, it sounds like you're still on that ride, that journey, because, you know, you're you're still playing and you're still doing things in the golf game. It's similar to it. Sounds really like my journey in a little bit where I'm 1/7 rounder. There's a first rounder taking in front of me. I get to play my rookie year. You don't really, you know, you know, you can play the game. You know you love the game, but you know you're not you know you don't see the people surrounding you like a first round pick. It's surrounded by people around them, so there's a little difference there. And you always wonder. Well, can I play this game and you have that little doubt. And then as you get going and I say the same thing you say, I wish I knew then what I know now. It would have been totally different game for me. Um, eso you just grow up and you move. I move from team to team and got better...

...as I went. And it sounds like that was a lot of your career. You got better and better and better. And then you start believing that when you see Funk up there with all the other ones in the tops, it's just normal now and you're ready to go. Yeah, your goals changed and you know when you first get out there. After I lost my card, my goal was just keep your card. And then when I kept my card, I felt like, Well, let's try to get top 100. And then it was top 70 which was a big deal. Top 70 gave me a little more status. Top 60 gave you. Ah, little more status for the invitationals. And, like Colonial on Hilton Head and mere field and things like that. And then top 50 rolled out into that meant a lot in the world ranking, if you could get there. Um, so it was money list. We're ranking points. And then at the end of my career, when, uh or near my the end of my regular tour career from 40 42 I played my best cough, and most guys don't do that. So that was my window where I really played. Well, uh, fortunately was during a tiger era when the person's went way up and, ah, lot of people benefited when Tiger showed up. Uh, where the person is just that's what huge and eso my goals were to make Top 30 and then try to make Ryder Cup Presidents Cup and and I felt comfortable doing that. And then I made, um, two Presidents Cups and one Ryder Cup, which I mean, golly, if you go back in my childhood and somebody said I was gonna play the PGA Tour, I would say, Yeah, that's Bs. And then, uh, they said you're gonna make the Ryder Cup team say that will never happen. But it all happened and and Yeah, that was that was pretty cool toe represent your country. And to make it to that level in the in the sport. And that was something I look back on. I still get goose bumps and pinch myself over, right? Yeah, I hear you. I mean that get into the playoffs. Student things that I've never thought I would do is a kid. When you see the pictures of yourself as a kid and you got a helmet and shoulder pads on and you're you're 10 years old and saying, Yeah, I'm gonna play in the NFL, I'm gonna be a Steelers someday And then you get to do it. It's it's it's kind of insane. One of the things I wanted to ask you was Can you explain to our fans and our audience a little bit about the in betweens of tournaments? And because that's one thing a lot of people I think they're curious about, Like what? What? That aspect is for you. So do you have to like, uh, ensure that your caddy gets to every tournament, Are you or do you just pay them and then you're flying? Is is that usually? I mean, this whole world is different because it's a new tournament every week where football, You know, everything's taken care for us. Do you have somebody to take care of everything for you? You got to do a lot yourself. You do everything yourself, your independent contractor. So you go and you pick the tournament. You wanna play? And you could do that. You take care of your travel unless you have a team around you. My team was my wife, and she helped schedule a lot. But I was a guy that played a lot. So I was, um e...

...was I would go out on the road 68 weeks at a time and, uh, try to figure somewhere in that, uh, 6 to 8 weeks, I was gonna play good. I could never really say I was gonna prepare and get ready for the U. S Open or the Masters or something like that or a major. And just say I know I'm gonna play good that week is like, I'm gonna get prepared and hopefully I'm gonna play good somewhere in that that streak and then I would just get tired, go home for a week or two. The caddies air on their own. They they show up and they're independent contractors to you. Just pay him a salary and a percentage of whatever you make and hopefully that you have a good bag and they can make some good money, too. And, yeah, it's just, uh it's a small little team, although nowadays the team's air, some of them are huge. You look at the when the Asians came, especially from Japan, when they were rocking and rolling. Um, and they have, uh, mother Chicago came out and Shigeki Maruyama back in the day, and and Jumbo Ozaki and guys like that way back, uh, they were huge names, and they would just bring this whole entourage with him and filming everything. They'd be on the range would be a coach or trainer, nutritionist, translator on and on and on, taking care of them and making sure that they could navigate around the country because a lot of them didn't speak really great English. When they came over, they learned on the fly. Yeah, you seem to be. Have you ever played with people that don't speak English Very well, because you seem to be a very social person on the course. Like where you're always cheering your whoever you're playing with, you seems like you're cheering them on. You having a good time. But you're also laser focused, and not a lot of people could do that. So when you play with somebody that is like that, it was that harder for you. Uh, no, no, it was it was fun to, um usually the Caddy. Somebody would have a little bit of English in him. But I remember one story we're playing. I was playing a match player, were LaCosta And I had Shigeki Mariano on the first match and no, not sure, Jackie, I'm sure KJ Choi from South Korea and first told she KJ hits it to about 3 ft and it was pretty much a gimme. But I'm walking up to the green and I'm talking to my caddy and I just said, You know, I really want to give it to him, but it just I gotta make him. But it's the first spot and my caddie goes up on as he's walking on the green, he just yell So KJ could hear him says, Hey, Fred, you should give it to him He's from South Korea, not North Korea and JJ JJ laughing so hard, I went. You understand English, that's good. And he said, very little, very little. But he understood that, though. Eso I remember back to when my first time I got to...

...play it was that in the Indianapolis I'm playing, there's all these fans out there going crazy. What was the first time you remember where you walk out? You're getting ready to tee off on the first tee. You know, you've been thinking about this. You've been on the range, you know these things, and then all of a sudden it's just lined up the whole way down. Like for me. That would be nerve wracking. Now you get used to playing in front of people. Um, they just become a blur. Um, that's not that big a deal. A DeLong's. You're hitting it straight if it's when the people are, uh, lining up when you hit a shot in the trees or something and they create that tunnel and then they're all leaning out like looking at the shot. Andi, I usually would just get around. So, Hey, guys, I didn't get in here by hitting it that straight. You gotta back up a little bit, so you know, that that made you a little nervous. But, um, I always enjoyed playing Tiger and Phil and guys like that that that really, uh, brought an atmosphere with him. It was really cool. I couldn't imagine. I mean, I would be Now, I've played in a couple of programs where there weren't that many people. I'm not a great golfer. I'm about a 10 handicap. I just go out and have a lot of fun. It's just a game, especially a lot of playing with my son's. Um Now your son is currently playing. Yeah, my son, uh, the 25 year old is trying to get on tour. He's really good. He played for University of Texas, and, um, he's got a lot of power and speed, and really, he's got the skill set. He just whether he makes it or not, I don't know. Hopefully, Yeah, well, at least he has. Dad has some experience that can give him some pointers. right. Do you have you caddied for him yet? Oh, yeah. Yeah. We've caddy form and we played together, and, uh, they gave us both a spot of Bermuda last year. And this year on the regular tour. And then, um, this year we actually got paired together, and I made the cut, and he didn't on. I wanted him to make the cut, but I ended up making the cut and and they said I was the fourth guy. At age 64. It was Sneed, Watson and Nicolas that have made the cut. So I went Wow, that's I never heard him. Yeah, but that's pretty good group of guys of being. Yeah, it was. It was pretty good. Have you ever had that dad moment where you know where you're You tell your son. Hey, maybe you should hit this. And then he gives you that that kind of stink eye side Look like my kids do and say Okay, Dad, I got this. Just leave me alone. Well, his game is totally different in mind. He literally I'm not as long as I used to be, but I was never long, But he is 70 yards in the air longer than me. He flies a 320 yards at sea level. He's Dustin Johnson long, so he's got a whole different and the modern game is something I don't. You know, I can't even relate to it. Zafon to watch. But these kids all hit it a long way. They hit it pretty straight. Its's a different game, like all the other...

...sports has become. Speed and power. Yeah, it's amazing how far some of them are hitting the golf ball now. I mean, I loved your interview where you talked about. We just kind of learned our swing and ever whatever worked, worked. Right now, today, everybody seems so robotic. They've been in, you know, it's just like quarterbacks, right? They all learn how to throw the ball from the time they're little. I never learned how to really throw the ball to. I was a senior in high school and we ran the winky offense. So it seems like the guys today. Do you think that why they're hitting it so far is because of that kind of robotic like play that they have? Well, they they're functional training nowadays. They're they're training their bodies. Uh uh. They're all finding out what works for them. They all do it a different way, but they've all figured out how toe generate a lot of speed. A lot of lag, a lot of, uh, rotation. Um, I don't know where they're going to go. Longevity wise on that's the test of time because the body in the back is not really meant. Toe, Take that kind of torque over and over and over. Mines shot. Last four years, my back has been really bad, and I don't even have a violent golf swing. But you know, these kids nowadays they're really talking and wrenching their bodies. And and it's just overuse constantly turning, hitting balls. You hit thousands and thousands of balls and it just wears on you wears on your joints. Oh, yeah, yeah. You're not even getting plastered by a £300 linemen, so no e can't imagine you're you're going one. Women are coming the other way. It's not not a good combination there. That isn't. That isn't so, Fred, Tell us what you're doing today and what you're into today. Well, you mean as in the golf course? Yeah, you have. You have your golf course. You're still playing. Are you on the tour Champions Tour? And then also, I know you're involved in charities. Yeah, I'm still trying to play. I'm not really, um, competitive Right now, my back has been really bad. I had one operation, but I need a They say I need a fusion, and I just don't want to do it because one fusion leads to another, and I'm scared to death of that. In fact, I just had a memory last week and it showed my bottom two levels in my lumbar shot. Eso I'm don't know what to do there, but, um, I'm still trying to play on the Champions Tour, and I'm trying to get three or four more years out of me. And then, um, I still do charity work a lot with any any of the veterans groups. I have a family of the fallen seals, folds of honor and pretty much anything to do with the military. I love the military and our first responders or police environment. So I try to do anything I can for them. Um, and...

...with the game of golf in the platform that gives you It's really cool that, you know, you could go out there and have, ah, a great charity day and raise a lot of money and everybody have a great time and you can't really do that in other sports because you certainly can't jump on a football field with football players and have a scrimmage against them. They'll kill you and, uh, or any other sports. So golf has really been a great game to raise a lot of money and and, um, and have a platform where you could draw people in and and for different causes, which, you know, charity for kids. There's there's not a bad charity out there and it's it's really neat. And then the golf course we're doing, um, out here in Colorado is is so much fun. We have a great piece of land. It's called Rain Dance. The golf course. Um, uh, it's gonna be a high in public golf course. It's so much fun to design is something I've always dreamed of doing a bucket list thing and and I'm just having a ball doing it, and we're out here in the winter time. They've had such a uh, not much snow here in this part. So we've been able to move dirt. Uh, since we broke ground about six months ago and it's been fantastic. What is your design style? Is it Rocky? Is it water? Is it more sand? Is it? You know, what is your design style? What do you like? Well, the style habit. I'll, uh, the land dictated what we're gonna dio on what we're doing. But my idea is I do not like, um, really deep fairway bunkers. I hate that. When designers put these deep fairway bunkers and the best players in the world, much less the average guy hits in and they can't get out of the daggone things. They just got a hit, a wedge to get it back and play. And, um, try to get it to the green and save par somehow. But they're high maintenance, so I don't like that. And I don't like mobile fields on the green. This golf course is demanding a really big big fairways and rather large green because it's, uh, pretty severe with these Arroyo's all around it and are all on it. And we're going around and over all these Big Arroyo's, which were just big erosion ditches, uh, have been there for thousands of years. Beautiful piece of land, not a three on it. And it's just it's fantastic. It'll be one of the best courses in the country. Yeah, I live in Oakmont P. And I've played Oakmont Country Club a few times, and you talk about, you know, fairway bunkers and and having a chip out a lot. You know, that's a tough course. It's a lot of fun to play, but it is a tough course. Eso I'm excited. What was the name of the course again? You're building rain dance, Rain down. That's a great name. Yeah. It was the name of the land that was on the topo map. Yeah. And I said, Ben, I saw that name on the topo map. So that's what we're gonna call it. I love that. That name. Yeah, that's a great That's a great name. So, you know, you're doing amazing things. You're helping the, You know, our veterans are...

...first responders. You're doing a lot of those things. So those charities, how can people follow you? Do you have a website that people can go to to kind of help you with your charities or anything that you're doing. Yeah, The folds of honors is one families of the Fallen seals Warrior Foundation. Uh, anything to do with the police? I just love our police and fireman. We need them and, you know, this day and age, and I just don't know why. You know, if there's always bad apples, You know, I get on the, uh, shoe box here and our soap box where you want to call it. And, uh, but, you know, you're always gonna have bad apples, no matter where you are in life. But, uh, overall, you know, we This is a crazy world we need. We need him. So, uh, just tired of hearing everybody demonize our our veterans and our policemen. Yeah. You know, I'm with you on that, and, you know, there's good and bad and everything you you look at and you see today and you know, and I I just think it's that way and anything that that you dio um and it's always been that way. It always will be that way. When you when you hope that something is good, there's always somebody who creeps up and makes it bad. But, you know, when you get those things out, you need the good people around to take care of all that. So, um, one last question for you, Fred, there's a big game coming up this weekend, and I wanted to get your take on the Super Bowl and, uh, who you think's gonna gonna end up holding that trophy? Well, the the quarterback battles Phenomenal. I I'm a big fan of the homes. I think Mahomes is just so good. He's gonna go down if he doesn't get injured, is one of the best quarterbacks of all time. And obviously, Tom Brady is maybe the best quarterback of all time, and it should be a really great Super Bowl to watch those two. But, uh, and the teams are really good. And the story I'm, uh I'm gonna be rooting for Kansas City. Uh, Tom Brady has enough. Um, but it's neat to watch him. I I think Tom Brady, if he really wanted to complain 10 more years as quarterback, if you look at the Belichick's Belichick and Brady scenario, whether you know, they say Brady was so good because of Belichick. I'm starting to think that Belichick was so good because of Brady, but obviously they were both really good together, and he's good. He made every team. He made the Tampa Bay Buccaneers really good. Um, it's amazing. And they gave him some talent where he can, you know, hand the ball off and he can. He has some receivers, and there's giving them good protection. And as you know, I think no matter how good you are is a quarterback. You better have a wall in front of you and, uh, to protect you a little bit. And he's doing a great job, so it should be a great game. But I'm a Kansas City fan for a week. Well, I know that when I go in the locker rooms and there's a big golf...

...tournament on, the guys will be watching it in the locker rooms in football. So when you guys were in the locker room and there's a big football game, are you guys watching? The football game is well all the time. Yeah, especially, uh, when you go at the Sony and they have the you know, that time of year you have the college playoffs going on and everything that that's really fun. And then you get you know, this time of year with the Super Bowl in the NFL playoffs going on. So, um, well, you get the college bowl games going on, and then you got the NFL going on when you're out there on the West Coast and and in Hawaii always love getting up early in the morning and and watching the games, because the time difference is kind of fun instead of being the East Coast guy most of my life and they come on so late. But yeah, it's fun to watch. It's the one sport I make sure I I still watch a lot. I love college football and I love NFL football. Still not a big fan of MBA right now, but that's another story. E hockey. I didn't enjoy the free. I did enjoy their bubble because it was on all the time. I thought they did a good job last year with that and got the watch a lot of games and it was the full go every game. Whereas now during the regular season seems like they take time off right on bond kind of get lazy, but in that system, and they were going at it hard, but yeah, I really appreciate you. I'm gonna let you get going. Get back to your course. I know you want to create something beautiful that everyone could go out and play out in Colorado. Don't Don't miss Fred, you know, and go check out. Of course. When's it gonna be ready? Well, open July of 22 will be seated this summer, and it's really gonna be something else. So they'll be, um they'll be certain little documentaries. You can tap in if you look up Water Valley or you look up rain dance out here in Colorado, something should pop up. And we're kind of documenting all the stuff we're doing out here during the whole process of building it and opening it. And it'll be really something special. Not because of me, but because of the land. And the and the owners is putting whatever we want done. He's allowing us to do so. It's really something else. Well, deep pockets always make thanks a lot of fun. Right s Oh, yeah. I wish you all the best. I wish you health. Yeah, I wish you health and happiness. And I wish your son the best of luck Hopefully gets on the tour. And there's nothing more than a father would dream of playing in a big championship together with the sun. So hopefully, maybe you guys get Yeah, he really Yeah, that's great, Gus. And also, if e think you'd be a good conversation to have, even though my son's not on any tour right now, um, but to talk to him on how hard it is to get out there and what he's going through and what these kids are going through. The competition so high and and the level of play is so good and the spots where so few that it's just difficult to find that edge to get over the top. But it be a neat conversation to hear his perspective. I think so. If you ever really want to do that, we can set that up easily, and I...

...think it would be an interesting conversation for a lot of people out there that air wondering what it's like that what guys were going through to try to not only get on tour, but even to stay on tour. I'd love to have that conversation with him because I think it's really interesting. You know, people ask me about the NFL all the time, how hard it is, and it's extremely hard. I'm sure that Gulf, it's the same way we watched the same guys on son, you know, when they're playing in the tournament, Thursday through Sunday and nobody watches the bottom, 100 100 or so that that struggle to get there right and you don't know those stories. But it is a difficult thing, and I'd love to have him on to hear about that. Yeah, it's a different perspective because you're seeing the guys. It's really fun toe, learn what the guys were going through. They're just trying to figure out how to help to get out there and and then how to stay there. And it's It's very, very difficult. You know what the average career in the NFL is three years, something like that. People don't realize that it Z if you have a long career in the NFL, that's very rare and the long careers 10 or 12 years, Um so you know that za violent game and The great thing about golf is you can play for a long time, but it's just so the competition is so hard. Well, yeah, mine gets hard because of a few beers and guys I play with, Like to bet. So that gets the only reason it gets hard for me. But, uh, but I appreciate it. Um, you know, good luck with everything, and we'll be watching it. And I really want to thank you for joining us on. Huddle up with gusts today. You gotta Gus. Thanks, buddy. Hi. This is former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte telling you that 16. 31 Digital news is your daily source for online news content featuring national and international stories on news, politics, entertainment, sports and lifestyle. Log on today at 16 31 digital news dot com.

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