Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Doug Cosbie

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week my guest, Doug Cosbie and I go old school and talk philosophy and mentality of football from the 70s and 80s. He was an all pro TE with the Cowboys and went onto be a coach at many different levels. One story that we heard from Doug epitomizes his philosophy of football.  Doug says you got to be stubborn. You have to work hard in life and in football and he quotes coach Monte Clark “You gotta plan your work and then work your plan.” In other words you create goals to be successful but sometimes you have to have a contingency plan, just like making on field adjustments during a game to get to your main objective.       Doug spent all of his professional playing career with the Dallas Cowboys. Before entering the NFL, Cosbie attended Santa Clara University where he was a three-year starter at tight end. He finished his college career as Santa Clara's top receiving tight end with 120 receptions, 1,721 receiving yards, 14.3 yards per reception and 10 touchdowns. Cosbie was inducted into the SCU Athletic Hall of Fame.   With the Cowboys, Cosbie caught over 60 passes in a season twice during his career and set team records with catches and yards per season and career. He caught 300 passes for 3,728 yards and 30 TD's and also had 22 catches for 243 yards and 3 TD's in 7 playoff games. He still ranks eleventh in franchise history in receptions and ninth in receiving yards.    Doug now works with the IAFA, International American Football Academy. They help International American Football players get scholarships to American Colleges and Universities.  https://iafa.us   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey, Casi x listeners, you got a new show. Come in your way. Join me. Gust rat, fifteen, your NFL QB and host of huddle up with gusts. Every Sunday morning at ten am, I talked to celebrities and veterans and professionals like Matthew mcconaughey and did for Mell about how sports shape their life. Join Gust Barat and his guests in the one thirty one digital news studio on huddle up with gusts every Sunday at ten am here on sports radio. Okay, six, welcome everyone to huddle up with guests. I'm your host, fifteen, your NFL quarterback, gusts fraud. We are here in the new thirty one digital news studio. If you want to learn more or listen to previous shows, you can check us out of our website. Huddle up with Gustscom or you can listen to us on the new RADIOCOM Apple, wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts. While in the huddle, our guests describe how sports shape their life. Now let's join the huddle. Hey everyone, welcome to huddle off with gusts. On your host, guests, Farrat, and thank you for joining us in the huddle today. Today, my guest is, you know, play the game a little bit before me. So back when, you know, Terry Bradshaw says that there were no row penalties on quarterbacks and offensive players. The defense could do whatever they want, and I'm sure dog can testify to all this. But joining me today in the huddle is Doug Cosby. He was drafted by the Dallas cowboys in the third round Hunt and you know, he played. He's been a pro bowler. He's played the game for a long time. You know, he's done a lot of other things. He's gone out, gone into business, been a coach, been a head coach. So I'm really excited to figure out how sports a shape Doug's life. So, Doug, thank you for joining me in the huddle today. I guess it's Nice to be here. And Terry was right, but the quarterbacks had a target on their back and their front chest for a long time. It's a lot better to play that position now, that's for sure. Yeah, you know, it's funny. I was watching some of your highlights on Youtube and they were I think you kint a touchdown passed from Joga boom and he made a great throw and right the announcement for saying like wow, man, the way he came back. You know, they just plastered him on his back right before that, you know, and you see him get up and he has like an elbow brace on and he has all these things. You know, I think the position is definitely a lot different today than it was back then. Yeah, I don't. Yeah, I mean it's so as I'm you know better than me. Is So really tough position to play. But I think physically, I mean, you know, you don't get hit the way you used to, that's for sure, and I don't practice. You know, I only anyone gets within five yards of the quarterback. You know, when I was playing, the quarterbacks can get hit bad and practice, but you know there was guys, you know, really close to him and push it on and, you know, doing really stupid stuff that I think the games lay a lot better right now. Well, I couldn't, man. I mean it. Can you tell her the guests a little bit about what training camp was like back then? I mean, I know it's way different from even when I came in in one thousand nine hundred and ninety four but I can't imagine what training camp was like for you when you came back, when you were in there. You know in the late S, what that was like, because it had to be got to get these guys in shape and where to go. Three days. Yeah, you know, we never won three days. But I was drafted a seventy nine and I mean, you know, the cop was on team I played for. But you know, obviously had a lot of friends and guys have played other places. You talked to I think Dallas is probably as bad as anywhere. You know, I'm a coach. Landry was really big into, you know, condition and running and the most interesting thing, which is just crazy. So my rookie here in seventy nine and the cowboys always signs like, I don't know, seventy free agents. So you would go to training camp with I think there was I think there was twelve rounds, then I can't remember, maybe fifteen, you know, the draft picks and some of the second year guys, guys that have been on Ir and then like seventy free agents, and you'd be there for about two weeks and then they cut half those guys and then the vets would come and you know from high school and College at the end of two weeks to two days you're getting in the game with season started, and you know you don't have to be a genius to figure out, Holy Crap, what we just did didn't mean anything because the vets of just getting here. But we went two more weeks to two days and then we actually played in the hall of Fame Game. So I think it was a fifth preseason game. My rookie training camp was just crazy. You know, in scrimmage a lot before the vets got there, like we scrimmage once after they got there for the week before the first preseason game. But yeah, it was very physical. There was a lot of contact. You know, it was not much different than the kind of training camps two days we had in college, except for this was four weeks of it instead of two weeks. Yeah, you know, and it you just really mentally got physically you will beat up,...

...he just mental you got worn down. You know, realis this. It was crazy, like you were there. We were there I think thirteen or fourteen days and then the vets show up and you're going and the cowboys have been the super bowl to prior year, so you knew every one of them. I mean, you know they didn't know you. You knew every name, every number, you know, because that's that was kind of the peak of America. Seeing there on every Sunday, you know, you started thinking, what am I doing here with these guys? Right? So when you were a kid growing up in California, you probably never thought about that part of it. Right, as a kid, you you see the as you said, everybody kind of has a household name. You have a your fan of somebody and you see all the things done on Sunday, but nothing leading up to that day. So, when you were a kid, tell me about the first memory you have of how you fell in love with sports. Was it an uncle? Was it your parents? Was it just somebody that your buddies out in the backyard? You you always went and played. What was that? What was that like for you? Yeah, yeah, I mean I had a interesting childhood. I grew up in East Palo Alto. We move when I was eleven and he's anyone that doesn't know the bay area, he'St Paalow Watho was predominantly African American working class and neighborhood and my parents were divorced when I was like six. I don't really even my dad has since to sease, and my mom. I don't really know my dad, but it was really my older brother. had a brother who was seven years older than me, who I'm a little over six six. He's about five hundred and ten. He's a way better athlete he was. He was, you know, one of the best athletes in the area growing up. But also, I think my parents divorce and you know, it was pretty ugod. My father was very abusive. He was a bad alcoholic, like physically abusive, and he had a way bigger impact on him, probably than myself and my sister who was a year older than me, you know. So he made a lot of bad choices my brother, but he was a great athlete. So it was. He was played football, he was a quarterback, was a pitcher in baseball, point garden basketball. I'm just really good at all three sports. He kind of just followed him. You know, I played baseball until high school, played basketball the way through high school and started playing football at age ten. I didn't really want to play I didn't like it, but my brother was like no, you're playing football. You know, I was a big baseball Fan Roberto Clemente was kind of my childhood hero. You know, I love the Pittsford pirates, you know, back in the S, into the early S, you know. So I mean I always envisioned myself if I was going to be a kind of professional athlete's never a dream. It was baseball and then I love basketball. But, you know, six six white guy with no shot, no, no ball skills, I'm playing, you know, going very far in basketball. You know, I was, you know, I could rebound and get the little the putbacks and play defense. But you know, you know, in my college roommate was a basketball player at Santa Claar. So I played a lot of basketball with the basketball players, but, you know, I just used to beat him up, I mean my skills. Yeah, good, that's all I ever did. I remember like I was, you know, I was six, four, six five, depending on what day it was, people whatever. But and when I played basketball in the high school, is the same thing, right, that I was running around and I would box out get the rebounds. You know, I wasn't the point guard, but the one memory I have is the one time I was the point guard where I got the rebound dribble. The whole way down the court it's been moving. That made a layup and that's like my whole memory of why I was such a good basketball player. You know, it's kind of funny how that, how that works, but I was definitely better at baseball, at football than anything else. You talked a little bit about, you know, issues that you had at home and you know, you definitely weren't alone. There's a lot of people in this world that have those kind of situations that you had and you grew up with. How was sports a release for you or comfort for you? Did it help you kind of get away from certain situations? Yeah, you mean, obviously it's, you know. I mean you know, it's an escape kind of from, you know, for a couple hours you can get away from, you know, the reality which you know with this whole pandemic that the world's gone through. But in this country, you know, I mean a lot of people had mixed emotions about, you know, sports coming back and playing. But you know, I think it's even as a fan of spectator watching NBA or hockey games in the bubble or, you know, the baseball but no one in the stands, you know, just gives you you know, with three hours to you know, kind of not focus on, you know, the things in life that are that are going on. So it was the same way growing up, I...

...mean, you know, and then just the coaches that you have, you know, the youth level, the volunteers or, you know, when I got to high school, my high school football coach, like I think a lot of guys that you know, we played with it NFL probably talk about their high school football coach. You know, I just had a great high school football coach, that he was a really good coach. We had good teams, but you know, he's just was a great person and you know, really care heard about his players. That I had a great college coach, you know, but in my youth coaches, you know, they probably didn't know how to teach much skill or x'es and Ose of that stuff, but you know they were just good people and it really kind of they gave me, you know, kind of like that father figure that I didn't have at home. You know. So I don't know what, but if I hadn't been involved in sports as a kid, I don't know, you know, where my life would win. You know where what they ended up? Surely in a different place that I am right now, for sure, and you know so you know, and I think you've done some some coaching also. You know. So I've done a lot of coaching at almost every level of football and, you know, e cuter off of college, but also did some high school coaching and you know, a big part of the reason why I wanted to do that was, I mean they help kids get better skill wise, but also, you know, just to kind of be their forum and, you know, help him through, you know, some tough times. One of the high schools I coached at sacramental high schools inner city school, predominantly African American, predominantly be poor, a lot of family situations like I grew up. So I was a head coach ad there for four years and then turns it over to a young coach that I coach in college that I brought in who the kind of just got them some experience we could take over and you know, you know, it just had a lot of impact on kids with you a lot of tough things there, you know, kids getting shot and killed and related stuff, kids going doing super stuff and you know, the juvenile hall then go into prison. But then a lot of success stories were, you know, kids got graduated with the college graduated. I got education and that's a big thing I preach to all the young people there is, you know, it's all about getting educated. The more degrees you have, you know, the more opportunities you have in life. Right, so, right. So, you know, all those experiences growing up obviously to happen for a reason, you know, and it kind of just gave me that kind of that heart, that passion that, you know, try to give back. Yeah, I want to thank everyone to listen, for listening. To huddle up with guss. We were talking with Doug Cosby in the new six thirty one digital news studio. So, Doug, I wanted to ask you about some of the things that you were talking about. Obviously your life growing up, how you were coaching in these kind of areas that the kids need a lot of help right, that they have don't have the great family structure, that it's a poor area, and I think that you know everything. I think one of the things that you mentioned that really struck me, that hit home with me, was that you know, everything to happen in your life probably happen for a reason, because now you're helping kids get through it. And it's important too that we don't focus always on the X as and knows. You know, it's about kind of the structure that we give these kids. My High School Coach was my wife's Dad and I saw him feed kids, drive them home, take them places, do all these other things. And when he was a coach he said to my job, you know, I got to care for these kids, not just on the field but everywhere else, and so I think what your leadership is as more than just winning games. Would you agree with that? A hundred percent? Yeah, I mean going especially, I think you youth coaches and high school coaches, you know, obviously more so than college coaches, because even at a small collins is still a little bit of a business. You know, I coach four years in the PAC twelve at two different schools, and you know, obviously you know there's a big business. And you said impact on the on the my call of them kids, but you know they're obviously adults and but no, you have the impact on your players at that level. You know, even at the professional level. I had some coaches in Dallas aid. You know they impact on my life. But you know, youth and high school coaches. Those high school coach has been just a lot of them, you know, just get paid a stipend some states. You know, they actually can make, you know, a living being a high school coach and maybe teaching a class or two, but you know, most of them it's basically volunteer work. They just have such an impact on kids, you know, usually positive impact. Not all of them, but I think most of us that work with high school kids have a real positive impact and they definitely their way underpaid and they don't get enough credit.

I think they do from the kids and maybe some of the families, but in general. You know, you meet somebody and they say what do you do? You know, teach to math classes and coach some high school sport. We were like, Oh, okay, you know right. I mean they they have such an influence, you know, all the young people in this country, in and actually I coached three seasons internationally. I've coached in Europe three different times and even over there I have some really strong relationships with some guys and kids, adults in Italy that I coached and two of them actually are here in the US playing college football right now, you know. But you know, it's just you know that coach thing, like you said, is so much more than you know, than the sport part of it. So you obviously have been around some great coaches. You talked to a little. You know, I read some stuff about how you really liked your coach at Santa Clara and then you obviously played for Tom Landry. It was one of the best coaches ever in the NFL. kind of no nonsense. And you know, I saw a quote where you said you you never really had a discussion with him maybe once or twice, other than football. Right. So tell me about why that this coaching is so important. I mean that you've continued this and you've really put a passion into it, where you do FBU, you do all these other things, but you've learned so much from these guys and I think it's important that. Do you ever get upset when you see a coach who doesn't take it the same way that you do? Oh, yeah, I'm exactly I've been a head coach a number of different places and yeah, the last place as a head coach, as a head coach for three seasons in Hawaii at a commandment of schools, is you have to be Hawaiian to go to school and the Ad, you know, going into the third season was like, you know, the head master from the schools. I asked to be like why does Doug Hasus a hard time keeping coaches, and you know some of it is at the high school level. You guys want to do it but they can't because the situation changes, they have another kid, they get a new job, you know, whatever. It might be right, but some of them I got I got rid of just because, you know, it was more than just their coaching style. It was just, you know, and in my opinion, you know, it was too much about them and not about the kids. And you know that's the high school level of youth levels, not the place, I don't think, to go and coach, you know, for your ego. You got to be there for the right reasons and the guys that I felt like they were weren't at a lot lot of places I've been. You know, after a year you said, you know, it's just not a good fit and kind of talk to him about why. I'd be way better off coaching, you know, somewhere else and someone with a different philosophy or at a different level, which I mean that I mean even the major college level and the professional level, because, you know, I did coach coach of bill walls for two years at Stanford, you know, and he used to say, you know, you got to keep a little bit of professional you know, like kind of separations or distance. But the players like you know, they're not supposed to be your best friend. And you know you probably around some coaches where, especially in the NFL, some of the the younger coaches in NFL that didn't never played in NFL, it's kind of like they want to be your buddy and stuff and it's like, you know, like I got into friends, I just need you to help me get better, right, you know. So coach walls was big on that. But comp really different at the high school level and even the small calls level, or have coach also. That's a little bit more like dealing with, you know, the high school level, where you know you don't need to be their best friend, but you know you need to be, you know, a role model, a mentor, you know, some cases like you. But the crazy thing is, Doug, what do you think I mean? The crazy thing is there's no classes on how to be a coach. There's no teaching on how to be a coach. There's no certification, right you you learn from people that you've been around. You know, for me, I went into High School coaching. You know, yeah, I'm like, I know the game of football, but how do you deal with kids? You know, I've been a parent. Right, my kids are all in these classes. Will all these kids am going to coach and and and you learn what you learned from the people before you and what lessons you've taken from the coaches that you've had. But there wasn't it really never any teaching on how to listen, how to be empathetic, how to do all these things to make your team better. Because I think if you know there's kids that don't trust, there's kids you know, doesn't matter if they're in youth or high school or College. So how do you get through to those kids? And what do you think the greatest quality of a coach should be? Well,...

I mean, I think the first part of that how you get through to them. You know, I'm just a firm believer and that you know. You know you a couple of things that you reap with you. So and also you know, you know there's a sunding. It's in the Bible that you know, you can tell a tree by its fruit, right. So I think your actions, you know. I think how you treat them. You know, you you know how you communicate with them, and you know, there's another, you know, another saying that you know that I try to use and it's like, you know, are you listening to understand or you listening just to reply? And I think dealing with people in general, but especially high school kids, you have to listen to understand. You know, when you have a conversation with them, you have to try to understand whethery're coming from, not just get an information, and so you can, you know, reply to it and, you know, give them advice. You know, you really need to understand where they're coming from, because young people make a I mean all of us do, but young people make a lot of stupid decisions, you know, and you know. So you got to use the word empathy. You have to have some empathy for him. And my wife was great because she'd obvious be like dug everybody has a story. Like you can't just like just jump on them until you know their story and which is, you know, very, very true, and you know she helped me a lot with that stuffing, you know, because, like with me, I had a story and my story is different than your story and different than Danny White Story. And you know, you can name anybody we've ever played with or met or coach this or people who grew up with. All of our stories are different and you know so if you can, if you can try to listen to understand, I think that when they you know, what's just saying, when they know you care, then no care and I think it's just really true. So it's just it's what you do, it's not what you say and life, and especially as a coach, you know, and I learned a lot. I mean, you know, it was interesting, you said, you know, there's really no classes on coaching, and there aren't, but the two years I coach to Stanford. So when I retired I volunteered a couple seasons at Santa Clara, where I played. The head coach was one of my ex teammates, has dad was my head coach and you know, so I was just working with the right ends, technique stuff and, you know, just kind of being a big brother to him. You know, I really enjoyed it and then bill waltz contacted me and said they you know heard, you know, your coach in Santa Clara, which is right. It's twelve miles from Stanford, right. And he's like, Hey, you know, I got to opening. You want to come coach the tight ends, do some special teams and then you'll work also with Monty Clark. I don't know if you Humanis, was a longtime NFL head coach of the niners and Detroit Lions. He was Don Shula's old line coach when they went seventeen and know, and played a long time for the Cleveland Brownser was one of Jim Brown's offensive lineman and so, as I you know, I mean I didn't say yes right away, very interested and you know, a couple days later got hired. But you know, I tell people, you know, it was packed twelve school and so you get paid pretty well, but I said, you know, I should have paid them. It was that working with coach Clark and coach Walts was was like, you know, a real life seminar on how to coach and deal with people. I learned so much from those two guys. Coach Landy, you know, you learn stuff from but united in the coaches and meetings. You're not. You don't spend as much time, you know, talking to you know NFL head coach as a player and you know Mike Dick. It was my position coach for three years. Gene stallings was the DV coach I think my first seven years and reeves was the running back, quarterback coach, which at the same time before he went to Denver, for two or three years earlier in my career. I was around a lot of really great coaches in NFL and then just learning and listening to coach Walsh and in money. You know, I learned so much about coaching. I learned a lot of x's and O's from them. But you know really, just like you know how to deal with players. You know because in staff meeting situation comes up. Coach walls in the south meant you would talk about it. What do you guys think? And you know, how should we handle this? And you listen to those guys talk about dealing with players. It was you know, it was crazy. I should have paid them. You know, it should have been and it's really a shame coach waltz is and with this anymore. It's his big passion was, you know, to help young coaches and especially x players. I want to coach like the things you know that we're talking about that you know, you kind of just learn it from watching other people, but no one really teaches it to you. And just his reinforcement...

...and the big thing I learned from him that I've used and he said you got to let players operate somewhere between plan in chaos. He goes. You want them closer to plan, but you have to give them freedom, you know, to be themselves. You don't want to coach a robot. And so many coaches they just like you know, and everybody has different philosophies with so many coaches are like his own. It has to be this way, this way, this way, this, you got to do it, you got to do it, you got to do it. And coach wells was like, you know, just somewhere between plan and chaos, closer to plan, as long as they're getting it done. You know, let him help, you know, let him have some freedom to be who they are and do it the way that they do it. And that's something that I you know, I really took everywhere I coached, you know. I mean there's some things yes, you got to do it exactly this way, but usually there's definitely some freedom in there. And you know a quick story friend of mine WHO's coach football for a long time in Alabama and Georgia. It tells a really quick story about because you ask football coaches like you know, why do you do that? You know, like a drill. Why do you do that? I don't know, that's just what we've always done. So he has a story that I use when people tell me that that his wife every time she'd cut a cook a hand, she'd cut it, has off both sides of the Ham, put in a Pan, bake it in the oven. And he asked her why, she goes, I don't know, because my mom did it. So he asked his motherin law one day, why did you do that? Why did you do that? I don't know, because my mom did it. So then he asked his wife's grandma, why do you cut an insolve both sides of the hand before you putting the Pan To cook it? She said because my pan was too small. So now you know. Now you so she could tell you why and most my experience, most coaches and tell you what to do, how to do, but the good ones can tell you why this is the best way to do it, right, like right, you know, you cutting the edges off the ham so fit in the pan. The other two to generations they were just cutting it off because that's what you do. Yeah, that's what they learned. Right. This is why, right, you they never took the time to ask, right, if they would even ask why they did it, then they would educate and then I think that's so true about coaches today, is that they don't take the time to ask why we do these things. You know, why is it? Do you know? Because everything so fast, fast paced. They, I think coaches really fill to is that their time isn't going to last long, right, they don't have time to do all these things that they want to do. Right. That that it's it's all right, you don't win right now, you're going to be gone and that makes it yeah, you know, you know, and I think coaches used to stay places a lot longer and you know, I don't know about you, so there. Yeah, yeah, yeah, so, I don't know when you were in the league, but you know, when I was playing, you know, the big saying was NFL stands for not for long, and right, you know, and you know it hadn't changed much. Average career is very short. But you know, a lot of these coaches now, you know, saying what you just said is you know, they know what it feels like to be like you know you got to earn your job every day and you know if you don't, you know there's someone behind you, maybe as good as you, maybe even better in you. They just need to get on the field, you know, and then you're gone. Yeah, you know, I think that a lot comes down to coaching in the NFL because most teams have the same talent. Obviously you have some star players, but obviously, and you can't really account for injuries that your team's got to have, just like the cowboys this year have had so many injuries that it's hard to overcome those things. But I still think that that great coaching helps teams win in situations they normally wouldn't. And we see that year and a year out and and even in the NFL, you think, wow, there's not going to be any jobs coming up and all of a sudden every year there's four or five jobs available and it's just crazy. And then even in college we see the turnover rate is so high and, you know, I think that what everything that you said really hit home with me and I think that it's really hard to find those good coaches and I think the schools sometimes overlook the qualities other than the winds and losses, because they they's know that the winds are so important and but they're overlooking what these coaches are teaching all those people around them. Yeah, I mean you know, and you know, not going to name any names, but we all know this. A lot of coaches they keep getting they get fired and rehired and fired and rehired, and it's like then, like are they not like I don't know anything about this guy? Right then, other people, we probably both have some really good friends that are great coaches, but this they have a hard time getting jobs and you're like going like if people really took the time to really, like you said, the really figure out and really look. And you know is there's a lot of really good coaches that have you know that are unemployed and there's a lot of guys employed. Are you how they get that job? Right, yeah, we see that all the time. Right. So, Ay, I wanted to ask you. We had, I've had coach Dick on. He's a Pittsburgh Guy. You mentioned...

...he was your coach for a few years and you want to talk about no nonsense. What was he like as a coach? Obviously, I mean we saw him with the bears. He mentioned a little bit that he coach a Dallas. But getting from you, I'd love to hear what you think, coach Dickil, you know what kind of coach was he? You know, Mike, I mean Mike was, I mean Mike's a great personality, miss a great guy, you know. So my coach the tight ends, receivers and special teams like this. Probably for guys now to do those jobs on NFL. See. But Mike was, I mean, I got to say Mike Wasn't as a position coach anyways. He wasn't really big into the like skill development thing, I mean like, you know, really hoping you with like, you know, you got to stem, you run a little more vertical, you got to stick him at the top of the route. Mike was more like you got to figure out a way to get open, you know. And and my best story about Mike I remember we were playing. It was Jayce Salley, Billy Joe, a prix myself with a three tight ends and we were playing, I think it was the giants and I think, I'm not sure if Mike was there Lawrence Taylor's rookie year, but I think we were playing the giants in New York and whoever the linebacker was is like, you know, made a couple plays, so he is. I remembered he grabbed all three of our face masks with one hand, pulled us together on the sideline and said you guys gotta goes. I don't know what to tell you other than you just got to F and block them. But that was Mike. But in a lot of you know, a lot of competition, but especially blocking, there's technique involved. A lot of it is, you know, you got to want to block them more than he wants to get off the block. I mean, like a lot of it's just a right, you know, and everything in life you know. You know there's skill base of nolves, but a lot of it is you know how bad you want to do it, but you know, and that was Mike. He's just like my rookie year I was on a kickoff team. I never was on a kickoff team and pop wanner high school, College I never covered a kick in my life and the first game, the opening kickoff of the season, I made the tackle and, like they thought, I was like, you know, like Bill Bas before bill base, I was gonna be the special teams like Google, like no man like that was luck. So I played on all the special teams. For what you're going to do. But like my first three years and you know, you know, Mike was like, you know, you're the l three. Stay in, you're laying don't give block mate to tackle. You know you're the content guy. Just squeeze him inside, don't let him get outside. You know the one. You know. It was like you just got to figure out how to do it, like or we'll find someone who can. I kind of approach, and I'm sure that change a little bit as a head coach, but you know, that's Mike's Personality, like, you know, you got to figure it out and you got to work your butt off and just got to get it done. And I'm sure it's the same way he does business, same way he coached is, you know, there's a little bit of a plan, but then you just got to work out it. You gotta go right. Well, that was kind of his his it when he when he talked to us, it was about put the work in, do the hard work. It's not always going to be perfect, but you just got to get the job done, and that that's kind of what his whole talk with us was about, right. That just just putting the effort in always, and that was one thing he said he hated was when guys didn't put the effort in. Yeah, and you know, because this thing I talked to kids about, you know, the two things that look for in a player. And is the thing. Even coach Wall said he goes, you know, athleticism he looked for. He goes, but not necessarily the position skill. He goes because I can teach that, he said. Well, he what he wants. His attitude, people with a great attitude that are going to work hard, effort and attitude. But the things that he always talked about, because if they have the athleticism, we can teach them to position skill, because he always Stanford, he won the six five two hundred and forty five pound, two hundred and fifty pound offensive lineman that no one else in the PAC ten wanted because of they're any but they're going to red shirt and then their junior year when they're going to star. They're going to wait two eighty two and ninety and they're going to be really athletic and and that's the same stuff he did with the forty niners. He wanted athletes. He teach them skill, but he wanted guys that were team guys that were work hard. Yeah, no, I can see that. We go wrong in anything in life of you know, people that work harder in they're in it for the, you know, the good of the group. which is interesting because when I was at command as schools in Hawaii, I wanted to to get on the back of our search shut up and work. It's my wife is like, oh, that's a little harsh, because you especially high school kids there just in people in general there making excuses whatever, and it's like what you just said, Mike said. So I went to our ad and say, you know, how would you say that in Hawaiian? And you know, they had to get like the Hawaiian cultural person came up with a two or three different ways you would say it in Hawaiian. The little translation...

...came up to like stop moving your mouth and start moving your hands. But you know, it's just like shut up, shut up and work like and you know, it's like no one cares. I mean you know, your mom might carry, your wife might care whatever, but basically, you know when you're when you're complaining about something at work, especially on a football team, no one really cares. Just like just go do your job, you know. And Ricky Huntley, Ricky Hunley, who's a good friend, is coached a lot. He has a saying that I'm sure you got from another coach, saying don't make your problem my problem, like you know, it just just let's just go to work. Yeah, well, I think that there's nothing that overcomes any kind of problems like hard work. Right, like if if your team doesn't play well with you know, we interviewed Dick for meal not too long ago and that was his thing. I was like, we're going to fix the eagles and how we got to fix them. We're going to get to we're going to we're going to put in a lot of good hard work and you know, that's the way you fix the problems and that's the way, you know, I shm back in the day, really thought about how fixed to fix problems was. We're just going to get to work and that's was a mentality that I think all of America had back I mean that was my dad. Yeah, no, for sure. And you know the thing that I that I nothing I learned from coach Wallas, because he's the same thing. He said like he goes. You know, if your group as a group, there's things they're not doing well, or the starter there's things are not doing well, you have to come up with a drill, but then the work on that. You can't just you know, you can't just say, you know, can't lose your block or whatever. Yeah, you got to tell him that and you got to you know, maybe they need more effort, but you need for the skill part of it. You need to figure out how to teach that skill that he's lacking, that he's not executing, if it's sticking the top of a round or not losing a guy and or reach block or speaking the tight end position, whatever it might be. You know, you got to come up with a drill that they work on that and then they can have success on that. Then it's going to carry over the game. You know it is. But again, it's it takes work. As a coach, you got an expensive time going okay, what how can I you know, how to get them in that position? I mean it takes some work and some time and then the players got to work at it on the field. You know, you can't just do it one time. You know it is right with you know quarterback drops. If you're you know, if you're you're hits in too big, you know you got to work taking little hitches. You can tell them you need to take a little hitches, but they keep hitching too big. You got to start doing a drill taking small hitches. Right. I mean, like and in the quarterbacks got to put in the work. You're there to help and guide them and teach them, but they got to do the work and you got to put in the work, but as a coach, before they can do the work right. Right, Hey, want to thank everyone for joining us on huddle up with Gus. We are talking to Doug Cosby in the new six thirty one digital news studio. So, Doug, I really wanted to ask you about what you're doing today. I think you know you were a tight end. I think I read where now you are coaching some quarterbacks. You were doing a lot of that work. So where are you coaching quarterbacks and how did that start for you? Well, and I'm actually I'm actually not coaching quarterbacks, but but it's the quarterbacks. Have Really started with coach Walsh, obviously, and then I was offensive coordinator at CAL for two years, heading coach the quarterbacks. I coach the wide receivers, but a friend of mine, Troy Taylor, who's now called his head coach with the quarterback coach, and you know troy played. He's a little bit older than you. He played. He was a backup for the jets from about three to five years, backed up Kenny O'Brian. So I learned a lot about quarterback play from coach Wilson and obviously from coach Taylor. So we started a a business called norcal passing academy and about fifteen years ago training court youth and high school and and some college kids and actually a couple guys are NFL now quarterbacks and receivers. And Troy and another quarterback coach friend of mine, Bobby Frescos, who's a college quarterback coach now, wasn't then. We're doing quarterbacks. I was doing receivers and then, so you know, I just have done quarterback training also when the groups got big, and then at the high schools I was at I coached the quarterbacks. But you know, I don't consider myself a quarterback coach. But you know, so we still that business. They're coaching college now, so they're not involved. So there's a kid that I coached in college. It was a quarterback who's ahead high school coach. He's kind of running it now. I just do the business side of it and go out a little bit. But you know, the the biggest thing I'm doing now is formed the nonprofit, although selfless, plug here, called International American Football Academy. It's I A F A dot us as a website. So because my experience is coaching in Europe, there's in...

...two thousand and ten. I hope the kid from Parma, Italy, defensive end, get an ai a scholarship, but college football graduated in the US. And then I've mentioned earliers, two kids from Italy that one's the receiver, ones are running back, that are their last year it came and play JC football. One got a scholarship, one walked on to four years school. There's finish in the last year. But because of that would be form this nonprofit. So actually Ricky Huntley's involved with me in it and he's on our board and Daryl Pollard, who was a DB for the forty niners, is not on our board but he's really involved. So what we do is we try to find international players and help them with their skill development and then try to help him get to normally the junior college to play football. And then we're also talking with people, actually Saturday with some people in Russia. We're talking to people in Mexico and China and in and in Europe, but doing coaching clinics and camps once the pandemics over. Looks like we're going to be doing something in May if we can based on Covid in Mexico City and say we're talking to the largest American football magazine publication in Russia on Saturday about what kind of what we're doing, but trying to help grow the game internationally and trying to give international kids that opportunity. So there's a there's a gun a and kid who's three, two hundred and forty that ricky and I both saw in Europe about eighteen months ago and ricky worked with four days and Ricky, after the first day it was just kick and playing NFL. He learns that play football. So he had a student visa. He should be over here playing right now but because of the situation, the JAC's aren't playing and so he's hopefully going to come next year. He's a little old, eastern, twenty two, but he'll be a freshman. He's from Ghana and we have as a receiver from Nigeria that we're working with. He has not been able to get a student visa even prior to the pandemic because I think Nigerians they heard State Department not letting a lot of Nigerians in the country. So kind of spending my time doing that. And then I coach the last four years at fulsome high school what's one of the best programs in the state. My coach the receivers and for of the wide receivers that I am going to do with me, I helped them, but they're all on de one scholarship and one of them is a sophomore at Clemson, Joe Nagata. It's like six four two hundred and twenty. He would definitely play in the NFL. He's hurt right now. He has a born muscle in his abdomen that he's had all since before the season started. He was supposed to be a starter. He and played, hadn't played much. Gambo loves him. He said he's the hardest worker he's ever coach and the kid is unbelievable. His parents are from Cameroon but you know, he was born here. He has a brother that's a D line in the Utah as a freshman brother that's a running back at Arizona State. Very talented family, you know. So ply help some young white receivers locally, but really this international stuff is working on. So before code, let's just take covid out of the whole picture, which we know he can't, but let's say it is what obviously you started this because you saw a thirst for American football throughout the world. Like have you seen that growing over years? And you know, because it is really is amazing that American football is kind of stayed here. We've tried, you European Leagues and other things, but we haven't really grown it internationally like it maybe should have been. Yeah, you know, and yes, it's growing, because I first coached internationally in two thousand and ten. So it's been ten years now. And I coached over in Europe last year and nineteen and it definitely has grown. The skill sets getting better. There's a lot of players that have the you know, the body in athleticism that they can definitely play college football. Some of them could play professionally for sure, but, you know, the skill sets just not there. So's it's getting better coaching and then, you know, just you know, getting their coaches better there and then just also just getting, you know, good coaches to you know, to work at these calm kids off, some of them, you know, or young adults, on skill development, position specific skill development, because they have the bodies and Athleticism, you know, and some of them are pretty good football Iq. They just, you know, they never they've never been coached and they barely understand the game. But the game is really growing in Mexico. Talking to people in Mexico, they've been playing American football down there, they told me, for a hundred years. There's High School League, They Have College Leagues Down there. There's a lot of really good players all...

...around the world. Talk to a guy in China last week. He's an Americans living there. This running a American football organization has six thousand youth playing. In just one big city in China because of covid they had seventeen academies. Six of them close because of covid. Like football academies was, I think we're just like facilities where they you know, trained them in they practice. But he says there's more, which is understandable because the population there's more Chinese playing American football than people in the US based on population. It's the support is really grown in there and you know, obviously the American Samoa and influence on football has been around for a long time, but it's starting to grow the Nigerian there's a number of Nigerians playing college football and some in the NFL and the sport is definitely grown internationally and I talked to Roger when I first came back in two thousand and ten about, you know, how I thought the League could help grow the game and I thought the grass roots is the way to do it, because that's why we played it right as a little kid. My brother played, you know, I played. I'm a fan of the game because I played it as a kid. Even if I didn't play past high school, it's still be a fan of the game right. But like you know, grow it organically and you know that's kind of not the NFL away. He was very nice about it. You know, they want to spend millions of dollars have games. But you know, Mexico City, every time they play there, they fill a hundred thousand people in the stadium down there. And the people down there told me that that the XFL when they come back and two thousand and twenty two and they talked about expanding after that if they get established, because they're crazy not to put a team in Mexico City. They would pack a stadium, you know, every Game Day, right. You know. So the game, the game is definitely grown and there's a number of x players and coaches that are doing a lot internationally right now. A lot of people are doing like, you know, the Webinars, like coaching clinic Webinars, but's is better than nothing. But you know, it's not the same as being able to get on a field, you know, and teach a coach or a player. So our plan is, once we can start traveling again, is, you know, we'll do coaching clinic and then skill development camp with players, not a competition camp, but like skill development, right, and that and what do you think? That's the biggest hurdle for international is just, you know, they don't grow up with it like we do, and so then all of a sudden they get little snippets or they see it on the Internet. Now, obviously, with what you can get so much on the Internet, but they said still you can watch as much as you want till you go out and do it and work on a time after time and get that muscle memory and everything else. Even like I've done Fu camps, I've done other camps with the hall of fame, and these kids come over from Europe and want to play a quarterback and and you see kids that are, you know, five years younger than them have way better skill sets and can throw the ball way better. And these kids have are, like you said, the good athletes. They just don't understand why they can't do these things. Yeah, you're not even ring them. Yeah, in the quarterback position. International's the worst because they don't grow up throwing anything. They grew up all playing soccer and, you know, maybe something basketball and don't they don't throw anything. So like internationally, like at the highest level, normally you can have like two Americans on the team everybody brings a quarterback because, you know, international European quarterbacks or good athletes are smart, that is, can't throw the ball very well. But there are some teams over there, the really good ones, that of developed national quarterbacks. Like there's a team in Italy, in Parma, they've had entire quarterback for the last three, four, five years. He's he's not bad, and so now they can bring over, you know, their second American. Doesn't have to be a quarterback. You can be a DV is, safety, receiver, running back, and they have a big advantage because now if your quarterback, you know, can run your offense efficiently. Now it's kind of like playing with three Americans. Is the other two can play other positions, you know, but all the positions, the skill set, they just don't how to teach them. You know, when they start playing in youth. You know all the coaches, some of the coaches played and they were never taught much skill. They watch youtube videos, like you said, and it's just not the same and they kind of know enough to be dangerous. There are some really good coaches over there. There's some really good ones and a lot of Americans go over then coach like I've been three times, but you go for six months and then you're gone. The next year another American comes. He puts in a whole new system. You know. You know. So there's the places where they have sure and I'm sure it's really hard to understand the cultural side of it and getting another students and you you know when you talk earlier about being empathetic and understanding those kids. But you know that's probably a big barrier for American coaches going over...

...to Europe big time. Because you know, like in the senior leagues, their adults, like the last time I was over, the one of the wide receivers is an attorney one the kind of the hs back big wide receiver was also attorney wide receiver from he was from African. I think he was some Cameroon. He was a nurse. So like you practice a night because they all there in school to working because they're all eighteen and over, and then they text you go I can't come because you know, my court case won't be done in time, or you know, I got to do another shift at the hospital. And now you got three starters on your offense that aren't there and you have like no depth and then it's like, okay, we got two wide receivers, you know, five offensive linement, our American quarterback and one of the running backs and we play in two days. Goes like this. What. Yeah, okay. The good thing, I'm sure the other teams doing the same thing. Right, they do the same thing. So it's very it. That is is very interesting. And then you know they're not in great they're not in great shape. They play super hard. That love the game. They're so passionate for it, you know, but you know, I mean they are. They play, they start, they play, like from different parts of Europe is different based on whether but I can kind of western Europe. They start playing in March. In the end, like in June. So you start practicing. Then to January and like you're practicing and you know, like snow and like it's can be really cold, and then, you know, the weather starts getting better and you know, half the team shows up one day. They now the half shows up two nights later. Guys got to leave early, they come late. It's a big adjustment, it really is. And then you you take it from our point of view, like they don't care, but they do. Again you got another story. I got to take the bus and the bus broke down. I mean, like you know, they all get it's a story every time, and you just like it is what it is and you adapt. And the thing is you think it's just you, but then you talk to the coaches before the game of the team you're playing and like Oh, yeah, my you know, are running back with sick all week or you mean there's always something. There's always something. Yeah, so before me let you go, can you give us a little bit? I mean, we talked to kind of in sporadic mentions of your life and what you've done, and we've kind of gone over it all, but can you really kind of clarify for me how sports has shaped your life, because I think you have a great story. You've been through a lot. You've seen the old and you've come into the new with technology and everything else. Can you tell me a little bit about how really sports a shaped your life? Yeah, I mean, you know, it's you know, the people talk about football being the greatest game. You learn all these life lessons. I mean, I agree with that point. I think most team sports you've learned a lot of the same lessons. But you know, I mean like we talked about. You know, you just learned that. You know you got to you got to be stubborn, you know, and and if you want to do something, you got to be stubborn about it and you know you got to work hard and you know, money Clark saying. What I would really took away. One of the things from coach Clark is you plan your work. Then you work your plan right, but you have a plan. In football is great with that right. There's always the game plan, but then there's always the you know, on field adjustments and in the halftime adjustment. So you have, you know, your plan for whatever. Then you you have to be able to adjust, you know, as you start working through it. And coach Landry, he would always said team goals and he always had reasonable and outstanding goals and he always had contingency plans, you know. So a lot of that I've taken when I've coached, for a lot of it I take it in my life to have a goal. Okay, is it reasonable? And then, okay, it is, and then what? How you going to accomplish it? What are the steps? Then you got to work my Dick, is said, and you got to work hard. You know, and Mike probably didn't talk about having a plan, but Mike had a plan. If you're not going to just work on stuff, that's not going to help you get to where you're going to go. But for me, you know. So that and then you know. The other thing is you just you never know, right, like, I mean how many times, and you probably played in a bunch of games where there's no what you end up winning. You're down by fourteen with three minutes to go in the game and you know somehow you get fourteen, go to overtime and win. Or You know you scored twenty one points in the last five minutes and you're down by nineteen. Like you just never know. You just don't quit, you don't give up. You know it's like it's over when it's over, and you know, you just you know, you it's all about the effort and attitude and in the one thing that I learned really is in life, not accomplishing something. There's two reasons why. I basically it's either you can't do it, like you don't have the skill set, like you know,...

I'm not going to be a narrow surgeon. Heay, either can't or you won't. Right and you know, and and and. So you have to look at if you're capable of doing it, then you didn't. Then you don't want to do it bad enough. Right. You don't want to work hard enough. And I tell kids that all the time. Ago You can or won't, and I've seen you do it before. So now I know you can, but now it's that you don't want to do it right. And with my own kids, right, like you know, simple thing with the little make their bed. I know they know how to make their bed. When they got up and left the school in the bed, one made his because they didn't want to do it right. I didn't have enough time. Will you could have got up two minutes earlier and you would have had enough time. I mean, like you know. So for me, I think those are the big things that have helped me in my life is that things look bad or whatever, but you just keep fighting and working. Like I said, you have to be stubborn. I think every professional athlete I've ever met or hide level athlete, they're stubborn. You know, some of US still a fault, right, but you're stubborn right because you just because it's just even for you know Lebron James of the world. It's not easy, you know. Yeah, he had a lot of God given a buility in size, but he works his butt off. Like you have to be stubborn about like I don't want to get up a sixer morning go to the gym, but you got to be like not, but I'm going to go because I want to be I want to maximize my potential, you know. So those things have helped me a lot and you know, in life and you know, and those are the things we try to pass on to people who coach, if it's adults and in Italy or, you know, fourteen year old's in south Sacramento. You know, it's the same message. Yeah, and yeah, and I think parenting and coaching aren't too far apart, but you know, they're good thing. So, Doug, one last thing. Tell us how everyone can find you and and give us again your website and where people can Yalue. Okay, yeah, so the the the best things of the website is I a f a dot us becausecom was not available. So it's international American Football Academy. So it's just those, you know, insials. I as a dot us and it's probably the easiest way to get a hold on me because on the last pages a thing contact us, and all those emails it says Info it I AFA DOT us. They all go to go to my, you know, mailbox. All right, good, excellent. and Are you on social media? I'm not a social media guy. It's like I'm of the CAREEM ABDULGER BAR IF. I saw him say this last year that you know, all these NBA players, you know, and an athletes that complain about you know, they get to have a bad game and they get blasted on social media. Gos knows making you be on it. You don't have to be on social because they ask them in your day what if they had it, because I wouldn't have an account because you don't have to be on social media and I just, I just, I don't do it. I don't know that the world needs to know about everything. I think, yeah, yeah, well, there's probably a good thing. Saves you a lot of time. We are on just for us so that we can share our show with everybody and share what you're doing today. So you know, real quick, Debbie Carusoe from FPU and hall of fame. You Know Debbie ride? Yes, yes, so she's on our board for IFA and she's the one setting up social media accounts for the organization. I said like, don't sell one up for me, so kind don't find out on there. Just go to his website, I F A dot us. Find out what he's doing today and definitely look them up. If you know you're interested in here more of duck story. So, Doug, you know, it was great. It was great catching up with you. Thank you for sharing your story with us and joining us in the huddle and we hope all of our listeners enjoyed this episode and can catch us next time on huddle up with Gus. Thanks again, Doug. Have a great day, I guess. Danks. Is Great talking with you, Herry Cassix. Listeners, you got a new show coming your way. Join me, Guff Rot. Put in your NFL QB and host of huddle up with gusts. Every Sunday morning at ten am, I talked to celebrities and veterans and professionals like Matthew mcconaughey and did for meal about how sports shape their life. Join Gust Barack and his guests in the one thousand six and thirty one digital news studio on the huddle up with gusts every Sunday at ten am here on sports radio. Okay, six.

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