Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 10 months ago

Doug Flutie

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to the Huddle with 15-year NFL Quarterback Gus Frerotte! In today’s huddle, Gus welcomes a fellow quarterback, Doug Flutie and the two share notes on what life was like leading the charge down the gridiron. Gus then dials back the conversation to Doug’s younger years and what led him to a life of sports and how playing football at a young age helped shape him. This episode is full of insights, exciting recollections and even some prognostications on how this season will end up across the NFL. Thanks for stopping by today’s huddle with Gus Frerotte and Doug Flutie!

Hey everyone welcome to another episode of Hello up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know some people say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read. 16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latest news, sports music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favorite podcast. Follow up with Gus check it out today at www. 16 31 digital news dot com. Huddle up with Gus is brought to you by Vegas sports advantage clients of Vegas. Sports advantage are winning big in 2021 you can be a part of the winning two. As of june 1st $100. Bettors are up $3700 500 dollars betters are up $18,500 and $1000 betters are up $37,000 and $5000 betters are up $185,000. Become a client today. By clicking the link in the description below and use promo code, huddle up To take 25% off your package today. Thanks to our partnership and ready. So today's guest, I can't wait to talk to him doing all the research on this guest has been amazing. Uh you know, I can't believe that if you start going through his resume it's amazing. Uh I played 15 years. He's played way longer than that but he's played in three different leagues. Uh He's set all kinds of records. He's almost in every Hall of Fame. Uh, you name it, He's done it and he's still doing it today. So our guest today doug flutie doug. How you doing buddy doing? All right guys hanging out down in florida. Being a bum trying to get some start. We had great waves this week and a little surfing in play a little baseball on that fun. So do you have a short border along board? Uh, the boards gotten longer over the years? And because I live in Melbourne Beach, right Beach about an hour and a half north down to our inlet, basically a little south of area is called the shark bite capital of the world. So we see more than our share of sharks. So I've gone basically to stand up paddle boards and you know, I have smaller like an eight ft paddle board and catch the waves on that. Stay away from the sharks. Yeah. I don't really want to get too close to those guys, right? Like we put it up to them. I don't want to leave it up to that. Right? My friends who live in, uh, right below you in, uh, in jupiter, they were saying that, you know, it's like winning the lottery, you just go in and what's the chances of you winning the lottery? And it's the same as like if you're going to get bit by a shark and I'm like, that's not a chance. I'm willing to take it all, Somebody wins the lottery every time, right? Yeah. Right? Yeah. Every day, someone who win the lottery, there's a lot of sharks out there. I'm like, no, thank you. I definitely don't want to do that. Most, the most recent, most recent I caught a wave. I was kinda at the end of the day and I was thinking about going all the way in the shore, decided no, I'm going to turn out of the way. As I turned out of the wave to my left, there was a 5-foot shark in the wave and I swear it seemed like my board must have hit another too fast and quick. That would never happen to go under. As I saw that I peeled back around and just rode the wave onto the sand and ran off the border. But they're, they're, they're all over the place that, that has to get your heart pumping. Like if you see that right below you, like it affects your balance, you get better balance or where you get like a little nervous if I think like there's fishy days, there's days where there's schools of fish and things and you're, I go in and don't fall off the board mode and very conservative about what we have to catch because I want to make sure I'm gonna be able to get out of the wave and stay on the board and all that. Um but I mean we've we see during certain times a year, there's spinner sharks and black tips they're migrating and they're all over the place and we see them jump all over and we're still out there surfing. Like my philosophy is is I want to stand up. Most the other guys are on short boards, they're like sitting waist deep in the water there, stark bait, right? So it's peter dangling. I'm not doing that man. No way. And that's amazing. You're on a it's almost becomes the same for you when you're on a paddleboard, stand up board when you're surfing, you just got to kind of manage the stick now right? Yeah, that's just, you know, instead of having the hardest part about surfing is when you catch the wave, you've got this flit second as you catch it to come down the face of the wave where you pop up and turn and as you, as you get older, the backs tighter, that gets harder, a little more difficult. And this now you're gonna stand up now my stand up smaller and a lot of guys surfboards, but now I use the paddle to get into the wave and I'm already up. Yeah, you catch the wave earlier, you ride the wave longer and you stay with me is that like, well you said before the show that you you served and you played baseball is that kind of your main form of exercise now because that's the best way to do it right? Get in the weight room. It's not fun like doing that would just be a blast. Yeah, I'm not a weight room guy. It never was just had a reunion with a bunch of the...

...boston college guys and and you know, they were all making the joke that doug still doesn't know where the weight room is and can't find it. Yeah, I mean that's that's my work. I hate pure workouts for working out rather activities and go way I do it, I hear you. So you stayed in your long career. You seem like you stayed pretty injury free through your whole career. You know, I say that I was lucky. I did play 21 years. I've retired at 43 years old. Um, But when you go back, I had four surgeries on my left knee to scopes so early on the knees, I had a lower back surgery, ahead Tendon reattached to my elbow, cracked a couple ribs, head of this. But you know, you start, you play 21 years, you make this long list. But no, I'm intact. I still feel really good. I can run and throw and uh just blessed to be able to because I've seen some guys, I mean guys that, that struggle walking already have two new hips and a new knee and proportionate this replacement that so you know from that were going on your hips or knees? Uh well my left knee, I need a replacement so that throws your whole body out of whack. So I gotta do some work just because I really don't want to go through another surgery when you've been through like 14 of them, you know what I mean? And then um And then my shoulder needs completely done. I have a labor man, a rotator cuff tear and my right throwing shoulder so I couldn't really throw a football in like 10 years just because I can't because it so I just try to long as I can golf. I'm alright and go fishing like you like the surfboard, I like to go fishing the one yeah someone coming down, your friends of jupiter will meet up down there because the fishing down, I'm not a fisherman but I'm willing to learn. Alright. One thing for me, my arm is you know, I think I tore the 10 and had to reattach when I was like 33 34 years old and it was like starting over it was like I was back to being a 20 year old throwing the ball so my arm still works for whatever reason and that's why you're playing baseball now, that's amazing, I mean that you know it's not the same as being in front of a you know but out there but you still get that intensity like a lot of us don't get that anymore. Uh It's uh we play these tournaments all that, we just got back from Fort Myers, we got another one going on out here at the Washington nationals old facility here in Melbourne coming up next week or at the end of the week and these tournaments where guys come from all their like 60 70 teams, it's the Roy Hobbs World series, we play at JetBlue Park, over where the red Sox spring training is and all the red sox fields and all that. It's really, it's, it gets you going, it's competitive. You know, there's some former minor leaguers guys that can, can rate God, there's a, you know, and then there's the old guy too. I mean it's the Advil tournament, you know, there's gonna be a strain that's going to be a torn achilles somewhere. Yeah, it's not, it's not a kegger anymore. Everybody's passing around the Aleve now, Not like not like we were young, like everybody's going to have a drink now, everybody's like, hey, you need some medicine like before you even start, I get that, I get that. But you know, I want to talk to you a little bit like you lived multiple places growing up, you were born in Maryland, you moved to florida. Um, your dad was in Aerospace and then all of a sudden you go back up to two boston, like assume that you had a lot of fun in florida when you were living down there because even in, when you were in junior high you were winning everything. Yeah, I live, you know, I was just living a block from the beach, a block from the river in florida basically in the town that I am now Melbourne Beach and you were outdoors all day, all day outdoors running around playing you know and I played all three sports for basketball, baseball and football and it was nonstop and it was just a way of life, you know, it's like you're throwing up reports, your dress and you just go and I think that really lent to my athleticism growing up and then my father decided uh yeah he didn't like the school system's down here and wanted to get up north to the boston area as I was in junior high school. He knew he knew more than I did. He, he knew all three of his sons were pretty good athletes and you know, wanted to give us the best chance. And we went up, my, my older brother played division one baseball, my younger brother played at boston college. The wide receiver spent three years in the NFL and a bunch of years in Canada playing from what is he like, he's like fourth in Canadian football and receiving or something. He he left the CFL is the all time leading receiver. That's amazing and he did a lot of great, he was like one of those 5 10 slot backs that had the two way go and running option routes with a little shake and he was Wes Welker before Wes Welker. Exactly, he was exactly all right. So you and your brothers all have extreme athleticism and we know that well which one is the smartest of all three of you because I know that's what you guys go after all the time now there's no doubt and this people don't believe that my older brother Bill is the smartest of all. He was a Brown university ivy...

...league. I write, my brother, Darren was the best athlete by far. Darren was like a step faster than me, he was much stronger than me. Um I kind of had a combination of the two and I don't know I had to drive for sure, but I don't know, I want a little more. My younger brother speed and my older brothers had mhm Yeah, I mean, so what is the, my older brother is 63, right? My younger brother. And yeah, we're 5 10. So I know you guys have to challenge each other when you, when you get together, what's the game you play basketball? What do you guys play? It's usually us against the world, we go to these tournaments together and really older, my older brother plays third. My younger brother has always been the shortstop and on the second baseman that and you couldn't have the discussion even though my arm was stronger as we got older, you could not have the discussion. Darren is the shortstop, that's the way it is. You don't even bring it up. And finally the last tournament. Um he's like why don't you take short? I mean we're all, he's in his mid-50s, I'm 59, my older brother's 60. Um so you guys all live near each other. Uh you guys all live near each other. My older brother lives down here in florida right near me and my younger brother is still up in boston will fly down for some of the tournaments. Oh yeah that's good. He loves the cold then. Uh it's it's family. It's always you know his son played at boston college, his he works up there and just for him it was more job related than anything to stay up in the boston area. Yeah, yeah, no I get that. So you're at, how do you say fanatic? Natick natick high school? Say I need that boston now we got, I don't have any accent because I was like a sportscaster. You have to be vanilla. I played lived everywhere. But So you're at natick obviously you play three sports, were you recruited in any other sports? I was recruited for basketball. Basketball was my first love. You know it was a point garden. Um but I was really a division to one of a kind of kid for for basketball but I was getting recruited the same for football. It was like I give league schools and Holy Cross and U. Mass and new Hampshire and then real late in the recruiting season boston College head coach resigns. The guy that was up in Maine Jack McNeill got the head job at boston College and started scrambling to get athletes and the two quarterbacks he really wanted when elsewhere and then he offered me, it was my only division one offered really. It was like steve teach went to Syracuse Pete muldoon Washington D. C. Kid went to Holy Cross, they bring in a quarterback and uh they offered me figured out and could change positions. I don't um Holy crosses up there by you. Right. It was, I wouldn't want to go there because it's something like the side of that hill, that mountain and you have to walk everybody's like no I wouldn't want to go there. I went to Tulsa, it was nice and flat. Yeah. Holy Cross is right then. That was actually a rivalry of boston College is really that mr it was Right 40 minute right out of the city and back in my years. Holy Cross was really good football. Um there were one double a school I think they had an undefeated season. The year 40 Lakh bomb was he was uh yeah he got in the mix for the Heisman all that kind of stuff but they ended up dropping football after a few more years. Yeah, so it seems like you know like I played every sport, loved everything. I thought about going to a smaller school to play baseball and then, you know, a few football scholarships came through and I got far away from home. I wanted to get away. But you know, it seems like when I went to school right, I didn't really have incredible expectations of what I should do, where it should be, where I was going. I just love playing sports and doing everything and I feel like that's how you kind of went to boston college with the same attitude. Oh yeah, well I went to boston College and I thought I really thought I belonged to an ivy league at that level and I went to BC thinking I'll never see the field. I mean I'm a, I'm looking at all the other quarterbacks, 6364 upperclassmen. We actually had like eight on the roster back then and there's no way I'm seeing the field. I was this close to asking to switch positions just to try to get on the field. You know what I did see it. BC was Alabama was on the schedule. Clemson Miami, uh you know, I want to be a part of that. I knew it was important to me and I wanted to be a part of that. Yeah. And and playing against the biggest teams, you know, we kind of, we were independent of Tulsa as well and we'd always play those big games, which is like okay, I was in double a football in Pennsylvania. Like we didn't, you know, we had like one good player on each team and now you're in college and you're going to play against Oklahoma. Like there was just...

...something about being able to go do that from how I grew up was amazing. Yeah, I mean, I, you know, I was excited when I saw like ivy leg if I went to Harvard, they could play Yale every year and that game would be nationally televised. This is back before they televised every game all over the place. But when I saw the schedule of boston college and be a part of that and be a part of playing at Penn State. First time I walked on the field and played, I was Walking out of Penn State 85,000 people just to see if people in beautiful day. I'm looking around like, Okay, I'm gonna go out here through 200 units, fourth quarter the game, I'm gonna go out here and just be terrible and this will be the last time. But I can at least say I was out in front of 85,000 people And then walk out on the two and play at Penn State. Yeah, that, that would be amazing. I used to, I probably was there one of those games because my cousin mitch um, played at Penn State, he was alignment and he was on the national championship team and then you probably were after him with the Bills. I don't know, he played for the Bills for for like four or five years. I've been early nineties, right? So you're doing Canada. Yeah, but but you know, you're getting back to boston college, like you started having this great career and playing all these games and then your senior year comes around and it seems like you just, you were just the leader, right? You just became the leader of the team. And did you ever just sit back and think about your whole past? Because sometimes I would do that. Like think about like I'm sitting here, I'm going to start to this game against Oklahoma and thinking about where I grew up, you know what it was like and now I'm here to senior and doing all these incredible things. I mentioned that we had a reunion and we're all kind of talking about this stuff that we were too stupid and naive to realize the stage we were on, we went, we went down to Alabama to play and it's like this is fun. Look at if we're in Alabama, who would have thought, you know, we're a bunch of stupid New England Area guys mostly and it's like we belonged at Harvard and Brown and we're playing in Alabama, this is fun and we have a plan and we're going to come from behind to beat Alabama at Alabama, We go to Clemson and head coach Jack, you know, they warned Jack and I, Jack Coach Bicknell at the time, we were talking on the bus on the way to the stadium and I'm like, look at this, there's tiger paws in the highway, look at this, this is cool tiger paul. And we pull him and coaches like, yeah, you know, they, they said that we're we really shouldn't be on the sideline um when they come down off the hill and touch the rock and run down on the field. I go, really, is it? What do they do? They touch this rock thing and come down and that's pretty cool that we got to see this. So, you know, we're out there just taking it all in and not knowing any better and that's why are group played so relaxed and having fun. It was, you know, I became a leader, that I was a quarterback and you had a knack for the last second heroics, like throughout the career, you know, there's two minute drives that was like my wheelhouse, I love, you know, nobody could catch you, that's why. And they're great and you don't have to read courage to start something breaks down, then you can just run around. I never could do that. So I don't know what you're talking about. I'm like the mannings right, they always complain that their dad got all the speed and Peyton and Eli didn't get any of it right? That's kind of how I was, you know what it allows and you see with all the young quarterbacks in the NFL now they're so athletic that they can be competitive right away. They can get on the field, do the quarterback reads and the R. P. O. S and the listen to that and make a team competitive right away. But because all their lives, you've been just the best athlete on the field, they got away with being lazy mentally, gotta catch in order to win at the NFL level. You've got to get that other aspect of the game that Peyton and tom and all those good. Gosh, yeah, right. And you get stuck with one blitz. It'll be the end of you. Right? So, hey, I got Armando here, he asked, he wants to ask you a question, Does Doug look at someone like Kyle um earlier, Russell Wilson where to go? All right, go back. Does Douglas, somebody like Kyler Murray, Russell Wilson say, man, I was then before the NFL involved, I, you know what, I cheer for those guys unbelievably because it's like a little man syndrome. I gotta stick together. It's like, yeah, I proved my point that we can, I wish I had the opportunity to play in the NFL today that the style of offenses, the willingness to electric quarterback run the ball a little more And all that stuff and I say this and I've said 1000 times with podcasts and other things that when I was up in Canada, we were doing that stuff 25 years ago, 30 years ago. Empty sets gun the whole game run game out of the gun. Damon Allen was a quarterback in Edmonton and what Damon started doing was i in that back side in, if he, if he closed he'd pull it naked bullet and I saw a man doing it. So I Damon Allen's Marcus Allen's younger brother. So I started doing...

...that. But then the strong safety position or corner, somebody would come off and come at me. So I started telling the receiver, don't block them, just turn and look for the ball if he leaves you turn and look for it and then we start putting around in so we're doing that our P. O. Stuff without really calling it anything, you're right and and I wish, yeah, that stuff, I'd love to have the opportunity to run some of that stuff in the NFL and see how it would go. Well. I mean now there's a lot more guys that play like you did right in the NFL weather. Um, it's Lamar, Jackson, Russell Wilson, those R. P. O. S are coming in, those coaches, the NFL is made now like college more than it is like it used to be because when you came in, when I played, it was all big play action, you know, running encounters and under center center. I mean how many shotguns? If the only time we ever did shotgun was either two minute drill or like third and long burning a mile or two minutes. And that was it. And I go back to my college station because I just saw Senator Jackie Burke, JR and Jackie goes, you know, we never practiced shotgun. We get in the middle of the game, the most important time of the game. Never done it. And you say I'm in shotguns just if we never practiced gun, we were always under center in practice and then those situations and I said, Hey, I'm in the gun. He's like, you know, he'd freak out because he's never done it. And yeah, and it's amazing how much I was under center when I look at some of my NFL films well and I think when you're under center all the time and then all of a sudden you gotta go to shotgun, it's a whole different view and trying to see people and all that. Like you people don't realize that five, your big difference. And when these guys are in shotgun all the time now they get so good at it right? Because they've been doing it since like their little kids, especially as a shorter quarterback, the further I am away from the offensive line to better my vision. So I would take deep drops and your coaches give me a hard time because I wasn't taking discipline drops and I couldn't give a straight answer as to why I did it, it was just an instinctive thing to find a way to throw the ball and see and whatever I was doing, but then you get a gun and you're away from that and it opens things up. I always hate it, I hate it. Double moves double move like a slant and go hit and go because I'd have to, I'd have to set quick, give the pump fake and reset and the old line would be in my lap, it just would look like and uh you know, you start finding things that work for you and things that didn't. Yeah, no, I agree with that. You got, you got to know your strengths and your weaknesses and always trying to prove I wanna, I wanna go to this one because you know, you had such an amazing career and they build this amazing statue because what you did at boston college, obviously the Miami game, the last second touchdown, but it's more overall your whole career, your, that they've been built out because of one play, but they built that because your career was amazing when you're standing in front of that. What do you feel like I'll tell coach bicks said this, but the day they unveiled the statue at that, you know, we had a little ceremony, a bunch of the guys are there, my coaches there, he stands next to me, leans over and whispers in my ear, I thought you had to be dead to have a statue. You know, you're right. Maybe it's pretty, I mean it's, it's pretty cool. I, I, you know, I end up going to a lot of games and on the way out you walk past this statue or near it and I'm usually taking a picture or sign an autograph over here and it's hard to get somewhere. And then all of a sudden, you know, people might come over to flock a little for the audit and like, you know what, screw it. Let me walk over in front of the statute. Let's do this. Right? And it, after every game, I end up sitting and signing in front of it for a while. But it's, I mean, I'm just amazing. It's the coolest thing ever and they should have one on the other end of the stadium of Gerard catching the ball. Oh, that would be really cool. Like both of you. But you know, one of the things I read about like after that game happened and after that amazing play, um, like school admissions went up incredibly like all these things happen because like you said before, the games weren't televised barely and this game was televised. Like one of the only ones at this big, big moment and you made it even bigger, which was really cool. Yeah. We, uh, we were very, we had three nationally televised games. My senior year. Um, are north Carolina game are Alabama game and the Miami game and not to mention the cotton bowl. Um, so the school raped in a lot of money for tv revenue compared to what was going on at that time. Um, they refer to it now is the flutey factor of what an influence or in a university and what I, I forget what the percentage of admissions that went up. But what it was, you had to be in the top 23 to 20% of your class to get into boston college after my senior year, you had to be in the top 3% of your class to get in. It became so competitive to get in. And uh, you know, it raised because I remember there...

...being one of the professors wrote an article in a school newspaper that you know, we're selling our soul to be successful in football and it was exactly the opposite because of the success of the football program and upgraded the education. Yeah. Yeah. That's smart. I mean don't you wish you could have, they would have an I. L. S back when you were playing there. Like you would, you would have had every person in boston coming at you man. It was crazy when I was in college. We are family. We had nothing. We, I mean if I didn't get a scholarship I wasn't going to school right. And the fact that I was on campus, I was on scholarship, I could eat three meals a day. I could eat like I had food and I acted anytime I want. Yes. I thought I had the world, you know, I couldn't imagine having a name and like this situation where I was getting endorsements while I was at school. I know that would be crazy. Like, like I was happy with my dad would send me $50 to college, right? I'm like, oh, me and my buddies were gonna go eat like you don't get to do that. So now it's like, could you imagine like the kid from Oklahoma, I think did a million dollar deal. Oh my Lord, I didn't hear that. But that's, that's amazing. And all the power to him. I worry, I worry that it's going to change the haves and have nots of college football, like there's going to be, there already is a discrepancy because they're able to, the programs that are winning, uh, perpetuated. You know, they're getting all their best kids and they're continuing the wind. Um, and now you're at a big school where you have boosters that are nuts about their football program and promising these endorsements opportunities and they're just going to keep getting the rich will get richer and the others, I potentially see someday there's a divide happening of almost like a one double A level and you know, the big boys, I don't know if that's gonna happen, but well and I also feel for all the other sports in those schools right there. You know how are those kids that don't have any money that aren't doing anything, they might be playing you know girls softball, volleyball, all these other things they probably are not getting any of those opportunities and and someday they'll go I feel bad for them so they'll give him something and it's like 50 bucks for this or 100 kids get your good money. Um. Yeah that's and it's always been that way at the college level that your football and basketball program carry the rest of the athletic department arrest. You know the olympic type sports just you know they're not raking in the money. They're not bringing in the fan base, they're not having a tv revenue. Um So they rely on their football and basketball program to bring in that revenue to support the rest of the programs. Yeah I think the N. C. A. Opened up like it would be like if you were on a surfboard and you're paddling out in the middle of a bunch of blacktip sharks. Like you just opened up this whole can of worms like I don't want to I don't want to really swim in that. No no turn around paddle back in. Yeah so you know you talk about your your parents and your humble background, you really didn't have much growing up and then I see the trophy behind you and then you get to that point after your season plus you won you were like college quarterback of the year Maxwell award all these things and I wonder since your parents, you know, we're pretty, it seemed like they were very well educated. Were they? I'm sure they were proud of you, were they more proud of you for that? But you are also up for a Rhodes scholarship. You also won a National Football Foundation scholarship. Like your academics were just a stellar. Yeah sure. Absolutely. They pushed. Um in fact when I made the decision to go to B. C. My parents wanted to go to Harvard, my counselors and teachers wanted me to go to Harvard because I got accepted right? I knew how important football was to me. So I I went, you know the division one level even though I'd probably sit the bench and all that. Yeah, I mean that's something I was very proud of. They were proud of me for that, that I take a lot a lot of pride in the fact that I was in that situation academically and had a chance to um uh you know what, I don't consider myself a scholarship. I'm not an intellectual tom brady is an intellectual to place here, right? I'm a jock and I put in my time to do what it was like a game. I always I studied to pass that test and I get a test and I dump it and I go to the next, you know, it was because I wasn't, I wasn't someone that like took the best notes and prepared the best and all that. But in the last hours, you know, I'd stay up all night, just like your game, right? You procrastinate. And then all right, I'm just gonna do it at the last two minutes and I'm gonna, yeah, yeah, I'll get through this. Look, look how smart tom is he's holding up your box of cereal for you. We're coming to, you know, I remember giving him a natick high school sweatshirt right from there was one christmas and so I gave a sweatshirt and sure enough he's smart enough to throw it on and get a picture...

...of him in it and get it out there and all the kids are back at the high school. Absolutely loved it. And you know, just tell me he's such a good guy and I, you know, things like that, like posting the flutie flakes when I did dancing with the stars a handful of years ago. You look good in those, those stretchy pants and you find out the stretchy shirts are nice. You're always used to wearing the tight ones. Right? Well we're used to these dress shirts, right? Yeah, yeah. And then I got there and they're giving you what looks like a dress shirt to put on and it's got give to it. I'm like, this is what are these things made on? This is awesome. It is awesome. Of course the glam and the blinged out stuff I could do with that was that hard for you doing that dancing, like Oh my God, it was hard. It was like one of the most challenging things you've ever done. You had four, Yes, it was. They give you four hours a day to rehearse with your partner. Mine was Karina Smirnoff, not the baka, but Karina, Karina was probably the most talented dancer in the group. Like she's world class, win world Championships, all that kind of stuff. But when it came to the teaching end of it, she was at such another level. I'm like, bring it down, like, just give me something, I don't, I don't care if my pinkies pointing in the wrong direction or what, Just make sure my feet do the right thing and I don't forget, but we would go for four hours, but we'll get there a little late and she would be texting or instagram, so we got to do something for instagram and then do that. So we'd waste half of the time, which meant in her mind, she had no time schedule, we would eight hours later, we're still rehearsing because I'm not getting it yet. So we went a long, long days, we really did and she was great. She put the time in to get me at least a mediocre and I got through seven weeks. I, my my wife would never let me do that because she knows what kind of I have two left feet and she probably would say you're not embarrassing the family. I embarrassed the family. Week one. We've been a weak one. I've spent week one right, My biggest fear. And I was older. I was in my fifties when I did it, remembering steps like just you know, something new here and I'm remembering, it's not instinctive and I missed, I missed step a little bit in the first dance and then I never miss steps even though I wasn't the most graceful guy in the world. He started to put my feet in the right spot. Right. There you go. There you go. So we got another question for you from Terry. So everyone, if you're listening, please come on, you can claim a spot. You come on and asked Doug to question yourself. But Terry has one here is she wants to know what is your favorite memory of playing in the NFL And your thoughts on the Bills getting to the Super Bowl This season boy, you know the first thing that comes to mind for me was in my first start in Buffalo. I had been out of the NFL for nine years, eight years. It was over nine years between starts and we went the length of the field With under a minute and no time outs against Jacksonville. They were 16 at the time And 1 4th down. I ran a bootleg in and ran it in for the winning score and all that. And that was kind of the moment that I had arrived back in the NFL, what was more important than that was week one, week one, you know, I I just was happy to be on the roster and make the roster that and and rob johnson got banged up and I went in the second half through a couple of touchdowns and put us in a spot to win the game. We go the length of the field, we had a chip shot of a field goal to win it and we missed the field goal. But that was the day that I knew this is gonna work out, you know, this is this is definitely gonna work out. I belong. Uh seeing the Bills, I'll tell you what last year I thought the Bills are going to make a run. They didn't play their best football in the playoffs. Um Yeah, but I love josh Allen. I think they're really good this year. I don't know what the heck happened last week. Oh man. Well he's my fantasy quarterback in our family league and I was like, what are you doing? I really didn't watch the game. I just kept seeing the score. I'm like, are you kidding me? When is it gonna let's go kick it in. What's going on? But I really think there They're a good football team. They're built to win late in season two and nasty when the weather gets nasty, there's still nobody wants to go to Buffalo. You don't want to play there. I, we lined up, we were playing the patriots there And it was snowy and really windy like 35 mile an hour gusts or whatever it was and uh peerless price wide receiver track guy from Tennessee slip. He's out there standing up on film. This wind gust came out blue snow on my face. I remember turning my head to the side for a second Then it died down and going back under center, snap the ball and run of the play on film. Pierre was standing up out there in the two point and got blown backwards three ft and had to walk back to the line of scrimmage and realign. I mean you don't...

...throw that, you don't throw for 400 yards in December in Buffalo. Yeah, no, it's it's it's crazy. And then you watch some of the Old games from the early 90s when they went to four super bowls and and you know what Frank Wright did all those things. I mean, okay, I don't know how they keep from the south, but it's like they never win when they go north. Remember Tampa Bay would always go play Green Bay? They never, they never had have current events affected the ability for you to pay your bills. Has your credit card debt overwhelmed you, has your income decreased because you're working less or have you lost your job. Credit card of America may be able to help you find a solution to this problem. We offer a free no obligation consultation to learn how you can cut your payments by up to half and potentially lower your interest down to zero. Credit card of America is an A plus rated non profit company that will work on your behalf. 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There's a mental aspect of it and you learn later not to put on so much stuff. Finally keep your hands warm and and go, I started wearing gloves. I started wearing gloves to throw the ball. Not because they kept my hands were in fact your hands get cold because you can't put him up under your pads, but it gave me a consistent grip on the ball and I could just let it fly without worrying about my grip. Yeah, that's the worst wearing gloves and trying to get them in your pouch and they are all sticky and you know what I mean? Like that was the worst thing ever. So I wanted to ask you a little bit about the CFl because that is not an easy place to play. Like you mentioned, you played in a dome, but you played for other teams as well. And the weather can get unreal because I have family that live in Canada. My family came through to the states through Canada. So I have a ton of family members in Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, you know, up there and then uh, we're in, you know, outside of Buffalo. So I have family all through there. And my uncle called me one time from Saskatoon. He goes, hey, will you come up and speak at a function we have right after your football season. I said, well what's the temperature right now? He said, it's not too bad. It's like minus 25 I'm like, I don't know...

...who might just stay here where I am. It sounds a lot better, but I mean that, but planning that would be insane. We played a game in Calgary playoff game against And at Kickoff was -24 and was a windy day. It's like 30 mile an hour winds. So it started to snow before the game at halftime. They took an extended half time to plow the field, it's off the heaters to save the propane And we couldn't restart them in the second half. So we went second half of no heaters, it got down to -44 with a -85 wind show. It was the most miserable thing I've ever been through in my life. It was how do you get through like your helmets just gotta be so hard. It was, it was, they're like there ain't why I ever left florida, you know, it's no coincidence. I spent I played in Buffalo, I played in Chicago. I played in New England, I played eight years in Canada at the end of my career, I got to spend a few years in San Diego but I was done being cold. Yeah, I played, I don't I don't know what team I was on because I played for seven but we played you out in San Diego. I played against you when you played for Buffalo, played against you when you were in New England and then we're playing with the dolphins. We come out and play and that's when you kick your your drop kick and I'm like okay, like that's really cool because I always practice dropkick, especially when I was with Morten Andersen we'd always do it, but uh for you to do that in the game. I was like okay that's not only rubbing it in our face, but that's pretty cool. It's like, how do I feel about this? Yeah. Cleo Lemon was one of the quarterbacks. Yeah, Cleo together in san Diego for a year. That's right. That's right. Cleo knew right away when I went out on the field. You, he told me, he said I knew exactly what you were doing and nobody believed me. Um yeah, Chris Berman had seen me messing around doing it in pre games and told Belichick I could do it. And then during the week he came to me actually, this was like three weeks earlier and we're gonna do it on monday night against the Jets. And I went in the game with quarterback With maybe four or five minutes ago in the game. We were up five scores and we were marching down the field and we stalled out about the plus 35 and it was too far. He wanted to do it as a field goal. So we didn't even talk about it for two weeks. I just happened to be standing next to Bill And we were down by 14 about 3-5 minutes ago and he saw me standing next to him. He's like, we score here, You kick it. I'm like, what? He didn't get the sentence out of his mouth and we were already in the end zone and I go, you seriously? Go get it? I grabbed the ball out of someone's hand. I kind of kicked it on the sideline and jogged out on the field. I was 43 years old. I've been standing around for 3.5, 4 hours or yeah, I'll tell you the middle of that field, the middle of the field to was just a dirt ball. I mean it was the end of the year, it was our old grass. She was beat up and the drop, you know, it was, it was a crap shoot. It really was, I happened to catch it flush and went through um, oh yeah, I've done it like, I mean on turf, like it'll hit hit wrong and it's going off the side of your foot, your, you know, there's all kind of things that happened and you piped it in that weather. It uh yeah, I mean, I, I did catch a flush. I pretty consistent from a shorter distance like that because you don't have to take a real stroke, you can just kind of, So the funny thing was the key trailers over the nose of Lonnie packs and our long snap like 23 15. He's like, what are you doing in the game with Flutie? And I'm gonna kick your ask. I'm going to, uh, there was, uh, they called time out, so we end up coming back in the huddle and he's like, he's gonna do it. I said, hey, tell them what we're doing, tell them what we're doing and guys just get him to chill out. So I think there were a lot of these conversations going on up front. I think Taylor was the only guy I sort of tried to rush because if they really rushed that thing and the chances are it's gonna get blocked and he didn't blow him up. He stepped by him, Zack, thomas actually stepped up, Lonnie snapped and step forward and Zach kind of looked over his head and watch the ball go through like, what the f was that? Yeah. Right. And look them in the space, That's a drop kick. Mother hadn't been done in 64 years. Yeah, that's why I was wondering, how many were there in the NFL, is that like, it hadn't been done since like 1941 wow, That's amazing. That just adds to the legend of, of Doug Flutie, which is awesome. Yeah, it's awesome. That's just, you know, that that is, that epitomizes the way I played the game, I think, Oh, exactly. But you know, I recently, I've interviewed a bunch of people that were athletes and they have a band, right? And I'm like, why are all these guys who musically inclined? Like, it's like they have a band. So you have a...

...band called the Flutey Brothers, right? Are you still doing that? We're still doing that. In fact, we're going up to Buffalo in a couple of weeks and doing some stuff up there. Um we are, you know, yeah, it's always all athletes got a band okay. But I've been playing the drums since I was 12 years old. My brother's been playing guitar since high school. Um, our lead guitarist and keyboard player at Berklee School of Music guys, phenomenal musicians. Our bass player's been playing in bands all his life as a professional musician and our lead singer is a guy that's been on broadway and done everything, in fact, is in a broadway show right now, we've got to find a replacement for um, for the Buffalo gig. Um, so surround yourself with talent, make yourself look good. That's, that's like the coaches always say, hey guys, just throw it to the talent, right? Don't try to do too much. Just get to the playmakers. Exactly. So who's your favorite drummer? Who was the guy that you idolize and drumming? I guess, you know, everybody goes back to Neil Perk with Rush that he's the most phenomenal. Um guy, you know, I'm more of a rock drummer. Straight ahead guy. I love Joey Kramer Aerosmith and I love Tico Torres from bon Jovi get biased because these guys are guys that are buddies of mine that I knew over the years and I just marvel the guy that right now is playing with Leonard. Skinner. Leonard Skinner is one of my favorite all time favorite bands and guy named Michael carter baloney that started out as a studio musician and he says price and he goes through his warm up routine before every gig, he does this methodically and he can do anything and then he goes out and just play straight ahead rock and has fun. But he's, he just, I, when I go and sit and watch him play, it makes me want to quit. It's like, why you see people with such genius. Right? So how about when you saw motley Crue and Tommy lee and he's in the drums and you're spinning around, do you think you could do that? Absolutely, absolutely not the Tommy, the Italians Tommy played piano, tom. I had some, great, I was in Chicago playing with the bears. It was my second year in the league. Um, and we had a bye week and my buddy scott McGee from the USfl days, his old doc managed bon Jovi motley Crue. So he's in town and we drive up the Alpine valley, Wisconsin to go see motley Crue and bon Jovi play. And the guys from motley, we're flying over to cedar rapids Iowa to play the next night and then coming back to Alpine Valley. So it's like 33 days, boom, boom, boom. Right, so scott, come on, let's go over, let's go over with the motley guys, we get on the private plane with the motley guys, we fly over to cedar rapids Iowa that night at the show. I'm sitting on Tommy lee's drum riser behind him, rolling and sticks, picking out the good sticks for, hold on, getting his water, getting in there and it was a rush. I got to be the voice of God to and introduce the bomb. Oh really? Oh, that would be awesome. Just did you have to drug, did you have to drug test when you got back off the plane? We all saw the motley crew. Like the whole, they were, they were a different breed. Now they don't drink, I don't smoke, I don't do anything and they are a different breed. Well you don't have to around them, you just, it's just being around them and just you fly back to Alpine Valley and after the cedar rapids gig, we're landing an Alpine valley and we had to land by midnight or the landing strip was closed. It was like one in the morning. No lights on the language, no lights at the airport, we land in the dark and you know, it's going to be, you know, motley Crue and four others go down, right, we made it. We landed. I bet that I mean, I can't imagine doing that. Like I've had to find like Foo fighters are one of my favorite. There are a couple of bands that I've always seen for a lot, but to be backstage with motley Crue, my wife might actually tease her hair up like she was in high school and get her motley crue shirt out with the hairspray and she had to be like her first, her first band was kissed like her first concert. So you know what kind of yeah, I'm not gonna say too much. I don't wanna get in trouble. All right, let's see if we got another question from Armando here. Uh Okay. So who was your favorite player to play with in the NFL? And why I have a guest to say it would have been pretty cool to play with tom brady. But I don't know if that would be a your actual favorite player. The first thing that comes to mind is eric molds is a wide receiver in Buffalo because he got me to a pro bowl. He was an amazing ride receiver and my best years throwing him. I did get the chance to play with tom and I absolutely love it. One of the coolest things ever though, One of the coolest things ever was my first touchdown pass in the NFL was to walter Payton. Uh huh. That that I got his jersey over my shoulder here, an autographed jersey from him. Um He catches the ball, it was a sprint out left and he was in the slot and ran a deep angle corner. Now he's running a deep angle corner and I had to throw it up and over the top. He's in the back of the end zone, straight over his head,...

...catches it drags his feet and slides in the back of the end zone running. Never you never see running backs doing that anymore. They put him out for like either a streak or a hitch. That's it. They don't they don't put him in slot anymore. He could run that he he could fill in a quarterback and throw the ball. He threw the ball as well as a quarterback could throw. He was a tremendous block or blitz. Pick up, catch the ball out of the backfield, like a wide receiver and just a tremendous room. He was one of a kind and the guy that was close to him were in the same ballpark was LaDainian Tomlinson in san Diego. I got yeah, you got to play with some incredible people. So when you were watching, have you ever watched uh walter run and just, you know, he had such a high knee run people over. So do you remember a time where he ran somebody over then? You were like damn, I just had this image of him breaking through the line, coming up a safety coming up to make it and instead of making a miss, he'd stand up straight and high kick, like a high step and then lower his shoulder and helmet and forearm and hit guys with the forearm and just throw him off him. And I just, I guess a lot of times when you get on the perimeter, he did that same move where he'd start to high step and then kick in and go, he was just fun though. I was only with him right at the end of his career. Oh yeah. Could you imagine when he was at his peak? Yes. What? Oh well that's why I went to Detroit. Like I left Washington went to Detroit. I'm like, I want to play with barry Sanders because you want to hand the ball off and just watch them go and right before the season starts he goes, I'm going to retire and I'm like, are you kidding me? You're going to retire now. Like there's some running back you just want to play with. Yeah, those guys are and and walter. Obviously they say about his forearms and just, you know, he had scars on his forearms because he just was always using them to hit people and run and run through. But yeah, just to be able to play with those guys, they're game changers because okay there, you're running back, right? You got a good running game, you've got this guy and you're hammering the ball. But the running backs that can line up and run rounds, You know the 10 routes and for for Walter. Payton corner routes go, you name it. Um It just is a game changer because those are your matchups, you're good tight ends and you're running backs can get these matchups and they can change the game for you. Yeah, I mean that always, I mean I've had, well when we played the running backs were such a big part for us, right? They were just handed off, they're gonna play actions right now. It's just like doing the R. P. R. P. O. S are a little different. I think they don't the running backs don't get that downhill running style anymore. Now it's it's more everything spout space, everything's about numbers in space. You know, in my day we called power, oh and we're freaking running. Yeah we're going right here, you know, we're gonna motion the z receiver down and you're gonna block in. We're gonna have nine guys, we've got 10 guys blocking, we're gonna use what we call the run. I mean we had our run checks and all that, but you know, we ran into loaded boxes all the time and just slamming the ball in there and these guys can tear the ball 30 times a game. They you know, they were we you're off into line with where people down your back will get strong guys like Herschel and bo Jackson and you know, they want the ball the more they get the ball they're gonna break one, they're gonna hammer people down and and then the play action game is your big plays and and passing the football Wasn't the high percentage game that it is now. Now now it's wide receiver screens are pos little this that and these guys are like 70% completions were in my day, you were in the 50% but you probably averaged a lot more per reception. Oh yeah. I mean think about all the guys that the quarterbacks have played around it. So it was all big play action and you know, doing those 25 yard throws downfield. That's what the coaches love. And now it's like, get the ball out of your hands because you know, if you're, if you've got five wives out of your running backs out, you don't get a lot of protection and these athletes, a defensive end now are ridiculous. The guys rushing quarterback are crazy. Yeah, I mean, and they're running as fast as the receivers. It is, it is crazy. Who's pepper Julius peppers? Didn't he run like a 4 to 9 40 or something. Like I went, I went to the Cfl for eight years through the, through the nineties, came back in 98 and I could run a 45 40 I came back at 33 34 years old. Whatever I was, I could still run my 45 40. But now, instead of being defensive back, wide receiver speed, I'm defensive end, linebacker speed, Defensive line backers are running me down and I'm still, it's amazing how fast how athletic everybody's getting. Well the first time I played with the Vikings Jared Allen was defensive end and we go do sprints in the off season. Right. I just get there. We're doing sprints and I line up with the quarterbacks and running backs. That's who always ran together. He lines up with the ride...

...receivers and dbs and is beating them in our sprints. That's how fast he was. The Duke could run. Yeah. It was like, what chance do we have? It's the same principle as an alligator. Don't go in a straight line, serpentine. You know, I could change directions. I was, I was quicker than it was fast. So my only chance is changing direction because these guys are running down. I get in the open field. I'm looking to pitch the ball. Yeah. Yeah. Well before I let you go, I wanted to talk something. I know it's very important to you because I understand it because my niece also has autism. But talking to me a little bit about your son's Foundation and I think it's awesome that you do this. Yeah. I was, I was playing in Calgary and Dougie was about 2.5 years old and um, he was speaking in full sentences. Had full speech. We've got a lot of theories and I'll say that because that's very controversial. But so we went along and when I came to Buffalo and jim kelly and I got together a little bit jim it started the Foundation Hunters hoping and sunday Krabbe disease. And I'm like, you know what? It's, I got to do that. And uh, he inspired it. Then. We started the foundation, we've been going about 23, years now millions and million, $30 million dollars raised. Um just something that's bigger and better than we ever imagined. In fact, I've been out of football now for 15, 16 years. Yeah, we are raising more money today than we were when I was playing and it just really goes and I didn't know, you know, I was a jock, I'm playing football, started doing this. It's like the blinders come off and you realize all the giving people that are out there and all the people that want to help and be a part of it and they volunteer their time and our board members, business guys that take an afternoon off to come, have a board meeting and you are genuinely concerned about what to do with the Foundation and we're just moving forward. We, we focus more on families, services for the fan. We started out doing some research and putting money towards that. We weren't bringing in the money that we make a difference there, but we can make a difference in the individual's lives with their parents. People that are in financial need for support for their Children. What do you suggest? Like? So my niece, um she has asperger's and she has a really hard time connecting with anyone and then she's, she's kind of like the typical, like she only eats three things. She just graduated high school. She doesn't, her family really doesn't know how to help her. What do you suggest? Where can I send her in in a direction to maybe continue her life because she's very smart. Yeah. She just doesn't have the other skills and the social skills are tough. And that's where especially someone with asperger's are high functioning mentally. Sure. But the awkwardness socially causes issues and they deal with these issues through high school through whatever. Because other kids don't really realize there's an issue with this person because they're, they're smart and class, their smartness, they can do this and this. Why aren't they? So they have it a little tougher. My son Doug is very low functioning and, you know, there's no doubt there's some issues there and people are really nice to Dougie and wrap their arms. He's very affectionate from an asperger stamps point. There are, you know, our foundation, we go right to our Foundation and we're clearing out. You can, you can uh, either online through three foundation dot org, get ahold of nick's avarice. Um, we, we helped place place kids and help get jobs and, and all that. And uh, it really, you just want to put them in a situation where they can continue to blossom and continue to have, You know, a fulfilled life. You know, you want them to be able to get the most out of what they have and there are about, you know, there's a whole generation. They're the numbers went through the roots through the 90s into the 2000? The numbers started going crazy. When we first started the foundation, it was like one in 2000 kids was diagnosed with autism Right now. It's like one in 50. Um, so it's great, I mean where we grew up and I don't know if you remember, I don't remember, you didn't see that. Maybe it was because it didn't have the social, we couldn't see everywhere. But I don't remember much of that when I was a kid, you know, and it seemed to have exploded in the last so many years, I mean, And do you work with Dan Marino at all? Because I think he has a son also, right, and Dan and I did some events together back in the 90s. Um, but dan's son actually, you know, he was mainstream schooling by the time he was in mid mid grade school and went on to college, graduated college has been very successful and living an independent life right where our sun will, he's nonverbal, low functioning, he'll be with us. But you...

...know, it just there, this whole generation and I was, I'm going to leave it alone because I said it's kind of gruesome. Um, but there's a whole generation where the numbers went through the roof and there's this whole generation now becoming adult, that's the next the big problem now or the next area is, there's a lot of things and mechanisms in place now for Children to get help right away to get into, to get one on one tutoring hand over hand maybe you knew everything else. But when they become adults, there's nothing, so that's sort of like jobs, independent living or some type of assistant living, something that makes them feel independent and that's the next big problem. Yeah. Like even high schools and colleges are doing more programs for kids that can help them socially and and be part of their colleges because she, I think she, that's what really is afraid to leave home and to take that next step, you know, And I'm trying to tell her like just do online school, just, you love to learn, you get great grades, just do online. But you know, I'm not a parent. So you know, the other aspect of that is there, you know, like I said, assisted living, assisted, you know, something with a little bit of an assistance in short flourish. But um, you know, that's like I said with asperger's, a lot of those kids are sharp and really, really not, you know, mentally like put them in front of a keyboard and let them go in their own independent world. They're like individual world. They're fine. It's that social aspect that, that does give them problems, but you need to develop that a little bit and yeah, I'm not, I'm not an expert on it, but it's just really for those that don't realize the numbers one out of, I think it's, I think it's like one out of 37 boys is on the spectrum. Yeah, it's it's really the numbers are crazy. That is crazy. So how can our fans and people are listening, help you and contribute to your foundation? Go to Flutie Foundation dot org. Um, you can make donations online. We have at least five annual events if you want, if you're in the new England area especially and want to participate in volunteer. We welcome that. We have a road race, We have a gala. We have all kinds of events and things that are my background is I don't like the stuffy black tie affairs. So whatever it's gonna be fun, I have a feeling you're doing a lot of drumming at those functions. You know, the really cool thing and this is cool. You know, we're in the boston area, We've all grown up. There are most of them. Um my band will go set up and we've got guys from J Geils band come in and sit with us. We've got guys from Aerosmith. We've got guys from the band boston. I'm looking at a picture over my shoulder right here. Uh three of the members of the band boston that played with us one night. Uh you know, it just really, we've had a lot of fun and the band thing too. It's just been we've played with guys. We played with Leonard Skinner. We played with Marshall tucker. We played with that is open incredible. And so I've been on stage with bon Jovi and you name it, is that more nerve racking or playing Football in front of 80,000 people? When I first started doing it, it was nerve wracking. Now you're fun and think about the drums is you don't get beat up and you never lose is what is right, and if you have a bad night, the audience probably doesn't even know your band made to do after you go backstage. Help. Were you smoking the night? Yeah, right. But I know our friends at 1631 Digital News put an ad up on their site in D. C. to support your foundation and Terry Terry was behind all that. So we want to help you any way we can, but you know, I just want to say, you know, we never really met uh we played the sport a long time and I'm really a fan you your career was amazing, I mean for God's sake, you were named the greatest CFL football player ever. I mean the greatest, I mean that's amazing to me, thank you. And that league's been around a long time. It's been a shoot, it was over 100 years. It's been around a lot longer than the NFL has been around and there are some legends of that game up there. I got to know a lot of the legend guys from up there, there's a sweet, there's a soft spot in my heart for the Cfl. I love getting back up there to games. It's just it was really, really a cool experience. You know I I know it's eight years that I spent out of the NFL. Yeah, I haven't changed anything for the world class. Well I mean there's not many players that have gone to both and I was reading like were you and Sean linda to where the um something about the last two NFL players right like that. I can't remember the company and I were USfl that's it, that's it, that's what we're us. So I got USfl in Canada and NFL and and Sean and I were the last ones in the league from that. And the thing I'll say about the USFl, we had Reggie...

...white, jim, kelly, steve young herschel holds Kent whole perennial pro bowler. 15 guys from the USFl the year of the U. S. Still folded up. 15 USFL players play in the NFL Pro bowl the next year. That's crazy. Well they did, you were like the highest paid rookie that when you went to U. S. F. L. So that was awesome. I mean your dad was probably like, wait what? How much are you making? I see I was because of my height, I was a real question mark in the NFL and Buffalo was talking about taking me as a higher draft. I was anywhere from the first to 1/7. They didn't know what to do with me. And then when I signed with the because the USfl was a sure thing for me. When I saw the NFL took a deep breath and relax. They were like, okay good, we're not gonna because they didn't know what to do with me. They didn't know whether me, whether I was going to be a free agent. They didn't know what. So it worked out. Yeah. It all worked out. You had an amazing career. You're doing some amazing things now. The Foundation, everyone can go to. It's Doug flutie foundation dot org foundation dot org. You'll find it. Yeah, you'll find it. You can go help him out support his cause it's amazing. Maybe you can catch him and his brothers out playing music one night with, you never know who they're going to have their, I mean, you never know who's gonna be in the crowd. Uh Yeah. So, and if you want to go down to, what is it? Melbourne? You want to go shark hunting with Doug? He'll take you out on the paddleboard. You guys can go shark hunting and have some fun. But your career was amazing. I appreciate you joining me on how to up with gusts and uh, you know, maybe we could do it again sometime after the season and talk about all the good or bad quarterback plenty. You got It sounds good. Alright, Thanks. Doug. I appreciate you coming on man. I love the background. Wait, who's the gold record. Who's that? I didn't get to ask you the record. Up top is an autographed original drum head from the band Leonard Skinner. Oh my gosh, three photographs, Jersey on, on Robin and uh tom brady autographed jersey on Batman. And my Leonard Skinner drum set that the drummer from Skinner JB 20 years ago. Wait, I'll show you the only drum I got. So I interviewed a guy named Mark Schulman, he's Pink. Mark Schulman's Pinks drummer. Nice. But also he was the drummer for Chicago as well. And so I interviewed him and and he sent me this cool drum. It was awesome. We had some good talks man, You're an awesome guy. Thank you so much. I hope you win your league in baseball, throwing those strikes buddy. I refuse to walk anybody because he can't throw it over. I'm gonna tell you what my dad told me night kid, He said gus throw the first one at their head and throw the next one over the plate and I'll always be a strike. He was the middle guy. That's how you played back then. But hey, I want to thank Doug for coming on and joining me. I appreciate everyone. Listen to huddle up with gus check us out next week on super dot events. You can go to sounder FM and listen to my podcast or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast and also I wanted to let you know that we're gonna be starting a contest here that when people sign up and they come on to super, they can subscribe and like, and then you get to come on and do a segment with me and my guests, which will be a lot of fun. So everyone, I appreciate you listening. Uh Jacky, I see you're on there. I hope I said your name right this time but have a great night. Doug. Thank you so much. And we'll see you next week on how to up with Gus. Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a matchup brian here, sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron at the diamond or on the links. We can only say welcome to this week's huddle up with gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchises with 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the games are one. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up. Okay, Sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, It's kick off time. So snap your chin straps on, get ready to huddle up with strange variety. But again, a big play two left.

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