Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Drew Bledsoe

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Joining the Huddle this week is NFL Qb Drew Bledsoe. The First pick in the 1993 draft. Drew helped improve the fortunes of the Patriots, who had fallen on hard times. During his tenure as starting quarterback, the Patriots ended a seven-year postseason drought, qualified for the playoffs four times, and made one Super Bowl appearance. He also made it to three Pro Bowls.

Drew suffered a near-fatal injury early in the 2001 season; he got hit by New York Jets linebacker Mo Lewis and suffered a sheared blood vessel in his chest, which almost resulted in his death. This terrible injury leads to his backup Tom Brady becoming the team's starter. He could not regain his starting position for the remainder of the season due to Brady's success; Bledsoe subsequently played three seasons with the Bills. He made a fourth Pro Bowl appearance, and two with the Dallas Cowboys, before retiring during the 2007 offseason.

Upon his retirement from the NFL in 2007, Drew Bledsoe "doubled back" to his hometown of Walla Walla, Washington, to realize a long-held dream. Drew and his wife, Maura, purchased a piece of property on the southern edge of the Walla Walla Valley and subsequently launched Doubleback, https://doubleback.com, as an estate-focused winery to craft America's best Cabernet Sauvignon. Drew had long been planning for this moment during his years playing football, and success came immediately as the first vintage earned a spot in Wine Spectator's Top 100 List.

Hey everyone, Welcome to another episode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte and welcome to the new 1631 Digital New Studio. You know, some people say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've Never read. 1631 Digital news dot com. Go to 1631 digital news dot com to get your latest news, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favorite podcast. Follow up with gusts. Check it out today at Wide. Digital News dot com. Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron at the diamond or on the links, we can only say, yeah, welcome to this week's huddle up with gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchises with 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the games are one. Uh it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up. Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it's kick off time, so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us two left. Uh huh. Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of huddle Up with Gus, I'm your host, Gus for about 15 year NFL quarterback. I want to welcome you to huddle up with Gus, I want to thank um 16 31 digital news in their studio for helping me produce the show. I want to thank our team, Terry, schulman and Ian Kiss Terry. Just had a birthday. So, happy birthday terry. And uh I want to thank sounder FM for hosting our podcast. Sounder FM has done an incredible job with all their new technologies and doing the transcribing of the show and putting it up on YouTube. So thank you to sounder. So today we have a wonderful guest, a gentleman who played a long time in the NFL 14 years. Uh he's in a ring of fame for the patriots. He was the number one draft pick. I can go on and on about this guy. But I think the best thing about Drew Bledsoe right now is that he makes wine for everybody and it's incredible. I'm waiting to get mine. I'm in pennsylvania. So I have to drive to Washington state to get my wine. So someday I'll do that. Drew but uh, joining me today on huddle up with Gaza's Drew Bledsoe Drew, how are you doing buddy? I'm doing well man. You know, actually, I mean, I didn't know it's terry's birthday. I would have just sent some, send someone to interpret terry. I mean screw you guys. I just send some military that said you can go you can go, you can go, you can go beg her for a for a glass. I know she's in she's in Maryland. You probably can ship it there. Yeah, I can't get anything shipped to P. A. Yeah, that's you know, so yeah, it's weird. It's there's a lot of things they don't tell you when you get in the wine business. And one of them is that, you know, because you're in the booze business, you're actually dealing with 50 distinct countries in the United States. Every state is totally different. I actually, to be a lobbyist in massachusetts had registered as a lobbyist. So I had to go actually get behind the scenes, uh, in the political world and see how things were actually done. And it was actually a lot worse than I thought it was. Uh uh but we got the law changed in massachusetts. So uh you know maybe you need to find some uh pennsylvania wine. Did to to go lobby for you in pennsylvania. Yeah we do. And I don't know if the state will ever change it because we have our liquor stores. That's where it's different. And we still have beer distributors. We're now just getting it into like gas stations. When I lived in Missouri, I retired when I lived in Missouri. You can go to anywhere get booze, you get wine, you get beer um and you can't do that in P. A. So it's kind of rough, right? Yeah. It's interesting man. They they like to uh they like to keep their mitts on it. But uh so far we're pretty good, we've been able to open most states, which is cool. Yeah, that is cool. And that's probably the hardest part of is getting the product out there and selling it. But anyway, Drew, let's go back. I know you when you were a kid, you moved a lot and then you guys settled in in Walla Walla. Was that because your father was coaching or you know, tell me a little bit about that story, and then tell me a little bit about how you fell in love with sports. Yeah. You know, actually those two stories are kind of tied together, but we we moved around a bit when I was younger, mostly just in Eastern Washington wasn't like we were moving across the country anything, but yeah, you know, mom and dad, both both teachers and, and uh dad bounced around a little bit coaching, coaching high school football and, uh, and teaching. Um, you know, thankfully they kind of kind of settled down once I got to sixth grade. So I was able to go from sixth grade on, uh, with, with the same group of dudes, which was great. But sports worker, you know, that was, that was sort of the deal, right? You know,...

...you move around a bunch, you know, if you go out to go out to recess and um, you know, if you can run a little bit and throw the ball around a little bit, you know, it's easier to make friends. You get picked for the teams. Um, so it was sort of an icebreaker and it's a way to get to know people when you're moving into a new place was to go out and uh, you know, turned out for some teams. And uh, so that part was uh you know, it was helpful, it was helpful and then once we settled down in water while, but you know the funny thing I guess, I don't know how you were growing up, but man, if you saw me and like 6th, 7th, 8th grade, um you would not have looked out there and said, hey, that's going to be a professional athlete right there. I grew really fast, my feet grew first, you know, and then I grew tall and skinny and it was kind of awkward. Uh you know when I was growing really fast like that and uh uh so it took a little while to grow into my body for sure. Yeah. So did you like for me, I had a lot of growing pains as well, you know, ninth grade was a year. I grew about six inches and my knees. Everything, we're killing me, you know? But you still went out and played sports like even though I went through all this stuff, my dad was like get your butt out there. So I played football, basketball, Baseball. Never did track. I know you were a track guy. You through. Yeah, I think you through. Did you throw discus and javelin? Yeah. Through the disk and the javelin high jumps and but that was more just you know, it's mostly just a deal to God and watch the girls run around the track to be honest. But it was it was something that something to do. It was it was funny that my least my least favorite of those events was the Javal and that was the only one who qualified for state and I hated the javelin. It just hurt to throw that thing. Well that's because you have to keep your arms straight. There was no it made no sense. No, no sense at all. Run really fast. Stop arch your back and let your arm just turning. It just didn't feel good at all. So I hated that one. But uh my sixth grade year was my sixth grade year, I think was the year though because I had played, we couldn't play football until seventh grade of any kind. Not even flag football. Both soccer, basketball, wrestling, uh swimming, baseball track. I think it was like six sports in one year uh that year. So it was that was kind of crazy. Um And you know, I was actually because you can imagine probably I was I wasn't pretty good swimmer. I just hated it because I was built like a spear and I was so skinny. Big hands, big feet. So you know, But they wanted me to practice swimming at 5 30 in the morning on my summer vacation and that just wasn't happening. Yeah, that wasn't happening for you. Like I I could see a lot of football players not, you know, swimmers, they get up early, you gotta get to the pool. I was not ever doing that, like I had to get my sleep, man, no doubt. Yeah, I could see you being a good swimmer though. I mean with long arms, long feet, like, you know, I'm touching a wall before anybody. Oh, hell yeah, man. Yeah. Hell yeah. Just no resistance. Uh because I was just, you know, I could shoot, I could swim in a garden hose. I was so skinny back in the day. Uh the uh but uh yeah, no, it was good man. You know, I mean, you know sports were then and still are to this day so formative and um you know, in my life and my family's life and uh and I think it's just um even more important now than it than it probably ever has been um for for kids to be involved in sports of some sort. Yeah, ours was kind of like, we didn't have like I don't growing up, I mean we're kind of the same age, so we didn't have that, we're going to stay in all day, we have internet, we have video games, we have all that kind of stuff, it was like go outside, go play, go do something and then come back when it gets dark. Yeah, 100% I apologize, this is going off, it's not my phone, I would never do that to you. That's my my wife's ipad is really, that's what the noises, so I blame her, but yeah, no it was no it was it was it was very different. Um You know, I remember I mean when we were growing up, you know you didn't have to have like an organized scheduled game to go play, you just went out and if there was a ball you picked it up and came up with a game and and uh ran it around and you know uh you know basketball, tennis, you know you go play tennis, you know, I was never a good tennis player. But you know you pick it you know or you find a tennis racket ball and you go play baseball with the tennis racquet ball. I mean you just made up your games, it didn't have to be. I feel like now a lot a lot of times uh there's a tendency for it to get so regimented where you know, you don't go play unless it's an organized game with referees and all that stuff. Well, how did, how did you learn your throwing motion? Because mine was like, my dad, we just went in the backyard and through. Yeah, I was, yeah, I mean we uh, grew up around and my dad was like I said, my dad was a football coach in high school, but he was an offensive lineman in college that, you know, he would, he would tell you. And I think...

...this is actually true. This is not just dad being nice that for myself and for my brother, any athletic ability that we had came from my mother. Uh, that's uh, you know, you know, I think a lot of uh, I think a lot of guys say that jokingly, I think in our case that was probably actually the truth. Um, you know, dad was big and strong, but mom actually supplied natural athletic ability to the extent that we had any, but you know that, but we dad, we had a couple of guys growing up that, um, that I was able to be around because my dad was a coach, the Bennett family, uh, and uh, you know, those guys are the ones that really helped kind of guide the throwing motion. Uh, that the funny thing though is that, you know, I mean, I've sort of, it's one of the things I've learned more about as I've gotten older and really just, I can last four or five years coaching high school football. I've been around a couple of, um, guys got to go spend some time with tom house down in, down in SAn Diego. Uh, and there were some things that, particularly when I was, you know, in the NFL, there were some things that some coaches tried to change in my throwing motion, um, you know, they wanted me to carry the ball higher and you know, kind of Peyton manning and get the ball up here. And uh, the guys that have worked with now, they were like, well you're lucky you didn't listen and I always carried it kind of low and they now have studied it all biomechanically and like, no, it's actually a more efficient motion to have the ball download and it, it comes off more naturally and so thankfully every time they tried to do that and try and be coachable and carry the ball of pine and uh, then we'd get to practice and get into a game and the ball to drop back down and thankfully it just felt natural to do that uh, because otherwise they would have screwed me up. I'm the same way as I got older and played longer. It was, it got from here to a little more side arm. Just don't know why, you know, and then you hear these guys that they work on than there every day, working on their motion and everything like that. And uh, you know, it's more scientific for me. It was like, okay, am I going to be accurate today or throwing a spiral? You know, you've had those days where you go out and it's like, man, this thing is not spinning right? So it's, you go through all those motions. And for me, it wasn't like I could go back to a coach that taught me how to do this, right. I just, I'm like, you, I grew up in the back and all my buddies and we would just throw it around and just, hey, I'm just gonna figure it out on my own. Yeah, the one time that I did have to go back and try and figure out in my third year, I separated my shoulder, separated my left shoulder and played with it all kind of taped up and that that really did kind of mess with mess with my motion because I couldn't do anything with my left side. Uh but in order to fix it, um we actually went and got my combine tape and went and looked at what I was doing in the car at the combine and then compared it to what I was doing, and I can't remember specifically what of us that we changed, but but it was sort of like, okay, well it worked before, let's just go back and do that rather than trying to figure out some new motion. Uh But it's it's sort of interesting, I mean, because, you know, this man, there's there's so many quacks out there when it comes to the position of quarterback, you know, everybody's got their, you know, their guru, um and, you know, you know, probably both met a lot of those guys over the years, um but ultimately, after all of that, there's they're, you know, they're exactly two guys that I've met, uh and tom house being one of them that I've actually studied and learned what is efficient uh for throwing and uh um and biomechanically, and it's certainly not what some of the other quacks are teaching. Um So yeah, I kind of get that, I see that, you know, um I'll just kind of thinking back when we were kids, and and I don't do you remember anybody's talking about biomechanics when we were kids? Like, you know, we don't have that stuff, you know, back in the 80s, there was nobody saying like, you know what I mean? I grew up watching terry Bradshaw throw and I don't remember them ever on tv talking about like here's his arm angle and here's how he throws. Like nobody ever talked about that stuff. So who was the guy for you? Like when you were in high school, who was it that you watched at that you kind of admired? Oh man, you know? Well, the cool thing for us, you know, so I think we are the same age, right? I'm 49, yeah, 40 years. Well, yeah, the cool thing for us was that those guys that we idolized growing up, we're still playing when we got in the league. Uh, you know, I talked about a lot, I mean, you don't shoot man, you know, Elway and uh, Marino and jim kelly and you know, Aikman steve young joe Montana, uh, you know, right down the list, Warren Moon, uh, actually got the spend time with Warren Moon when I was, when I was a...

...young kid and I had better at football camp. Um, you know, and then all of a sudden we get to actually go out and compete with these guys. I mean, I was, it was, it was just so cool. It took, I remember it took, you know, it took a little while to get over being a little bit awestruck, um, you know, being on the field, but these guys, Because they were drafted when we were 11, you know, that that famous quarterback, you know, class of 83. So we were like writing prime football, you know, watching idealization time when they had, you know, the greatest quarterback class of all time and uh, and all those guys were still going when we played and I just remember it was really hard not to be awestruck. Um, you know, my first game was at, excuse me, was that Buffalo? Remember I'm down there playing catch 21 just, you know, had just watched the Bills in the Super Bowl just a few months before. Um, and uh, you know, first of all, I saw Bruce smith come down the tunnel and I was like, oh shit, I'm in the wrong place man, I did not belong here on this field with Bruce smith, you know, and then jim kelly comes running down the tunnel, he kind of runs by and he pats me on the houses. Hey, good luck, look like shit, that was, that was mr kelly, you know, and all of a sudden you gotta go play it. So it was so it was, it was just a really cool experience to uh, you know, to be there and get to compete against and, you know, eventually become friends with guys that were our heroes. Yeah. You know, they were our heroes and you know, I used to try to, when you think about, you try to emulate some of them and they're throwing cells, but they were all completely different. Right, Right. And that's what you talk about biomechanics. I kind of throw that up the windows sometimes when I, when I talk to kids and things, and it's like if you go back and look at each individual quarterback from that draft class, they all, they all step different, they all through a different, their arms were different angles, but they, you know, it's about getting the job done really. It is, it's about figuring out what, figuring out what works for you. And then there and then there are some some common things specifically to you know the arm angle. Like they all eventually got to the same place, it just got their differently. Uh You ever you ever watch Far Far was actually pretty brilliant at imitating the different guys really. I've never, you know you gotta you gotta go find it far was actually pretty, it was like you you know I had a I had a decent john L. A. Um I could actually I could actually imitate Marino fairly well like his like his his like his like open like his open step and and it just that that's that really quick motion just where I just, it was just his shoulders were open to start with and just that ball came out so quick. But you're right. No it was it was, you know, sort of like uh like golf swings, right? You know, you look at the golf swings that have been successful throughout history, man, it couldn't be more different, you know? So, well, it's like for me, it's like growing up and it's uh I emulated a lot of the Pirates when, because I was a huge pirate fan, I live in Pittsburgh, so all those swings from Willie, Stargell, Dave parker to Clementi, you know, all these guys that I grew up watching, um you try to emulate their swings and it's the same thing for quarterbacks, you know what I mean, like where's my arm? So guys, what and now the great thing is is that you can get on and watch all that, like think about we we had to wait till sunday to see any of that shit, you know, like now you wanna watch whatever you want whenever you no doubt, no doubt. Which is really cool. I had to get a lot of ways. It's really cool. I think in some ways it can be harmful. I think that I think about it, I know you want because you watch, you watch some of these kids were like, oh no, you're imitating the wrong thing. You know, you don't imitate the way he dresses in the way he celebrates and with all the imitate all the work he's doing in the weight room and you know, all of that stuff that's actually not on the video. Um, and then if you do all of that stuff, then you can work on your touchdown dance, but let's go, let's go. Let's go imitate all the stuff that got him into the end zone that got him on the team and got him there. Uh, it's a little bit, a little bit frustrating sometimes. You see these kids, you know, like, no dude, no, you don't get to do that celebration. You're not Superman, you're 16. Uh, let's go. Let's go imitate everything that, you know, cam Newton did to earn the right to be in the end zone before you start doing the superman deal. Well, I'm sure when you were 16 and you were in high school and you through a lot of touchdowns, um, do you have a time when you try to do that? And your dad was like, we don't do that drew, no. You know, I think, I think we were, you know, we were, I mean, it was sort of different, You know, I think, you know, the guys that, that we watched, you know, there was, there was not a lot of that going on, you know, I mean, you know, I mean, joe Montana would point at the sky and that was...

...about as, you know, as crazy celebrations got from the quarterbacks that we watched, you know, um, so, you know, I think we just had, we had the role models we have from that standpoint, we're different. Um, you know, I did remember, I do remember watching the show that the, uh, like the dolphins receivers back in the day who had their kind of their orchestrated touchdown, you know, stuff, which I thought that was really fun. Um, but I can't dance at all. So, I mean the ends up dancing, I'm just going to look like a man. So you're like me, you probably need two or three bottles of wine before you get out on the day before you even try. And even then it doesn't look good. I still don't want anybody watching. I had, so I played with Henry Ellard right? And you throw, hop a touchdown and he'd do a front flip into the end zone. All right. And I'm like, Henry, can you teach me that? He goes gus you can't do it. I'm like, all right, I'm not even gonna track, we're not we're not gonna go there. No, let's let's let's just let's just leave the, leave the flips to the athletes. You just keep throwing the ball. But so, uh you go through high school, you're getting recruited, you know, you're gonna get ready to make this next big transition in your life and you pick uh wash state. Uh well, this is a big reason for that. Uh Coach just fell in love with mike Price, who was the coach there? Um you know, it's also closer to home. I mean, you know where it was two hours from home, which um that was important. You know, there, you know, not just for my family, but so many, you know, people that I uh that helped me as I was coming up and being close enough to um you know, they could get to watch games. Um but the other three schools that were kind of in the mix, University of Washington was in the mix stanford. And then uh and then I took a trip to Miami but I knew I wasn't going to Miami uh took that plane ride and said, yeah, I can't, well, I mean I knew going in, man, it's too far away, but I wasn't going to turn down a trip to Miami. I mean at that point I think I've been on an airplane once or twice in my life and they're going to fly me down to fly me down to South Beach in the middle of the winter. I mean, come on. Um, but I knew that was too far away. Matter of fact, the only reason that another reason I was that they knew that I existed was Dennis Erickson, who was their coach down there had been at Washington state previously. So he'd seen me in high school. Otherwise they wouldn't have known I existed. You know, it wasn't like they had huddle and all that stuff that they have today. It's amazing. You have to go remember remember sitting downstairs with my dad, you know, with two vcrs trying to double highlight tape together and you know, to put together, put together like two minutes of video took hours. Oh my gosh, we did the same thing. Yeah. I ran the winky in high school. So I had like, I don't know I didn't know that. Yeah, so they they throw it like three times a game. And uh I tell the story that in my career in high school I think I threw like 45 times and then I got to my first game in college and through it like, you know, 50 in my first game in college. Isn't that amazing? How do you want, how'd you uh how'd you, how'd you figure out, you know how to uh you know, become a passing quarterback when you do you did you go to like some seven on 7 stuff in the summer or what? No, no, we didn't. There was none of that around here. I went to um I was a big baseball player. I could always throw it no matter what. And um playing in the wing t obviously didn't lend itself to learn how to drop back or learning how to, you know, being a shotgun. We never did any of that stuff. We ran the waggle and some of that stuff, but I got to college my freshman year. Um they knew I was 65 is a big kid, I could throw it. Um and it was just a lot of hard work man, just putting in the time and the effort. We had a coach, coach, workman, who, I mean we were in the gym, Tulsa, what didn't have any money. We're throwing the balls against walls and exploding them against the wall. I mean we, you know Dustin Anderson was this kid from texas big kid, you know, I'm coming, I was like one of the biggest kids in my high school and I go there and I'm like, I'm gonna be okay then you get there and you see like all these other athletes from all these other states and you're like oh I gotta work And I luckily had that kind of mentality from my dad. You know, he was one of 15 kids. So yeah so they grew up in the depression and like you had to work for everything you had and that's you know when I was in 8th grade my dad bought me a new pair cleats to play football, broke my foot the first day of practice. He said I didn't buy those cleats to sit on the shelf, just tie your shoe tighter. So I tied my shoe tighter, played the whole season on a broken fall. And that's kind of the mentality kind of like mustard P. A. Was for me. But but I was going to tell you that I played for coach Price in the blue great game. And it was really and his son, what was his son's name? Eric eric eric uh eric and erin was the kicker.

So I think it was eric who was the quarterback, right? He was QB. Yeah, exactly. And then they were, he coached the blue grey game and I was there. You right though, He was a great guy. Oh man, I loved him to death. Still do to this day. He's retired now. He's living up in quarterly in Idaho and um, you know, hanging out on the lake. But, but when I was being recruited, you know, we, we, you know, we, you know, we had all the different coaches come through and uh, you know, I think it was, you know, sort of one of those that, uh, any good recruiter um, understands. My mom fell in love with coach Price. Uh, once you, once, once you've, once you've got mom, you know, mom never actually said you should go here any, any of that. But you know, you could, you can tell, you can tell, you know who mom, who mom prefers. Uh, and then I also had some, some insight from a friend who was a G. A. On the staff that, that I could maybe play early if I went up there. And that ended up being the case too. But uh, there was a cool experience and it was, it was familiar. You know, I mean little small town Walla Walla in the middle of the wheat fields out in eastern Washington and go into pullman, which is kind of the same size town and it was a couple hours away. So it felt kind of safe and that was part of it too. Um, yeah. Which made the next transition all that much crazier. Yeah, I mean that had to be tough. So tell me a little bit like, so obviously in high school you threw the ball around. Not that not as much, but then you get to college, you're throwing it all the time. I think you were, you guys were big shotgun team. I mean, I was same way at Tulsa, we threw the ball everywhere. Um, but obviously you, you, you just, when did you figure out like you kind of came into your, you know what I mean? Where you started lifting, you started doing all these things and at what point of your college career? Because as a freshman, I guarantee you probably feel like you were still skinny, you're still not to where you want to be, You know, and then there's a point in college where you've been lifting in a wheel real weight room and I'm doing all those things that your body changes. Yeah. You know, it started it started honestly my my senior year of high school and then freshman year, you know, I started to kind of, you know, all my pieces started to fit a little better, you know, thankfully I thankfully I stopped growing when I was a sophomore in high school. Um So then I had I had a chance to start catching up at that point. Um But yeah, I mean, I think, you know, my my freshman year when I when I, you know, got on the field in fall camp and uh you know, started started chucking it around a little bit and uh you know, figured out that okay, yeah, I can I can do this, you know, I can I can I can hang with these guys and uh uh, so I was kind of a around then. Um, and then, you know, the end of my, the end of my freshman year, I ended up starting halfway through that year. Um, the end of my freshman year after my freshman year, um, Mel Kiper said that I was going to be the first draft pick, number one pick in two years after my freshman year in college. So then I'd answer that question for the rest of my college. Are you, are you coming out? Which, I mean, obviously it's awesome, but it also is like, okay, dude, I just, I'm just like, you know, 18 years old, I'm trying to, you know, enjoy playing some ball here and next thing, you know, I got to answer that question every, uh, every time I turn around, but uh, which was just, it was just sort of, you know, it was just sort of funny, but um, but you're already in the media. Yeah, exactly, exactly. All the, all that rabid media and pullman Washington. Uh, there was like the student newspaper and then the spokesman review from Spokane Washington and that was it, that was it. And I'm sure as you got into your senior year, there was a lot more of national publications calling you, you got to do these interviews. Yeah, yeah. We had a good media relations guy and um, in pullman and it was cool. It was a piece of advice that that resonated with me, um, you know, and he said, is that stuff started to happen? He goes, he goes make sure that you understand that drew blood, so the football player and drew blood. So the person are different people and you don't ever get those two confused because if you're, because the football player guy is going to be on a super high pedestal one day and he's going to be uh you know, thrown in the dump in the dumpster the next day and it's going to be a mercurial thing. Uh um but make sure that the person, you keep that thing separate and distinct and uh that was advice that stayed with me all the way through, you're just going to make sure that that professionals, that professional side that, you know, goes...

...up and down on a daily and sometimes play by play basis. Um you don't get that confused with the person. Yeah, no, that that that's very good advice, you know, and that takes people like that mentors that can come from all kind of different areas in your life. Um One little tidbit like that can really help you through your whole career because as you said, you went from you know Washington to you know one of the biggest media markets in the world and then all of a sudden you got everybody around you so that transition alone had to be kind of, you know, I'm not saying difficult but different for you. Oh man, it was crazy dude, I mean shoot you know, you go from, You know I? M. I think you know outside of the university was like 22,000 at that point and I think the rest of the town, it was like 8000 you know like I said there really was, there was like one newspaper that was kind of close and then there was the Seattle newspaper but you know that was it and you go to boston and there's two newspapers in town and then you got providence and you got new york and you get all of this stuff. So just the media stuff was absolutely crazy. Um and then you learn that, you know, in the, in the west sports was kind of pastime. You know, it's something that that we that we that we watch and you know, growing up we had our favorite teams and so on. But you need to go watch the game and then after the game was over, win or lose, you just kind of go on with your day. It's no big deal man. You get to boston. It's a, I mean it's a freaking religion, you know, I mean it's a religion, they take it serious man. And uh remember my uh and I tried to kind of keep it all to the side, remember my, my rookie year, we played the Steelers And I threw five picks, threw five interceptions. And so I decided on purpose to go get the newspaper the next day, go get the boston herald. I just wanted to see how bad it could get right right. And I'm like, okay, let's just go see. You know, let's, let's see what, let's see what they have to say here. And one of the writers um, opened his article with, um, it was the worst performance by a quarterback in Patriots football history. And I like, all right, well, I guess it can only go up from there. I really got one way to go from here. Oh yeah, from here. Well, I guess, you know, I mean, I can't be worse than the worst. So, you know, I guess I'm just gonna try and get better. Uh huh. So it was sort of one of those where I at least have the perspective to go see okay, well let's just see how terrible this can be, uh and then we'll rise from there. Yeah. Hey everyone welcome, thank you for joining me on huddle up with gus uh we're gonna take a quick commercial break, we'll be right back, we're talking with Drew Bledsoe, Uh huh. Hey, how come up with us listeners manscaped. Well, they sent me uh they hooked me up with a bunch of tools and formulations for their package three point oh kit. Uh so you know, I want to show you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We all think we got a perfect package, but they sent me the perfect package, three point oh kid, I want to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It came in this great box uh you know, and you can see what it says. They will thank you because they sent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us, uh, you know, stuff that makes you smell better. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this great, uh, some boxers what you get right, protect them. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this cool game sat, I guess you want to call it to store all your stuff in. So, uh, it's been great. Manscaped sent me a bunch of product. Um, you know, and you know, you can see it all on here. Uh, you know, if you can go to Manscaped dot com and put in the code, uh, Gus Frerotte, that's G U S F R E R O T T E. Get 20% off and free shipping when you use that code. But you can get a kit, you can get individual items like, uh, this way, cool groomer that has a little led light, um, ceramic. These things come apart. They're waterproof. You can do a lot with them. So, you know, man scape is great. You know, it's funny. I remember when I was playing with the Denver broncos and I'm not going to mention any names, but there was a gentleman who was playing on our team. And uh, you know, if you ever hears the story, you'll know exactly what I'm talking about. But uh, he brought his own clippers in one time and he used it to trim his beard up,...

...his goatee and everything. And he had him there for about two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner, he walks in and there's a person, another player that is actually manscaping with his beard trimmer. So, you know, one of the things is, you don't want to use the same trimmer down there that you use up here. So uh, he kind of freaked out a little bit and he said, hey, how long have you been using that tool there? And he said, well, showed up here about three weeks ago and I've been using it ever since, so you know, there is a lesson learned that, you know, don't leave things out and probably if it would have just said manscaped on it, we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probably one of the funniest, uh, taking care of your ball stories I've ever heard or been around in the locker room in the NFL. So, uh, it's a great story. Um, but you know, I always said There was no way to know, there's no name on it and the guy was just using it and another guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heck of a funny story. So one of the best I've ever heard my 15 years playing in the league. Um but you know, there's so many great things about Manscaped and what they're doing uh because guys, you got to take care of yourself even though I got great hair um and getting older, but you still have to maintain some sort of grooming, right? And so, uh you know, we all work out for me. I like working in my yard doing those things now that I'm retired, get a little sweat on and everything. You want to smell good. Uh you know, you got to take care of yourself, they've got some great products. Um, you know, this one, a little uh all deodorant, we'll need that here and there. Um, after, you know, working the yard, taking a hike, doing a walk, whatever you do. Um It's a great thing but there's so many great products um I want to thank manscaped for sending them to me. Um But the lawnmower 3.0. Obviously you can use it anywhere in your body, but I'm sure you guys have all seen the commercials. But this is one just letting you know that the lawnmower three point oh comes with a perfect kit. You can buy the lawnmower by itself, You can buy all these products individually. They even sent me this wonderful shirt. You can see the back. Your balls will thank you and then here's the front. So it's an awesome shirt. They have great gear and you know what? Sometimes you can just sit back, take care of your balls a little bit and and and read the paper. So Man's Cape even has their own daily news so which is great. So don't forget that you can go to the code Gus Frerotte and that's G. U. S. F. R. E. R. O. T. T. E. Uh And you can save 20% on any products, the complete the perfect uh package gift set and uh you know you can save 20% and get free shipping. So use the code Gus Frerotte. G. U. S. F. R. E. R. O. T. T. E. Hey everybody spells my name wrong, they even spelled wrong on the back of my pro bowl jersey. So you know I gotta I gotta help you guys out. So don't forget how important it is that you use these products, take care of yourself down below and have some fun right? There's nothing closer to you than your little buddies. So use the lawnmower uh Use the Code Gus Frerotte save 20% and get free shipping and port of some great manscaped products. So uh Mhm. Hey everyone welcome back to the show. We're talking with Drew Bledsoe. We were just talking withdrew about, you know, the difference between when you're in college and Drew went to a smaller school. Uh and then all of a sudden he's in a huge media market and how you handle those things and handle the positive and the negative. And so Drew, when I was went to Washington, there was a guy there, you may know his name. Tony Kornheiser. Tony was not a fan of mine. So people not only call you, but you can read the Washington post. You know, it was kind of like you where you're at this big media market and these people could say the worst things and it's just like, man, my wife would get more upset than anybody. Yeah, no, it was it was it was it wasn't and harder on the family than it was on us, right. You know what I mean? Because you know, you know, we're out we're out there at least at least we can do something about it. Um But when somebody is attacking somebody you love um man, you want to go after him and there's really nothing to do. Uh you know, one of the blessings that ended...

...up getting flipped, you know, kind of later in my career, you know, early on. Um and I love to say this in front of the kids too because like man, your old dead. But uh but you know, it's like pre internet, right? So you know really on um and I was 3000 miles away from home. Um so my you know family and you know loved ones back home, you know, they were they were seeing highlights, you know, once in a while on ESPN, um, or some very filtered, you know, news that made its way, um, you know, out west, the worst thing for, you know, the health and well being of my folks was the internet where all of a sudden, you know, mom and dad can get on there and you know, you want to see what's going on with your kid. Well, all of a sudden they can read everything from every outlet unfiltered. Um, you know, and of course it's pre social media, but you know, it still was all of a sudden, and I think that drove my stress level for my folks through the roof. Um, you know, when all of a sudden they can see that, and I asked dad multiple times just to not do it. But you know, what are you gonna do? You gonna not go look and see what people say about your kid? Uh but early on it was a real blessing because I was so far away. Uh, you know, when I came home, it was a vacation and my friends and family didn't have to see, you know, the bad stuff when it wasn't going well. Um they still got to see, thankfully they, you know, thankfully then they got to see the highlights because when it was going well, then you made the highlight reel alright. They didn't didn't show a whole bunch of interceptions unless we threw a touchdown to the other team. Uh you know, but so it was really a real blessing back then. Um, you know, and being that far away, the great thing about your career is that you're one of the rare quarterbacks that have thrown way more touchdowns, interceptions. So I don't, I think you, you bring up interceptions way too much. So, you know, you've, you've thrown a ton of them. Um, and you know, you've had some, some crazy stuff happened in your career, where your, you know, your first round draft pick and you're the guy at the Patriots and then you've had all this stuff happened to you. I mean, I was I'm not, I'm not even close to like the same and on the level of you as far as quarterbacks go. But I had some crazy stuff happened in my career to, you know, where, um, you know, it wasn't something that, you know, you could handle that easy and you had to deal with it all and you had to make all these transitions. So tell me a little bit about when you got injured and then all that that comes up That had to be hard and you just talked about it and I know it was tough on your parents as well. Yeah. You know, so, um, you know, I've been in New England for, and I've been been the guy been the franchise guy for eight years and uh, um, we've had some, you know, some ups and then we had some downs and you know, and we were starting to, we were starting to look like we're gonna start coming back out of it. And Belichick had just gotten near the year before. Then all of a sudden we looked like we had an offensive line that was, that was ready to rocket, ready to ready to rock and roll and we had some stuff going on and, and after, you know, and after all of that, you know, it was right after 9 11. so there was all the emotions surrounding that. It was the first game back after 9 11 and uh playing the playing the Jets and I got hit by mo Lewis on the sidelines. Um I mean, it was a hard hit, you know, you go back and watch the the, you know, the video and you know, it was a hard hit, but it didn't look like, you know, something that was life threatening. Um But I, you know, got up and went back in the game the next the next series and um it was actually Dame and Howard and then our fullback Marc Edwards who ratted me out because had a pretty pretty bad concussion in addition to the other stuff that was going on, because I put back on the field and we had to check with me, I had to go right or left and I knew I didn't go left and you know, I needed to go left, go to the bubble and I, but I can't remember what the word was. So I turned around to Mark said, hey Mark, how do I go left? You go say odd, like okay, odd, odd. So he's like, hey, he's not, he's not right. Um And then I went to uh to Damon on the sidelines. He's like, hey, let's go over the two minute place. Well the two minute players have been the same for two years and we have every single week, there are only like five or six of them. He go. And so damn it goes, you want to go over the two minute plays? Like yeah, let's just run through. And so they went and ran at me and said, hey, he's not okay. Um After the game I just, I wanted to go in to the uh, uh, to the locker room was like, you know, in our trainer came and grabbed me and he goes, hey, why don't you come with me bob? And uh, I was like, yeah, I'm just gonna go for team prayer and then I'll come. And he goes, no, I think you need to come with me. You don't look very good. So we went in and that's when uh, that's when they discovered, so normally we have a...

...concussion. Your heart rate starts to slow down quickly. Um, uh, And when uh, when I went in, my heart rate started to spike. Uh, and that's when they figured allocate, there's something that's not quite right here. So through many ambulance and we're driving up to uh Mass General. My brother actually was out there and jumped in the ambulance with me. Um, and as we're driving up there they couldn't give me morphine, I'm allergic to morphine and they couldn't they couldn't even give me Advil because an anti coagulant. And they figured out that I was bleeding out Um driving upwards. So we're driving up to mass general. My brother's sitting there with me and he told the story, told us that I didn't know the story until 15 years after 20 years after, I can't remember when he finally told me but we're driving and we're on the outskirts of Boston and I'm sitting there, he said I was just in pain kind of groaning and all of a sudden, you know we're on the outskirts of Boston and I just went lights out and he thought I was he thought I died. Um uh So you know so you know and I don't remember any of this stuff. It's all this is all after the fact, but I remember just waking up in the hospital and really had no sense that for being a serious thing until, you know, days later, but turns out I was bleeding out internally, you know, about a third of my blood was inside my chest cavity. At that point we recycle and put it back in. So all of that, you know, and so then I, you know, I go, you know, spend days in the hospital and and uh they, you know, was like, God, it was like six or seven weeks later, they let me start working out a little bit a couple months later. Um you know, I get the green light that I'm healthy and I can go back and play well in the interim, you know, this little shit from michigan who help help help help raise and who had dinner at my house all over any time. All of a sudden, you know, tom brady is on the field and he's starting to play decent. Um, he wasn't tom brady at that point, but he was playing decent and the team was rallying around and they were playing really good football. So I get finally healthy after almost dying on the friggin field, I come back and my job is not there anymore. I'm like, well this is, this is fucked up. You know, like this is not, this is not how it's supposed to go. You know, there was that old fallacy that I don't know who made it up, but I don't think it's ever been true that you don't lose your job to injury. I don't think that's ever been true. I don't think they're not ever been true either. You know, it's like, it's like, no, you don't lose your job to injury unless there's somebody else in there that's playing pretty good at a lower salary cap number or whatever, You know, You know what that's like. I I don't I don't know who made that up. It was probably, you know, you know, some good intention union rep, uh, that first C. B. A. Yeah, exactly, exactly. And uh but also in Tommy's playing pretty good and, you know, my job is not there for me anymore. And uh man, that was that was that was bitter pill to swallow. Uh you know, that's the first time you, you know, the first time you're not the guy was was that was that was hard and uh you know, to do some sort of some soul searching their work and then uh, you know, ultimately, you know, decided okay, you gotta you gotta do the right thing here and go back and made it a little bit easier because, you know, I really did love and respect, you know, Tommy. Um, um, you know, he was, I mean he was practice squad guy the year before, um, and he worked his ass off and just, you know, all the things that you want to respect about, a person, he had all those things, um, if he was a jerk, it would have been a lot harder, but ultimately was able to go back and and support him and support the team. Um, and uh, uh, you know, thankfully he was nice enough to sprain his ankle in the NFC championship game, so he let me play for a little bit. Uh, but then of course he gets healthy for the Super Bowl because, you know, they threw him back out there, but um, but it was a crazy time, you know, it wasn't, and um you know, people ask about, you know about that stuff from time to time, and um it wasn't easy, but at the end of the day, you know, I tell people, and I just, it's a perspective that I think that anybody that's that's privileged enough to be us has to have, man look, if I get paid to play a game, there's no room for self pity. You know, you know, you don't get to feel sorry for yourself when you're a professional athlete, because you're living out the childhood dream of most young people in the United States and really worldwide, um and um side I was able to learn to cherish the uh, you know, cherish the challenge and and embrace adversity, and um and that's something that that has transcended on into the, into the business world and into the rest of life. You know, adversities inevitable. It's going to come and if you can learn to embrace that and use it as a stepping stone to for self improvement, for business improvement, for sports improvement for any of that kind of...

...stuff. Um and you can turn that very that adversity into a positive thing. Um you know, then you're set up for some success. Yeah, you really are. And I think that that's probably the first time hearing this story for me that really that you face that kind of adversity because throwing an interception or losing a game is a type of adversity, but it's not like what you went through, and it's difficult because I've been through a shit ton of adversity in my life and had to fight through a lot of stuff, and on the other end it only makes you stronger and it gives you something that you've never had before. And, and so tell me about how that affect then, then you go on through the rest of your career. Um, and so what did it change your perspective on things at all? Or did it, you know, how did, how did that change you in a way? Yeah. You know, I, uh, I know that I appreciated more, um, the opportunity that I had because it was the first time that it was taken away, you know, and um, you know, I remember when, I think it was probably my last year and I was in Dallas, Yeah, uh, uh, in the old stadium and uh, I just made that stadium. It was terrible. It was terrible. Was a terrible stadium, like that would be lit up. And I was just, yeah, the turf was hard and it was just a plus plus jerry was not maintaining anything because he was trying to work on the new stadium deal. And uh, um, so it was just in shambles. Um, but you know, we were coming down and I made it a point and coming down the tunnel before each game, we're going out to get ready to get introduced. I would always find a rookie as I was walking down the tunnel, I would just grabbed by the pack of the back of the pads. Like, dude, how cool is this? We get to go do this. Uh, and you know, look at me like, what are you doing? Like, Oh yeah, yes. You know, it's pretty cool. What's up? But weird old man. Uh, but, but I really do think that I appreciated it. Um, going forward from there. And uh, and also I think in some ways uh, understood that at that point that, you know, life would go on, you know, you know, if I wasn't playing anymore, you know, I still got great wife and family and like there's a lot of good stuff out here that that's not tied to ball and life is gonna go on and there will be life after this. And um, so I think that it did change, certainly my perspective. Um, you know, going through that, yeah, that is hard, you know, because 25 years doing the same thing, but I was, man, it sounds like we're very close because my other life was my family and my kids and enjoying them, so that when I was done, they were always going to be around, because you've seen like me, a lot of guys who didn't do that, and then all of a sudden they're done playing and there's this family and kids, they have no idea what to do or how to handle it. Or, you know, what do I do now? So, uh, it sounds like you made that transition pretty pretty smooth. So what point in your career? Yeah. When you were in the NFL, where do you really got into wine? You know? Because, I mean, everybody has been out like you're young, you've had some wine, but to where you really say, oh, I understand it. I get it, I want to do this. Yeah. I mean, there were, you know, first of all, you know, with, with two parents who were schoolteachers, there certainly wasn't a lot of wine around. There certainly was a good wine, you know, if it was, it was wine, you know, it was a dollar, Magen David. Yeah, exactly, exactly. So it was not, it was not something that was, that was part of my life growing up. Um, but you know, same is exactly what you said. You know, you get, you get into the league, you have a couple of nickels in your pocket and you go out to dinner. We're like, oh, well, we should have some wine because that's what people do when they go out to a nice dinner. Um, you know, so really only do we drink some winds were supposed to. Um, but kind of part way into probably, you know, your four or five started to like get into a little bit more and, you know, collects wine and, and all that. But um, probably the turning point for me where I started to figure out, okay, maybe this could be something, um, uh, that I could get into, you know, later as a business. Um, you know, we have guys come over to the house and I would just tell him to bring a bottle of red wine and so guys would go grab something invariably would be, you know, some from, from California or something from bordeaux or, or whatever. You know, some guys would try to show off, other guys, would try to sneak a cheap bottle and we all know, well, we all know those to those teammates, right? There's some guys, we're gonna puff their chest out and try to show and then there are the guys are just gonna be cheapskate. Uh, but anyway, they would come over the house, we would do blind tastings at the house just for fun, right? We put all the lines and paper bags and we would just taste...

...through them and pretend to be wine dorks. And uh, well, I discovered that my hometown Walla Walla was actually making wine. Right. And matter of fact, you know, one of my next door neighbor's was, was Leonetti cellars, which were, they were making these, you know, really highly regarded wines, uh, that we're getting big scores and all this stuff. So I would always sneak a wall wall of wine into the mix with these big boys from napa and these big boys from Graco. Every time I did that my hometown winds would win the wine tasting. You know, we do the big reveal at the end and we through like, it was like, oh shit. The one that we liked was lee and Eddie or the one that we liked was, you know, Pepper Bridge or Woodward Canyon. Um, and so I think for me that was like, oh, wow. You know, my little hometown with the funny name that I couldn't wait to get out of. Uh, it's all of a sudden, you know, growing wine grapes that are making wines that can compete with the best in the world. Um, and so that's sort of when the light bulb went off, like, okay, maybe we could do something here. Um, you know, we got the competitive advantage of going back to your hometown where you can hopefully get the right people to work for, you get the right piece of dirt, all that stuff. You've got the marketing story of it being my hometown, which is a huge piece of it and that's how you came out the name. Double background. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. I grew up people that's the football term, right, quarterback, halfback, fullback, double back. Like, no, it's not that we wanted, we wanted the story about to be about returning home because there was a stigma attached then that's that's less true now attached to athlete wines, where, you know, most of them weren't very good, to be honest with you. Most of them were endorsement deals, you know, you know, you go slap your name on a bottle of somebody's, you know, third wine that they're trying to get rid of and, and uh, and so we didn't want the story, They were gift wines. They were exactly a matter of fact, I just, I uh I doubt Freddie Biletnikoff will ever hear this, but Freddie was a guy that I got to spend time with when I was a little little kid and there's always been a hero. But recently, um somebody gave me some of Freddie swine um as a, as a gift and uh, I actually opened a bottle and it's like, oh dude, no, no, no, this, this just has Freddy's picture on, it goes on the show. Yeah, it's number 25 it's Freddie signed one and that's the, that's where it's going to be a trophy forever and ever amen. But, but you know, we wanted the story to be about, you know, small town kid that grows up and is fortunate enough to go, you know, have a career and then doubles back and comes back home. Um, and, and I think that started to resonate with people. The best compliments ever are, you know, people that, you know, we'll reach out or like, hey, I had the one really liked, I had no idea you were involved until I turn the ball around. I really liked the wine. And then I found out you were involved like, okay, that's cool because, you know, you're not into this, you know, because you're trying to be nice that. And then I got the super backhanded compliments from old teammates, you know, who would buy the line because they had to, you know, before you got to support your guy and then I get these tax, these phone calls, like, dude, I had the wine, it's actually really good. So you're surprised you thought I was going to make some shit wine. They're like, well yeah, kind of uh but it's been uh, it's been, it's been a cool ride man. It really has. You're like, you're like, it has nothing to do with me. It's all about the ground, the soil and how they grow the grapes. So I love your show that you did about talking about how you have different patches of grapes and then they're close together, but still they produce a different flavor tones tan and all that stuff that come through the soil. So absolutely, you know us a little bit about which one is your favorite? Like are you a cab guy or you a chardonnay guy? Which one's your favorite? Yeah. You know, if I'm gonna, there's only going to be just one forever and ever amen. It would be cab and uh, you know, I think it's, and it also happens to be, and I don't know if this is, it's sort of the chicken or the egg conversation, right? Do I like cab because that's what Wallawalla does best. Um, um, you know, or do I like cab and so when we started growing cab, you know, but whatever, however, that pieces together, that's that, that would be the one if I'm gonna just drink one forever. And it's, it is kind of interesting though in our valley. Um, You know, you talk touched on this just a little bit, but you know, it's a small little valley 20 miles wide, um, like a big 20 mile wide bathtub. But within that, you know, in very close proximity are these radically different soil types and growing. Um You know what the french call terroir where you, you know, you get different aspects to the sun, different hillside um, elevations. Um, and so you can take all...

...of that stuff and you can put it together and the goal at the end of it is to make something that gets more and more interesting, the more time you spend with it rather than being, you know, a stereotypical football player wine that just just punch you in the face. Big fruit, big big alcohol. Just, you know, I said, we wanted to produce something that had some subtlety and some nuance and some balance that got more interesting over time and then, you know, as, uh, uh, one of the coolest pieces of it and we touched on this a little bit earlier, um, was discovering that a lot of the things that were important in quarterbacking a good football team, um, and being part of a good, good organization carried over very directly into business and specifically into the wine business. Um, and uh, you know, probably at the very top of that was putting together the right team, you know, shoot man. You and I were you and I were really good at our job, but we were only really good at our job if we had five badass dudes in front of us giving us some room and some amazing dudes downfield that were open and where they were supposed to be, when they were supposed to be there. Uh, if that happened, you know, pretty good, uh, if that didn't happen, we weren't very good and, and uh, and for me it's the same in the wine business, I just have some great people around me that make me look good. Yeah, you know, um I was looking at your story a little bit, it's pretty amazing how you built that team and then, you know, each set of grapes has their own little people that handle it and you have to find those people that want to do that that want to be there, you know, and I think that's the same way, like when you're building a team, it's not only us on the field, there's, there's the, you know, the people that are finding all the guys that need to be unfilled with us, the coaches are putting all the plays together, you know, because you can't do it all and so what's your favorite part of being in this business, like obviously drinking it is, you know right now, but but what's your favorite part? Is it like, is it is it like saying okay, this is how long it has to be in a barrel or like there's so many different parts to it, it's always very interesting to me, I think my I think my favorite part is that there are so many aspects to it, so I mean that's sort of a sort of a cop out answer, but it's actually really the truth, so um you know, we're in real estate first, you know, we were actually in the process of looking to acquire more land um right now um then we're farmers, we have our own farming company which is a really cool aspect to what we do because we um you know we're sustainable across the board and that you know the most important piece of that is sustainability with our people where our farming crew, we hire them year round and then they work for us year round, we've got health benefits, retirement benefits and they are, but because of that they take care of our ground and take care of our minds better than any other crew in the in the in the region. Um so we're farmers second and then we're into production and that's where you get into all the nuance of the winemaking process, which again I know just enough to be dangerous if you give me some work, if you give me some world class grapes um I could go make you some perfectly average wine um but I've got great people that actually take you know world class grapes and make great wine, but then you're into marketing and brand development and sales and customer service and um fulfillment and problem solving. And so when you put all those things together, because there's a quarterback, you know, to the uninformed people think, oh well you just, you just throw the ball like, okay, well that's, that's about 5% of what a quarterback does. Uh you know, and I used the illustration, you know, we all watched Peyton manning at the end. Um He won a super bowl and he couldn't throw, like I know Elway was sitting up in the box watching Peyton on the field. He's like, I'm sitting up here in a suit and I'm 60 years old and I could still go down and throw better than that. But Peyton was still able to, you know, win a super bowl, right? Um and so you know, when you, when you, when you look at uh the wine business, you know, it's it's really fun because it's never static. Um And it's also seasonal. I was thinking about this the other day, I've never had a year that I remember in my life that wasn't just entirely dependent on the seasons, you know? Yeah. You know, we're young. It was that that meant, well it's fall, so it's football season, it's winter, so it's basketball season in spring. So for you, it's baseball for me as track season and then summertime, you know, his vacation. So Um my life was always seasonal and then you go play pro ball and it's very seasonal. You're either in season or off season. Uh and now in the wine business it's extremely seasonal again. So I don't know what I would do, honestly, I don't know how I would survive if you told me that 12 months out of the year we're going to be the same. I wouldn't I probably go...

...crazy. You know. I would not. Yeah, it would be it would be very tough and and um I love that idea of it being seasonal and obviously wine a seasonal and there's so many components to it and you know um I had Will who's uh what's Wills Blackman? Will Black. Yeah. So will we were talking about you know one of the hardest part about being in the wine business is selling the line like yeah you can make wine but if nobody wants to buy it or you can't market it and get it out there or ship it, it doesn't matter. So that all that all that has to has to kind of be fun. But also we be very nerve wracking. Yeah. You know, well remember, you know we had our first vintage uh in the bottle and we hadn't even put it, you know, hadn't even attempted to sell a bottle yet. You know, we bottled it and then we then we uh we generally after it goes after it goes to bottle will hold it for like six months before we actually release it. Um So the first day we had, you know, the wine in the bottle, brought a bottle home and sat down just my wife and myself and we sat down and was sort of like this moment of truth, like, okay, just the two of us shared a bottle. And so we're just kind of sitting there quietly having dinner and stepping on the line. So I finally I look around like, so what do you think she was? Well, I hope people buy it, but if they don't, I like it. So we got a lot of wine to drink. Uh But yeah that that piece of it um You know, so people have asked, how do you replace the competitiveness of football in your life, where do you go for that? And like, well I left football actually got into the most competitive industry in the world by products. Q It's the most competitive in the world are 50,000 unique bottles of wine made worldwide on an annual basis. And so to try to stand out as one of one in 50,000 man you gotta compete all day every day and are and it's been fun for us to the team we put together. Um It's not part of the interview process, it's not a question that we asked in the interview process, but they're almost all athletes, like team oriented athletes. Uh Matter of fact I hope who uh is the er director of sales for the double backside of our business? Um She and her mom went into the Walla Walla High School Hall of Fame on the same day. Really? That's really cool. So we've got theirs to Walla Walla High School Hall of Famers on our team, I get to be one of those, let's go Blue devils. And uh and then uh and then uh and then hope so, but but our team, you know, they they're competitive as hell, and in really good ways, they're never trying to, you know, stomp on our neighbor. As a matter of fact, they're always trying to build up our neighbor, our neighbors around us because we want everybody to to do well, we just want to do better than everybody else. And uh by having that super competitive team, especially on the sales side, um you know, allows us to stay at the, at the front of the, front of the line. Oh yeah, You want Walla Walla to be that name. Um, if it's an individual person, it's probably a lot harder. But you know, napa, there's a ton of people their right or Wallawalla if your whole community is doing well, everybody's gonna know, hey, we need some wine from Walla Walla. Absolutely. It's the biggest difference from my, uh, a lot of similarities, the big, biggest difference from our previous life that you and I lived to, uh, to the wine business, You know, in football, you want your competitor to lose and you want him to lose as bad as possible, right? You know, I mean like, like, especially if it's the jets, right? You want the jets to lose 520 every single game and never ever win another one. Right? Well, that kind of comes true sometimes. Yeah. Right. Yeah. It doesn't break my heart at all. Um but in in the wine business, you know, if my neighbor does well, it's good for me, right? And so and so uh, you know, and our community really embraces that where we're always supportive of the other people in our community, other businesses, our community because it's it's actually good business um to have my neighbor. Um if you wanna make better one. Yeah, I would think so. So true. You know what you had, you had amazing career in the NFL. I want to congratulate you and all that and all that success and then now you have an amazing career in your second, you know, job business that in in the wine industry and that you can't say that for a lot of guys and you're doing something special that I think a lot of people enjoy, and I appreciate you taking the time to tell me a little bit about your story, on how to up with gus Absolutely, man, Well, we got to uh we need to get together and drink some wine, but because, I mean, for it, at the end of the day, that's that's the reward for for this cool business I get to be in. Um but you know, I will tell you, man, and I know that uh that you would echo this man. What what crazy...

...cool ride. We've gotten to go on the internet. I mean, jeez, man, you think about when you're a little kid, you're, you know, you're out at recess, you know, throwing the ball around, throwing a nerf football around, and you're pretending, like, remember way back when I remember, you know, I wanted to be terry Bradshaw because terry Bradshaw before, like the Draft class in 83, it was Terry Bradshaw. He was the guy, uh, especially for you in Pennsylvania was my number. That's why I have my number. Yeah. When he came to, when he came to Washington and interviewed me and how you talked about like those guys, when he came and interviewed me in Washington, I was kind of in awe, right? Because there's a guy I always watched on every sunday morning. Absolutely. You know, and you think about that, you know, and you know, you and I got to do that man. I mean, how freaking it's crazy. I mean, it's just crazy. And then, uh, you know, for me to go from there and then to be able to, you know, go back to my hometown and you know, call my second career, you know the wine business. I mean, shoot man. It's been, uh, it's been a crazy ride. I've been, uh, I've been, I've been extremely blessed in my life in so many ways and um, and I truly don't take it for granted. I, I really appreciate it. And we'll come up, we'll take a bottle of wine up, we'll go see my old best man, john freeze up in court Elaine and go see coach coach price and we'll have some wine with them and it sounds like a good time. Heck Yeah man, we got to get back together with freeze. I haven't seen freeze in about 15 years. I see some pictures every now and then. Um, but you know, love freeze and uh, yeah, come on out man. We'll show you a good time and we'll drink some good wine, maybe hit a golf ball or something. Yeah, I love it. So tell tell of our guests uh you know how they can follow you and how they can find your wine. All right on. Yeah. Thanks man. Uh Just the instagram stuff is just at Drew Bledsoe. That's B L E D S O E. Uh And then on the wine side it's just double back dot com. Go find us there and then you know if you go there we actually we actually have three separate and distinct wineries. Um but you go to double back, you can find the other stuff too. Um So it sounds like you're growing, it sounds like you're growing. I wish you the most success and thank you again for sharing your story right on ghost man. Great to talk to you about it and look forward to seeing you here in the pacific northwest here before too long. I would love it. I would love it. My wife and I will be driving the airstream out soon. Oh, there you go. We've got a good spot for you to park the airstream right on the property. I love it. You can roll it up and we don't have you got to go dump your own septic. We don't let you do that. But before we get there there you're good, good, good. But we've got we've got a great spot with some great views right in the vineyard where you can park the trailer for a little bit. I love it. I think we have our we're gonna have our little wine cellar in the whole back of the RV. That's what's gonna power us through. I love it, man, I love it. All right. Drew thanks again man, I appreciate you. Hey everyone, thanks for joining us. Another great episode of huddle Up with Gus. I want to thank Sounder FM and I also want to thank 16 31 digital News Studio and super producer brian, Happy birthday to terry and thanks again. Ian for doing all of our social, everyone have a great day and we'll see you next time. And that's a wrap sportsman. Thanks for joining in the fun at the 31 digital studios for another actually, huddle Up with Gusts featuring 15 year NFL quarterback. Gus parent huddle Up with Gus is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available on Apple Music.

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