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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Eric Davis and Marc Watts

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Joining me in the huddle this week is former Super Bowl Champion, Eric Davis and NFL Network Executive Marc Watts. Eric Davis was a pivotal player in the 1994 NFC Championship game versus the Cowboys when he made two key plays early in the game. These plays helped the 49ers beat the previous two-time champion Cowboys to advance to the Super bowl. The 49ers went on to beat the San Diego Chargers 49–26. Marc Watts is America's foremost TV talent maven. No one has sculpted more in-front-of-the-camera TV careers than Marc. Hundreds of on-air TV news and sports personalities who are household names consider Marc to be the go-to coach that made their aspirations a reality.  Eric and Marc talk about their different paths in life and how sports helped shape their careers. They have joined together and created a company that helps athletes stay on the right path. Athlete Brandguard, a Los Angeles-based sports culture and empowerment corporation that specializes in athlete development, life skills, sensitivity training and etiquette. The corporation was formed by NFL Alumni member Eric Davis and former NFL Network executive Marc Watts. Together they’ve created an educational curriculum to assist athletes in protecting their brands, maximizing their earning power, mastering athlete etiquette and safeguarding themselves against scandal. Brandguard is taught in a one or two-day seminar and is also available as a certified online course (www.athletebrandguard.com). “Athlete Brandguard is a playbook on how to deal with life. Everything I learned and experienced inside and outside the lines as a prospect coming up in Alabama, getting drafted, winning a Super Bowl with the 49ers, dealing with media, fans, finances, retirement, up to today was precisely weighed for relevance to today’s athlete climate and it’s included in that AB (Athlete Brandguard) playbook. We never got a ‘Brandguard’ or tangible insight into the actual ‘show’ we were characters in. Mistakes made now are costlier. That’s why today this training is so essential for an athlete, starting with high schoolers,” said Davis.  Davis partnered with Watts in 2012, laying out the framework and in writing the coursework for Athlete Brandguard. They teach it on stage directly to amateur/pro teams, summer camps and it’s also offered as a comprehensive online course on their website. Both men had front row seats to major sports scandals. Watts was CNN’s lead correspondent on the 1994 O.J. Simpson double murder trial. “We’ve both witnessed first-hand historical events which enabled us to produce the online course detailing how sports, media, law, success, pressure to win, social media, activism, money and mental health are all connected,” says Davis. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hi, this is former NFL quarterback GusFra, sixtheeed Ndthirty one digital advertising. Is Your one stop shop topromote Your Business and get new customers for award winning creative togetting as online in display video o TT connected TV and streaming audio go toe thoandsixthunden ND thirty one digital advertisingcom welcome everyoneto huddle up with Guss, I'm your host fifteen year, NFL quarterback Gusfrat.We are here in the NE E sand, sixhunded ND, thirty one digital news studio. Ifyou want to learn more or listen, Tho previous shows, you can check us out atour website huddle up with Guscom or you can listen to us on the newRADIOCOM apple wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, while in thehuddle our guests describe how sports shapes their life. Now, let's join thehuddle, Heyoe EPSD Hud up with us, I'm yourhost Gus Fri'm, usually joined by my cosh Dave Higer. But Dave is not withme today. He could not make it so today I have some incredible guest, butbefore that I want to let you know that you can go to hutdle up with guscom andyou can subscribe and, like our show, you can listen to all our otherepisodes. You can also find us on RADIOCOM AP or wherever you listen toyour favorite podcast and you can find thus on n thousand sixhundred andthirty one digital news. If you could see behind me, I got alittle bit of diffnt different backdrop. We're going to be talking to a fewguests who have a great company coming out called Athlete Brand Guard, and not you guys, may know these people.You may not recognize them back here, but I coach these guys in high school.The one there that you can see is Equ Eliot and if you go this way, the otherone is way con and Foye placs for the Atlanto Falcons in the Zekio Playe forthe Dallas Cowboys. I thought it was appropriate to put them in mybackground today talking about athletes and protecting their brands, butjoining me today or my two guests and and creators of athlete. Brandgardfirst is Eric Davis Eric One super bowl with a San Francisco, forty niners.When they, you know troun somebody I can't remember who was maybe it was achargers? I think- and you know it's been a pro baller ed played thirteenseasons in the NFL for four teams, Eric Davis. Thank you for joining me. Yourpersonality. Everybody sees you every weekend on the NFL now you're out therecrying about your San Francisco forty nine years. All the time. No also I want to bring in withus tough crowd, creator of Athlete Brangard, but you'realso the vpfv sports TV, and you also have your own academy called MarkdAcademy. So, gentlemen, I appreciate you guys joining me in the huddle. Howare you guys doing today? Well doing go goy thanks for thanks forhaving me on, I mean you know I'm holding on for an old man. You know atleast I'm not crying today, Gussiatot Sundays, right, O R, when they'replaying in metow lands and get everybody hurt on Monday, sometimesyeah, sometimes on Mondays, yeah yeah. That's that's a tough one for the fortynine ears. So, gentlemen, let me start. Let me just start off. You know theshows about how sport shaped your life. You guys have been in sports, yourwhole life, so Eric I knew you grew up in Alabama. You went to you went toJacksonville state and you know there's a lot of people that played football.That came into the NFL from where you grew up. I can't remember the town inAlabama, where you're from but you've been in football for a long line time.So what is that first experience? And why did you fhane in love with it?Andisben Alabama is the town that I'm from and yeah. There are a lot of guysa small town in North East Alabama and football is a religion in the south.It really is so. I fell in love with the game because, early on, I learnedsome things about football and I didn't realize I was going to shape me whereyou're talking about this about shaking me throughout life, but early on. Irealized that football wasn't about me. It's not about me. It's about the obligation that you haveto everyone around you. You have to do your job, because one guy can't want afootball game and you have to do your job, regardless of how you feel aboutthe job. They ask you to do whether you are the starter, whether you are thequarterback, whether you're he running back or defensive back. You have a jobto do and you have to do it as well as you possibly can, or the team can't win.You can't be successful if you're not willing to do your part, whether youget a pat on the back or not. That's what football taught me early on it'sgreat when everyone acknowledges you and give you that Pat, but you don'tknow if it's coming and you still have to do it and you have to lock in andbuy in and put your Holl into it to be successful. That's I learned that and Ithink that's a very valuable trait to carry through life, knowing that youhave to do your part for the monster to be successful, and sometimes you maynot necessarily be the star in the room, but no success without you doing yourjob so who got you started into...

...football was just you loved it, likeall your buddies played? Was it one of your parents who was it well, my dad, my dad and my uncle? U Gl Cammy! They were like localfootball legends and went off to college and played at Savana state, andso everybody just assumed that I was going to play football. My I have twoolder brothers and they rarely never really got into it and when I startedplaying, I noticed that my parents, when someone-and this is true- I had to get good grades- I couldn't get in trouble thatmy parents just wouldn't allowe hit, but I noticed that when I had a goodgame at a very young age, someone when someone walked up to my mom or dad andsay hey, we saw aric a good job out there that they would stand up a littlestraighter that you know their chest would stick out. So I realized that wassomething I could give to my parents that, and that was some attention. Icould get that my siblings weren't getting. So that's that really fueledme to play football, and I because I people thought I was good at it and Iactually enjoyed it and I got to run into people and break things and stufflike that. You know be a boy and knock stuff over and not get in trouble forit that, but that's really what got it. I think just seeing my parents be proudand it's how I really got into it and started, and I think I was like in thethird or fourth grade. So did you play other sports because you know football?Doesn't you can't keep playing it throughout the year? You can practiceit a little Bot, but you know as young boys, we want to got out and we want todo all kind of other stuff dod. You play other sports. Yes, I did and Igrew up in an Arizoda you guys we grew up in an era where we did play all thesports, which I actually think kids today are missing out on, becausethere's different skill sets tople, I plut. When it was football season. Iplayed football, basketball stars, you play basketball in baseball, you playbaseball and you run track. You do all of these things. An I think is adifferent skill set that you work on and you work with, and you learndifferent things. You know different balances, different. You know wage torun control of your body. All of these things, the Handeye coordination, hasinvolved in basketball. I think all of those things help me become a betterfootball player down the road, but yeah I did an I played. I played football.Basketball baseball ran track late soccer, I was actually I was a betterbaseball player than anything Baseballis. My favorite sports. In thisday I was a much better baseball player than anything else I ever did in mylife. So who is your favorite player that you watched? Who was your swing?WHOD? You model your swing after Um, wow wow, that's funny. You know as akid that changed the whole line. That changes a lot I mean because and it's funny more so than more so than guy swings. I Pai moreattention to how guys were out in the field. I really did. I really did likethe way certain guys, you know certain filders, what they did and just and just how they played thegame. That way I like it's funny at. I got to be really good friends with him.I like the way dusty Baker played. I like the way Dave conception play. I,like the way Jim Rice play, therewas that it was just. It was just differentthings that guys did that way. I was, I was a really really big pet rose fan,but he was just tough yeah like whe that Charlie Hussell was the best yeahI mean he was. He was just. He was just tough, he wasn't the most talented, hewasn't the biggest the strongest a quickes. He was just a tough dude andand- and I like the way he played and Heope an t at- and that was somethingthat I took for him took from him all. The way to the NFL was that I heard him say something early on that.He realized that he wasn't Willie Maze that he didn't have that talent that hethat he was not as fluid and athlete and graceful and fast and strong withthe arm, but he knew that his body wouldn't break down, so he could playharder. He could play longer. He could play tougher and that's what he had todo to survive so and I it's so that right there trigger than me it'sfiguring out what you have to do to be successful and then be willing to putin the work, be obligated and willing to put inthe work to be successful and-and that's so he always stuck in my head, so pete rose was always one of myguys right. I hear you all right mark. So what was it like for you growing up?Where did you grow up? I couldn't I tryn to find some information about you.I mean. I know you went to flashing the luck with that. You know you're a Huskyand then you go to Minnesota. So where are you from? Where did you grow up? Igrew up about five miles from the Rosebowl and all we ever heard aboutgrowing up was OJ Simpson little that I know. Thirty years later, he would play kindof a big row in one of e big stories I covered as a correspondent for the newsbut yeah. I grew up in southern California, Facadeni California, aboutfive miles from the Rosebowl and like Eric. All I knew growing up wasbaseball. I didn't really play much...

...football growing up. I wanted to be asinner fielder for the dodgers and my first exposure to major sports was nine vote. TRANSISOR radio to my ear,listening to Vinskulli called the Games, and I did eventually play high school baseball. I did prettywell. I had a lot of speed, so I attractedscouts, but I couldn't hit a curv ball, so i Never Wen anywhere Aeby de Fault.I ended up playing football. I went to university Washington played under DonJames for three years and had got so far behind in graduation, and I knew Iwasn't going to ever play football because guys who were much better thanme were you know they were getting drafted and they were way way betterthan me. Vincent Newsson March doer, Tusant, Tyler, Steve Pulor, guys like that. That was a era I playedwith back at Universityf Washington. So I cut bait, didn't quite have a nough skills toplay pro ball, but I sure talk a good game and went into broadcasting and andthat's that's, what fuel no jed have that start somewhere. So in yourneighborhood, when you were growing up, did you did you have like a bigcontingent of friends that you would all go out and play Wilf fooball or gofind a park? Or you know because, like Eric was saying, that's what we did. Weplayed every sport and like in Pennsylvania, where I grew up here inPittsburgh. You know, depending on the season, was what sport we were playingyeah. We lived on a dead in street, and that was a good thing and I had a bigbrother. He was bigger, faster, had way more skills, an myself and I was always trying to beat him andeverything and he was my driving force as a younger as a younger kid. I wasalways trying to live up to him, be better than him. I would pitch to him. Sometimes he would pitch to me and whenwe were coming up there was a park and an altadeens called Loma out the park,and my brother was the pitcher and I was Ha catcher and he threw the ball sohard from whatever it was fifteen feet, whatever that Litt League hitching differences backan en but and I could never catch the ball but yeah, he was my inspirationgrowing up and- and I tried to live up to everything that as a big brother, hethrew at me yeah. You know a guys as we get older and we go through high school.We go through all these transitions and people don't realize it. How we justkeep going through all these transitions in life and that's whatsports really helps with so eric. I know you go from high school you're,probably a star your high school you're. Doing all these things tell me aboutyour recruiting process a little bit and what that was like for you, becauseyou know we all have expectations. I went to the University of Talso fromPittsburgh. I was a thousand miles away from my my parents and my family andfriends. How far were you weighang like? What was that process for you believe it or not? The school that Iwent to that I eventually settle on going to Jacksonville State isbasically Mike Hometown is twelve miles away. I literally would go home to washmy clothes, so it was it was. It was funny my mom, because I played offenseand Calla. They would let me play safety a little bit, but I was aquarterback growing up. I was always a running back or quarterback, orsomething like that, because my father I mentioned earlier, my father was awas the local hero running back and and my uncle was the quarterback, so theeverybody assumed sinse. I was a little Davis that I had to do those things now.I always wanted to be a DB. My can was my favorite. To this day is my still myfavorite football player all the time I want to be my kangs. I wanted to be acorner N. I was trapped in his body. I didn't have that six, four that mihthangs at but but but still he knows, that's the reason, I'm acorner. Today I wanted to be a corner, but every school that recruited mewanted me to be a wide receiver, a all the SEC schools. They all recruited meeveryone, except for Alabama, I'm not even goin Ta Line Alabama had reprutedme. I would have gone to Alabama and I would have been a wide receiver, butthey didn't recruit me, but Tennessee Allbrun, busness ipes to everybodywanted me to be a wide receiver. Jacksonville State devision, two headcoach Bill Burges, had taken over the year before and he had previously beenthe rival high school local high schools coach at Oxford High. He wasour local rivalry, so he had seen me grow up and play against him for fouryears. He said come to the school. I will give you an opportunity to be adefensive back. I will give you an offense Ike, an opportunity to start ashe freshman, because everyone else said your wife, receiver, you're too small,we're going to red shirn you and I wanted to play because gus, you knowhow it is we're just used to playing. We had always late. I'd always been onthe field and Thi someone's like well.

You don't get to play for a few yearsand I'm like that, doesn't make sense to me. So he said I'll give you achance, but he sai. If your little jail can't play DB, I'm going to regstertyou and I'm going to move you to wide receiver, and I said: Okay I'll take it. So Iended up going to Jacksonville stake. I ended up starting all four years thereand my mom was happy because and h. Her whole thing during recruiting. She said:Go wherever you want, but if you go to Jacksonville, I wouldn't have to worryabout you being hungry, but it's your decision. What, if you Goto Jackville,if your clothes are dirty, you can just come on, but it's your decision. But ifyou go to Jacksonville, I could probably go to every game, but it'syour decision so ri, I kind of think with my mom's decision, but it workedout worked at great. So you know you see all these guys now lik like littleMar Jackson and and Kyler Murray, and these guys that when they came in theLeague, the League as changed so much, you have to have some emphathy towardsthem. FHROUGH. What you know, teams wanted them to do. You know everybodytalked about when Lamar Jackson was going to come out, he was going to be areceiver eventually. You know and we've seen that happen to a lot of guys thatwere quarterbacks in college and then they came out and they weren't reallyquarterbacks in the NFL anymore, and you probably have a lot of empathytowards those guys when you, when you talk about them or when you have to doa story on them. For me, it's just understanding. It's understanding- andI don't know if you askd, that to you Markr, if you aske me but good now, youno N, no fso for me seeing it's difficult when you come into the Leagueand you've been accustomed to doing some things and Gush. You know you'vebeen really good. That's why you get your opportunities to play in the LEAG.You've been really good and then all of a sudden you're being told that youcan't do that. You can't play at the next level and it's in is frustrating,and I think that's for every player coming in is frustrating understanding.Why, a while of? U settain thengs, aren't working out the way theynormally work out and it has to be exponentially more frustrating when youwere being told that you're not even going to be given the chance to proveand show that you can play at the next level and that's what a lot of guyshave had to go through. Fortunately, you have these guys. Just like me, backin high school, I had a IA had someone who had seen me play and perform in acertain light, say: okay, I think you can do it at this level as well. That'swhat a lot of these players are getting now. These college coaches are cominginto the NFL that understand the skill sense of these guys better and theydon't want them all to stand in the pot. The NFL Today I mean you've studied it.You've been around it you've reported on it. You teach people how to come offwith the NFL and talk about it. What do you think that the NFL has really gonetowards college football or college footballas just had such a presence,because back in the day it was like, college was trying to be like the NFL.I think the NFL was a little more like trying to be like college for becauseof that reason, Whan Eric just talked about. How do you feel about that someof the stuff that he was talking about about quarterbacks and not beingallowed to Quaterba play the quarterback physition? I certainly sawthat back on back in the S and early S, and I just felt it was terribly frustratinga lot of those guys were my friends. It were forced to be, they were exiled upinto Canada and they had to go prove themselfe in Canada for two reasons,because owners didn't feel that they couldproperly be the face of the franchise and, secondly, they didn't feel thatthey were Astut enough to run the passing offense. Now Twenty five yearslater. Yes, Gus to your question that college game and that college style quarterback is now finding a place in the nfl where hecan thrive. Yeah know I agree, and you know. I think that the game has changeda lot right. Ari Hope. I said that right here. No, no, no, you did yousaid that correctly 't. The only thing I would add when you know own thequestion about bringing in the the college, coaches or whether or notthe NFL is, is reaching into college or is college trying to mimicking. Is itmimicking the pros? I think Co. The pros are memic in college now, becausethey have no choice: gus, the quarterbacks, the players that arecoming out. Everyone is now playing a certain style once upon a time. You'reright because remember college football is the minor leagues for the NFL. OnyGuys were all trained. They were trained in NFL's, tigpt ball in prosystems, and the running backs were in the eye, because that's how everybodyplayed in nfl what's happening now, college coaches have gone in and youhave th. You have the Urban Myers that were Lokd at what just saying my job isnot to prepare these guys F R for the prose. My job is to win in college, soyou start for having these pread...

...offenses that were giving peopleproblems, but because you have that you have spread quarterbacks they're,starting in the lowin levels. Now in the eighth grade, guys are in thespread they're not under center, so to get them in the NFL, you have to teachthem mechanics of being under the center to turning their back to thedefense in playaction. quarterbacks now are accustomed to always looking at thedefense from the shot gun from the spread offensive. Linemen areaccustomed to blocking in that in that manner. So coaches in the NFL have nochoice, but to switch to that, that's why you see the influx of college hiatcoaches getting hit coaching jobs in NFL as opposed to having to grind itout in the NFL for so long and then getting their chance learning the ropesof the NFL. The game is switching because it has no choice, because theminor league system has changed, yeah, you're right, the minaling system ischanged and it also creates a lot of excitement inthe NFL. You know when you watch these quarterbacks e still pocket passers.You know I mean that's what I was I was. I always calle myself, a statue backthere right that Yo Oyou know and the last guy that's able to do that. Rightnow is Tom Brady who still playing the game. HIVAN drew breeze. They don'tmove out of the pocket, but they're very successful, and you know we saw aguy a couple guys who have won super bowls. Now that are changing, that theway that we play the position, Ind, Russell Wilson and Patrick Maholmes,hopefully Lamar an a couple- other guys can get there, and then you have. Icall like a hybrid where Aron Rogers can move, you can get out of situations,but he can sol play the pocket, so there 's that I think the guys wwerestatues like me, who played you know there were a lot of ush back in the day.I could probably name you about forty of them, but you know they're few andfar between anymore. Those days are over to two reasons: one we just discussabout the the minor league system. Changing number two: The defenders havegotten too much too fast, but you have defensive ends. Now win two hundredninety pounds running our s. You stand there, you want you, you get you'll getkilled. You have to be able to move as a quarterback, because the defensivefront is just too big and fast. Now me look at Arin. I mean look at Aarondonal and the way he just tosses grown men around and hen the Speedin Iin,which you can get to you from from a one technique, he's right in your face.You have to be able to run yeah you have to and and and Mark Idon't know if you ever. If you remember what your college days were like, butyou know, I think, those those kind of days that we all went through incollege are gone. I mean the guys are bigger, faster, stronger now, and youknow with your with your company Mark Academy, I'm sure you're seeing himcome through and you know how do you feel about theguys like? For me it was football and my family, and thatwas it. That was what I did for fifteen years and I really feel like I missedthe boat on Continu continuing education, and what would you tell aplayer now that he should do from the time he comes in the League if he wantsto be a broadcaster just nthing like just his life, is going to end at somepoint in football right. First of all play as long as you can play as long as you can till they kickyou out of the League, even if you can hold the clickboard and made threemillion dollars one last year in the NFL, I said that to Jordan Palmer hislast year. I think w with the bears, if you can do that, do that as long asyou can, but the minute you get into the League,I feel you should also be preparing for your exit into the League, becausethere is life after the NFL and what we teach in a cin. Our company AFE BrandGuard is how to transform your sports career into a lifelasting post careerafter athletics, so learn everything you can learneverything you can about. The League sports learn everything that you can ina building. If you want to be a general manager one day try to get aninternship in the front office. There's all kinds of things you can do thatathletics exposes you to that. Sometimes guys forget along the way,because it's just so much exas an ose and football. Well, the smart guys who were now general managers for teams. They took a little bit ofdifferent approach. They knew that maybe their careers were winding downand they were smart enough. You know to maybe go upstairs and ask you know how do you?What are the determining factors that you do when you, when you analyzeplayers in college, there's all kinds of things that you can be doing? Youhave access to everybody, you're a star for the team you're one of the fiftythree best football players in that city or for that franchise. You haveaccess to learn anything you want about...

...the game and that's what we recommendto hem today, all right. Well, I got a question on that when we come rightback, but everyone hey well be right back. We are talking with Eric Davis,superbowl champion and Mark Watton, and so they are the CO founders ofathlete brand guards. We are going to come back after this quick break andtalk to them about athlete brain gard, Tako amp, the multiformat network, is hereto help create, produce, distribute and sell your content for more information.Send a message to Info at AA, MP, dot TV, that's Info at UA, MP, DOT, TV hi.This is former NFL quarterback Gustra sixhueded ndthirty one digitaladvertising. Is Your one, stop shop to promote Your Business and get newcustomers for award winning creative to getting as online in display video o TTconnected TV and streaming audio go to e Thoanshixhunden n thirty one digitaladvertisingcom? Do you have any questions about legalissues? Have you ever been stopped by a police officer and issue a ticket thatyou're scared to deal with? Have you ever been in trouble with the law anddon't know what to do? Do you have a will or a power of attorney question?Is Your home being foreclosed upon and you don't know where to turn? Maybe youwere given a contract that you don't understand for freedom and a worry freesolution call for Legal Shield today, at two hundred, an three two four fiveone: Three: Zero Five: it's that simple youwill have access to high quality lawfirms that will fight for you for less than a dollar a day. Piece of mind isjust a callaway deaths for legal shield call two hundred an three two: Fourfive one: Three: zero five or visit us at no court dot. US It's justice forall and not justice. For some on welcome back to the Sixen Tirty onedigital new studio, im your host cusst fraut and you can find us on RADIOCOMAPP or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, and you can also findus on our website hut up with gustcom. I am speaking today with two gentlemenwho crofounded athlete Brand Guard we're going to get into that now, and Iwant to come back to mark and ask him a question about what wew're talkingabout before the break but mark you know for me going through the NFL forfifteen years. We had people come in to speak to us and you know. Usually itwas like at nine in the morning and Yeu weretired a d. He didn't even hear whatthey had to say. You know and did it for a long longtime you know, and then I had two agents. I had two different agents:Ralph Indrich, an Marvin Demof, and I never had any relationship with thembesides when they were doing my contract. That was it. Do you feel,like the agent should have more of a responsibility to really take theirplayers and teaching what you just said about take those opportunities whenyou're working in a business that everybody wants to be a part of you'rethere you're in there go take those opportunities go find those intershipsdo what you want to do. What do you want to be because we know at somepoint this is going to end yeah, absolutely in the research that Eric and Iconducted as we wrote, the curriculum for athlete Brangard. We picked thebrain of Lee Steinberg a lot and asked him what he taught and how he what did hedo? I mean if you look at some of the guys, warn moon, Troy, ACMAN, SteveYoung, all three guys who went on not only all three hollow famers, but alsodid well on the field, but also did well in the broadcast booth as well,and so to answer your question. Yes, the unfortunate thing about that isagents simply don't know everything they know dollars and sents. They knowpersonnel. They know wher theyre, where ther talent mightfit for a certain team, but this stuff that Eric and I teach the reason it really has never beentaught before. I, because no one's really studied it and looked at it as adiscipline and a specialty as Eric, and I now consume it yeah so eric. Why didyou want to get into this with mark? Well number, one think about what youjust said: Life after football's going to end, and what should you do questions thatshould be as how should you approach it? Is it? Is it right to think aboutsomething other than just football? The way we were kind of wired to be justlike you said football and family all of Ose. All of those questions arethings that mark, and I start throwing back. You know back and forth bit oneanother and what what we realize is that those answers as like you justsaid about the agent. These are guys that don't know the Agen is doing itsjob. Is it it really truly the agent's...

...job? What did I hire the agent to actuallyhelp me with lie, skills and moving forward? Is it his job to do it and notnot? The quetition is really does the AGEC fiel that way and most cases,that's not what they're there for that's, not what they think they'rethere for they're just concerned about how much money they can get you andwhat's going to happen with that money, because, as long as you have money,theywere going to get money, but what we wanted to have the conversations is:How do I put myrself into best light as an athlete to be successful? When do Istart thinking about life after? When do I start trying to find the nextphase of my life, and how do I handle the situation that I'm in right? Now?That's what mark and I started having conversations about and as we had thoseit became clear to us that we needed to start letting people know letting youngathletes. Now I mean professional athletes, young athlete, you know boysand girls. Let them know that this is the world that you're in, and these aresome of them, as these are some ofthe decisions and mistakes that you canavoid. These are some of the right things that you can do so that's sortof why we put it together and th t, that's really what got into it. When Irealize that he knows a world from the media standpoint, he knows exactanswers to questions that I had. You know Gusswhen the used to we, you comethere, you get to your hoteil room and the lights already on and Rightyou seethese messages and and these reporters are acting like they're, your friend islike okay, so I know Y. I know we're not that cool, so what's happening onthat side, so he's the Guy Thot's like hey, they teach them to do this and getthis information out of you for that and they this story is written and weneed a quote for this and then from our from my standpoint, understanding whatis like to be on the other side of that rope and being in that arena like theseare things that will be presented to you because gus you and I both knowthat there are things that happen, that people don't believe if we told themtheir thenat an opportunitycom, it's not normal and you're not treatednormally and- and you do get to do things that other people don't no don'tdo, and we want to let the young athletes understand how to deal with itand what can go wrong and how to get yourself back in on track when thingsdo go wrong. So that's that's what this turned into and and I'm glad we didyeah Os Mare gusss before you go, Mar Hey! You know. One thing I think, isthat you mentioned a key word and all this is that is curriculum right. We asathletes, boys and girls hot, go through young athletes and you as youget older. Hopefully you get INA professional athleticism. Sometimes you get lucky like I did and you get togo play, but there's nothing that you go to school. For that teaches you anyof this. So when you mention curriculum, you know we go and our coaches don'tcare. Their coaches aren't there to to help he kit, through lieer there o winGames and and put us in the best position to win and put the bestplayers on the field, and you know we don't get anything outside of footballor that sport we're playing in the classroom right. They don't teachanything in high school about any of this stuff. So what you guys are doingis so smart. So tell me a little bit about that mark. Well, I'm goingtosteal, Eric's line and he's the one that told me this, because I add Simone day during a module that we were teaching.I said: Is there a dress reversal and he said exactly what you said. There isno dress rehearsal for this, which thus has formed one of the core beliefs of our curriculum thatthis has to start being taught to student athletes at age. Thirteen andfourteen gust. You mentioned the agent what the agent supposed to do inthousand yn twenty. If an agent is teaching you how to behave, which isyour professional sports agent you're, a professional making millions ofdollars by then it's too late and that's the problem. What Eric and I areteaching and we're emphasizing it. It has to start to be taught to someonethe moment they become a prospect and, and once Eric and I partner up, whichwas eight years ago and both of our kids, our children were in high school.We developed a kinship and began to see that by talking to them and teachingthem some of the core values that what we experience respectively as anathlete and immediate media member, in our adult years, we saw how it began tohave a major effect on them as they transitioned an evolve through life. Sothis has to be taught at age. Fourteen fifteen, sixteen seventeen by the timewhen you get in the pro ranks, sometimes it's too late, because you'rea grown man and a griws woman and you're not going to really listen toanybody. You don't even listen to your...

...parents at that age. Well, have you guys had say that again? Isaid how many parent teacher corrages have you that, because yeah, you couldtell fourteen year old kid what they should do, but if the parents aren'tdriving in in at home, IT'S NOT GOINGNA! Last Hav! Well, you know what n theseare the things that you have to do and it's constant you now. It's repetition and you talkto him and you', explain to him, and- and yes have, I had conversations with parents.Yes, I've actually had teammates, and- and this is these are conversations tat mark and I had we Hav. I had conversation with teammates thatchildren wouldn't listen to them and they say hey. Will you say this to thembecause they'll get it from you around, because it's a different voice andthat's what we're trying to do we're trying to give them a different voice,because sometimes you don't want to hear mom and dad say stay out oftrouble. You don't want to hear the coach cus. You mentioned that God tatwould come into the meetings at nine o'clock in the morning and you're justsitting there like okay, I got to listen to this and they give you thisspeech. What we're trying to do and we've created real life situations,real life curriculum that really helps. You understand what it's like when youare, what you truly are a sports reality. Y Y? U A football player,basketball player, a student athlete you are reality, show star! That's whatyou truly are. It's reality television and you have to understand that thecameras aren't going off like on the Cardashians. You don't get a retake.Everyone has a camera they're following you around the things that you doaffect you so so you have to learn whether it is whether it is small townfamous whether it is big college famous, whether it is worldwide fame. You haveto understand that there are rooms to being famous and it's different wher.The Wen people will say everyone's treated, the same no you're, not as anathlete you're not, and we wanted to create, and we did create a playbookthat athletes are accustomed to. We use the word. Turriculum athletes areaccustomed to having a book that says this is when you left weights, and thisis what you should eat, and these are the courses you should take and we justwanted to create one in in that mindset to where now athletes can say. Theseare things that I can follow and here ofe the life skills that will give mean opportunity to be successful. That's what we that's, what we've done andit's a useful to for the athlete, the coaches, the parents that are involvedwith with them as well? Well, that's just it right guys is that we don't seeplayers or athletes in any situation getting in trouble, while they'replaying a game or a practice or lifting weights right it's when the coaches,when nobody's around what are they doing, they're going out with theirfriends and all of a sudden you get the the report on the AP that this guy gotin trouble, or this guy did this, and that- and those are skill sets that,like anything else, can be learned from a time when you're young- and I willsay that I did listen to one guy when I was playing for the Vikings in o threeo four he came in and he gave us a speech about choices, decisions andconsequences right and that always stuck with me because it makes it veryrelative to everyone. No matter what age you are, you have a choice. Youmake that decision and you have to live with the consequence, and so you guysare just giving these guys a booklet or playbook or curriculum to kind offollow the rules. I love it, but en you know mark, let me jump in right here,not only Da o. let you just say that: not only are we trying to give them aplaybook on how to follow the rules gus we're trying to, we are trying to bereal about it, we're trying to also give them the information andunderstanding and skill set to say how do I fix something when things go wrongbecause things are going to go wrong, you're going to have problems you'regoing to make mistakes, your human being you're, going to do somethingwith all with all of the good parenting, the good coaching, the good teammatesthings can still happen, some wounds areselfinflicted. We really try to getyou to avoid those some, you can' avoid and they happen, but just becausesomething goes wrong. Does it mean that you compounded by doing somethingstupid on top of it and we're trying to give you that that's a part of that's apart of the understanding as well is how to deal with the good how to dealwith the bad, because it's always there. You know it's never as good as youthink is never as bad as you feel, and we want them to have a fullunderstanding on how to deal with it. How ould you approach someone that ateammate, a friend that you see is having to deal with problems? How doyou approach them? How do you even take the informationand and listen to someone who is approaching you that is possibly tryingto help you and not get offended by it?...

These are all the things that we haveincorporated into this wbecause. We truly want to give the student athleteand opportunity to be successful as a pro and when we say pro remembereveryone's going to be a Prefen, a professional something you're Goingnahave to get a job. It may not be worts you're going to be a professional,something someday and that's what this course is all about teaching you how tobe the best pro whatever the profession is that you can be if you're, a coachout there. Listening to this, a high school coach college or professionalcoach and if you're having problems with one or two specific athletes- andthey just don't- seem to be taking in the information or they datin trouble- and you want to you're trying to figure out what can Ipass along wit them as far as sensitivity? Training goes to help themsucceed in the game of life, like what Eric said, because everything isn't. Ohyou messed up your career is done a lot of what we teach is. Okay, you made amistake: it's not the end of the world and Eric and I are brought in sometimesto teach individualized, trainings and special cases. As far as sensitivitygoes, which, as we all know, athletes sometimes needto be brought into the principal's office and talk to individually rightright. So when they go through your course right. So I go through yourcourse. I take all these things. What a now are you continuith that educationwith them ore they geting e certificate? I have a lot of stuff to talk to youguys about off the air that I'm doing and, and I work with a gentleman out ofConnecticut his companyis called winning profild and he profiles,individuals in three different systems, and it lets you know who you arebecause I don't know bout you guys, but as growing up, I really had no idea whoI was internally right. People don't tell you those kind of things. Youdon't really know you know. Am I accommodator? If you know those thingsabout yourself, you can really get a little further ahead than in reality.Then the other way. So there's a lot of things. I think that you guys are doinggreat and I think, there's some things that I know that I can really. I wouldlove to share with you later on that maybe help all these people that youwant to help as well sure it's a lot of what Eric and I teach Eric just callsit life skills and I come at it from the media perspector because gass I Icould. If let's say, if I would have got to you as as a young prospect andTulsa and- and you took my course, I could have told you how to react andI'm not by no means to. I mean any disrespectto this. What do you say to that reporter from Kt ul and Tolsa, whoasked You Guss? Why did you throw those threee interceptions after that game?There's a way to properly answer that question, there's a way to talk aboutfailure as an athlete so that you don't shoot yourself in the foot and devalueyour brand thereis a way you can handle it. There's three specific ways: Howyou can answer a tough question where you actually Defang the reporter andyou take the bullet right out of his gun and you turn it back on him and youcan make him feel really stupid. Sometimes if you know how to handlethat question, we teach things like that and we come at it from the mediastandpoint, because I've been on the other side firing those questions, war,Moon when I was a reporter at Kho UTV in Houston and after he threw threeinterceptions. I was the first guy that he called on to ask that question now.What I've done with the help of Eric is Flipp the switch and we try to educateathletes on so much how to deal with mainstream media, social media, socialactivism and everything that involves the fabric of what being an athlete intwo thousand and twenty intales. Well, you know what hip tone for me is I hadto deal with that with my family right. My Dad was my worst critic and you know:You'RE GOINGNA Call Your Dad after every game, and that was him. Why doyou throw them tre, three picks with dad. I threw four touchsowns Wen, wewon. Well, I don't wo, you threw three pitcks. Why do you throw those? Youknow that, but being able to diffuse those situations, because it justbuilds frustration up in you and didn't really want to call thim sometimes, soI understand completely what you're talking about, because it's not onlymedia but it's family and now wit, social media even makes it worse andEric. As you know, as a player, family really wants to be involved all thetime and everything you're doing, and sometimes it's really difficult forguys to say no well. Yes, yes and that's a part of it, just understandingthat it is okay to say no and that that frustration is real. You just said thatsee as and you have to understand as an athlete you'R Youe an athlete, yourball player. You know it doesn't matter if Youre swimmer, Your Bay, Football Player, baseballplayer, basketball you're competing, but you are a human. Your an individualwith feelings and frustration is real...

...and not wanting to hear what you didwrong in that moment. It's OKA and that's the part of it that you don'thave you don't have to be bullet proof. It's okay, to understand that that thisis something that I really don't need in this moment and understanding andlearning how to talk to family in those situations, understanding how to really compartmentalize and know thatthey do mean well. This is a part of it because it's never like. I said some of it. Is You not of it as you?It's never as good and people are going to pick out the bad when things gowrong, always remember, you are capable of the good and you have to be able tounderstand that it's all in compeencing. Everyone doesn't get that becauseeveryone's not told that or talk that we're talkng to plays we're, taught thetechniques we're not taught how to deal with the emotion. That's real emotion,most of the time athletes are taught to hide that emotion unless it's positive,unless it's positive and strong, but that's not real life. Everyone hadeveryone has bad days. Everyone has times where the dog is bid, Hem, thewife or girlfriend a boardfriends, not happy. You know your there's depression, it'sa real theng, you, don't you don't, like the thestress of your classes, understanding that if I don't pass this, I may losemy scholarship and I got to go back to this small town. This is the only thingI can do, and on top of that, I have to play well in this game or I'm going toget betch which could lose. I could lose my scholarship all or or I won'tget one if I don't perform while I'm in high school. Those are real things thatyou have to understand how to deal with and that's what that's what we talkabout, whether it's coming from the family, wheter, it's coming fromfriends, you know outside outside sources, it's real and you have to beable to deal with it. Let me dove tell on that. If I can guys,because Eric just sayd something really important and I'm going to even stress,it's Importante just a little bit further. The reason why that's soimportant gus is when you're feeling there are enough pressures that you toas college stars and professional athletes felt when it's compounded frompressure from social media, press, trolls and people like that. That'swhat causes you to go out and do something stupid, yeah,something stupid. So what we teach athletes is just being just being awareof how, along with the normal struggles of what we can easily say now on mentalhealth, fissues, that a lot of athletes deal with like what Eric says a lot ofit all of it is you and none of it as you, you have to factor that mentalpressure that sometimes explodes in rage or you doing something silly orstupid, and you have a Runin with the law and that's what we're trying toprevent we're trying to prevent that next paron Hernanda situation fromcascading into a situation like that, where a guy actually lasses out in a homicidal means andends up at suicidal and is not here anymore. That's the whole point of thiscourse. We don't want to ever see that ever happening again and that's why weteach it Athle, Brango and Gus. Let me say this: Yea fucking, when you talkwhen you talk about family, some things that you know everyone has tounderstand, and this is family. This is you know, reporters friends, all th.You know the soap that the new cousins that are going to come into your lifeas you can a better player bree under yeah. Three things to understand numberone. No, as you just said, you started by saying a yet no is okay. Silence is an answer by that I mean sometimes it's okay tonot even respond to something crazy. Something that you don't want to do.Silence is an answer for so you need to understand that, yes Y, you need that's,that's one. That definitely needs to be understood. No, as an answer silence silence is silence is definitely ananswer right there. No one's acceptable, and the third thing I'm gonna tell youright now, I don't know is a very good answer. When you don't know, you needto understand that and a lot of times everyone wants to react and gus. Wealways want to feel like we have that answer. Why did things go wrong and andwhat's happening in and and you want to explain everything to the family andeveryone that's happening. Sometimes you just don't have anything to say inthat moment, and you said it just you...

...don't know so. It's okay, brease. Ihear every day in an excege from a ballclar summer. I exercise bad judgment. I should havethought this through more clearly, I responded improperly. All he or she hadto do is just get the pause button for one or two moments. Let reality hitthem. Of course, you've taken athlete Brandguard, so you know how to respondand everything is go. Every oung is good I'll give on an example of how Isee this right when I coached high school and I coach Youth football whenI got out of the NFL, and I was doing those things. My first meeting with allthe parents was look. There's going to be times that you're not happy therthisits going to happen, that's football, your kid didn't playing up for whateverhappened. You were not allowed to call me for twenty four hours. That was the rule. That was the onlyRoleiha. Yes pause, like you ecause, you know how itis. Sports are emotional and you lose it sometimes, and that was it's thesame thing. Some things happen quick and you can get out of control veryfast and you need to take that pause. That's a very good! THAT'S NUMBER THREEOT! Next time! YOU FORGET IT I'll! Remember it Erican! I remun there. Itis there that appreciate that so tet Meeisto, you know, and how should wedeliver it to all the people that needid out there, because you knowthere's, there's hundreds of thousands of athletes that could juseus? Well,let me say it's not just for athletes. Gust! It's for parents, as you said,coaches athletes, anybody who deals regularly with athletes, Front office,personnel, athlete Athletic Directors, coaches trainers; they just don't havethat understanding of how to properly deal with athletes and sports culture.That's why you see so many mistakes Bein made on a daily basis and that'swhy Eric and I sat together and sat down for seven or eight years in pinthe course. How can you get it? You go to athlete rangardcom. You can sign upand request us to speak to your team. We can appear to them face to face andseminar form. We can do it through teleconference or you can also sign up and enrol for ourclasses right online. You just pick the classes that you want. Click thatbutton and roll here and Wala. The information comes right into you. Youcan rotch the course right on a computer and and gus also Wen one ofHem saying in Tha. Of course, he just said it Houg. We have done it and wewill continue to do it because you know two thousand and twenty created this this market force, andthat is the zoom market, so you can get yo can get one or both of us individually to be able to sit down.You know, and in that way, even after taking ha course, theyr continuededucation and if their questions- and you want to throw off, you know basicbasic coaching, understanding and teaching, because it's just different,it's something that you and I both know it's a world that, if you, if you've,never really been in the arena, you don't know it. This is something that'svery difficult to tell someone what it's like if you've never really beenthere, so we tried to break it down so that everyone in there can understandthe different phases of it and I think, actually, with my gray, hair andeverything I have now. I THINKI'M ADI well mark used to have here, but wewe're at a we're at a point now O coven ther tere. We have experienced it fromevery phase and understood and understand how to communicate that to this generationcoming up, because something you have to think about it's, it's different,out'to, a lot of pressure, think about what we see all the time and wementione his ONCON. We've mentioned social media and and social justice andeverything that's happening right now. That's a lot of pressure. That's a lotof pressure, we're asking twenty something year: Olds Right now tochange the world! Think about it right! We want twenty something: your oldathletes, male and female. Just speak up and say this is right, and this isinjustice and all these things, those that's what's going on, so you needsome understanding on how to step into that arena. That's just one of the manythings that we deal with Napart Real, quick or you obviously did esportsright. You were ESHORTS television right. You Know Ye! Well, these kidscoming out they're, not playing outdoors like we did growing up andthings like that, but there they're they're getting paid as athletesbecause they're playing esports right, it's crazy there it's in a whole nothercategory and genre that probably I cand never understand, but my kids doing,kids their age do and even younger. So are these kind of people? Are youdealing with that? Can take your course as well. Absolutely many esportsathletes have signed up and enrolled in...

...our classes, and I want a stress to you.The econolic benefit of this course. You can go to our website, athebrangard and for seventy five dollars guss. You can take one of the coshesthat Eric and I are teaching seventy five dollars now you guys both play proball. Do you know what it's going to cost you for a Dui or if you get introuble with the law or if you bring embarrassment to your institution, youresports organization, Your High School or college team? Do you know how much money somebody is going to have topay for reputation Rehab to get someone out of jail if they get penalized and loss ofscholarships and all the ramifications of problems that develop forinstitutions, because athletes are behaving badly? Wouldn't it make moresense to pay that seventy five dollars for preventive treatment or you couldlearn? Maybe how not to do something than spending millions of dollars inRehab D D and damage control? Doesn't that make sense makes all the sense inthe world. I think what you guys are doing. Is it a is amazing, and I thinkthat you know your product that you guys are creating is not something youjust thought about. Six months ago you guys have been doing it for eight years.You came together. You understand the curricuum, you understand the need ofpeople out there and, like you said it's not just athletes, it's everyonethat could use his help. Laush monotlest Eric. Can we can myfans figure out how to find you how to follow you and how to get that. Youknow your social media, so they can find out what you're doing. Okay,twitter, I'm on the old twitter machine. That's underscore Eric Davis underscorethat's what we get on the OI tredip twitter machine and I get on there andhave fun every now and then on bump on on instagram. It is at bump in runsorry underscore bumpbump an run. Are you in story of my life? So that'swhere I am on instagram. You might you'll see a lot of pictures of mygranddaughter you'll see a lot of putures are her thewife. You know food, occasionally, probably a gus forrod interception Ihave on there somewhere, but but yeah on the goywise he played against everySunday. I will go that far no GOS. You know you had your days outthere Ihad a lot of fun playing. so Mr Watts tell us about you. How caneverybody find you and follow you yeah, I'm I'm, I'm the guy clicking the sticks forathlete Brand Guard where Instagram Linktin facebook everywhere it's justat athlete, brainguard feel free to like us and follow US Eric,and I, if I twist his arm, I put littlesegments out on the class free every time I throw. He lets me give oneminute lessons out on the class and I couldn't face him from the class. Hegets. Mad D then says: Why are you giving it to him free? I said.Sometimes you just got to give him some free stuff. Every ney. I do not saythat im all bout ot SOMIMETYEAH, no, I'm just calling hisleg, but yeah we throw little there's little excerptsof our classic. You can find on all of our Social Medias, and we just we just want to see the coursecontinually growing each week the number of enrollmentsincreases and we just wanted to go up and up and up til all eight millionhigh school athletes in the country ofe signed on absolutely because we knowit's only going to make them stronger, yeah, definitely definitely so EricMark. I appreciate you joining me in the huddle. It was amazing to talk toyou. It was amazing to hear about athlete brand guard and really howeveryone really needs this tat's it so important in our society today,especially this year of two thousand and twenty and weve seen all the memesabout it, and these are young athletes they're going to need some help, and Ithink that athlete brand guard is what they need. So thank you again forjoining me on huddle up with Gus, thanks for joining us in the new sixeenthirty one digital new studio and you can find up on Radiocom or were youever.Youve, listened to your favorite APP check us out on Howlon, il poccom andlife, an subgrand to our show have a great day and we'll catch. I ex e.

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