Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Eric Davis and Marc Watts

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Joining me in the huddle this week is former Super Bowl Champion, Eric Davis and NFL Network Executive Marc Watts. Eric Davis was a pivotal player in the 1994 NFC Championship game versus the Cowboys when he made two key plays early in the game. These plays helped the 49ers beat the previous two-time champion Cowboys to advance to the Super bowl. The 49ers went on to beat the San Diego Chargers 49–26. Marc Watts is America's foremost TV talent maven. No one has sculpted more in-front-of-the-camera TV careers than Marc. Hundreds of on-air TV news and sports personalities who are household names consider Marc to be the go-to coach that made their aspirations a reality.  Eric and Marc talk about their different paths in life and how sports helped shape their careers. They have joined together and created a company that helps athletes stay on the right path. Athlete Brandguard, a Los Angeles-based sports culture and empowerment corporation that specializes in athlete development, life skills, sensitivity training and etiquette. The corporation was formed by NFL Alumni member Eric Davis and former NFL Network executive Marc Watts. Together they’ve created an educational curriculum to assist athletes in protecting their brands, maximizing their earning power, mastering athlete etiquette and safeguarding themselves against scandal. Brandguard is taught in a one or two-day seminar and is also available as a certified online course (www.athletebrandguard.com). “Athlete Brandguard is a playbook on how to deal with life. Everything I learned and experienced inside and outside the lines as a prospect coming up in Alabama, getting drafted, winning a Super Bowl with the 49ers, dealing with media, fans, finances, retirement, up to today was precisely weighed for relevance to today’s athlete climate and it’s included in that AB (Athlete Brandguard) playbook. We never got a ‘Brandguard’ or tangible insight into the actual ‘show’ we were characters in. Mistakes made now are costlier. That’s why today this training is so essential for an athlete, starting with high schoolers,” said Davis.  Davis partnered with Watts in 2012, laying out the framework and in writing the coursework for Athlete Brandguard. They teach it on stage directly to amateur/pro teams, summer camps and it’s also offered as a comprehensive online course on their website. Both men had front row seats to major sports scandals. Watts was CNN’s lead correspondent on the 1994 O.J. Simpson double murder trial. “We’ve both witnessed first-hand historical events which enabled us to produce the online course detailing how sports, media, law, success, pressure to win, social media, activism, money and mental health are all connected,” says Davis. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hi, this is former NFL quarterback gusts. Far At sixteen thirty one. Digital advertising is your onestop shop to promote your business and get new customers. For Award winning creative to getting as online in display video, Ott connected TV and streaming audio. Go to sixteen thirty one digital ADVERTISINGCOM. Welcome everyone to huddle up with guests. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback gusts for up. We are here in the new six thirty one digital news studio. If you want to learn more or listen to previous shows, you can check us out at our website. Huddle up with Guestscom, or you can listen to us on the new RADIOCOM APP or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts. While in the huddle, our guests describe how sports shape their life. Now let's join the huddle. Hey have one another episode of huddle up with Gus. I'm your host, gusts from usually joined by my coast Dave Hagar, but Dave is not with me today. He could not make it. So today I have some incredible guests, but before that I want to let you know that you can go to huddle up with gustscom and you can subscribe and like our show, you can listen to all our other episodes. You can also find us on RADIOCOM APP or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts, and you can find us on a new six thirty one digital news. If you can see behind me, I got a little bit of different backdrop. We're going to be talking to a few guests who have a great company coming out called Athlete Brand Guard and not you guys may know these people. You may not recognize them back here, but I coached these guys in high school. The one there that you can see is is Zek, you Elliott, and if you go this way, the other one way, con and foyer plays for the Atlanta Falcons. In Ezekiel plays for the Dallas Cowboys. I thought it was appropriate to put them in my background today talking about athletes and protecting their brands. But joining me today are my two guests and creators of Athlete Brand Guard. First is Eric Davis. Eric won a super bowl with a San Francisco forts when they you know, trout somebody. I can't remember who was. Maybe it was a chargers. Are there and you know, it's been a pro bowler. He played thirteen seasons in the NFL for four teams. Eric Davis, thank you for joining me. You're a personality. Everybody sees you every weekend on the NFL. Now you're out there crying about your San Francisco for niners all the time. And now it also I want to bring in with US tough crowd co creator of Athlete Brand Guard, but you're also the VP of Esports TV and you also have your own academy called Mark Academy. So, gentlemen, I appreciate you guys joined me in the huddle. How are you guys doing today? DOING GROWL? Guess? Thanks for thanks for having me on. I mean, you know I'm holding out for an old man. You know, at least I'm not crying today. Guess, say it's Sundays, right, or when they're playing in the meadowlands and get everybody hurt? Monday, sometimes, yeah, sometimes, on Mondays. Yeah, yeah, that's that's a tough one for the forty nine or so. Gentlemen, let me start. Let me just start off. You know the shows about how sports shaped your life. You guys have been in sports your whole life. So, Eric, I knew you grew up in Alabama, you went to you went to Jacksonville state and you know there's a lot of people that play football and came into the NFL from where you grew up. I can't remember the town in Alabama where you're from, but you've been in football for a long, long time. So what is that first experience and why did you fall in love with it? And it's been Alabama as the town that I'm from. And Yeah, there are a lot of guys a small town in Northeast Alabama and football is a religion in the south. Meet it really is. So I fell in love with the game because early on I learned some things about football and I didn't realize I was going to shake me where you're talking about this, about the shaking me throughout life. But early on I realized that football wasn't about me. It's not about me, I it's about the obligation that you have to everyone around you. You have to do your job, because one guy can't want a football game and you have to do your job, regardless of how you feel about the job they ask you to do. Whether you are the starter, whether you are the quarterback, whether you're the running back or defensive back. You have a job to do and you have to do it as well as you possibly can or the team can't win. You can't be successful if you're not willing to do your part, whether you get a pad on the back or not. That's what football taught me early on. It's great when everyone acknowledges you and gives you that pad, but you don't know if it's coming and you still have to do it and you have to lock in and buy in and put your all into it to be successful. That's the I learned that and I think that's a very valuable trait to carry through life, knowing that you have to do your part for the monster to be successful and sometimes you may not necessarily be the star in the room, but no success without you...

...doing your job. So who got you started into football? was just you loved it, like all your buddies played? Was it one of your parents who wasn't um? Well, my Dad, my my dad and my uncle, uncle t l Cham me. They were like local football legends and went off to college and play at Savanna state, and so everybody just assumed that I was going to play football. My I have two older brothers and they really never really got into it. And when I started playing, I noticed that my parents when someone, and this is true, I had to get good grade, I couldn't get in trouble, that my parents just wouldn't allow that. But I noticed that when I had a good game at a very young age, someone, when someone walked up to my mom or dad and say hey, we saw eric good job out there, that they would stand up a little straighter, that, you know, their chest would stick out. So I realized that was something I could give to my parents. That and that was some attention I can get that my siblings weren't getting. So that's that really fueled me to play football and I because I people thought I was good at it and I actually enjoyed it and and I got to run into people and break things and stuff like that, you know, be a boy and knock stuff over and not get in trouble for that's but that's really what got it. I think just seeing my parents be proud is how I really got into it and started. And I think I was like in the third or fourth grade. So did you play other sports? Because you know, football doesn't you can't keep playing it throughout the year. You can practice it a little bit. Book. You know, as young boys we want to get out and we want to do all kind of other stuff. Did you play other sports? Yes, I did, and I grew up in an era. Soda. You guys. We grew up in an era where we did play all the sports, which I actually think kids today are missing out on because they're different skill sets to play. I put when it was football season, I played football, basketball stars. You play basketball, baseball, you play baseball, you run track, you do all of these things and I think is a different skill set that you work on and you work with and you learn different things. You know different balances, different you know ways to run, control of your body, all of these things, the hand eye coordination that's involved in basketball. I think all of those things helped me become a better football player down the road. But yeah, I did, man, I play. I play football, basketball, baseball, ran track late soccer. I was actually, I was a better baseball player than anything. Baseball is my favorite sports to this day. I was a much better baseball player than anything else I ever did in my life. So who is your favorite player that you watched? Who is your swing? Who Do you model your swing after? Um, wow, wow, that's funny. You know, as a key, that changed a whole lot. That changed the lot. I mean because, and it's funny, more so than more sold than guys swings, I paid more attention to how guys were out in the field. I really did. I really did like the way certain guys, you know, certain fielders, what they did and just in just how they played the game that way. I like, it's funny. I got to be really good friends with him. I like the way dusty Baker played. I like the way Dave conception played, I like the way Jim Rice played. There that it was just it was just different things that guys did that way. I was, I was a really, really big Pete Rose Fan, but he was just tough. Yeah, actually, just like wasn't that? Charlie Hussell was the best. Yeah, I mean he was. He was just he was just tough. He wasn't the most talented, he wasn't the biggest, the strongest, the quickest, he was just a tough dude and and I like the way he played and he hoped and and I that was something that I took for him, took from him all the way to the NFL was that. I heard him say something early on that he realized that he wasn't Willie mays, that he didn't have that talent, that he that he was not as fluid and athlete and graceful and fast and strong with the arm, but he knew that his body wouldn't break down. So he could play harder, he could play long or he could play tougher and that's what he had to do to survive. So and it's so. That right there triggered and me it's figuring out what you have to do to be successful and then be willing to put in the work, be obligated and willing to put into work to be successful. And that and that's so he always stuck in my head. So beat rose was always one of my guys. Right, I hear you. All right, mark. So what was it like for you growing up? Where did you grow up? I couldn't I try to find some information about you. I mean, I know you went to washing the luck with that, you know you're a Husky, and then you go to Minnesota. So where are you from? Where did you grow up? I grew up about five miles from the Rose Bowl and all we ever heard about growing up was OJ Simpson. Little that I know. Thirty years later he would play kind of a big roll in one of the big stories I covered as a correspondent for the news. But yeah, I grew up in southern California, Pasadena, California, about five miles from the Rose Bowl and, like Eric, all I knew growing up was baseball. I didn't really play much football growing up. I wanted to be a center fielder...

...for the dodgers and my first exposure to major sports was nine volt transistor radio to my ear listening to Vince Gully call the Games. And I did eventually play high school baseball. I did pretty well. I had a lot of speed, so I attracted scouts, but I couldn't hit a curveball, so and ever win anywhere and faceball by default, I ended up playing football. I went to university Washington, played under Don James for three years and had got so far behind in graduation and I knew I wasn't going to ever play football because guys who were much better than me were, you know, they were getting drafted and they were way, way better than me. Vincent K News, Mark Stewart Toussaint Tyler, Steve Pulur, guys like that. That was the era I played with back at university Washington. So I cut bait. Didn't quite have a enough skills to play pro ball, but I sure talk a good game and went into broadcasting and and that's that's what fueled me Jad have that start somewhere. So in your neighborhood when you were growing up, did you? Did you have like a big contingent of friends that you would all go out and play with football or go find a park or you know, because, like Eric was saying, that's what we did. We played every sport and like in Pennsylvania, where I grew up here in Pittsburgh, you know, depending on the season, was what sport we were playing. Yeah, we lived on a dead end street and that was a good thing. And I had a big brother. He was bigger, faster, had way more skills in myself and I was always trying to beat him and everything and he was my driving force as a younger, as a younger kid, I was always trying to live up to him, be better than him. I would pitch to him, sometimes he would pitch to me, and when we were coming up, there was a park and an Alta Dean's called Loma out the park and my brother was the picture and I was the catcher and he threw the ball so hard from whatever it was, fifteen feet whatever, that little league hitting diftance his back and then, but, and I could never catch the ball. But yeah, he was my inspiration growing up and I tried to live up to everything that as a big brother, he threw at me. Yeah, you know, I guys, as we get older and we go through high school, we go through all these transitions and people don't realize it, how we just keep going through all these transitions in life and that's what sports really helps with. So, Eric, I know you go from high school. You're probably a start your high school. Well, you're doing all these things. Tell me about your recruiting process a little bit and what that was like for you, because, you know, we all have expectations. I went to the University of Tulsa from Pittsburgh, goes a thousand miles away from my my parents and my family and friends. How far were you? A way, and like what was that process for you? Believe it or not, the school that I went to that I eventually settled on going to Jacksonville State is basically my hometown is twelve miles away. I literally would go home to watch my clothes. So it was it was. It was funny my mom, because I've played offense and called that they would let me play safety a little bit. But I was a quarterback growing up. I was always a running back or quarterback or something like that because my father, I mentioned earlier, my father was a was the local hero running back and and my uncle was the quarterback. So that everybody assume since I was a little Davis that I had to do those things. Now I always want to be a DB. Mike Hanes was my favorite to this day, is my still my favorite football player all the time. I want to be my kings. I wanted to be a corner right I was trapped in his body. I didn't have that six fourd at Mike Kings at but, but, but still. He knows that's the reason I'm a corner today. I wanted to be a corner, but every school that recruited me wanted me to be a wide receiver. All the SEC schools, they all recruited me, everyone except for Alabama. I'm not even gonna lie. If Alabama had recruited me, I would have gone to Alabama and I would have been a wide receiver, but they didn't recruit me. But Tennessee all run mississippis to everybody wanted me to be a wide receiver. Jacksonville State Division to head coach Bill Burgess had taken over the year before and he had previously been the rival high school, local high schools coach at Oxford High. He was our local rivalry. So I head at seeing me grow up and play against him for four years. He said, come to the school, I will give you an opportunity to be a defensive back, I will give you an offense, an opportunity to start as a freshman, because everyone else said your wide receiver, you're too small, we're gone to red shirt you. And I wanted to play because gus, you know I would. We're just used to playing. We had always late, I'd always been on the field and if I...

...one's like well, you don't get to play for a few years and I'm like that doesn't make sense to me. So he said I'll give you a chance, but he said if your little jail can't play DB, I'm going to rich starch you and I'm going to move you to wide receiver and I said okay, I'll take it. So I ended up going to Jacksonville state. I ended up starting all four years there and my mom was happy because, and her whole thing during recruiting, she said go wherever you want, but if you go to Jacksonville I wouldn't have to worry about you being hungry, but it's your decision. But if you go to Jacksonville, if you're clothed or dirty, you can just come on, but it's your decision. But if you go to Jacksonville, I could probably go to every game, but it's your decision. So right, I kind of think with my mom's decision, but it worked out. Worked out great. So you know, you you see all these guys now like Lamar Jackson and and Kyler Marie and these guys that when they came in the League, the League is changed so much you have to have some empathy towards them through what you know teams wanted them to do. You know, everybody talked about when Lamar Jackson was going to come out. He was going to be a receiver eventually. You know, and we've seen that happen to a lot of guys that were quarterbacks in college and then they came out and they weren't really quarterbacks in the NFL anymore, and you probably have a lot of empathy towards those guys when you when you talk about him or when you have to do a story on them. For me, it's just understanding. It's understanding and I don't know if he has that to you, marker, if he has me, but no, you, no, no, for so for me, seeing it's difficult when you come into the League and you've been accustomed to doing some things in Gus. You know you've been really good. That's why you get your opportunities to play in the League. You've been really good, and then all of a sudden you're being told that you can't do that, you can't play at the next level, and it's in it's frustrating and I think that's for every player coming in. Is Frustrating understanding why, I while all of us sudden things aren't working out the way they normally work out and it has to be exponentially more frustrating when you were being told that you're not even going to be given the chance to prove and show that you can play at the next level, and that's what a lot of guys have had to go through. Fortunately, you have these guys just like me. Back in high school I had a I said, I had someone who had seen me play and perform in a certain light say, okay, I think you can do it at this level as well. That's what a lot of these players are getting now. These college coaches are coming and to the NFL that understand the skill sets of these guys better and they don't want them. All the stand in the pot the NFL today. I mean you've studied it, you've been around it, you've reported on it, you teach people how to come out with the NFL and and talk about it. What do you think that the NFL has really gone towards college football or college football has just had such a presence? Because back in the day it was like college was trying to be like the NFL. I think the NFL is a little more like trying to be like college. Because of that reason, what Eric is talked about. What how do you feel about that? Some of the stuff that he was talking about about quarterbacks and not being allowed to quarterback play the quarterback position. I certainly saw that back on, back in the S and early s and I just felt it was terribly frustrating. A lot of those guys are my friends. It were forced to be. They were exiled up into Canada and they had to go prove themself in Canada for two reasons, because owners didn't feel that they could properly be the face of the franchise and secondly, they didn't feel that they were a student enough to run the passing offense. Now, twenty five years later, yes, gust to your question, that college game and that college style quarterback is now finding a place in the NFL where he can thrive. You know, I agree and I you know I think that the game has changed a lot. Right. Are Hope I said that right there? No, no, no, no, you did. You said that correctly. Don't. Only thing I would add I when you know on the question about bringing in the cut the college coaches are whether or not the NFL is is reaching in to college or his college trying to mimicking if it mimicking the pros? I think how the pros are mimicking college now because they have no choice, because the quarterbacks, the players that are coming out. Everyone is now all playing a certain style. Once upon a time you're right, because, remember, college football is the minor leagues for the NFL. The guys were all trained. They were trained in NFL's tight ball, in pro systems, and the running backs were in the eye because that's how everybody played in the NFL. What's happening now? College coaches have gone in and you have the you have the urban Myers that were that. Would just say it. My job is not to prepare these guys for for the pros. My job is to win in college. So you start having these spread offenses that were giving...

...people problems. But because you have that, you have spread quarterbacks. They're starting in the lower levels now, in the eighth grade, guys are in the spread. They're not under center. So to get them in the NFL you have to teach them mechanics of being under the center, to turning their back to the defense in play action. quarterbacks now or accustomed to always looking at the defense from the shotgun, from the spread offensive linemen are accustomed to blocking in that, in that manner. So coaches in the NFL have no choice but to switch to that. That's why you see the influx of college head coaches getting hit coaching jobs in the NFL as opposed to having to grind it out in the NFL for so long and then getting their chance learning the ropes of the NFL. The game is switching because it has no choice, because the minor league system has changed. Yeah, you're right, in the mine league system is changed and it also creates a lot of excitement in the NFL. You know, when you watch these quarterbacks are still pocket passers. You know, I mean that's what I was. I was I always called myself a statue back there right that. You know, you you know in the last guy that's able to do that right now is Tom Brady, who's still playing the game. Him and drew breeze. They don't move out of the pocket, but they're very successful. And you know, we saw a guy, a couple guys who have won super bowls now that are changing that the way that we play the position in Russell Wilson and Patrick Mahomes. Hopefully Lamar and a couple other guys can get there. And then you have I call like a hybrid where Aaron Rodgers can move, you can get out of situations that he can still play the pocket. So there is that. I think the guys who were statues like me, who played, you know, there are a lot of us back in the day. I can probably name me about forty of them, but you know, they're few and far between anymore. If those days are over to two reasons. One, we just discuss about the the minor league system, changing number to the defenders have gotten too much too fast. But you have defensive ends now weighing two hundred ninety pounds running for five fort s. You stand there if you want, you you get, you'll get killed. You have to be able to move as a quarterback because the defensive front is just too big and fast. Now. We look at Aaron I mean look at Aaron Donald and the way he just tosses grown men around and then the speed and which he can get to you from the from a one technique. He's right in your face. You have to be able to run. Yeah, you have to and and and mark. I don't know if you ever, if you remember what your college days were like, but you know, I think those those kind of days that we all went through in college or are gone. I mean the guys are bigger faster, stronger now and you know, with your with your company Marked Academy, I'm sure you're seeing him come through. And you know, how do you feel about the guys like? For me, it was football and my family and that was it. That was what I did for fifteen years and I really feel like I missed the vote on continued, continuing education. And what would you tell a player now that he should do from the time he comes in the league, if he wants to be a broadcaster, just or anything like just to his life is going to end at some point in football. Right. First of all, play as long as you can, play as long as you can till they kick you out of the League, even if you can hold the clipboard and make three million dollars one last year in the NFL. I said that to Jordan Palmer his last year. I think we're with the bears right. If you can do that, do that as long as you can. But the minute you get into the League, I feel you should also be preparing for your exit into the League, because there is life after the NFL and what we teach in a cut in our company, after brand guard, is how to transform your sports career into a life lasting post career after athletics. So learn everything you can. Learn everything you can about the League sports. Learn everything you can in a building. If you want to be a general manager one day, try to get an internship in the front office. There's all kinds of things you can do that athletics exposes you too, that sometimes guys forget along the way because it's just so much x's and Os and football. Well, the smart guys who were now general managers for teams, they took a little bit of different approach. They knew that maybe their careers were winding down and they were smart enough, you know, to maybe go upstairs and ask, you know, how do you what are the determining factors that you do when you when you analyze players in college? There's all kinds of things that you can be doing. You have access to everybody. You're a star for the team, you're one of the fifty three best football players in that city or for that franchise. You have access to learn anything you want and about the game, and that's what...

...we recommend to him today. All right, well, I got a question on that when we come right back, but everyone, hey, will be right back. We are talking with Eric Dave, the Super Bowl champion, and Mark Watt and so they are the CO founders of Athlete Brand Guard. We are going to come back after this quick break and talk to them about athlete Grand Guard. Stay tuned. AMP, the multiformat network, is here to help create, produced, distribute and sell your content. For more information, send a message to Info at AA MP DOT TV. That's Info at double a MP DOT TV. Hi, this is former NFL quarterback Gust Farrad. Sixteen thirty one digital advertising is your onestop shop to promote your business and get new customers. For Award winning creative to getting as online in display video, Ott connected TV and streaming audio. Go to sixteen thirty one digital ADVERTISINGCOM. Do you have any questions about legal issues? Have you ever been stopped by a police officer and issue a ticket that you're scared to deal with? Have you ever been in trouble with the law and don't know what to do? Do you have a will or power of a turney question? Is Your home being foreclosed upon and you don't know where to turn? Maybe you were given a contract that you don't understand. For Freedom and a worry free solution, call for Legal Shield today at two hundred and three, two four five, one three and twenty five. It's that simple. You will have access to high quality law firms that will fight for you for less than a dollar a day. Peace of mind is just a call away. That's for legal shield. Call Two thousand and three, two forty five, one three hundred and twenty five, or visit us at no court dot us. It's justice for all and not just as for some. Here one welcome back to the thirty one digital news studio. I'm your host, Gusts Frat, and you can find us on RADIOCOM APP or wherever you listen your favorite podcast, and you can also find us on our website. Huddle up with Guestscom I am speaking today with two gentlemen who crow founded Athlete Brand Guard. We're going to get into that now and I want to come back to mark and ask him a question about what we were talking about before the break. But Mark, you know, for me going through the NFL for fifteen years, we had people come in to speak to us and you know, usually it was like at zero in the morning and you retired. You didn't even hear what they had to say, you know, and did it for a long, long time, you know, and then I had two agents. I had two different agents, Ralphindritch and Marvin Demoff, and I never had any relationship with them besides when they were doing my contract. That was it. Do you feel like the agents should have more of a responsibility to really take their players and teach them what you just said about take those opportunities? When you're working in a business that everybody wants to be a part of, you're there, you're in there. Go take those opportunities, go find those internships, do know at some point this is going to end. Yeah, absolutely. In the research that Eric and I conducted as we wrote the curriculum for Athlete Brand Guard, we picked the brain of Lee Steinberg a lot and asked him what he taught and how he what did he do? I mean, if you look at some of the guys, worn moon, Troy Acheman, Steve Young, all three guys who went on, not only all three hall of Famers, but also did well on the field but also did well in the broadcast booth as well. And so, to answer your question, yes, the unfortunate thing about that is agents simply don't know everything. They know dollars and sins, they know personnel, they know where they're where their talent might fit for a certain team. But this stuff that Eric and I teach, the reason it really is never been taught before is because no one's really studied it and looked at it as a discipline and a specialty as Eric and I now consider it. Yeah, so, Eric, why did you want to get into this with mark? Well, number one, think about what you just said. Life after football's going to end, and what should you do? Questions that should be asked. How should you approach it? Is it is it right to think about something other than just football, the way we were kind of wired to be? Just like you said, football and family, all of those, all of those questions are things that mark and I start throwing back, you know, back and forth, but one another. And what what we realize is that those answers are, like you just said, a about the agent. These are guys that don't know the agent is doing his job. Is it really truly the agents job? What? What did...

I hire the agent to actually help me with life skills and moving forward? Is it his job to do it? And not that. The question is really does the agent fill that way? And most cases that's not what they're therefore, that's not what they think that they're therefore, they are just concerned about how much money they can get you and what's going to happen with that money, because as long as you have money, they're going to get money. But what we wanted to have the conversations is, how do I put myself into best life as an athlete to be successful? When do I start thinking about life after? When do I start trying to find the next phase of my life, and how do I handle the situation that I'm in right now? That's what mark and I started having conversations about and as we had those, it became clear to us that we needed to start letting people know, letting young athletes know, I mean professional athletes, young athlete, you know, boys and girls. Let them know that this is the world that you're in and these are some of them is, these are some of the decisions and mistakes that you can avoid, these are some of the right things that you can do. So that sort of why we put it together and that's really what got into it. When I realized that he knows a world from the media standpoint. He knows exact answers the questions that I had. You know, guys, when they where, you come there, you get to your whole chair room and the lights already on and right you see these messages and these reporters are acting like they're your friends. Is like, okay, so, I know, I know we're not that cool. So what's happening on that side? So He's the guy that's like, Hey, they teach them to do this and get this information out of you for that, and they this story is written and we need a quote for this. And then from our from my standpoint understanding what is like to be on the other side of that rope and being in that arena like these are things that will be presented to you because, Guss you and I both know that there are things that happened that people won't believe if we told them their things and opportunities that come. It's not normal and you're not treated normally and and you do get to do things that other people don't don't do, and we want to let the young athletes understand how to deal with it and what can go wrong and how to get yourself back in on track when things do go wrong. So that's that's what this turned into and and I'm glad we did it. Yeah, well, more guests before you go, Mark. Hey, you know one thing I think is that you mentioned a key word and all this is that is curriculum. Right. We as athletes, boys and girls of go through young athletes and as you get older, hopefully you get into professional athleticism. Sometimes you get lucky, like I did, and you get to go play, but there's nothing that you go to school for that teaches you any of this. So when you mentioned curriculum, you know we go and our coaches don't care. Their coaches aren't there to to help get through, like you're there to win games and and put us in the best position to win and put the best players on the field. And you know we don't get anything outside of football or that what we're playing in the classroom, right. They don't teach anything in high school about any of this stuff. So what you guys are doing is so smart. So tell me a little bit about that, mark, well, I'm going to steal Eric's line, and he's the one that told me this, because I asked him one day during a module that we were teaching, I said, is there address rehearsal, and he said exactly what you said. There is no dress rehearsal for this, which thus has formed one of the core beliefs of our curriculum, that this has to start being taught to student athletes at age thirteen and fourteen. Gust you mentioned the agent. What the agents supposed to do? In Two Thousand and twenty? If an agent is teaching you how to behave, which is your professional sports agent, you're a professional making millions of dollars by then it's too late and that's the problem. What Eric and I are teaching and were emphasizing it. It has to start to be taught, to Sumone, the moment they become a prospect and and once Eric and I partnered up, which was eight years ago and both of our kids are children were in high school, we developed a Kins up and began to see that by talking to them and teaching them some of the core values, that what we experience, respectively as an athlete and immediate medium member in our adult years. We saw how it began to have a major effect on them as they transitioned and evolved through life. So this has to be taught at age fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen. By the time when you get in the pro ranks, sometimes it's too late because you're a grown man and a grown woman and you're not going to really listen to anybody. You don't even listen to your parents...

...that age. Well, gods, have you guys had say that again? I said, how many parent teacher cottages have you had? Because, yeah, you could tell fortune year old kid what they should do, but if the parents aren't driving it in at home, it's not gonna last. You have a well, you know what, no fee. These are the things that you have to do. And and it's constant, you know, it's repetition and you talk to him and you explain to him and and yes, have I had conversations with parents? Yes, I've actually had teammates and and this is these all conversations that mark and I had. We have. I'd had conversation with teammates that children wouldn't listen to them and they say, Hey, will you say this to them, because they'll get it from you around because it's the different voice. And that's what we're trying to do. We're trying to give them a different voice, because sometimes you don't want to hear mom and dad say stay out of trouble. You don't want to hear the coach, Gus, you mentioned that God, that would come into the meetings at nine o'clock in the morning and you're just sitting there like, okay, I got to listen to this, and they give you this speech. What we're trying to do is in we've created real life situations, real life curriculum that really helps you understand what it's like when you are what you truly are. Sports reality, a football player, basketball player, a student athlete, you are a reality show star. That's what you truly are. It's reality television and you have to understand that the cameras aren't going off like on the Kardashians. You don't get a retake. Everyone has a camera. They're following you around. The things that you do affect you. So it's so you have to learn, whether it is whether it is small town famous, whether it is big college famous, whether it is worldwide fame, you have to understand that there are are rules to being famous and it's different whether you willin people will say everyone's treated the same. No, you're not. As an athlete, you're not, and we wanted to create, and we did create, a playbook that athletes are accustomed to. We we use the word curriculum. Athletes are accustomed to having a book that says this is when you left weights and this is what you should eat and these are the courses you should take, and we just wanted to create one in that in that mindset, to where now athletes can say, these are things that I can follow and here are the life skills that will give me an opportunity to be successful. That's what we that's what we've done and it's a useful tool for the athletes, the coaches the parents that are involved with them as well. Well, that's just it, right, guys, is that we don't see players or athletes in any situation getting in trouble while they're playing a game or a practice or lifting weights. Right. It's when the coaches, when nobody's around, what are they doing? They're going out with their friends and all of a sudden you get the report on the AP that this guy got in trouble or this guy did this and that, and those are skill sets that, like anything else, can be learned from a time when you're young, and I will say that I did listen to one guy when I was playing for the Vikings in thousand three hundred and four. He came in and he gave us a speech about choices, decisions and consequences, right, and that always stuck with me because it makes it very relative to everyone. No matter what aide you are, you have a choice, you make that decision and you have to live with the consequence. And so you guys are just giving these guys a booklet or playbook or curriculum to kind of follow the rules. I love it, but when you know, mark, let me jump in right here. Not only they wide and let you just say that not only are we trying to give them a playbook on how to follow the rules, Gus, we're trying to we are trying to be real about it, we're trying to also give them the information and understanding and skill set to say, how do I fix something when things go wrong, because things are going to go wrong, you're going to have problems there, you're going to make mistakes. You're human being. You're going to do something. With all with all of the Good Parenting, the good coaching the good teammates, things can still happen. Some wounds are self inflicted. We really try to get you to avoid those. Some you can avoid and they happen. But just because something goes wrong does it mean that you compounded by doing something stupid on top of it, and we're trying to give you that. That's a part of that's a part of the understanding as well. is how to deal with the good, how to deal with the bad, because it's always there. You know, it's never as good as you think, is never as bad as you feel, and we want them to have a full understanding on how to deal with it. How to approach someone, that teammate, a friend that you see is having to deal with problems. How do you approach them? How to even take the information and the and listen to someone who is approaching you, that is possibly trying to help you, and not get offended by it. These...

...are all the things that we have incorporated into this do what? Because we truly want to give the student athlete and opportunity to be successful as a pro and when we say pro remember everyone's going to be a prefet, a professional, something you're gonna have to get a job. It may not be sports, you're going to be a professional something someday, and that's what this course is all about, teaching you how to be the best pro whatever the profession is, that you can be. If you're a coach out there listening to this, a high school coach, college or professional coach, and if you're having problems with one or two specific athletes and they just don't seem to be taking in the information or they've got in trouble and you want to you're trying to figure out what can I pass along to them as far as sensitivity training goes to help them succeed in the game of life, like what Eric said, because everything isn't Oh, you messed up, your career is done. A lot of what we teach is, okay, you made a mistake, it's not the end of the world, and Eric and I are brought in sometimes to teach individualized trainings and special cases as far as sensitivity goes, which, as we all know, athletes sometimes need to be brought into the principles office and talk to individually. Right, right, so when they go through your course, right. So, I go through your course, I take all these things. What a now are you continue that education with them or they getting certificate? I have a lot of stuff to talk to you guys about off the air that I'm doing and and I work with a gentleman out of Connecticut. His company is called winning profile and he profiles individuals in three different systems and it lets you know who you are, because I don't know by you guys, but as growing up, I really had no idea who I was in eternally right. But people don't tell you those kind of things you don't really know. You know, am I a commentator? If you know those things about yourself, you can really get a little further ahead than in reality than the other way. So there's a lot of things. I think that you guys are doing great and I think there's some things that I know that I can really I would love to share with you later on that maybe help all these people that you want to help as well. Sure, it's a lot of what Eric and I teach. Eric just calls it life skills, and I come at it from the media perspective because guess I could if, let's say, if I would have got to you as a as a young prospect, and Tulsa and I and you took my course. I could have told you how to react, and I'm not. By no means I mean any disrespect to this. What do you say to that reporter from Katie L and Tulsa who asked you guess, why did you throw those three interceptions after that game? There's a way to properly answer that question. There's a way to talk about failure as an athlete so that you don't shoot yourself in the foot and D value your brand. There's a way you can handle it. There's three specific ways how you can answer a tough question where you actually defaying the reporter and you take the bullet right out of his gun and you turn it back on him and you can make them feel really stupid sometimes if you know how to handle that question. We teach things like that and I we come at it from the media standpoint, because I've been on the other side firing those questions at war moon when I was a reporter at Kho you TV in Houston and after you through three interceptions, I was the first guy that he called on to ask that question. Now what I've done, with the help of Eric, is flipped the switch and we try to educate athletes on so much how to deal with mainstream media, social media, social activism and everything that involves the fabric of what being an athlete in two thousand and twenty and tales. Well, you know, I what hips tone for me is. I had to dealttle that with my family. Right my dad was my worst critic and you know you're going to call your dad after every game, and that was him. Why do you throw those three free picks? With that I threw four touchdowns. We won. Well, I don't care. You threw three pics. Why do you throw those? You know that. But being able to diffuse those situations, because it just builds frustration up in you and didn't really want to call umn sometimes. So I understand completely what you're talking about, because it's not only media, but it's family and now with social media and even makes it worse. And Eric, as you know as a player, family really wants to be involved all the time and everything you're doing, and sometimes it's really difficult for guys to say no. Well, yes, yes, and that's a part of it. Just understanding that it is okay to say no and that that frustration is real. You just said that see as and you have to understand as an athlete. Your Yeah, you an athlete, your ball player. You know, it doesn't matter if you're swimmer, your your Your Bay football player, baseball player, of basketball. You're competing, but you are a human you're an individual...

...with feelings and frustration is real and not wanting to hear what you did wrong in that moment. It's okay, and that's the part of it that you don't have. You don't have to be bulletproof. You it's okay to understand that, that this is something that I really don't need in this moment, and understanding and learning how to talk to family in those situations, understanding how to really compartmentalize and know that they do mean well. This is a part of it, because it's never, like I said, some of it as you none of it is. You is it's never as good and people are going to pick out the bad when things go wrong. Always remember you are capable of the good and you have to be able to understand that is all incompensing. Everyone doesn't get that because everyone's not told that or taught that. We're taught to plays, we're taught to techniques, we're not taught how to deal with the emotion. That's real emotion. Most of the time, athletes are taught to hide that emotion unless it's positive and less. It's positive and strong. But that's not real life. Everyone has everyone has bad days, everyone has times where the dog has been of the wife or girlfriend of board friends not happy. You know your there's depression. It's a real thing. You you don't you don't like the the stress of your classes, understanding that if I don't pass this, I may lose my scholarship and I got to go back to this small town. This is the only thing I can do and on top of that, I have to play well in this game. I'm going to get bitch, which could lose. I could lose my scholarship all or or I won't get one if I don't perform while I'm in high school. Those are real things that you have to understand how to deal with, and that's what that's what we talked about. Whether it's coming from the family, whether it's coming from friends you know, outside, outside sources, it's real and you have to be able to deal with it. Let me dove tell on that if I can. Guys, because Eric is said something really important and I'm going to even stress it's importance just a little bit further. The reason why that's so important, guys, is when you're feeling there are enough pressures that you two, as college stars and professional athletes, felt, when it's compounded from pressure from social media, press, trolls and people like that, that's what causes you to go out and do something stupid. Yeah, something stupid. So what we teach athletes is just being just being aware of how, along with the normal struggles of what we can easily say now, a mental health issues that a lot of athletes deal with, like what Eric says, a lot of it, all of it is you and none of it is you. You have to factor that mental pressure that sometimes explodes in rage or you doing something silly or stupid and you have a run in with the law, and that's what we're trying to prevent. We're trying to prevent that next Aaron Hernandez situation from cascading into a situation like that where a guy actually lashes out and a homicidal means and ends up at suicidal and is not here anymore. That's the whole point of this course, we don't want to ever see that ever happening again, and that's why we teach it. Athlee brancard. Hey, guys, let me say this. Yeah, something when you talked, when you talk about family, some things that you know, everyone has to understand. And this is family. This is, you know, reporters, friends, all of you know, the the sold them, the new cousins that are going to come into your life as you have a better player. Three things understand of them. Yeah, three things to understand. Number One, know, as you just said. You you started by saying it. Yet know is okay. Silence is an answer, and by that I mean sometimes it's okay to not even respond to something crazy, something that you don't want to do. Silence isn't answer for so you need. I understand that. Yes, you need, you need. That's that's one that definitely needs to be understood. No one was an answer. Silence, silence is. Silence is definitely an answer. Right there, no one's acceptable. And the third thing I'm to tell you right now. I don't know is a very good answer. When you don't know in you need to understand that. And a lot of times everyone wants to react and guts. We always want to feel like we have that answer. Why did things go wrong? And and what's happening, and and in you want to explain everything to the family and everyone is happening. Sometimes you just don't have anything to say in that moment. And he said it just you don't know. So it's okay. Breathe. I hear every day in an excuse from a...

...ball clear somewhere I exercise bad judgment. I should have thought this through more clearly. I responded improperly. All he or she had to do is just get the pause button for one or two moments let reality hit them. Of course you've taken athlete brand guard, so you know how to respond and everything is good. Everything is good. I'll give you an example of how I see this. Right when I coached high school and I coach Youth Football. When I got out of the NFL and I was doing those things, my first meeting with all the parents was, look, there's going to be times that you're not happy. There's this. It's going to happen as football. Your kid didn't playing up for whatever happens, you are not allowed to call me for twenty four hours. That was the rule. That was the only rue I have. Yes, clause pause, like you, because you know how it is. Sports are emotional and you lose it sometimes, and that was it's the same thing. Some things happened quick and you can get out of control very fast and you need to take that pause. It's a very good at number three out next time you forget it. I remember it, Eric, and our money there. It is there. I appreciate that. So that mean I'm lether deliver this to you know, and how should we deliver it to all the people that need it out there? Because you know there's there's hundreds of thousands of athletes that could use us. Well, let me say it's not just for athletes, gust it's for parents, as you said, coaches, athletes, anybody who deals regularly with athletes, front office personnel, athlete Athletic Directors, coaches, trainers, they just don't have that understanding of how to properly deal with athletes and sports culture. That's why you see so many mistakes be made on a daily basis and that's why Eric and I sat together and sat down for seven or eight years in pin the course. How can you get it? You go to athlete brand guardcom. You can sign up and request us to speak to your team. We can appear to them facetoface and Siminar form. We can do it through teleconference, or you can also sign up and enroll for our classes right online. You you just pick the classes that you want, click that button and roll here and while the information comes right into you, you can watch the course right on a computer. And and gus also one of the thing, and of course he just said it. Oh, we have done it and we will continue to do it because, you know, two thousand and twenty create it. This this market force, and that is the zoom market. So you can get you can get one or both of us individually to be able to sit down, you know, and in that way, even after taking a course, to continued education and if their questions and you want to throw off you know, basic, basic coaching, understanding and teaching, because it's just different. It's something that you and I both know. It's a world that if you if you've never really been in the arena, you don't know it. This is something that's very difficult to tell someone what it's like if you've never really been there. So we tried to break it down so that everyone in there can understand the different phases of it. And I think actually, with my gray hair and everything I have now, I think of at a the will mark used to have here. But we we're at a we're at a point now. I covid there there. We have experienced it from every phase and understood and and understand how to communicate that to this generation coming up, because something you have to think of. It's it's different outs a lot of pressure. Think about what we see all the time and we mentioned it on we've mentioned social media and and social justice and everything that's happening right now. That's a lot of pressure. That's a lot of pressure. We're asking twenty something year olds right now to change the world. Think about it, right. We want we want twenty something euro athletes, male and female, just speak up and say this is right and this is injustice and all these things those that's what's going on. So you need some understanding on how to step into that arena. That's just one of the many things that we deal with. So that's the park real quick. Or you obviously did esports right. You were esorts television right. You know, he's well, these kids coming out. They're not playing outdoors like we did growing up and things like that, but they're they're they're big, they're getting paid as athletes because they're playing esports right. It's crazy there. It's in a whole nother category and genre that probably I can never understand, but my kids doing, kids their age do and even younger. So are these kind of people are you dealing with? The can take your course as well. Absolutely many esports athletes have signed...

...up and enrolled in our classes, and I want to stress to you the economic benefit of this course. You can go to our website, athlete Brand Guard, and for seventy five dollars, guess, you can take one of the courses that Eric and I are teaching. Seventy five dollars. Now you guys both play pro ball. Do you know what it's going to cost you for a Dui or if you get in trouble with the law or if you bring embarrassment to your institution, your esports organization, Your High School or college team? Do you know how much money somebody is going to have to pay for reputation Rehab to get someone out of jail if they get penalized and loss of scholarships and all the ramifications of problems that develop for institutions because athletes are behaving badly? Wouldn't it make more sense to pay that seventy five dollars for preventive treatment or you could learn maybe how not to do something, then spending millions of dollars in Rehab and and and and damage control? Doesn't that make sense? Makes all the sense in the world. I think what you guys are doing isn't is amazing and I think that you know your product, that you guys are creating, is not something you just thought about six months ago. You guys have been doing it for eight years. You came together, you understand the curriculum, you understand the need of people out there and, like you said, it's not just athletes, it's everyone that could use as help. Laugh, but not least, Eric, can we can my fans figure out how to find you, how to follow you and how to get that you know your social media so they can find out what you're doing. Okay, to whitter. I'm on the old twitter machine. That's underscore, Eric Davis, underscore. That's what we get on the old twitter machine and I get on there and have fun every now and then on bump on on instagram it is at bump in run. I'm sorry, underscore, bump, bump and run. Are you in story of my life? So that's where I am on instagram. You might you'll see a lot of pictures of my granddaughter. You'll see a lot of pictures. Are Her, the wife? You know, food occasionally, probably August farad interception. I have on there somewhere. But but yeah, I'm the Guy Eric wish he played against every Sunday. That will I will go that far. No, Guy, you know you had your days out there. I had a lot of fun playing. So, Mr Watts, tell us about you. How can everybody find you and follow you? Yeah, I'm I'm I'm the guy clicking the sticks for athlete Brand Guard. Were Instagram, Linkedin facebook, everywhere. It's just athlete brand guard. Feel free to like US and follow us. Eric and I, if I twist his arm, I put little segments out on the class free. Every time I throw he lets me give one minute lessons out on the class and I cut and faste him from the class. He gets mad and says why are you giving it to him free? I said sometimes you just got to give him some free stuff. Everything. I do not say that I'm all about Tim, all about marmy. Sometimes I've got a yeah, none, no, he I'm just pulling his leg. But yeah, we throw a little. There's little excerpts of our classic you can find on all of our social medias and we just we just want to see the course continually growing. Each week the number of enrollments increases and we just wanted to go up and up and up till all eight million high school athletes in the country of signed on. Absolutely, because we know it's only going to make them stronger. Yeah, definitely, definitely. So, Eric Mark, I appreciate you joining me in the huddle. It was amazing to talk to you. It was amazing to hear about athlete brand guard and really how everyone really needs this. That's it's so important in our society today, especially this year of two thousand and twenty, and we've seen all the memes about it. And these young athletes, they're going to need some help and I think that athlete brand guard is what they need. So thank you again for joining me on huddle up with gusts. Thanks for joining us in the new thirty one digital new studio and you can find us on Radiocom or whereever you listen to your favorite APP. CHECK US out on how up with Gustscom and like and subscribe to our show. Have a great day and we'll catch the next week.

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