Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode 1 · 5 months ago

E02: Huddle Up with Gus: Warren Moon

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Gus compares arms with Warren Moon and finds out which sister taught him how to throw!

Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a match up. Brian here. Sports Fans, whether your game is on the Gridiron, at the diamond or on the links, we can only say get up off your seats and get ready for some real action. Welcome to this week's huddle up with Gus. Fifteen year NFL quarterback, Gus Bar Rot Passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the benches. Playing for seven NFL franchises with one hundred fourteen TD's under his belt, Gust knows who the players are and how the Games are. One every day get to hang out with an NFL quarterback. Up Oka, sports fans, from the decked out and plush sixteen thirty one digital studios, it's kickoff time, so snap your Chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us. One of hey everyone, Gus Ferat huddle up with Gusts fifteen, your NFL quarterback. I appreciate you listening. You're going to enjoy our show today, our last show. We just had dotty pepper on, who does who is the walking reporter for CBS Golf. This week is a special show. We have nine time NFL pro bowler, you know, two time NFL passing leader. Five people won five titles in the CFL in a row, you know, and you just record after a record, and in both the CFL and pro football hall of fame, an alumni and a brother of mine from the NFL joining us today is Warren Moon. How You Doing, Warren? Guess I'm doing great, man, great too. Great to see you, great to talk to you and looking forward to our conversation. Yeah, I have to you know, I could have probably kept going with all your stats for for everything, you know, because I look at my career, I had fifteen years and and I was telling my son tonight I said, you know, I threw a hundred twenty touchdowns in the NFL. Warren Moon through five times at many. It's like it's it's in pants and insane of how many passes you thrown? How many, if you think about in your twenty three years, how many times your arm came forward with that little as you said in one of your interviews, I just got to throw this little oblong ball down to field and put it in the end zone. Yeah, it I can't even imagine how many times. Not only that, I threw in games, but what about all the time and practice, just warming up during a game, you know, just getting ready for a game? How many passes do you throw in pregame warm up? Or when you're getting ready to go in on another drive? You take another four or five passes just to get yourself loose to go back in again. So, yeah, it's been a lot of passes in this arm. And I have a fourteen year old right now who plays high school football and he's a receiver and a running back. So I on the ball to him too, and I, you know, my rotator cuff is burning sometimes after I get done throwing with him, because he never gets tired. I command at fourteen, who a tired? Right? No, nobody gets tired. Yeah, well, especially you. You know, I was reading your story a little bit and you know, it's so nice to do these shows because I get to you know, I know your story, but I don't know your story, so I got to go back and do little research. You grew up in La your father passed away when you're young, and it sounds like you your mom did a lot of work, but you had to pull a lot of the weight in the household too. But you had six sisters. Yeah, which one of them taught you how to throw? I pretty much taught myself how to throw by throwing objects at them because they got on my nerves all the time. But I don't know how I really learned how to throw the football. I just started doing it and I was very good at it. It like eight or nine years old, and then when I started playing pop warning football at ten, that's when everybody started to see that this this kid has an arm and I used to just practice all the time out in the streets. Were buddies of mine throwing the football before I actually got into playing organized football and and then I just developed it from there.

And but it was mainly just through repetition, man, just throwing it as much as you possibly could, figuring out what's best, figuring out what's the best grip. You know, what's the best release. So what finger, you know, it needs to come off of, and that's what it really came from. I remember out in the lived on a corner and on the street that I lived on, so we had, you know, four street lights in that corner and that's that was my lighting, because I would be out there with a buddy of mine down the street and I would just be throwing past after pass after passed until my mother finally would just yell and scream at me to come in the house. So a lot of repetition, a lot of practice. That is awesome because you think about it, back then there weren't a lot of videos, there wasn't anything out there to teach self. Teacher, you know, because now you can watch all these kids, watch the Internet. You see kids now. They're they're that age and they're getting taught by coaches. Like it was my dad throwing football as me and saying this is what you got to do, and I'd be like Dad, you just gotta work from the factory. You don't know what you're talking about. Yeah, I mean these kids the day the game has become so specialized and, like you said, these kids have coaches from the time, depending on if they can afford it, and I you know, some of them eight, nine, ten years old, and then all the way up through high school. They're getting great quarterback coaching from quarterback experts, guys who have played the game or we're guys who have coached the game for a long time. So they're learning the fundamentals and they're learning all the techniques that you need to learn as a quarterback at a very, very young age, and I think that's why these kids come into into the pro game so well prepared is because of what the training that they've had for so many years before they even get there. Well, you know, and that's that is so true, and I tell kids all the time. Look, in ninth grade, my first year of football, I played line right. I was like the biggest kid and I hated it because they're aybody was kicking my butt all over the place. So then the next year in eighth grade, I didn't know what I was going to do. I just went out for the team and I didn't have a specific job like quarter that you just played wherever the coach put you. And in ninth grade I broke my neck playing football. Tackled somebody with my head down. So I didn't play for two years. I never played quarterback in Twi was in a junior in high school. Wow. And so I always tell kids like there's a path if you want to follow it and find it. There's some way for you to get there. If it's your dream and what you want to do, it doesn't have to start when you're seven. It can start when you're fifteen or setting or whatever. But I love your story that you kind of did that on your own and you've kind of probably formulated how you threw the ball your whole career. I really did. And you know, when you when you grow up with six sisters in a mom you find yourself being alone a lot of the time. So I was. I was in my yard or out in the street alone a lot of times, just kind of acting like I was a pro football player or college football player, and I was then. I was the announcer, I was the player. I remember nights where I would be taking the trash cans out to put on the street for the trash man to come, and what I would do is I'd line up like I was in the I formation and I'd get a handoff and I'd make all these moves all the way back to the backyard to get the next trash can, but I'm announcing it the whole time and he gets the hand off and he goes right. Yeah, no, I mean I was the whole thing, because that's what how I had to enter team myself as a young kid. The same thing playing basketball. I would play by myself, but I was chick hern, who was is the voice of the La Lakers, is like yeah, Angeles, and I would kind of say what he would say, as I made baskets all the time. So yeah, that's what I was as a young kid. I had a great imagination. I had this dream that I wanted to play in the NFL one day and I finally realize and that was the book that I wrote about about twelve years ago. It was called never give up on your dream, my journey, and it just talks about all those different steps that I went through to get to the national football league. I love that.

So who was your idol growing up like you? I mean obviously we only watch football on Sundays. It's not like we could watch it every day and all this. So who was that like when the Sunday football came on? Who was the guy that you love to watch? Well, being in La as a young kid, I really idolized Roman Gabriel, who was the quarterback of the rams at that time when I was a young man, and then James Harris, who's African American quarterback, came later on and he led the Rams to the NFC championship game. He was a pro bowler and he was somebody I could really identify with as far as you know, my my ethnicity, thinking the okay, maybe one day I can play in the NFL because here's another black guy that's actually playing in the NFL and doing well. So those are two guys that I really looked up to. And then Roger Stallback with somebody, you know league wide, I really looked up to because I loved his style of play. kind of fit more of who I was as far as being able to throw the ball but also being able to run the ball and scramble and do the things that he did, even way back in those days and the you know, the late s early s when he played. So those are three guys that I really I lize its quarterbacks. Yeah, so did you play all three sports like when you were kid? I know in high school you kind of went to one sport because, I mean, I just love that you had it. You can only play one sport because you had to work the other Kias. And Yeah, I I love basketball. That's my favorite sport to this day. And if I would have been taller, if I would have been six five or over, I would have chosen basketball to play, and I was pretty good when I was younger. Baseball might have been my best sport, but it was a little too slow for me, and football I gravitated towards it because, you know, when I grew up in my house as a seven year old, I kind of matured a lot faster than most seven year olds because of the circumstances. You know, I became the house and I had all this responsibility and I got six women in the House that I have to, you know, kind of look over and make sure they stay safe in that type of thing. So so I really created some great leadership skills as a young kid because of that, and I think that's why I gravitated towards playing quarterback. Well, on that front, I love how you learned how to sew, how to cook. You had to learn how to do all these things because it's like there's nobody else going to do it for me, know, and it wasn't. My mother taught me all those things, but there wasn't a man around they could teach me how to do the mechanical things. You know, I couldn't change or well on my car when I was able to get a car in high school or I wasn't. My I couldn't fix things around the house like you know, maybe other young kids could because they had a dad showing them how to do that. So I was very good at taking care of myself, especially when I went away to college, you know, living in the dorms or living in an apartment. Everybody wanted to come to my house because I could cook. Yeah, they do. They could get a good meal when they came around. Warren and and I could take care of myself. I could. So I washed my clothes, I did all those things that you need to do to be functional in life. And I spent a lot of time alone when I was in Canada my first three or four years before I got married. So learning all those things that I learned from my mom when I was younger really came beneficial later on in my life when I was living by myself. I could imagine everyone, thanks for listening. To Huddle up with guests. We appreciate you being here. Check me out and huddle up with Guestscom we're talking with Warren Moon. Warren, we talked a little bit about your when you were younger. One thing I wanted to ask you when you started, like playing football only what did your family did your sisters today all come to all your games like? Was it like a big family thing? Do you have a lot of other family in the area? Some of my older sisters had gone away and we're living in different cities, so they weren't able to come to a lot of my games. With my younger sisters, yes, they went to a different high school than I did. They went to the high school in my district where I was supposed to go, but I just didn't want to go there because it was huge gang movement at that time. Athletic program wasn't graded at that at that high school for football. So I went to a school called Hamilton High School in...

West La and they would come to my games whenever they got a chance to. But my mom was at every game and she was somebody that really supported my career. Yeah, so like when you would come off of a game from high school, what was it like? What did she have like a saying for you to she always give you a pep talk or because, like my my dad was the first one to see me and you didn't matter how many touchdowns he three be like, why do you throw that interception? You know that was him. So what was your mom like for you in high school? Now she was more nurturing. There's no question about it. It didn't matter how I played, as long as I came out of the game. You know. Okay, that was the first thing she wanted to know. You know, how do you feel? I know you took this hit there, you took this hit in the third quarter. You know how you feel after the game was over? And she was also aware of how nervous I would get the night before games. So where she did is she taught me how to bake cookies, believe it or not, the night before games. So I would like get my mind and focus off of football, because I became a little irritable around the house tonight before get yeah, taught me how to bake and just to get my mind off of playing football, and I was like anything else I did, I took very seriously. So I took this baking very, very seriously and and became pretty good at it to where I started a business, wow, that's chip cookie business when I went to Canada. But that was one of the things she taught me to do was bake chocolate chip cookies a night before games, just to mellow me out a little bit. Is that your favorite cookie still to this day? You know, it's right up there. I like it was a little more of a OATMEAL base to it. Thing makes it a little more crunchier. So yeah, pocolate chip cookie, but I got a little more of a Oh yeah, back, back, I'm sure when you were younger, it was Chris Goe. Yeah, and you use like the really, really bad good stuff for Lard. Yes, that's what made up a lot of water, though, you know, a lot of butter. To butter and lar together you made a pretty good cook were you? Were you a dunker guy with your cookies? No, I was a bite and then drink. I actually like to eat my all my cookies and then save the milk for lass and just guzzle it, you know. Okay, yeah, everybody has her own way. It's fun to everything there. You know what I mean, and I love that you had that side to you. So your leadership skills or wellknown when you were playing, and those always have to come from somewhere, and you know you were alone a lot, like you said, but those leadership skills to understand how to you know, look behind you and all these people are falling you and they want to be with you. Where did that come from for you? You know, I really think it came from my mother, believe it or not. You got to remember she was left at a very young age when my dad died, you know, with six kids all of a sudden, and you know, what is she going to do? Is She going to fold? Is She got to give up? Is She gonna live off the government or welfare or whatever? My mother went back to school and became a nurse. That's amazing. And I just watched how she took care of our household and made everything work and never she never showed any panic or anything like that, and it was always everything had a place for it in our very small house. She always had, you know, hot food for US on the table. We always had clean clothes. She worked two shifts, and so I watched her do all of that and watch how she let our household and I think a lot of my leadership came from her and and I think one of the things in my personality I wanted to be like her was to be so calm and cool about everything and its people talked about me throughout my career. They always admired how how I never changed my demeanor, and I think a lot of that came from from my mother. You never saw me get too high and emotional. You never saw me get too low, and that's the way she was and I just really admired the way she she took care of our family and the way she commanded our family. Yeah, I mean that's a lot to learn, because when I watch videos of you, you know, and they would put the mic on you or they have the mic on to fill and you were talking and they were like, Warren's really pumping them up. You'd be like, all right,...

...guys, let's just go down put one in the end zone. Yeah, like, wait, wait, wait, I thought he was going to be like drew brees and doing the crazy you know. But I know and I wish, I wish I had that in me. Sometimes you never did either. Like watch some of these guys do that and they get in these huddles and they're pumping guys up like grew brees does before games or whatever. That's just not my personality. But the guys around me knew that inside of me there was a fire burning and they also knew how I was throughout the week of preparation, that I didn't take any crap. I wanted everything to be perfect. So by the time the game came I didn't want to have to do that with anybody. If you can't get yourself motivated to play an NFL football game, there's something wrong with it. Yeah, yeah, you set the standard during the week and everybody followed it. That's that. That is that is great. So then all right. So then you you go to a two year college after high school, Right. Was it pretty close to your house or was it? Was it kind of far across the city here? To know it wasn't very far. As called West La Junior college is probably the same distance as my high school that it was to the junior college, just a little bit further north, I mean brook further south, but I had worked out there a lot in the offseasons when I was in high school. I was very familiar with it. In my high school coach, he went to the junior college, is the offensive coordinator. So we went there and basically ran the same offense. That's night a little bit, a little bit more passing to it in the junior college and and I had a really, really good one year there. I didn't I didn't go for two years. I didn't want to go there at all, but it was really hard for me to get a scholarship as a quarterback at that time to one of the major schools that actually threw the football. You know, there was a lot of schools and wanted to recruit me. The ran the option and the beer and wish ball all the sudd I'm like, I'm not a wishbone quarterback. I'm a I'm a good athlete for playing quarterback, but you're not going to see me running no four or five or four four and and making guys miss and all those different things that it takes in those type of office. I want to go somewhere where my strength was. I wanted to throw the ball. Yeah, I only use my brain throw the ball where it needs to go, and you know, I love that. Like, my thing was I was a wing tea guy in high school. I was so happy to get out of the wing team and go to college and be able to drop back and just throw it right. It's so different. So my son is in the wing tea right now and the quarterback for that team they throw it four times a game, but nobody like forty times my whole high school career, but nobody could. Nobody can stop their running game. And he wants to play receiver, but because they don't throw the ball, they put him in running back, where you can touch the ball, and he's doing really well there. But I don't want him to play running back because running backs get beat up and they have a very short life if they ever get to play pro football. I want him to be able to play what he wants to play, which is wide receiver. Yeah. Well, my sons went to high school the the Pittsburgh Central Catholic brand, the wing tea, and I begged them and begged them and finally they did it and we went to shotgun. So it became a single wing, which was a little bit you can still run most of the same place. Right. I said we have an incredible players and two of them never touch the football, the guys standing out by the numbers. Yeah, right, and I said we got to get everyone involved in our you become a why blockers, which you are exactly here. You're just a white blocker, and the wing back, even the wing back, only carries the ball maybe four or five times a game. He might get some big plays out of it, but most of the time he's blocking. Yeah, he's just the ghost guy, right. He's a saying, Oh, I'm gonna get it fold you guys right that that's the wing tea for you. Exactly. So was your high school and when you went to West La with your high school coach, what was his name, Jack Epstein. Was He a good mentor for you? Was He younger or older? He was at that time. He was probably in his s. You know, he's still alive, believe it or not, and we still have a relationship. And then my other coach, round price, is a alive as well and I have a really good relationship with him...

...and his in a son. His son is very active. So these people are still in my life to this day and, like I said, credible. A lot of the reason why my mother put me in sports was to keep getting me around more boys, because there was all women in my house and then and then more mentored like mentor mentor guys like coaches that would be more like a father figure to me, and that's that's what a lot of my coaches became. They became like father figures to me, and and coach Epstein and coach price were no different. Yeah, I will say this. Even though I had a dad, those coaches were still those father figures. It's just that they you perceive them a different way, you listen to them a different way. You know, and my high that's what you need in your life. You need because everybody's saying the same thing. You just need different voices telling you, because you get tired of hearing your your your mom, say the same thing that you do this, do that, do this, do that every day. But if somebody else is telling you that, and then multiple people are telling you that, maybe it starts to make some sense. Hey, yeah, well, my mother's telling me really makes sense, because my coach is telling me there's my baseball coach is telling me that, basketball coach is telling me that. So there's a lot of truth to that. Yeah, no, there's no doubt about that. Hey, everyone, I appreciate you listening to huddle up with Guss, check us out where ever you listen to your favorite podcast. We're talking with more and Moon Warren. I want to get into your college. Now you go to. How did YOU PICK WASHINGTON? I know you said you didn't have a lot of for year schools looking at you. But, like you know, you're in La. It's nice and Sonny and warm, and then you got to go north Washington without a big leg change for you. It was, you know, out of high school, I I committed the Arizona State, believe it or not, as a quarterback, and frank cush was there at the time. Yeah, and then they ended up signing the two top high school quarterbacks in the country. You Guy by the name of Dinnis Sprou and another guy by the name of Bruce Hardy, and then they called me and told me, bruce, still going to offer you the scholarship, but we're going to change your position to defensive back or wide receive you then no, thank you, and that's why I d commended and went to junior college for the year, because I was not going to play another position that I really never played before. So when I went to University of Washington, was mainly because I had a chance to compete for a starting job. They did have a fifth year senior guy by name of Chris Rowland who was there their starter, but new coach coming in, Don James, and he told me that he was going to give me a chance to compete for the job. I was going to be in the on the West Coast, which, you know, my mother and family could still watch me play a lot, whether our games were on TV or be able to come to games. So all those things were the reason why I decided to go the university Washington chance to play, because I had already gone to junior college and wasted one year, so you know, and had three years left. So I want to go. I had a chance to compete. Like USC recruited me, but they had Vince Evans at the time and I would have to rich shirt if I went there. So there was reasons why I didn't stay locally. I wanted to go to Stanford, but they wouldn't recruit me as a quarterback. And James Lofton, who was also an all city quarterback when I was in school, he went to Stanford to and they changed him from quarterback to and he becomes an all pro and and pro football hall of Fame Wide Receiver. Yeah, I mean it's amazing the people that do switch. You look at John Lynch and other people that, yeah, that do switch, but some of us it's like yeah, I'm not playing like Eve when I went to college. You're like you want to play tight end. I'm like no, there's not. Yeah, I'm stopped, just playing quarterback. That's all I want to do on so you got to wash in. You have a a incredible crew. It was a pack eight back then. Right in your senior year you won the pack a right, you know, went to the Rose Bowl championship and went to the Rose Bowl and we beat Michigan in the Rose Bowl that year and I was MVP of the of the Rose Bowl. So it was a it was a great senior year for me to close out my career there. Did your mom go to the game the Rose Bowl? My whole family was there there. They weren't going to miss that one. You know, I watched...

...that game for many years of a young kids. It was a dream of mine to be able to play in it one day. We could never, I could never afford to go to we would go to the Rose Parade believer and not. We go out and sit out on the street and like zero in the morning and wait for the parade to start to get a good spot out there and watch the parade. I did that a few different times, but always wanted to go down that hill and see what the Rose Bowl was like and able from the Rose Bowl. So my first time in the Rose Bowl was when I played in it. So when you came out and you saw your family in the stands, like, was that a big thing or did you not look at them like some people have the day? Everybody's a little different. With all that, I could when I came out of the tunnel with the with the captains for the for the coin toss, I walked out of that tunnel and it was fifty fivezero people in blue and fifty fivezero people in Purple and I got chills. My Man, I almost lost it. I got so emotional when I walked out there and I had to get myself together because we won the coin toss and we were going to get the ball first. And here I am, you know, still having and chills down my body from this atmosphere that I've dreamed about being a bark so long. But I got it back together and we took the first drive down and I end up scorning the first touchdown the game. That's awesome. Did you bake cookies a night before now? I didn't have the facilities in the hotel, but I had definitely learned out of curtail my nervousness by then and thanks to my mom. Yeah, that no, that's awesome. So then it's your senior year. You've had an incredible college career and you're looking to move on, you know, and like you said before, there's not a lot of guys that look like you were in the NFL. Right, there's hurdles that you had to get over all the time and reading your story you said you just don't want to be that guy that was undrafted. You want to go play and show people what you can do. so you decide to go to the CFL. And how did that happen for you? Like, what team? Who picked? Like? Why? Edmonton? Well, I had an agent at the time, least Iinburg, and we were kind of talking to the small name. We were talking to teams and different personality knew throughout the League about what we're warn moons possibilities, and in the feedback that he was getting with was most people were going to either draft me late in the draft or they were going to change my position. And then the the CFL. You Campbell, who was a head coach at that time. He had approached to us about me coming up there to play and he he thought I could be a really good quarterback up there. But he even thought I could be a really good quarterback in the NFL. He wasn't he wasn't sure why the teams in the NFL weren't giving me a you know, more serious look. So right, the more we looked at the pros and cons, I said maybe Canada the place for me to go because I don't want to play another position. I'll probably quit the game if I did, and he was giving me a chance to play quarterback. So that's where I went. I went to Canada mainly because I wanted to be assured I'd play quarterback and the financial package was was really good as well, but definitely the fact of playing quarterback was a thing that took me up there. So, you know, giving your background, you go to Edmonton, you get we all have that feeling, like when I got my first pay check, when you got your first paycheck in Edmonton, what was it like to be able to call your mom and tell your sisters? What was that like for you? Yeah, there's that first bonus check that you get even before you get to Edmonton, to have that much money for based off of where I came from, it was it was so nice to be able to say hey, mom, why don't you go out and buy you this or buy you that or or your just take care of all our bills and make her where she didn't have to work anymore, so she stopped being a nurse and, you know, just being able to know I could take care of my mom was a great feeling and a great comfort for me and it was always a motivator for me throughout my whole career that that was not only did I want to make it because...

I love the game and I wanted to continue to keep playing it, but it was also a motivator that I wanted to be able to take care of my mom and my family one day, because we had gone through some very, very tough days. Yeah, I could imagine. So now you're up there, you have a great precursor for what the weather is going to be because you went to Washington from La and now you're in Edmonton. Their nickname is the Eskimos. Like it did you foresee what the weather was going to be like for you. You know, guys I went up there on a visit before I actually signed up there, just to see the city and see the facilities, and they have brand new stadium going in because the Commonwealth Games were going to be there that year. So the Commonwealth stadium was in Edmonton. It was going to be in Edmonton and we were going to go in and move into that stadium as soon as right soon as the Commonwealth Games were over. So I knew there would be great facilities. But man, it was like three feet of snow and I went up there. I know they had to be an I I mean washing you're going to get a bunch of weather right, but it's not like in Canada. No, no question about it. Nothing like Canada. I have family and Saskatoon, so I mean I know what that's like. Kept there and you had to go play in Saskatchewan and all these other places and I'm sure that was pretty intense for you. How do you? How do you like? You were always known for throwing the ball and like it. Weather never affected you. How why is that possible? Just you have huge hands? or well, I think the hands help and the fact that I just practiced in it a lot. You almost have to learn how to play, how to throw the ball differently when you play in certain types of weather, like if you play in rain. I learned how to throw the ball in the rain and Seattle that you can't grip it as tight because if you can do the balls going to come off your hand weird. And then you know, playing in the coal when the ball is slick and hard like it is there, you have to grip it a little bit tighter and you try got to try and keep your hands warm for me so you can feel the football, because a lot of guys can play in gloves. I couldn't play in gloves. I tried to do it. I have to have the feel of the ball, so keeping my hands warm with something that was very important. So I had a Jersey made that had fur actually in the pockets of the Jersey and I kept my hands very warm throughout the game so I could actually feel the ball. Once I could feel it and be able to squeeze it a little bit, would go where I wanted it too. Yeah, I know, that's awesome. So five CFL titles in a row like and then it's a whole different game. It's so football, but it's a whole different game. How long did it? I mean, obviously didn't take it out long, but you know, there's different rules in the fields a little wider and you're like man, this is bigger. I get the you know, throw the ball around a little more. You know, there it really is a different game. And if you go up there the first time and see one of those games and motion like the first preseason game I went to, I remember we were playing I think it was ottaway and it was the end of the game, close game, preseason game, and and you know if when you punch the ball up there, if you put it into the end zone and you don't bring it out, you get a you get a point for that. Right. That the PUNNING team. So we were the receiving team and they punted the ball in the end zone and our guy, Larry High Ball at the time. He catches it instead of running it out, because he might not have made it out because our end zones are like twenty five yards. Yeah, deep, you know, he punted the ball back out. He punted it back out and then all of a sudden they caught it and they tried to put it back in and I'm like, what the Hell's going on here. That in my life, but that was part of the game. It just that's what I loved about that game up there. It just always keeps going and it's never over until the actual clock says zero, zero, because there's so many different ways to score. I mean, you kick a field goal and you miss it, you get a point for that, unless they bring it out of the end zone. or every punt return has to be returned. You don't. There's no catch, such thing as a fair catch. You know, you get you get it for kids. You get a two yard ring...

...around the receiver and he has to return that or or they get a penalty if they get within that two yard ring. Isn't that for kickoffs to like? If they kick it out the end zone, you get a pulls in the end zone. If it doesn't come out, there's a point there. That's that's cruse. Love that. It keeps the game going and keeps it moving and and if you want to give up that point, you go ahead and do it, but most of the time teams are running everything out. So it just keeps the game going. It does, you know, and then it's faster because there's don't you really only have three downs right. Yeah, and we have a there's a twenty second clock. Believe it or not. They wait until the ball is set before they started, but it's twenty seconds and it moves. The game really really moves. So when you were up there, did you call your own place or did it? How did you like that? I loved it. I loved it because it made you have, first of all, have to study more and and get more into the game plan and you have more of a feel for the game when you're out there. If if you can do that, of course I got a lot of suggestions from the sideline. I got suggestions from my, you know, other backup quarterbacks, but because they could see things sometimes that I probably couldn't see it, especially from upstairs. But for the most part we knew how we wanted to attack. Somebody now did did like I never got the call because, you know, in the NFL come coaches are just like this is my game and you're not calling anything like for you is probably different, but I would assume when you're calling your only place that we're did guys come up and you say hey, when I was open that last time, or the running backs like hey, I think we can get it, the line would be like. You know what I mean, because you're own huddle together. Always wondered what was that like? Hey, I'm killing this guy, we got to come over here. I didn't allow any talking once the huddle got formed. You better tell me something in between. We're walking back to the huddle. And receivers are always open. It didn't matter if, hell, yeah, that's the playhere, if I wasn't calling the plays, receivers are going to always tell you that they're open, and so I never paid any attention to that either. I talk to those guys on the sideline. I want to know exactly why they thought they were opening, because I can tell them whether it was a safety right on the other side. Didn't see him, but if there was some legitimate way he thought he could beat the guy, yeah, we we'd take some individual route and make it an individuals, you know, stutter go or whatever it might be that he thinks he can beat the guy on. But yeah, for the most part it was still going to be me and command call them the place, because I was going to be the one to take the blame if they didn't work right, right, and I love that, like I'm responsible for throwing the touchdowns. I'm responsible if that don't work. Like all like that should be how the game is played, I think, because you don't want me to say, well, so and so told me to throw in that ball and I didn't know who's going to be double covered, but he was, and not through an interception. And so to eliminate any of that, you just say it's all on you. But if it's going to be all on you, it's going to be my suggestions. Yeah, no, I definitely get that. So you got to do this, like I'm sure you in college. E didn't get to do that. Call your play right, the coach was doing a go up there the NFL. Right. So you get a new power, but it makes you study more, like you said. Did it? Did it take your level of knowledge of the game up a little bit from college? No question about it. And again, it's a good feel thing. And and you know the things that you that you execute best. You know the type of throws you want to throw, you know what you think your best throw is on third down and in certain situations, and I didn't always feel like that had to come from the sideline. I could tell you what I had been feeling throughout the game by who I thought I could work on, which receiver I like to work in that particular situation. So it was easier for me calling plays on my own. But you know, the NFL coaches took it over and they have those egos and they think they know everything best. So I just went along with it. But the great thing about playing in the NFL when I was in there, because coaches had respect for me, what we did throughout the planning, throughout the week and especially when we got there like Friday, we would sit down and talk about every situation, you know, whether it's first and ten second and medium second and...

...short second and long third, all the different situations. What were the plays throughout the week that we were working on that you liked and what we did you didn't like, and those were the things I would write down and then those were the things that were usually called in those situations in the game. So we were pretty much on the same page, even though somebody else was calling. The place I could almost anticipate with that call was going to be. Now when you were you get to the NFL. You know, you see the play college today on the sidelines there's a sheet like that wide every front and back. We're Dick. Then the quarterback has a massive thing. He's got to remember the plays. I love like when done third stree quarterback got to come in also play from his wristband and he's walking up the line reading it again. It looks like it looks like he's an elementary so school, you know, just trying to trying to cheat off of a test or something. I think the offense that you ran in Houston was awesome to me because it was predicated on it was maybe the same play call, but it's a bunch of different places because the defense they give you. We had five or six different passing plays, but there were so many different adjustments off the one play that the receivers should always be right. If he if he saw how he was being played, whether it was on, where it was man, whether it was inside man with outside man. So he always had a good way to go and if we were on the same page as as far as me seeing what he was seeing, it was hard for people to stop what we were doing, but it takes a lot of work to do that. I was when I was in running shoot yet, but you know what you keep it simple to where you don't have to have all these different play calls. It's a matter of just repetition, of giving different looks in practice. So we did a lot of individual work where we just gave different looks and we threw off of those looks. That's what we did most of the time individual period. But people see, we kept it simple and then we the things that we were really good at. We just kept running those things over and over till somebody could sea. Well, that's the old high school coach Adage, right kiss keep it simple, stupid. That's what they'd always tell you, like in high school. Just just keep it simple, let your guys run what they run. Yeah, but the West Coast system, you know, is a ton of different plays and I learned I finally went to the West Coast System when I went to Kansas City and boil. Boy, that boggle my mind because, I said, I had gone through all these different offenses for the for the twenty years that I was in the League, or I'm not twenty years, but fifteen years I was in the League before I got there, and now all of a sudden I got to learn and and call everybody's round everybody's protect, I mean protection, all the all the flare control roused by the backside of the out of the backfield. is so much put on the quarterback in that offense. Man, your head is spending and and they call so many different plays. We went into games with a hundred and fifty pass play them like God, we have all these pass plays. We're only got to run seventy plays as it is in the game. Half of those are going to be running plays and some of them you repeat. So why do we need to learn a hundred fifty plays before game? Well, I was. I started out in the digit system, the Don correole system, right, that wasn't that bad. Like you call protection was a word. And then you take hundred eighty five, ninet whatever, right, and then I go to the West Coast with Mike Shanahan and I study every night and I still don't understand he's he'd come up to me be like Steve Young, memorize he has on like he has a photographic memory like I do. You know, because it was like every play was its own play. So if I gave you a a formation with emotion, you knew what the play was. Right, and I'm like, that was just blown my mind. Right. Well, yeah, that's how they call it the place. He just give you the play and you had to put all everything else together with a you had to put the formation, the motion, everything with it. Like I said, that was as much study as I ever had to put into the game. Was My last two years in the league. And Yeah, you know, you still, I think you still made a pro bowl at you write and in Kansas City. Not In Kansas City,...

...no, in Seattle idea. But we had all that's right. We're running more of a spread offense, which I loved, and it was Dennis Ericson's offense and I like Dennis a lot. And it was more like the of the number system, like you were talking forty four, you know, a point lad or whatever, and we did the same thing in Minnesota with with Brian Billick. I love that offense as well. Yeah, Minnesota was you know, I'd love to Minnesota when I played there. I did too. Have a lot of good friends there and still go back and visit. I do too. There's just people like there's a different place up there. I loved Minnesota and I was have you seen the new facility? I have. I haven't seen the new practice facility with new stadium, but I heard the practice facility is amazing. Well, and I was like, I walk in the new practice facilities like windows. You can see outside. The old one was like a bunker. Who Miss it was like a bucket is like a bunker. You Walk in, it's dark, you leave, it's dark and you don't see the light of day, to light unless you go out to practice. And if you if it was too cold, we practice in doors. So you never went outside right and everybody Super Pale, like I'm like, this is ridiculous, like and you had to go outside. Did you have a car starter? We used to have a starter for my car that I would start my car before I went in the shower after practice and take my shower, dress, go out to my car. By the end it would be warm enough for me to get in it. That's how hold it was. Sometimes. Yeah, I had a diesel truck in like they had plugins, like you go to practice, you could plug in your truck. So that's so it'd say warm and you could you could start it up. Hey, everyone, we are talking with Warren Moon. I appreciate you listen to huddle up with guss check me out at huddle up with Gustscom or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. So warm we're going some you know, it's kind of amazing you've had this incredible career and I feel like I'm still a kid watching you play, you know, because it's just amazing how you threw the ball. You know, one thing I wanted to ask you because for me, every training camp I'd go in and the end of my fingertips were always raw. HMM, and I watched a video of a guy talking about you could just hear the ball coming off warns fingers. Right, it's it has that, you know. And so did you have like that? Like you were. You had to get used to throwing so many passes in training camp, though. I mean just those little things I remember about the game. Yeah, your hands would get calloused. Yeah, built that callous up on the end of your fingers just because you threw the ball so much in training camp. You know, idea, they bring in twenty receivers and and fifteen tight ends and three quarterbacks and you got to throw it like one quarterback is down with the running backs and so he's only two quarterbacks there sometimes only one and you got to throw to these guys pumped after pumped after pumped after pump. You your arm wants to fall out by the end of by the end of camp, and that was one of the things I developed was a stretching program from my arm and the way I sit down. I read books like by Nolan Ryan and also orld Hirsh eies or how they took care of their arms as pictures, and I looked at my arm is just being like a picture. You know, what can I do to get the most out of my arm and and get it to you know, the bounce back when I needed it bounce back, especially for second practice. Of We don't they don't have double days anymore. They don't worry about that. They worry about that like that is my we throw the ball a lot and your arm took a took a lot of abuse. Yeah, double days were tough, right, because you had to lift, you do all that stuff in double aggs. And then, like for me, once I got past the arm soreness, like, once that went away a little bit, I was good to go. It was like, but it's your body cools down and you know, you go through this hard work out in the morning and then your body cools down. Then you gotta go take a nap during them, during lunch time, and then you got to get back up in your stiff and you you got to try and get everything going loose again, and especially...

...as you get older, it was harder to do that. But I really took great care of myself and I think that's one of the reasons why I didn't have a lot of injuries. And and you know, my preparation and also my the way I rehab like I hated to get in that ice tub, but I got in it every day. Yeah, D's Did, just like the running backs did, just to get my legs back ready to go again. You know, you just slide in that silver tub with my hit the button and it would do the world. Have Tow in my mouth and biting it. Yeahs, to make those little rubber booties you put over for your toes. Yeah, yeah, all, yeah, I had all of that. Oh, yeah, yeah, everybody like you know, you want to do it, but you had to do it because you knew it had helped you go to comes. Never really, they don't have to do that anymore. Yeah, so you made all these incredible transitions in your life and then you're in at the chiefs, it's your last year and then you're done. Like I talk to people all the time about like when you're done, you're done. There's there. I can never go back to it, and it's so hard people understand how hard that is for us, because we're not like yeah, you got to play a long time, but some people aren't. They played ten years. Yeah, and then they're thirty two and it's like, okay, what do I do now? You do now? Yeah, how did you handle all that? Because you had this incredible success throughout your career. Then it's like what do I do now? You know, I never in a million years imagine I would play twenty three years professional for biologist, trying to get into the in the league first rate and play, and now I finally get, you know, from the Canadian experience to the NFL, and that was one of the reason as I went to Houston, is because of my chance to play right away. And then their financial package was the best. I really wanted to go to Seattle, believe it or not, but their financial package wasn't as well as good as Houston, and I'm figuring I've already played ten years, I mean six years. Maybe I have six more left. That I give me a twelve year career, which is a long career. At that time I got to get I got to get the most money I possibly can coming out of this deal. I'm thinking this might be my last deal. You know, I'm not sure. So that's kind of what my thinking was. But now I end up playing another seventeen years in the NFL. During that time and one of the things my attorney, at Leasteinberg, told me when I first came into the League use the NFL as a stepping stone for the rest of your life because when you do retire at thirty five years old or before, you create relationships throughout this whole time and make sure you're collecting business cards and meeting people and getting involved in your community and doing all these different things that kind of help you prepare for after the game was over. So I did things like in the offseason I would work in commercial real estate, I was involved in broadcasting, I did sideline reporting for TNT during the offseason. I did all these different things that figure out what I wanted to do when I retired. But I just it just never came. It just kept my career just kept going and going, kept UN so by the time I did retire I had a pretty good feeling idea what I wanted to do when I was done. But I it was only because I tried all these other things that I had a lot of great relationships that I had built up over those years because of his advice. And I love that advice because I tell people that all the time. If I had one thing I go back and do over, I mean I had kids when I was twenty five. I had them and you know, they're all grown and everything now. But if I go back and do anything, I would have wrote everybody's name I ever met in a book of their number and how to meet them, you know, and and how to connect with them, because as now, when you get out and you want to do some business, you want to that's all foreign to me. Like you were doing it. That's so smart that you were doing it while you were playing, and that's incredible advice from Lee. Yeah, yeah, and you notice most of the quarterbacks that he represented, whether it was Steve Young or myself or drew blood so or Troy Acheman or can go on and on. These guys have all done very well once their careers were over. Yeah, so you have an incredible career. You Start Your next career. I know you...

...want it. Did you go right into TV and radio for the SEAHAWKS? Yes, I did a couple of years. Well, I did a year for Westwood One and I did some Fox college football, as will pack twelve, I mean at that time pack ten football. Yeah, and then I just kind of eased into the Seahawk thing because I just love that. I was living in Seattle, I had a familiarity with the Seahawks, that I played there, I went to the university Washington. Just all made sense to to be up here in Seattle. And you know your life, you talk about your mom being your mentor and helping you with leadership and everything, and you've had all these hurdles to go through as an African American quarterback. Right, we know these these things are real. So how did you see, because I know you've mentored Cam Newton and some other guys that have come in the league. How do you approach them and say, Hey, I want to work with you, I want to teach you things that I never had and hopefully I can help you be successful. Well, a lot of it was with Cam for instance. He had gone to a football camp and myself, Doug Williams and James Harris had had in at Disney world, at wide world at Disney. So he I've met him when he was fourteen years old and I fifteen years old in high school and it was just big. I mean he was like six foot three at that time and probably about two hundred and twenty five pounds as a fifteen year old. Yeah, Hannon of our arm, but the ball would would go everywhere we had knew. Nobody knew where it was going to go. So we tried to work with him. But then the years later after he goes to Florida and then he transfers and a whole story about Auburn and said his dad calls calls me up and says he wants me to work with him. So different relationships happened different ways just because of a relationships. Even with Andrew Luck, you know I worked with him before he came into the League. Well, Oliver Luck, his dad, was my backup quarterback at the Houston owners when I was here. So he he called me up and wanted me to work with Andrew. So it just happens through relationships that different people came to you and because I didn't really seek any guys out, but I was always available for guys to if they needed my help, and that's all I wanted to be, was somebody that they could lean on if they needed it. Yeah, that, that is amazing. So then now you're going to culminate your career at the hall of fame. You get the call that you made it, and how emotional was that for you? And who was the first person you called to let them know that you that now you're in a group of people that no one can ever cut you from. Yeah, that what a day that was. You know, I had done a youth quarterback camp that morning. I was trying to do whatever I could to just keep my mind off of the voting that was going on that day, because I knew the selections were coming up and a lot of people were telling me you had a chance and some people are saying, you know, yeah, I don't know if you're going to do it this year, and so on and so forth. So I'm trying to keep myself busy. Finally I get a call from my my presenter, who's our beat writer, John Mcclain, and he's like, Warren, I think you need to get down here to the to the hotel where they're going to make the announcements, because I think you have a good chance of making it. They're down to the final eight and you're still in there. And I'm like, John, I'm not coming down there. What if I don't make it? And it all of a sudden I'm standing there with my my thumb in my button and a parent uff that I didn't make it, because you know, Michael Irvian had done the same thing. He he was kind of hanging around waiting for the selection of that happen and he didn't go in the first two or three times. Yeah, he got nominated. So I didn't want to do that, but finally he talked me into it and I and my wife talked me into it. And so we're in Detroit at this time because the seahawks are in this in the Super Bowl and I'm I'm broadcasting the game. So we're preparing for the game and had been there all week. So we go driving down to the to the hotel and I'm driving down the freeway and it's kind of snowy and sleetie out and I get a call on...

...the on my phone and it I thought it was the call, but it was a lady from the NFL that said she got these tickets that I had asked for some friends of mine from the fair Tailgate Party, and I'm like okay, thank you very much, and she's liking, by the way, congratulations on being inducted in the pro football hall of fame. We're being selected. I'm like, what are you talking about? She said it's going across a tick or tape that you were one of the ones selected. I'm like, nobody's called me, I don't know anything, so I'm not I'm not going to go buy that, but thank you very much, and then I hang up the phone. Next thing you know, the phone rings again and it's them and they're telling me that I was selected as as one of the two thousand and six members. Guss man. The tears just started rolling out of my I was crying like a baby. I mean I had to pull the car over to the side of the road. I couldn't even control the wheel. My wife had to take the take the wheel of the car. It seemed like everything that I had gone through just came a pouring out of me. You know, all the different journeys that I had to make to get to where I was, everybody that told me I couldn't do it, all the other African American quarterbacks we were told the same thing that I knew, knew about. All that just came pouring out of me. So it's probably one of the most emotional moments of my life. I can imagine it's like when they say, like if you have a near death experience, you think of everything that happened in your life and it comes flying back in like a minute, right. I'm sure that that, like everybody, your high school coach or college like, everything happens in a minute, and I can imagine why that's so emotional. Yeah, and I never even thought about it in those terms beforehand, like how am I going to react if I do make it? How I'm going to react if I don't make it? I always try to be positive, but there's always that little bit of doubt in there to kind of protect yourself, you know, against Yeah News. But yeah, it was. It was probably the most emotional moment I've ever had, because I'm not a big emotional guy. Yeah, you're very you're very even killed, very even killed. But I lost it on that one. I can see the night before your speech, like, I mean, guys are so everybody's around you. I can just see you saying, I need to take a break, I'm going to go bakes some cookies, some tacket chip cookies. I'm going to call my nerves. That has to be a bear with that. If I want to add an oven and some flower and egg at my disposal, I probably would have done. I can just see you like handing them out to the guys like all the all of favors. It came before you, like hey, it's the only way I call my near is. Yeah, no, what a career. And then to not didn't even write a speech, you know, I all I did was put some bullet points down. I put like eight bullet points down on a piece of paper that I wanted to hit, and that's what I did. I didn't write and write a whole speech and I just spoke from my heart. You kept it simple. Yeah, it's it's your offense that you love, the huge mo other offense is what you see. Yeah, that's amazing. Yeah, so now you know you had. All this happened to you and now you're kind of moving on. You've given back. I know. Are you still involved in you have the Crescent Moon Foundation, and tell us a little bit of tell our fans about that and if they can help you out in any way. Well, I started it back in one thousand nine hundred and eighty nine when I was a nfl man of the year, and basically, my mother had always taught me about education, that that was the most important thing you needed, and one of the reasons why I even wanted a college scholarship was to be able to get an education, because I knew my mom wouldn't be able to afford to send me to college. So I knew that everybody couldn't be a professional football player. Everybody can be entertainers, Singer, pro baseball player, but if you're if you have education behind you, have a chance to be a competitive in life, right. Yeah, well, that was my main focus, was to provide scholarship opportunities for for young kids that come from, you know, impoverished backgrounds but have the half the grades, have the desire but but need the the financial support. So that's...

...how I set up my foundation to to give out scholarships. Now, we did a lot of other things, but the our main focus was to raise money for scholarships and over the years we we've given an over some three hundred fifty scholarships. It's incredible college for young kids. So it's great when you get those calls back later after they after they graduate college or whatever, and tell you how much they appreciate it and is there taking on a new job or or whatever it might be. So it's a very rewarding experience to go through that. Anybody ever from Hamilton High School? Oh, yeah, yeah, I had a scholarship that was just for him. What to scholarships every year just for Hamilton. I had a couple out of my pop warner program that I would, you know, sponsor a couple of kids. They couldn't afford the to the fees to play football. So I tried to give back in as many different ways as I could, you know, with the funds that we had. Yeah, no, that's amazing. You've had an incredible career. You're doing some amazing things now with the rest of your life. And so what's next for Warren Moon? You know, I'm thinking about doing something like you're doing. I've been talking to different people about possibly doing a podcast. I just got approached by a production company maybe about doing a movie on my life. Believe it or not, be amazing. I'm on about three boards now. I'm on the Pro Football Hall of Fame Board. I'm on the Rose Bowl legacy board. I just got back from the Rose Bowl last week, a couple of weeks ago, for the game. So there's a lot of things I'm doing right now and and really staying busy and but having a lot of fun as well. And then I have I have eight grandkids now. So Wow, I spent a lot of time with my kids and grandkids down in Houston, Texas. That's where they all are, and spent Christmas with them. Had A really great time. So yeah, I'm really happy with the way my life's going right now. I can kind of pick and choose what I want to do. I love it. I don't want to do anything, I don't have to do anything, so right it's a great place to be. So one last question here for you. So when you're with your grandkids, do you ever say something that said, oh my mom would have said that. Never catch yourself doing that. Um, yes, I do, because, you know, it's like there's a certain things to take you back. Yeah, and those things were told so much to you that you have almost have an obligation to tell your grandkids. Right, same thing with your own kids. You. I still tell my own kids, my grown kids, some of the things my mother used to tell me, and they look at me like that. Give me a break, I'm I'm thirty five years old. You know, why are you telling me that? Yeah, my mom told me that. Yeah, right, right, and still hits you like it was yesterday. Right, Hey, one, I really appreciate you joining me and telling us some of your stories. I hope you had a good time and you know I wish you all the best and everything you're doing a gust. Thanks a lot for having me on, man, I appreciate it, and we ever want to talk again down the road, we can do that. I really admirge you. When you played the game, didn't think it was very smart you to but hit but a wall, but other than that, I thought I loved everything you did about it. I'll probably was the only one who thought it was a good idea. Hey, as I had this poster in my college dorm room and it was a duck and I don't know, my mom bought a from and it just said Shit happens, and I had just kind of my motto. When that happened. I'm like are you got to deal with that? Moved on, you play. I played another ten years after most of the AGO. Never have in my life and you don't let it get you down. You just know what at all. I just thought it was funny. Oh, it was funny. A lot of people laughed, but I still get to talk about it and about it because seriously heard. But I'm now that I knew you were seriously heard. I said that was funniest thing I've ever seen about quarterback. Well, you know, the Redskins wanted to find me twenty fivezero dollars for doing that because I said it was conduct detrimental to the team. Yeah, exactly. Well, we're how can our fans find you?...

Well, if you can go to me at at Warren Moon one on twitter. Weren't at w moon one on twitters, use me, and then Warren Moon one on instagram. Which one has better pictures of the Old Warren Moon? Probably the INSTAGRAM. Yeah, I bet, I bet there's some really good ones on there. Yeah, back in the day, I do some good throwback Thursdays sometimes. Oh, I love that. I love that. See me as a two year old. You never know, you never know. Hey One, I appreciate you coming on. Good luck with your podcasting. It's a lot of fun. Yeah, it's something I want to be able to commit to. Of I'm going to do it, I want to do it the right way. I just don't want to do one that I like. Weank you. You got to think you should just come out of your shell and just be like the Anti Warren Moons, super excited, not low key at all. It. Just go for it. Yeah, and then all the look at him being phony out that that's not him at all. All your all your old receivers will call you up. Said, what are you doing? I know, what are you doing? You Right? Somebody know? Anybody know where he is? Yeah, right, what happened to him? I want to have a good night, man. I really remember hate you joined us huddle up with guests. Everyone, thanks for another great episode. In listening to us, go to our website, huddle up with guestscom check us out or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. Will see you next week. That's a wrap, sportsman. Thanks for joining in the fun. Studios nudes featuring fifteen year NFL quarterback gusparrock. PUDDLE UP WITH GUS is probably pretty was by one thousand six hundred and thirty one digital media and disavailable happy music.

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