Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Elizabeth Beisel

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

American competition swimmer Elizabeth Beisel joins the Dave and Gus in the huddle. Beisel specializes in backstroke and individual medley events. She is a three-time Olympian and has won a total of nine medals in major international competition, four gold, one silver, and four bronze spanning the Olympics, World Aquatics, and the Pan Pacific championships. Beisel became a member of the U.S. national swim team when she was 13 years old. She attended college at the University of Florida and swam for coach Gregg Troy's Florida Gators swimming and diving team from 2011 to 2014. She won nine SEC individual championships, and was honored as the SEC Female Swimmer of the Year in 2012. She received eighteen All-American honors and earned first-team Academic All-America recognition. In 2019, she ventured into reality television when she competed on season 39 of Survivor, Island of the Idols and placed 9th. Since retiring from her swimming career, Beisel has become extremely involved in the LEAD Sports Summit. She has been a part of this organization since 2017 and is currently active. LEAD is a yearly summit that connects young female athletes with Olympic champions and experts through an all-inclusive, 4-day event. Survivor isn't the only television or movie experience that her family has seen as Beisel's great uncle, Warren William Krech, has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and was called the "King of Pre-code Hollywood." He was also one of the original fourteen members of the Screen Actors Guild. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome everyone to huddle up with gusts, where we talked to our guests about how sports shape their life. I'm your host, Gusts Farat, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and I'm joined by my longtime friend and Co host, Dave Hagar. You can now find us under the big top with the sports circus and ring master sow. Look for us on amp TV a a MP tvcom. Welcome everyone to do another episode of Hud off with Gusts. Today, Dave, I think we have our first Olympian on the show. Three time. Olympia, three times. It's really excited. So day we're really excited. We're brought to all of our fans by some great people, RADIOCOM and we're one of their original podcasts, and also amp TV and we're under the big top with style, the ring master in the sports circus. So we're really excited to be a part of them. And also, you know, we love to talk about our favorite hotel out in Ala, the same bonadventure. Yeah, so, yeah, Bontoventro Hotel, the Weston BONDOVENTRO HOTEL OUT IN LA. We're proud of be one of one of their great people that they loved a sponsor. So today on the show, Dave, we got our book. Everybody's right here. We're so excited to have our three time Olympian, one of the show that you love to tell me about, survivor, survivor. We're going to hear about that today. We're going to be here about our time in college. So we're really excited to have Elizabeth on with us. Elizabeth, thank you for joining us on the show. It's great to have you. And so we always start with what was that first time in your life that you fell in love with sports? Can you remember back that far where you said I got to do this. I remember being a baby and having I don't really remember being a baby, but through my parents I knew that I had a lot of energy and I just literally could not come down without being in the water, and so that was my first taste of maybe being a plimmer one day. And so then I remember my first like dream come true moment was making the Olympic team at fifteen. And eight years before that I watched my first Olympics on TV as a seven year old and I remember watching it and being like I am going to do that one day. I'm gonna go to the Olympics and I remember. Sorry, can you hear that, like knocking? No, you're good. That in the background. I'm so sorry. Hold on, can we pot I'm really good for it. This is like really annoying me. I'm so sorry. Yeah, Guy, can you like close the door something? It's really loud. Okay, thank you. That my be our first NAT's good. That's going to be our first social media clip of Elizabeth Yelling at her dad to close the yeah, because I'm never here, like, I don't like Dad, stop doing what you're doing now. That's awesome. So you were telling us about your first memories what we said? No, you were telling us about your first memory of that first time you were in the pool. Okay, so let me just like let me like start up. Yeah, go for it, I'm about some starts. Okay. So, yeah, I think one of the First Times that I truly knew I was an athlete was obviously being a baby and going to the Mommy and me classes with my mom and just having this in facial energy that needed to be burned off, and that turned into me joining the swim team, and then I remember being seven years old and watching my first ever Olympics on TV and it was sort of a carbon copy of what everybody else experiences of their first one pics. You know, you're on your family couch, you click on and you put on...

...your score and my sport was swimming and I remember watching it and seeing misty him and when the gold medal in the Turner Fly and peeing her on the podium, in the American flag being hung down from the ceiling and being like I'm going to do that one day. And eight years later, as a fifteen year old, I did that. And so between seven and fifteen I was like die hard summer. That was my life. I was going to do whatever it took to be an Olympia one day and then from then my career just kept getting better and better and stayed with the sport for another ten years after that. No, Elizabeth, did you play other sports? So I know you had to dedicate yourself to swimming, but like early on, did you play soccer like a lot of kids, or was it really like swimming right from the beginning? Oh No, I did soccer, basketball, ballet, curfey and I was super into music, so violent and piano were really important to me. But I felt like swimming. I always was drawn too, more so than the other sports, and so for me I I never really question of the swimmer. The other sports were Mede to doing things because I was competion. Really enjoyed that. At the end of the day, I identified as plummer. Well, being from the ocean state also, that was a natural yeah, that if I mean you kind of have to go swimming all the time. Do you know Rhode Island's other nickname? No, it's, I wished it, little ruddy little Roadie, right, isn't it true? Little Roady, little road. Yeah, I know that is small day. You know where the Roady Ram that Urri, the Roady Rams. I love it. So do you think in any way the other sports you've played helped you be better, be a better swimmer? I think so, and and I think balance in my life was a huge contributing factor to my sixcess later on in the sport of swimming, because when I was little, yes, I was so drawn to the support of swimming, but it wasn't everything, it wasn't who I was yet, and I think being able to, you know, go to basketball practice or violin lessons or whatever it was that I was doing. It sort of gave sense without my life where, hey, maybe it's swimming didn't work out. I sat other stuff on my plate and I think it's hard, especially at that age, to dedicate yourself to one thing, because because you might be some good at swimming at seven years old, but maybe not good at swimming at fifteen years old, right. So to be able to have different skills and assets that you can use later on in life, I think is really important, especially as a young kids, especially because when you're seven years old you pick up everything like it's nothing, you know, whether it's a language or an instrument or or it's just your your mind is a spunge, so comes a lot easier to so for me it was really just having that balance in life and I'm grateful that my parents provided that for me, because I wasn't driving myself to any of these things that seven years old, but my parents were willing to put in that sacrifice to me. So I definitely think that that helped me in the long run. For sure. Being a plummer, like did you know was it was? It pretty evident pretty quick that you were gifted, I think so. You know, I took to the water very early on, you know, at six months old. So I knew the water was where I sort of was most comfortable. I joked that swimmers are water athletes and then there's everybody else, and that's like the normal athletes, like land athlete, and and I sort of knew that land or mark my thing. And so around seven years old, eight years old, I started breaking New England records, you know, more regional stuff, and then, folly after that, breaking national record. So I do think I was one of those athletes who really just showed promise at an early age. But the thing with any sport is that you could really excel at something at seven hundred and eighty nine ten years old, but that doesn't really mean that you're going to be incredible, of a fact, at twenty years old. So where I was very...

...talented, we sort of spared with caution and being like okay, she does, you know, have some promise in the swimming world, but we're going to keep up with the other sports and the other extracurricular activities just in case this swimming thing doesn't work out. One of the things I'm interested in is finding out because I think swimming you have to have a mental intensity like no other sport. Right, Dave, you get to go out and run and you know Switt if you're playing baseball, football, you're doing a lot of other things. Swimming is I'm in the water, I'm whatever swim, I'm doing whatever stroke you're doing and you're in there for hours and it you have to have a mental intensity and you can't hear anything. So kind of describe that for me what that was like for you and how you got through that early on. Are you cut up? Yeah, being a swimmer is probably one of the hardest sports and that you are in your mind the whole time. You're not talking to anybody. It's just you and your thoughts, and so for me it was almost a blessing in disguise, because I'm a naturally extroverted person and although I am an extrovert, I do need a loane time sometimes, and it seems as though swimming was almost my getaway where I would come home from a really long day at school or whatever it was, and then be able to just dive into practice and think about whatever it was that I needed to think about and be in my own thoughts and then but also do that while being with teammates and I think, you know, swimmers definitely do have an innate ability to focus, because we have nothing else to do other than start of black line for three hours in a practice and it's all about your turning and your stroke count and, you know, you're seeing about technique the entire time. So it's one of those things where, if you're going to dedicate three hours to being in a MELLIE CO ordinated pool and being bored, you might as well, you know, make the most of it, and so I think that was one other thing that I really took from swimming is that if I'm going to show up, I'm going to show up and do it well. I'm not going to waste anybody's time, mine or my coaches or my parents, whoever it was. So I do think that swimmers definitely have have a special ability to be able to focus and really commit themselves to something. Your mom was a very accomplish swimmer herself. Right, good city and Ding you. Miss you broke up. I'm sorry. Yeah, now, your mom was an accomplish swimmer in her own right. So my mom grew up swimming at the Y MPA and then was basically a lifeguard at all the Rhode Island beaches in the summer. But I don't think she would ever really label herself as accomplished. She's super humble but definitely far more accomplished than just the average Joe swimmer. So I definitely did have a little bit of swimmer Jane and me. And then my dad was a complete opposite. My Dad played football, like, ran like, did not really do the swimming thing and and we joked because my mom is definitely the swim mom and then my dad is not really a swim dad, and that I could tell my dad I went like twenty minutes and my fifty free and he'd be like honey, was that about story? You're like no, but it was a great balance for me and my house because I had my mom who really knew a lot about the sport and then my dad who knew enough about the sport but it wasn't kiss sport, you know what I mean. And so I really had a great balance in my house when it came to my parents. And you know, my mom and my dad drove me in a practice every single day. They made sure there was suit on my plate, like I would not be doing this interview with you guys, had it not been for them in the factor sites is that they make. So I'll just take this chance to thank them for everything that they've done, because, whether it's me or you or anybody in the world up in the world of athletics, you know you can't do without that support system, and I was really lucky...

...to have a good one, I'm sure. So. So you go on, you start swimming at seven in you're going through your life, you get into high school and I'm sure that you're like you said, you're breaking records in high school. And then what was that first time where you said, Oh, I could swim the Olympics? Where did you find you find that out? I think there was always an angling and the back of my mind that I could be an Olympian, but it's one of those dreams that's so crazy you never want to fully believe it because you almost don't want to set yourself up for failure. So even when I was eleven, twelve, thirteen years old, showing a lot of prom it to maybe one day go to the Olympics, it was one of those things where I thought I could do it but never was really fully committed until actually happened, and I think that's like you don't want to get your hopes up. And so for me, when I finally made that Olympic team, it was a sense of relief, almost being like well, like I really, I really did it. You know, I believed in myself and I knew I could do it, but then also like surprised too, because was I really, really, really expecting that I could do it. It was almost like, Oh, if I do it, that's great. If I don't, oh well, and then, especially for me to do it at the age of fifteen, I think it was a huge shocker to me and my family and everybody close to me, because I'm the youngest on the entire United State Olympic team and I have basically just come out of nowhere. And that's sort of a cool thing to do too, because I was just a scrappy fifteen year old girl that just showed up to Olympic trials and was like hey, I'm here to race. You know, I've gotten nothing to lose. I'm not at the end of my career, I'm only at the beginning, so why not take advantage of this time? Well, also being I believe this is true. Bring from Rhode Island. That's unusual in itself to be such a good swimmer. I mean the people on the team with you are probably a lot of Californians, maybe Florida, whatever, but not not, not upper northeast right. Never the upper northeast, at least not for swinnage. You know, we have the Lacrosse players. Oh, sure, players, but yeah, and I remember growing up and showing promise in the court and us a swimming reaching out to my family and being like Hey, we've noticed your daughter. She seems like she's really on track to do something special here. Might you not consider moving to Florida or Texas or California, because that would open up your training options tenfold. You know, there's one team in the state of Rhode Island and my parents and myself we sort of made a decision where we were like no, you know what, if we're going to do this, we're going to do it from Rde Island and I don't want to uproot myself for something that's not guaranteed. So for me it was basically putting my foot down and being like I love where I'm from, I love Rhode Island. I can do this regardless of where I'm living. And it was cool too, because the last Mumpic swimmer from Rhode Island before me, in two thousand and eight, was a woman named Clara Lamore Walker, in one thousand nine hundred and forty eight. Wow. Wow. So for sixty years there was not a single Olympic swimmer from the state of Rhode Island, and so that was also something that was kind of on my radar as a girl growing up in Rhode Island was, Hey, I want to break this dry spell that our kate has had and I'm just so happy that my parents supported me and staying here and really just sticking sticking it out, for lack of about before, I guess, and really believing in my coaching staff and myself and knowing that they maybe we're not in Florida California, but we can still do pretty amazing thing to see from Rhode Island. So so what was that experience like in high school, because I mean I've played in high school and played every sport and...

...you know, you kind of get that sense of people know that you are good at a support or whatever, but here's an Olympic athlete going I'm going to high school with. What was that like for the people around you and your friends? I mean it had to be crazy. I would be lying if I said the adjustment back after the Olympics was easy. It seems as though. You know, I had my knit group before, you know, I had my close friends heading into the Olympics, and the thing that I loved most about my childhood and growing up was that my swimming life stayed at the pool and my school life was at school. You know, people knew that I swam, but they did not know I was going to the Olympics, and so I was just like, Oh, the swimmer girl whatever. And then I come back from the Olympics as a sophomore in high school and now all the sudden people are making this massive deal about me. You know, people are whispering that's the Olympic swimmer girl. You know, there's newspaper articles hanging from shock boards and classes and I'm like trying to concentrate at my face is staring my back in me. You know, it was just like everybody seemed to all of the fun want to be friends with me, and I guess that was a lesson that I learned early on. And like who has good or bad intentions, you know, who actually wants to be my friend for me, versus me being an Olympic swimmer, and that's cool, but it was. It was crazy coming back to school because, like, didn't have my license. I was just trying to fit in and be a normal girl and then all of a sudden, you know, I'm I'm trying to go to Walmart or something in my family and people are taking pictures of me. So and by no means am I like a celebrity, but in the state of Rhode Island at that time, me being the first Olympic swimmer in sixty years and just being the local girl and the only Olympian from her island during those games, it was almost like a bigger deal, you know. And like, had I in from California of Florida, I could have gone anywhere and nobody would have recognized who I was. But because I was in the state that I was in and the small town field that Rhode Island has, I think it was definitely a bigger deal than maybe it would have been out there. So it was it was a crazy adjustment. One thing I see Dave is I think she took it very well. She didn't seem very shy. She's not shy. She not shy. She has a lot of fun and I'm sure that enthusiasm with through, especially when you're wearing a metal or coming back from the Olympics and everybody wants to take pictures. I'm sure that was a lot of fun for you as well. It was so much fun and it made me feel like I brought the state together, even if it was just for a week during the Olympics. Valet stay and play on your next getaway to Los Angeles. The Weston Bonaventure Hotel and sweets offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotel is just moments away from all the action and accessible to Hollywood, beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room and valet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code PSF in the code box when making your online reservation, or call one two hundred and three, six, two four one thou and ask for Promo Code PSF. So, Elizabeth, you already have an Olympics under your belt. Before you even decide on college. I guess that's kind of an unusual step in the process. So I'm sure also you could have gone at this point to any college anywhere for swimming. How did you choose where you went? Yeah, so it was. It was crazy going into college recruiting as an already Olympic swimmer because obviously you're going to be the top recruit, heavily recruited. Everybody wants you, and so for me I narrowed it down to three coaches and schools that I knew were going to fit what I wanted academically and athletically. So I knew at an early age I wanted to go into some type of journalism, broadcast communication, something along those lines, and I...

...knew obviously I wanted to be a successful swimmer. So the three schools I narrated it down to or University of Florida, University of Texas and CAL Berkeley, and I had personal relationships with all three of the coaches from the Olympics and world championships meets I have been to prior and they all had great journalism communication schools. And ultimately ended up choosing the University of Florida because I knew that coach the best and that coach had a very good relationship with my club coach. And in swimming, I'm not so much sure about football or any other sports, but in the swimming world it's very rare for you to have a turnover in coaches. Maybe you swim for two to three coaches your entire life, and so the coaches have a very strong, interroal part in your success as an athlete. And so for me I also wanted to leave my club coach, who was named Chuck, and go to a school for a college coach and I wanted that college coach and that club coach to have relationship and that was super important to me. And so shock and Troy, who was my college coach, had a very, very good relationship and so we almost had like a triangle line of communications where I would always talk to chuck and Chuck would talk to troy and then troy would talk to me. And so it was just a very, very nice feeling to have going to school and uproot myself but know that I wasn't good hands and nothing was going to be too new or too I guess, carry to deal with and pouring so right. So, Quie for now. So one thing it's going through my mind when you're talking about all this when I first went to college and I was okay in high school and then go to college and you're wonder, can I make this, can I do this? You're going to college as an Olympic swimmer, and to me it's like, you know, were you nervous? Like were you just feel like you were right at home, like you got in the pool and there was you know, nobody can keep up. I'm going to lead this team. How was that feeling for you? Because for me, it took several years to get to where I was good enough to lead the team and be one of the best on the team. Yeah, I think one of the things that I went into some at University of Florida was I'm only a freshman. It doesn't matter that I've already been to the Olympics. Just because I have been to the Olympics doesn't mean that I'm automatically a leader to these people. They don't know me. I have no right to boss around the seniors who have really created the culture that I'm walking into, and so I think for me, I sort of just observe my undergrad years as a freshman and a sophomore. I was like, all right, this is the culture of the team, this is how the seniors in the juniors lead. I'm going to follow their lead because something at us. You know, it's one of the best schools in the country for something. So even though I've been to the Olympics, it's still a step up in my training and that I'm training with now fellow Olympians, whereas in high school on training with just some high school athlete. You know, I'm the only Olympian there. So I was able to learn a lot in the years that I was coming at the University of Florida because my teammates were Olympians, and so it's cool to be able to learn from those other athletes and whether they're from the United States or Poland or China or wherever they are, it's really cool to see a different type of training and start to implement styles that they have into my own training, and I think that's one of the cool that University of pad was Fu the diver foreign program where I was simming with athletes from all over the world, and what we do here in the states is far different from what they do in Australia. So it's almost like an exchange of ideas and knowledge that ultimately made of better athletes across the board. What...

I want to ask Elizabeth about to what's I've no ideas. I'm assuming it's a massive amount of training. What's like it during swim season? I know it's for you. It's probably all the time. What is that training schedule like? How how many hours are you in the pool? What do you do when you're not in the pool to prepare yourself? Yeah, so a typical, you know, hard block of training would be we'd be in the water around ten times a week. So we would do ten practices. We would normally double, which means a morning practice and an afternoon practice, so to practice is a day. We would double on typically Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, and we would single, so one practice on Wednesday and Saturday and then Sunday would be off. So we would touch the water ten times a week and those are two hour practices. So we'd be swimming four hours a day, four times a week, and we'd also be in the weight room on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and that would really be probably an hour hour and a half and it would differ between what events you swam. So I am more of a distant swimmer. So I would lift a lot of like higher reps, but less weight, whereas the printers maybe more so like a like a fast football player, would lift. We're doing and cleans and snatches at a very high weight, but only like one or two rests. So I would be in the weight room three times a week and then another three times a week we'd be doing dry land, which for swimmers mean we'd either go for a run or walk up and down the stadium stairs at the University of Florida stadium where we play football. crunches add more like body weight exercises. So we would be working out close to thirty hours a week, I would say, and that that's sort of like what you have to do to be a swimmer, because swimming is a sport where you're in the water, obviously, and I think because us as humans we're not naturally water athlete. So if we take a day off, it's almost like our body for guess what it's like to be in the water. And and the rule in swimming is if you take a day off, it takes double that a man on a time to get back to where you were. So if I take a day off, it's going to take me two days to get back to where I was. If I take two weeks off, it's going to take me four weeks to get back to where I was. And that's that's the swimming protocol. So it is a sport where, if you're not willing to dedicate and put in the time, you're really never going to reach to the success that you possibly could reach if you were to put in the time. So right, so what you want? What Year were you in college when you went back to the Olympics? I was a sophomore, so I had just finished off more year and then swam in the London Two Thousand and twelve Olympics summer between my sophomore and junior year. So similar to my high school experience, coming home, I figured all on going to University of Florida campus starting my junior year. It's the campus of Fiftyzero kids, like no way people are going to recognize me. And of course you know it wasn't a ton, but you know I'd be in a big lecture hall a three hundred kids and the professor would be like, and I just want to announce that we do have Olympic medalist, Elisabeth five will in our class, fighting in the back like Friday shy away because, you know, I just it's just so funny, as I say this to people that I've talked to, when they make a big deal about me, me, and I'm like, guys, literally, the only thing I do better than you, it's went like like that is the only thing I might be better at you then, and so it's just like it's cool, though, you know on the other side of it is you don't know who is cheering for you or who wants to be like you as a little girl and the they look up to you. So it is cool to also play the role model role for little girls...

...and boys growing up and, you know, wanting to be an Olympic summer one day. But I do think it's funny because I feel like I'm just a normal, average joe that twins a little bit crosser than you. Right. So I think Elizabeth was she as soon as she hit Florida, she was setting sec RAC yords, etc. Like it wasn't like a Slouche. Well, that's what I'm saying. Like it was no, like I had a big transition in college. She she yeah, and she did. She wanted to know the culture. She was already dominating everything out there, out there. So I want to say thank you to all of our fans again for joining us on huddle up with gusts and listening to us on RADIOCOM and joining us under the big top of sow the ring master and am TV, on hotel television. So one of the other things Elizabeth and I'm really interested in is you go at fifteen. Everything had to be you had to be starry eyed when you go to the Olympics at fifteen and now you're back at nineteen or twenty somewhere in there. Tell us the difference between the two times and how you felt and if that made a real difference, and how you swam. Yeah, it made a massive difference and how I swam, how I acted. It's like, you know, going to your first Olympics or first super bowl or whatever it is. That sort of your dream come true and it's finally here. I found myself focusing too much on what everybody else was doing. So I'm a fifteen year old and I'm a team I'm on a team with a twenty three year old Michael Felt, and he's one of my heroes, and all I wanted to do was coffee whatever Michael did and where. Yes, maybe somethings that Michael did also works for me, but not everything Michael Does is going to work for me. And I sort of learned that the hard way at those Olympics because because I really wasn't giving myself what I needed, I was too focused on, Oh, Michael Does this before his race, I need to do that, and a lot of those things didn't end up working for me. So I learned through that Olympic to take a little bit of stuff from here and there, from different athletes and shape it into my own routine. So by the time that I made it to my second Olympics at nineteen years old. It sounds crazy, but I'm now the seasoned veteran and I know what to expect and I think one of the craziest things about the Olympic Games is I had pictured it. You know, it's the pinnacle of our sport, furs swimmers. It's the biggest shade you can swim on and I picture the village to be the beautiful Western hotel with amazing shuttle systems and great food and tandidly it's the complete opposite. You know, you walk into the village and it's a bed with a sheet, no pillow. You know, there's no comforting accommodation. The shuttles run here, they're everywhere. You never know what they're on time or not, and it's a far cry from what I had experienced past, like a world championship, when we're saying in a five start health. So that was also a huge culture shock, because you say all that the Olympics, it's going to be amazing, the food is going to be great and you're like wow, I don't even know what I'm eating in this dining hall. Nothing's in English, I don't know where I'm going. What luck do I take? And so it may have its organized chaoff. So going from Beijang in a Chinese speaking country and going through London, and English speaking country, that also helps my transition as an Olympic athlete. It might sound funny to say, but it does make a difference. And so for me London I just felt much more at home at he's. I knew what to do as an athlete. I knew the language, I knew the food. So it's there are a lot of factors that go into play when it comes to the Olympics and and where you're from. Honestly, are you when you're in the village? Are you you're mixed with all the other countries, right are the are the US...

...team separate from other teams? Or are you guys like a dining hall? Are you just everyone's mixed together? The dining hall is fair dame for anybody and I'll never forget. This is when my favorite stories. I'm fifteen year bold at my personal events and it's our first trip to the dining hall and I want you to picture this massive warehouse, thousands and thousands of square fee, and there's all of these food stations, Mediterranean, Mexican, like anything that you want, and I think I went into like the Mexican line and I'm standing behind this sixth book clothes and I'm like, well, wow, that's cool to make it like, I wonder what he does, and it was you say both, and that's like the Olympic Village. You know, you run it, happy that you see on television, that you have posters of in your room, and I think that's the coolest thing because, you know, small town girl from rn island at the Olympics is in line behind quite possibly the greatest Olympic tracks are ever and it's just like Oh yeah, we're getting good to the Mexican station today, and it is it's just it's athletes that you see on ESPN and NBC and all these major network, you know, doing what they do best, and you're like wow, I'm actually here on the same stage of them. You know, like that's pretty cool and I'm sure it had to be different too, because you were, you know, you're still a kid kind of fifteen, and then at nineteen you're more of an adult and then all of a sudden you go to your third one. You know, I can't imagine what the changes people saw in you, as well as what you saw in yourself. Yeah, I think one of the biggest changes that I sign myself, and definitely the other saw was, you know, at fifteen I was definitely more reserved than I normally am because, although I'm an extrovert, I'm intimidated by the entire situation that I'm grown into. You know, fifteen year old girl from an island to the next oldest person on the team is in their twenties. Don't really have a lot of friends. I'm just trying to find my way. And then fast forward eight years later to my third Olympic and I'm now twenty three, much more seasoned, I know it to accept and I'm voted team captain, and so I sort of went from this like loner girl who had no idea what was going on to, you know, the girl that knew what was going on and the girl that people turn to when they were nervous or when they needed to know something about what to expect. And so for me that was a really cool full circle monent, moment for me, because I saw those first time Olympians come into that team where it was my third time around and I knew exactly how they felt. I knew what they needed, whether that was guidance or what to expect or what the nerves are going to be like, and so it made me feel good that I could really help those athletes feel comfortable at their first on in the games, because it's a very scary, pressure filled situation. There's millions of people watching you and it's a lot thrown at you at once and the time of one to two week time fans. So for me to be able to be a captain and d those young stirs, it was a full circle type of moment for me, which was really special. How did your parents deal with it over those eight years, from a newer fifteen to twenty three? And, you know, did you see them like really settle down? I'm sure you had to. It's fifteen. They're probably nervous for you and and were they with you all the time? Yeah, at fifteen they were super nervous us and and, like me, very you know, we had no idea what to expect. We didn't have any experience and so by the time the third Olympics ran around, it was like my parents were doing what I was doing with my athletes, but...

...they were doing it with the first time parents and they were like all right, they need to get this hotel. You're going to watch. Yeah, so it was cool because they were sort of helping the first time parents around, because I think one of a lot of people don't really know is that when an athlete makes me on became the parents aren't really given a block of rooms, like they're sort of on their own trying to figure it out. How do I get tickets? What do I do? USA swimming obviously helps with that, but you don't know what you're doing when you go to the Olympic Games and getting a credential and all that stuff. So it was nice for my parents to sort of follow my track and become almost like Olympic like veterans. They knew what to do, which is really cool for them. Now that would be amazing experience as a parent. I was just seeking of, like you, thinking back, like your first swim meet and he looked at your parents. You know, this is when your seven or whatever. Probably looked at your parents are off to the side watching. Then you're in your first Olympics or your third Olympics, you look up and they're sitting there. That's probably a pretty neat dynamic. Yeah, I just got the chills. Why you said that, because it's it's so true that you know your parents are with you through it all and they are the ones that have consistently, on waiver and Lee, supported that dream, and so I you know, I'll never remember, for get the time like after I won my first Olympic medal in two thousand and twelve and meeting up with my mom, my dad and my brother after that race and just like handing them my metal and them having this overwhelming sense of wow, like all of those early mornings, all of those drives, you know, was all worth it and I think for them it was just as rewarding as it was for me, because it is a team it's a team thing, you know, even though it's an individual sport. You know, I didn't get on that podium without them or my parent or my coaches or my teammates and everybody else who helped me. So I think it was cool for them to, you know, be there at my pool at six months old, in my backyard to me on the Olympic podium. You know, it's not why I got into swimming, but you know, it is a cool outcome to have. So you then, if we go into your college at the end of Your College, now you're still swimming. You graduate from Florida. So then where do you go? Where were you training for your for your last Olympics? So I stay training at the University of Florida. And this is another sort of swimming culture thing where if you train at a university and you go there for your four years as an athlete and the NCAA, you typically, like I said earlier, you don't want to change coaches. So a lot of athletes what they do is they do their four years at Florida or Texas or wherever it is, and then they say they're as a post Grad to train. And so I ended up saying at the University of Florida for another three years, okay, as a post graduate athlete. And what's great about that is that if you typically swim in a program where there is a lot of Olympic excellence, like there was a Florida, they will have a separate training group for foreign athletes to come through or American athletes, and so I was lucky enough to be training in a group with almost twenty solely training for the Olympics athlete and that was a really, really cool just environment to be in heading into my last Olympic Games, because every single person that was their training was there for the Olympic Games and it's not a common thing in the flimming world to have a group of athletes that large all training in one spot. So I was lucky enough to already be at Florida and have my coaches be the coach of that group. So it just made sense for me to stay in Gainesville and finish out my career there. Start Your Day sunny side up at the Weston Bonaventure Hotel and suites and enjoy breakfast or two on us. No matter how you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles, start every day with a hearty...

...meal to kick start your morning. Enjoy breakfast for two on US each day you stay. For reservations, be sure that Promo Code S for B appears in the Promo codebox when making your online resident Vation at Marriottcom. BACKSLASH LAX BW or call one eight hundred two to eight nine thousand two hundred and ninety and asked for a promotional code s four B. I'm thinking of the the recruiting standpoint. That's pretty good for the coach to bring in, yeah, high school junior and been like Oh, yeah, there's what? There's our twenty Olympians swimming around there today. You know, it's kind of helps the coach out to a little Biteah, that's easy to recruit that way. Yeah, you know, it's not said keep up its stores over there's just one happens right there. I think I'll go and before we get into the post your post swimming life, I want to ask you about I always hear about the like the diets that we just talked about, Michael Phelt my Michael, many calories? You have to like he consumes like Twentyzero colories. Why? Is In training or something? Is it? Is that true? And then like what was your diet like and what's a typical diet for someone training? Yeah, I think maybe early on, before I knew Michael, that was probably true. I know him very well now and he's definitely not eating twentyzer powers a DAGG. But I mean for sure, of a swimmers we definitely eat on the higher end. Like I remember going into the dining hall after practice and football and swimming got out at the same time and at Florida we had an athlete dining hall and the football guys would always look at the swimmer girls and, you know, like we're really say we're muscular, like we're not big girls, and maybe like Damn, we're filling up our plays their phone up there. But it's such an aerobic, Cardio Bay sport. You know, if you don't feel yourself properly, you're just going to be burning through muscle and then you're going to get flower and flower and flower. So I definitely have altered my diet since been done in swimming because of my paint like the way I ate. While for me I'm not, it would not be good. But yeah, we do, I would say, in my heaviest training outcall, eating five, five thousand colleries a day. Wow, that's like us, gustucaid, we don't swim or do much of anything else. Right, I did for a while, though. I was in pretty good shape when I played football. The only problem is I didn't alter my diet. I can't say the same for myself. It's unfortunately, it's been just a downhill drive ever since I was about still here though day, if we're still here, still here, we're still kicking through. I want to thank our guests for joining us here and they can listen to us on RADIOCOM or wherever you get your podcasts. So we want to go into after your college career and after your swimming career. I think it's just what an amazing career you had, but we all have those transitions. For me is fifteen years in the NFL and then all that. It's over, like once you're done, you're done. You know, I can still go through a football but it's not the same. I'm not doing what I love to do forever. What was that transition like for you and that decision for you to stop, and how did you know that was the right time right? It was hard and I think you can relate. It's sort of like you're mourning a death of an identity that you've stuck to for your entire life, and so for me it was Elizabeth Bizble, the slimmer, and it's like, yeah, I can still swim, but I'm not doing that anymore for life. And I think for any athlete it's a scary transition because, especially for us, you know, what is our resume say? You know, Oh, you have fifteen years in the NFL. That's great, but what are your skills in the workplace? Oh, I swam in the Olympics, that's awesome, but I don't care how faster turned back time it right, that's not going to get you this job. So for me it was like, okay,...

...well, my resume says nothing and I don't really know what I want to do and I knew that I wanted to go into sports broadcasts or journalism, whatever it was, but I didn't know what that looked like like. There was no clear cut path for me. So I sort of just started saying yes to everything that came on my plate. If there was a local for me that needed an announcer, I was like yes, I will do it for free, I don't care. Or if there was a public speaking game that I could get, I would do it. And slowly I gained a lot of experience and figured out, you know, what my niche was and started doing clinics across the country and learn that it I love teaching little kids how to swim and you know the life saving skill, so ordered with you if they swimming, and started doing a lot of clinics and underprivilege areas you know, giving those kids an opportunity to learn how to swim for free, and it's sort of just molded itself into what my life is today, and I fully attribute that to just me having the mindset of saying up to anything. And I can't even really explain what I do now professionally because I have a million folks in the fire, but I'm happy and that's really what matters at the end. Of the day. At least for me, it's just loving what I do. That's great. So tell us as a teacher of swimming when you get a little baby, because I can remember this. We had to drop our kids off at the pool and the teacher was like, okay, now you guys can leave and we're like what? Yeah, he's like you cannot see how I train your children to swim right, and I don't know if that's if you work with little kids like that that are still one and two years old. That heaven's you know did that before, but we really trained our kids from a young age and when we came back there like floating and swimming and we're like how did you do that? He's like you don't want to know it. So do you? Like I'm afraid of this story the start. Well, I mean he basically just threw them into water, he said, and they just naturally learn how to swim. He in, it's just something that you did and it's amazing. But I he's right. I didn't want to watch that. So I'm not sure if that's like, yeah, teaching loader I'm not. Yeah, I'm teaching more like five, six, seven year old and above the little kids. I'm certainly not qualified to actually like teach you how to be in the water and blow bubbles and stuff, but I think I'm overfake with seven year old and that, friends, where these kids have been. They've seen the water, maybe they've touched their feet in the water before, but they don't actually know how to swim and save themselves. And that sort of like our motto, is that this is the only sport that can save your life. You need to know how to do this. And so we'll get them comfortable enough where they'll come in and by the end of two hours they can put their head underwater, they can blow bubbles, they can swim from one end to the other and and that's really what you need in order to just prevent drowning, is knowing how to say a float. So we try to implement those skills within those two hours. But when it comes to the six month year old babies, that is not me, I ask, not me right, but I have so much for those people. Yeah, so have you found? Have you ever seen or been around somebody? U said they remind me of me. Right, the really good in the water. I love watching them and they have a passion like I had. Have you been able to find that person every so often at a clinic that I'll run? And these are clinic for kids that already swim, they're on a team and I'm just there to a sort of critiques them a little bit. But yeah, every so austen, I'll come across the kid and I'll try to find the parent afterwards...

...and be like hey, well, Johnny over there, like he's got something special. And I think the Greeks to hear because it's I don't know if this is what it's like for football or any other sports, but when you watch somebody swim, you can sort of tell if they have it or they don't, and when you can tell that they have it, it's almost like you're dancing for drawer, like yes, one of these kids have it, and like they can go far if they really want to, if they really want to dedicate to their life to this, they can definitely make a run to the Olympics. But often times it's, you know, maybe they're just counted at a million other sports. You know, they're really good at soccer or football or basketball whatever, and swimming just like well, you know, something fun that they do in the summer. So I always do try to find the parent and be like Hey, I don't say this often, but I think your child has a lot of potential. And I'm like maybe me saying that will make all the difference, right, and that would mostly do. But yeah, there are. Yeah, that would mean a lot. So you said you say yes to everything, so tell us how you said Yes to the show survivor. Yeah, so survivor was I wasn't even looking for survivor. So I actually got approached by CBS to be on amazing race with a fellow Olympic teammate of mine. They wanted to do like an Olympic or athlete edition of Amazing Race, and so I was going to be paired with another swimmer and for whatever reason that fell through. But they came back and they were like hey, would you want to consider survivor? And I didn't really know much about the show. I knew you like lived on an island, but I was in the says to everything things in my life. I was like yeah, why not? A shot at winning a million dollars, I can't say no to that, and so I essentially said yes. I went through the craft, the casting process and sure enough, I ended up getting picked and we flew out almost exactly a year ago, over an early March right now, and that's mid March is when they start filming, and so flew out the fig and did the whole reality television show thing and survived survivor, and it was it was just a really, really cool experience. Who Sort of because they take your phone. You're completely off the grid, and I think that was one of my favorite aspects of the show, is that it's just you living on the beach and there's no emails or phone calls or work that you have to do. It's just you kind of appreciating nature and being out in the wilderness. As crazy as it sounds, I really did enjoy it. Did you find like your ultimate competitor? Did you find in the show, because it's all about competition still, did you find your cut, your competitive juices coming out? I mean you talk about nature, but then you want to win a million dollars, so at some point you're competing. It was honestly the first time that I had felt challenged, like swimming had challenged me, since being done with swimming, and I was so stoked about that. I was like give me this challenge, like I'm going to take all these guys, but like, I don't care who they are, where what Jim they worked out out like Tim here to play, and I think that was like the coolest thing for me because I had I had almost forgotten about how competitive I was since being done swimming, because I've been done for about two years since then and haven't done anything at all competitive since. And so then I get the survivor and they have these challenges and for a million dollars, and it was like I didn't miss a beat, like I was back to old competitive Elizabeth, and that was that was just so much fun to know that I still sort of had that fire inside of me, even though it wasn't swimming right that? Yeah, that would have been that would have been a lot of fun. How many how long were...

...you out there? How long were you on the island? So inonal like when we got there to when we left, it was around six weeks. Wow, but the game of survivors thirty ninety days and I lasted thirty eight. So I was living out in the wilderness for a month. So what happens? And what once you're no longer contestant. You still or like sequestered? Right, you're not. You're not flying back home. You're you're staying on the island. Is a right? Correct. Yeah, we are. We continue to be sequestered until the final day of filming and then that next day we fly home. So it's actually great. I always joke like I sort of got the best end of the best of both world where I got to play survivor and live outside, but I also got a really beautiful, wonderful free vacation and fig yeah, and that was also great. You know, got to keep whatever I wanted, sleep in you know, go swimming in the ocean and feed you. Such a beautiful place too. It was like wow, I'm really lucky right now, and obligations that. So it was really cool. We all had on this private resort island until filming was over. So two things. Surprise. You used the word sequestered. Pressed it took it was an effort to get out of my mind, like and then, second of all, are you still friends with the people that you were on the show with that we're in that series of survivor with you? Yeah, we are very close friends and I think it's I compare it to teammate on a sport team and that you go through a lot of highs and loads together that nobody from the outside looking and really understands, and so it's a special bond that you have with people where you're deprived of food and shelter and comfort for a month, you know you've been through some bad stuff, and so I think that was a bond that really solidified us being life lump friends, which is cool because I sort of got another family out of the show, which I really love about that. How is that first meal once you were eliminated and you're in your resort? The first meal was great for the first hour too, and then my stomach was not at me for the next two days and it's like you you literally do not eat for thirty days, like you might have a coconut, some rice here there, but my first meal back, you know I'm so ravenic. I'm like Pizza Man. I can cheese ice cream, broad it would not be good my body. And you know it tastes so good. You haven't had flavor in a month and you know you're loving it, you're eating it, and then your stomach starts to growl a couple hours later and you're like, Oh God, why did I do that to myself? And then it takes the fool like twenty four to fourty eight hours to recover. But silly, but surely your stomach readjust but yeah, the first meal back is it's a rough one. I'll just leave it at that. I could imagine. I could imagine. All right. So before our last segment of the show here, I want to discuss your book a little bit and tell us a little bit about why you wrote it, who helped you write it and how people can find it. Yeah, so the book was basically it was never on my radar to write a book, I will say that. And then I started going to a lot more clinic and public speaking gigs and people would find me afterwards and asked me if I had a book or suggest that I write a book, and so I ended up hearing in a knot that I was like, okay, I'll think about it, and so I basically like went home, open my laptop and I was like chapter one, what am I doing? And so I was writing for a couple months, no idea what I was doing, and it was just like Sarendipitous that I found the woman who coauthered it with...

...me, named that fare, who is an author, and we were in this open water swimming group together and we were discussing what we like to do and projects that we were working on, and she opened up to me that she was an author and I was like, are you really how to help me with my book, and she agreed to it and she is the reason why it's quite done in French today and it's and it's a really well written book by her, and it's about my swimming career, but it's about the ups and down, you know, it's it's a book for athletes to read, whether you're a professional athlete or an eight year old athlete that is looking for a little bit of inspiration, but also that notion that yes, maybe I am an Olympic swimmer and I have Olympic medals, but I'm also a human and I've gone through a lot of the same stuff that you're probably going through right now, and it's something that I would have liked to have read when I was a child growing up through the sport, because I put these Olympians that I looked up to on a pedestal. You know, nothing ever, went wrong in their careers. No injuries ever happened, they never lost. There the perfect superhero human being, when in reality that's the furthest thing from the truth. You know, we go through ups and downs every single day. We want to quit, we hate the support, we loved the sport. So it's really just the tale of my ups and down through my swiming career and you can find it on Amazoncom called silver lining and I think it is a book for not just swimmer street but all athletes or anybody who is looking for maybe a little bit of inspiration in their life. Have you had your first book signing it? Yes, I had my first book signing. It was last Wednesday at very books at a place in up Rhode Island, and the turnout was amazing. We had a QA session. It was like a threehour long line to get the book. Cling now that's always a huge success, which makes me feel good. Yeah, so it went really, really well. That's great. Lot a little road he's out to get the book. Yeah, Oh, no, doubt. Sounds like it all right. So we want to thank all of our guests for joining us here and huddle up with guests and they can catch this on, you know, RADIOCOM or wherever they like their podcasts. And this last segment is brought to us by AMTV and and sports circus. So, Dave, we call this one the no huddle. So explain to Elizabeth little bit what the no huddle is. Well, no huddles, just quick, quick hitter questions. Sometimes a little bit more explanation and but some of them are just like one word. We just want to pepper you with a couple. Yeah, Gett you got a better feel for we are gonna have some little fun here. So, Dave, shoot, okay, if you were making a Mount Rushmore of Florida gator athletes, who would that? Who'd be on that Mount Rushmore? All right, I would throw a little bit of Tim Tebow, Ryan lockty. Could I add a coach, rushing burrier as a coach. He's a Stapleh and Tracy Cockin nice whatever. That's a she's she is given us the fastest Mount Rushmore we've ever had and sometimes it takes like three minutes as yeah, well, she she knew right away. Awesome, awesome. What is your biggest pet peeve? Probably when people feel I sit in the middle seat a lot. When I'm on planes and when the two people on both sides of me take the arm rest, then I'm like a little key rex, like yeah, I hate that. That's why I sit by think gets the armrest. Yeah, I just hate and I hate when people assume that the arm rest is there's I do that a lot, like because I'm bigger. I just kind of force my life. I was one. I wait and just see if they do and then if they take it, a go see. That's type of person. You know, I hate it. You're just...

...so nice my go. No, that's me, just so nice to like this. Yeah, it's horrible. Okay, if you were the commissioner of all competitive swimming for a day, what change would you make? I would issue a lot more money to the athlete and prize money. And, Oh and one more thing, hi, for the NCAA athletes that compete at the Olympic, I would let them keep their metal money. Oh yeah, so you there's never rule with the men and Galla where you can't keep your metal money. Well, Dad that. Do you think that change now, since the NCAA rules have changed, that athletes can make money? No, I think there might be a cap right now. I would need to like really read into it, but I know at least when I was swimming, when I won my medals, that money basically went back into a big pot. It's head. It's not even like deferred. It's no, no, no, but you do not get get it. Oh Wow, yeah, twimmers, that's huge. Like we're not signing million dollar contracts, like we're living no money. So I would do that. So if we open up your phone and we say, okay, we're going to find the most famous person in Elizabeth's phone, who would that be? Probably Michael Felt. So you can text Michael Right now and he'd be like Hey, what's up be how you doing? Oh, yeah, awesome, that's that's big. That's pretty good. Okay, Elizabeth, if you could trade places with one person for day, any realm of life, anytime period, who would that be? I would probably I would love to be a member of the Beatles back, what an answer, a couple decades ago, because I love music. I would love to like be in a cool band like that, but just to like see their rides to stardom from the bottom to the top. I think that would be really, really cool. And so so can you. Do they make pods now that our waterproof that you can listen to music while you're swimming underwater. They actually do have it. They're not are pods, they're not like apple made, but they do have a couple brands that make underwater headphones. But I we would never use them in practice because right we want to hear what the coaches and stuff like that. But yeah, they are available somewhere out so if you could use them in practice, who would? What band or group would you listen too? I really am into Zach Brown band right now. Good. They're just like good vibes, like great music. I'm really missing summer right now. On Country Music reminds me of summer, so that would probably be my playlist right now. All right, like it. If you could go back in time and give yourself ten words of advice, what would you tell yourself? You broke up. Sorry, Cresey, one more time. Okay. If you could go back in time and speak to a younger version of yourself, what ten words of the device would you give yourself? I would say stop comparing yourself to others and just have fun. Everything's going to be okay. I think I will love I like it. I like it Holl your message. All right, so, Cup two more days. Okay, all right. So my last one is what is your favorite sports movie? That's a hard one. All miracles so good, especially because we're like celebrating the anniversary right now. I think I would have to go with miracle. It's a it's an awesome well, I was just going to ask her what her favorite non swimming Olympic moment is, but...

I think we did hear. We heard answer right. Okay, how about this, because it's just this is in the pet peeve category, but it just happened to me and it's annoying when you're to grocery store. What's your pet peeve at a grocery store? I really just like when people cover over something for an extended period amount of time. Like normally I know what I'm getting, so I'm in and out and people are like hovering over the avocado section, touching every single avocado, and I'm like one, it's gonna be out right. They're acting like it's like a wedding ring or something, but it's say, it just a it's a it's go through it all. This one's a little softer. That was a little firmer like. Yeah, now I just wear everything on Amazon prime because I don't have to go the grocery store anymore. So it's so nice. Let me exactly. It's unbelieve me. All right, so tell everybody how they can find you on social media and if you have a website. Yes, so, my website is a litabit Bislecom and all my social media handles on twitter and instagram are EBIS. All thirty four. Awesome, awesome. So we really appreciate you join on a huttle off with a gusts and getting in a huddle with Dave and I. It was amazing to hear your story and you know, we'll let you know when the episode comes out and we hope you can share it and retweet it for us. I absolutely well, thank you, guys, so much for having me on. You guys are the best. Well, thank you and Tell Your Dad, tell you daddy can go back to pounding on whatever nai he was pounding on, putting down the new floor down there like a port. Just put me an hour behind. David. Are you like all right? Thank you, nice meeting me. Excellent. Thank you, guys. Bye. Hey, we want to thank you for joining us today on Hudle up with guests, where we talked to a wide range of guests about how supports shape to life. As always, been joined by my great friend and Co host, a pager, and we want you to be able to follow us on all of our social media at huddle up with gusts and we really appreciate you and thank you for your time and listen to our podcast.

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