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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 10 months ago

Doug Cosbie

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week my guest, Doug Cosbie and I go old school and talk philosophy and mentality of football from the 70s and 80s. He was an all pro TE with the Cowboys and went onto be a coach at many different levels. One story that we heard from Doug epitomizes his philosophy of football.  Doug says you got to be stubborn. You have to work hard in life and in football and he quotes coach Monte Clark “You gotta plan your work and then work your plan.” In other words you create goals to be successful but sometimes you have to have a contingency plan, just like making on field adjustments during a game to get to your main objective.       Doug spent all of his professional playing career with the Dallas Cowboys. Before entering the NFL, Cosbie attended Santa Clara University where he was a three-year starter at tight end. He finished his college career as Santa Clara's top receiving tight end with 120 receptions, 1,721 receiving yards, 14.3 yards per reception and 10 touchdowns. Cosbie was inducted into the SCU Athletic Hall of Fame.   With the Cowboys, Cosbie caught over 60 passes in a season twice during his career and set team records with catches and yards per season and career. He caught 300 passes for 3,728 yards and 30 TD's and also had 22 catches for 243 yards and 3 TD's in 7 playoff games. He still ranks eleventh in franchise history in receptions and ninth in receiving yards.    Doug now works with the IAFA, International American Football Academy. They help International American Football players get scholarships to American Colleges and Universities.  https://iafa.us   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey Cas Ixlisne, you got a new showcoming your way join me, go throuout fiftee year, NFL T be and host U Hu upwith Gus every Sunday morning at ten, am I talke to celebrities an veteransand professionals like nothing to kin of hand, diffen mil about how sportschate their life join, gus, verroct and his guest in the sixteen thirty onedigital news studio on Huddle UV with Gus every Sunday at en am here onsports radio, hey at'sis, welcome everyone to huddle up with Guss, I'myour host fifteen year, NFL quarterback Gusfrat. We are here in the NE T, sandsixhueded Andthrty, one digital news studio. If you want to learn more orlisten to previous shows, you can check us out O our website huddle up withGuscom or you can listen to us on the new RADIOCOM apple wherever you listento your favorite podcast, while in the huddle our guests describe how sportsshapes their life. Now, let's join the huddle. Hey everyone welcomed t ho off withguys on your host Gu Frot, and thank you for joining us in the Hoddle todaytoday. My guest is, you know, play the game a littlebit before me. So back when you know Terry brachaw says that there were norole, penalties on quarterbacks and offensive players. The defense could dowhatever they want and I'm sure Doug can testify to all this. But joining metoday in the huddle is dog cosby. He was drafted by the Dallas cowboys inthe third round, and you know he played he's been a proboller. Hehe played thegame for a long time. You know he's done a lot of other things. He's goneout, got into business, been a coach been a head coach, so I'm reallyexcited to figure out how sports a shape dugs life so doug. Thank you forjoining me in the huddle today. I guess it's Nice to be here and Terry wasright. Yeathe quarterbacks had a target ontheir back in their front chest for a long time. It's a lot better to playthat position. Now. That's for sure, yeah. You know it's funny. I waswatching some of your highlights on Youtube and they were. I think youcaught a touchdown path from hogaboom and he made a great, throw and rightthe announcer for saying, like wow man way he came back. You know they justplastered him on his back right before that. You know and you see him get upand he has like an elbow brace on and he has all these things. You know. Ithink the position is definitely a lot different today than it was bakthenyeah. I don't yeah, I mean there's Sol I, as you know better than me. I soreally tough position to play, but I think physically I mean you know youdon't get hit the way you used to that's for sure and I dontn practice.You know onnly anyone gets within five yards as a quarterback. You know when I was playindg. The quarterbackscan get hit bad and practice, but you know there was guys you know really close to hem and pushit on, and you know doing really stupid stuff that I think the games way a lotbetter right now. Why? I couldn't man mean? Can you tell our lie guests alittle bit about what training camp was like back then I mean I know it's waydifferent from, even when I came in I one thousand nine hundred and ninetyfour, but I can't imagine what training camp was like for you. When you cameback when you were in the you know in the late s what that was like, becauseit had to be going to get these guys in shape ndwe're going to go three days yeah. You know we never went three days, but I was draftin. I seventy nine and I hinyou know the cowbays on to I played for, but you know obviously had a lot offriends and guys Hav played other places you talked to. I think Dallas isprobably as bad as anywhere. You know. I'm a coachlandry was really big intoyou, know, condition and running, and the most interesting thing whish is juscrazy. So my rookie heare in seventy nine, the COWAS always signs like I don'tknow seventy free agents, so you would go to training camp with. I think therewas. I think there was twelve rounds, then I can't remember, maybe fifteenyou know the draft picks and some of the second year guys guys that havebeen on Ir within, like seventy three agents and you'd be there for about twoweeks and then they cut half those guys at then the vets would come, and youknow from high school on Collids at the end of two weeks or two odays you'regetting in the game with season started, and you know you didnt have to be agenius to figure out a holy crap. What we just did didn't mean anythingbecause the vets were just getting here, but we went two more weeks of two daysand then we actually played in the hall of Fame Game. So I think it was a fifthpreseason game. My rookie training camp was just crazy. You know in he scrimmage a lot beforethe vents got there like we scrimmeed once after they got there for the weekbefore the first freseason game, but yeah it was very physical. There was alot of contact, you know is not much different than the kind of trainoncamps. Two days we had in college, except for this was four weeks of it.Instead of two weeks yeah, you know and it you just really mentally gotphysically. You beat up, he us mentall,...

...you got worn down. You know rights his. It was crazy, likeyou're there we were there, I think, thirteen or fourteen days, and then thevets show up. You're gon and the cowboys have been e super bowl to prioryears. So you knew every one of them. I mean you know they didn't know you, butyou knew every name. Every number you know, because that's that was kind ofthe peak of America Scene Nheare on every Sunday. You know you startedthinking. What am I doing here with these guys right? So when you were a kid growingup in California, you probably never thought about that part of it rightthat as a kid you, you see, as you said, everybody kind of has a household name.You Have Youre Fan of somebody and you see all the things done on Sunday, butnothing leading up to that day. So when you were a kid, tell me about the first memory you haveof how you fell in love with sports. Was it an uncle? Was it your parents?Was it just somebody that your buddies out in the backyard you just alwayswent and played? What was that? What was that like for you yeah? I mean Ihad a kN W interesting childhood. I grew up in East Paloalto. We moved on.I was elevend e, anyone that doesn't know the Bayar Eas Pello Alto waspredominantly African American working class and neighborhood, and my parents were divorced when I waslike six, I don't really even my dad as sents to see im and my mom. I don'treally know my dad, but it was really. My older brother hada brother who, as seven years older than me, who I'm a little over six six he's aboutfive ten he's a way better afplete he was. He was. You know one of the bestathletes in the area growing up, but also, I think my parents divorce, and youknow it was pretty ugly. My father was very abusive. He was a bad alcoholiclike physically abusive and he had a way bigger impact on him, probably thanmyself on my sister who, as a year older than me, you know so he made alot of bad choices, my brother, but he was a great athlete you know. So it was.He was played football. He was a quarterback was a pitcher in baseballpoint garden, Baketball, I'm just really good at all three sports. Hekind of just followe him. You know I played baseball until high school, played basketball,the way through high school and started playing football at age. Ten. I didn'treally even want to play. I didn't like it, but my brother was like no you'replaying football. You know I was a big baseball fan.Mebrito Clemente was kind of my childhood hero th. You know I love thePittsburgh Pirates. You know back in the s into the early s. You know so than Ialways invisiot myself. If I was going to be an kind of professional athlete,woilh, never dream was baseball and then I love basketball.But you know six six white guy with no shot, Nono ball skills, you hot playngs, younev going very far in basketball. You know I was you know I cun Reboun andget the little the putbacks and play defense. But you know you know in my college. Roommate was abasketball player at Santa Clar, so I played a lot of basketball with tebasketball players, but you know I just used to beat them up. I mean I mu skill,yeah good, that's all I ever did I remember like I was you know I was sixfour six five, depending on what day it was people whatever but n, when Iplayed basketball in the high schools, the same thing right that I was runningaround and I would box out, get the rebounds. You know I wasn't the pointguard, but the one memory I have is the one time I was the point guard where Igot the rebound dribbled all way down the court Ta as Spen Moving Ma made alay up and that's like my whole memory of why it was such a good basketballplayer. You know it's kind of funny how that how that works, but I was definitely better at baseballand football than anything else. So you talked a little bit about. You know issues that you had at home and youknow you definitely weren't alone. There's a lot of people in this worldthat have those kind of situations that you had and you grew up with. How wassports a release for you or comfort for you? Did it help you kind of get awayfrom certain situations? Yeah, you mean. Obviously it's you know and mean you know it's anescape kind of from you know for a couple hours you can get away from. Youknow the reality which you know with this whole pandemic that the world's gone through,but in this country you know, I mean a lot of people had mixed emotions about.You know sports coming back and playing, but you know I think, thit's, even as as afan of spectator now watching NBA or hockey games in hebubble, or you know the baseball wit noone thattestands, you know just givesyou you know two or three hours to you, know kind of not focus on. You know thethings in life that are that are going on, so it was the same way growing up.I mean...

...you know, and then just the coachesthat you have. You know the youth level, thevolunteers and you know when I got to high school my high school footballcoach, like, I think, a lot of guys that you know we played with fl,probably talk about their high school football codes. You know I uhad a GreatHigh School Football Coach Tat. He was a really good coach. We had good teams,but you know he just was a great person and you know really cared about hisplayers. II had a great commens coach, you know, but in my youth coaches you know theyprobably didn't know how to teach much skill or XS and os or that stuff. Butyou know they were just good people and it really kind of they gave me. Youknow kind of like that, father figure that I didn't have at home. You know soI don't know what if I hadn't been involved in sports as a kid I don'tknow, you know where my life would, when you know where I whel, I ended up, surely in a different place, Thati arright now for sure- and you know so, you know- and I think you've done somesome coaching also. You know so I've done a lot of coaching at almost every level of football, andyou know setooff of college, but also did some high school coaching and youknow a big part of the reason why I wanted to do that was I mean to help kids get better skillwise, but also you know just to kind of be their form and you know help themthrough. You know some tough times, O one of thehigh schools that coachd that Sacramento high schools, Inner City School, predominantlyAfrican American, predominantly pretty poor a lot of family situations like Igrew up. I was a headcoach ad there for fouryears and then turnd it over to a young coach that I coached in college that Ibrought in. who kind of just got him some experience we could take over andyou know you know just had a lot of impact on kids, wit Toug, a lot of tough things there.You know kids getting shot and killed getting related stuff, kids going gonsuper stuff, and you know Juveni all then going to prison. Butthen a lot of success stories were you know, kids got graduated whith thecalls graduated. I got education and thats a big thing. I preache to you allthe young people is, you know it's all about getting educated t, the moredegrees you have. You know the more opportunities youhave in mife right so right. So you know those experiences growing up,obviously to happen for a reason you know- and it kind of just gave me thate kind of that hard that passion that you ave te try to give back yeah. Iwant to thank everyone to listen for listening to huddle up with Gus. We aretalking with Doug Cosby in the new sixen thirty one digital news studio, so doug. I wanted to ask you about someof the things that you were talking about. Obviously, your life growing up how you were coaching an these kind ofareas, tha that kids need a lot of help right, that they have don't have thegreat family structure, Thatit's a poor area, and I think that you knoweverything. I think one of the things that you mentioned that really struckme that hid home with me was that you know everything that happened in yourlife probably happened for a reason, because now you're helping kids getthrough it and it's important to that. We don't focus always on the ETES, annose. You know it's about kind of the structure that we give these kids. My High School Coach was my wife's Dadand I saw him feed kids drive them home. Take them places, do all these otherthings and when he was a coach, he said it's my job. You know I got to care forthese kids, not just on the field, but everywhere else, and so I think whatyour leadership is as more than just winning games. Would you agree withthat? A hundred percent yeah I mean know, and especially you know, I thinkyou, youth, coaches and high school coaches. You know you, obviously moreso than college coaches, because even at the small college is still a littlebit of a business. You know I coach four years in Te Pack, twelve at twodifferent schools, and you obviously you know this a big business and I used to have impact on the on the Icn my call of them kids, but you know they're, obviously an told Sim, butknow you have an impact on your players at that level. Ou, even at theprofessional level, I had some coaches in Dallas. I had you know big impact onmy life, but you know youth and high school coaches, peally high school coaches, Bens is' a lot of them. You know just get paid,O stipen, some states, you know they actually canmake. You know a living being a high school coach andmaybe teache a class or two, but you know most of them. It's basicallyvolunteer work. They just have such an impact on kids. You know usually positive impact, no, not all ofthem, but I think most of us that work with high school kids have a realpositive impact and they definitely...

...they're way underpaid and they don'tget enough credit. I think they do from w the kids and maybe some of thefamilies, but in general you know you meet somebody, they say: What do you?Do you ging to teach two math casses and coach from high school sport o werelike? Oh okay, you know right I mean they have such aninfluence. You know a the young people in this country and and actually Icoach, three seasons- International I've coached in Europe three differenttimes and even over there. I have some really strong relationships with someguys and kids adults in Italy that I coached and twoof them actually are here in the US playing college football right now you know, but you know it's just ouknow that coach thing, like you, said its so much more than you know than thesport part of it. So you obviously have been around somegreat coaches. You talked Olop, you know. I read some stuff about how youreally liked your coach at Santa Clara andthen you obviously played for Tom Landry. It was one of the best coachesever in the NFL kind of no nonsense- and you know I saw quote where you saidyou. You never really had a discussion with him, maybe once or twice other than footballright. So tell me about why that this coaching is so important.I mean that yyou've continued. This and you've really put a passion into it.Where you do FBU, you do all these other things, but you've learned somuch from these guys, and I think it's important that do you ever get upsetwhen you see a coach who doesn't take it the same way that you do. Oh yeah, Imean exact. I've been ahead coach, a number of different places and yeah the last place. I was a headcause as aheadcoach for three seasons in Hawaii and command, as schools is a Ool, youhave to be Hawaiian to go to school and the ad you know going into the thirdseason. S was like you know. The headmassege from the school is tlikegass to be like. Why does dug? Have sice a hard time? Keep ing coaches- andyou know some of it- is at the high school level. You know guys want to do,but they can't because the situation changes. They have another kid, theyget a new job, you know whatever it might be allright, but ' but some ofthem I got I got rid of just because you know it was more than just a coaching styleI's just an you know an in my opinion. You know it was too much about them andhot about the kids, and you know that's the high schoollevel, O youth levels, not the place. I don't think to go and coach. You knowfor your ego, you got to be there for the right reasons and the guys that I feel like there weren'tat a lot of places. I've been you know. After a year, U K Jus said you knowit's just not a good fit O and kind of talk to him about why od be way better off coaching. You knowsomewhere else in someone with a different philosophy or at a differentlevel, which I mean that I mean you ow, the major college level and theprofessional level Y Ow, because you know I did coach coach ofGil Wals for two years of Stanford. You know, and he used to say you know yougot to keep a little bit of professional. You know like kind ofseparations or distance, but the players like you know, they're notsupposed to be your best friend, and you know you probably be around somecoaches where, especially in NFL, some of the the younger coaches, an NFL thatNiken never played Metafo, it's kind of like they want to be your buddy andstuff, and it's like you know, like I got enough friends, I just need you tohelp me get better right. SOPO coachwals was big on that, butcompretly different at the high school level and even ha small college level.Wer have coach. Also that's a little bit more like dealing with. You knowthe high school level, where you know you don't need to be their best friend,but you know you need to be. You know a role model, a mentor. You know somecases, but the crazy thing is dwhat. Do youthink I mean the crazy thing? Is there's no classes on how to be a coach?There's, no teaching on how to be a coach. There's. No certification, rightY: U You learn from people that you've been around. You know for me. I went into HighSchool coaching. You know yeah, I'm like, I know the game of football. Buthow do you deal with kids? You know I've been a parent right, my kids ereall in these classes, with all these kids are going to coach and and and you learn what you learntd from thepeople before you and what lessons you've taken from the coaches thatyou've had, but there Wasit really never any teaching on how to listen,how to be empathetic. How to do all these things to make your team better,because I think if you know, there's kids, that don't trust, there's kids,you know it doesn't matter if they're in youth or high school or College, sohow you get through to those kids. And what do you think the greatest qualityof a coach should be, but I mean I...

...think, the first part of that how youget through to them. You know I'm just a firm believer and that you know you know you a couple things that youreput you so and also you know you know, there's asand in gets in the Bible that you know you can tell a tree by its fruit right.So I think your actions, you know, I think, how you treat them. You know how you, you know how you communicate with themand you know there's another. You know anothersaying that you know that I try to use and it's like you know, are youlistening to understand or you listening just to reply and I thinkdealing with people in general, but especially high school kids. You haveto listen to understand. You know when you have a conversation with themyouhave to try to understand where they're coming from that just gettinginformation. So you can, you know, reply to it and you know give hemadvice. You know you really need to understand where they're coming from you know,because young people may ot, I mean all of us, do be young people make a lot ofstupid decisions. You know- and you know so, you gotta and you use the word empathy.You have to have some empathy for him and my wife was great becauseshe dowaysbe like dug everybody has a story like you can't just like just jump on themuntil you know the story and which is you know very very true, and you knowshe helped me a lot with that stuff thing. You know because, like with me,I had a story, my story's different than your story and different than youknow, Danny White Story, and you know you can name anybody. We've ever playedwith or met OC coach, Tis or people. We grew up with. All of our stories aredifferent and you know so. If you can, if you can try to listen to understand,I think that when they, you know, what's the saying when they know youcare the no care, and I think it's just really true, so it's just its what youdo, it's not what you say in life, especially as a coach. You know, and Ilearned a lot I mean you know I was interesting an you said. You know.There's really no classes on coaching, an there art, but the two years I coachTe Stanford. So when I retired I volunteered a couple seasons at SantaClair, where I played the head, coach was one of my ex teammates. His Dad wasmy headcoach and you know so. I was just working with the tight andstechnique. Stuff and you know just kind of being a big brother to you know Ireally enjoyed it and then Bill Walsh contacted me and said: Hey. You knowher. You know your Coachin Santa Clara, which is right. It's bout, twelve milesfrom Stanford all right and he's like hey. You know I got TA opening you wantto come coach. The tight ends, these some special teams and then you'll workalso with Moni Clark. I don't know if Youhomani, as was a long time, NFL headcoach of the forty niners and Detroit lines. He was Don Shula's oline coachwhen they went seventeen an o, an played a long time for the ClevelandBrown Zoos, one of Jim Brown's offence alignment, and so as like you know, Imean I didn't say yes right away. I'm very interested an you know. A coupledays later got hired, but you know I tell people, you know I was pack twelveschool and so you get paid pretty well, but I said you know I should have paidthem. It was that working with coach Clark and coach Walsh was Ik was, likeyou know, a real life seminar on how to coach and deal with people. I learnedso much for tmost, two guys, you know coashlandoat, you learn stuff from, butyou notevn, the coaches and meatings you're. Not You don't spend as muchtime. You know talking to you know: NFL, head coaches, a player, and you know myDicka was my position coach for three years. Jeane stallings was the DV coach.I mhink my first seven years and reevs was a running back quarterback coach.At the same time before we went to Denver for two orthree years, earlyer my carers, I was around a lot of really great coaches innfl and then just learning and listening to coach Wals an in mony. Youknow I learned so much about coaching. I learned a lot of XS Andos from them, but you know really, just like you knowhow to deal with players. You know because in staff, meaning situationcomes up, Cos wal in the SAPMAN. You would talk about it aright. What do youguys think? And you know how should we handle this and you listen to those guys talk about. You know deepmem with players. It was. You know it was crazy. I should have paid them. Youknow it should have been. It's really a shame. Coach Walsh isn'twith is anymore. His Big Passion was, you know, to helpyoung coaches and especially x players Ar want to coach like the things youknow that we're talking about thet, you know you kind of just learn it fromwatching other people, but no one really teaches it to you, and I justhis reinforcement is the big thing I...

...learned from him that I've used and he said you got to let playersoperate somewhere between plan, an chaos because you want them closer toplan, but you have to give them freedom. You know to be themselves, you don'twant to coach a robot, it's so many coaches, they just like you know, andeverybody has different philosophies, but so many coaches are like this on. Ihas to be this way. This way. This way this, but you got to do it, you got todo it. You got to do it and coachwels was like you know, just somewherebetween planning chaos closer to plan as long as they're getting it done. Youknow, let him help you kno. Let him have some freedom to be who they areand do it the way that they do it, and that's something that I you know Ireally took everywhere. I coached you know I meanthere's some things. Yes, you got to do it exactly this way, but usuallythere's definitely some freedom in there and you know a quick story friendof mine WHO's, coached football for a long time in Alabama and Georgia, hetells a really quick story about because youas football coaches, likeyou know, why do you do that? You know like a drill. Why do you do that? Idon't know that's just what we've always done Bu. He has a story that Iuse when people tell me that that his wife every time she cut a cook, a Ham,she cut it insoff both sides of the Ham put in Ha Pan Bakit in the oven, and heasked her Wi. She goes. I don't know because my mom did it so he askd hismotherinlaw one day. Why did you do that? Why did you do that? I don't knowbecause my mom did it so then he asked his wife's grandma why you cut an insheof both sides of the hand before you put in the Pan to cook it. She saidbecause my pan was too small. Okay, now you know Mag, so she could tell you whyand most my exters most coaches tell you what to do how to do, but the goodones can tell you why this is the best way to do it right like right. You knowyou cut in the edges off the HAM, so e'l fit in the Pan, the other twogenerations. They were just cutting it off because that's what you do, yeah,that's what they learn right. This is why yright they never took the time to ask rightif they would even ask why they did it. Then they would educate- and I thinkthat's so true about coaches today- is that they don't take the time to askwhy we do these things. You know why is it you know, because everything's sofast, fast paced day? I think coaches really feel too. Is that their timeisn't going to last long right. They don't have time to do all these thingsthat they want to do right that that it', it's all right. You don't winright now, you're going to be gone N, and that makes it yeah. You know youknow, and I think coaches used to stay places a lot longer, and you know Idon't know about you still there yeah yeah, so I don't know when you were inthe league, but you know when I was playing. You know the big saying wasNFL stancs for not for long and right. You know, and you know it hadn'tchanged much. Haverag careers, very short, but you know a lot of thesecoaches now you know saying what you just said is you know they know what itfeels like to be like you know you got to earn your job every day and you knowif you don't. You know, there's someone behind you, maybe as good as you, maybeeven better an you. They just need to get on the field. You know then you'regone yeah. You know. I think that a lot comes down to coaching in the NFL,because most teams have the same talent. Obviously you have some star players,but obviously- and you can't really account for injuries that your team'sgoing to have just like the cowboys this year have had so many injuriesthat it's hard to overcome those things. But I still think that that greatcoaching helps teams win in situations they normally wouldn't, and we see thatyear in a year outand and even in the NFL, you think wow there's not going tobe any jobs coming up and all of a sudden every year, there's four or fivejobs available, and it's just crazy and then even in college we see theturnover rate is so high, and you know I think, that whateverything that you said really hit home with me, and I think that it's really hard to find those goodcoaches and I think the schools sometimes overlook the qualities otherthan the wins and losses, because Etis know that the winds are so importantand but they're overlooking what these coaches are teaching all those peoplearound them. Yeah, I mean you know, and you know not going to name any names,but we all know thies a lot of coaches. They keep getting. They get fired, O re,higrer and fire to rehired, and it's like men like. Are They not like Donknow anything about this Gy other people? We probably both havesome really good friends that are great coaches, but tethey have a hard timegetting jobs and or like going like. If people really took the time toreally like you said, I really figure out and really look, and you know thisis a lot of really good coaches that have you know that are unemployed andthere's a lot of guys employed that you're like how did they get that jobright yeah? We see that all the time right so ey. I wanted to ask you. We aI've, had coach Dicka on he's a...

Pittsburgh Guy. You mentioned he was your coach for afew years and you want to talk about no nonsense. What was he like? As a coach?Obviously I mean we saw him with the bears. He mentioned a little bit thathe coach, a Dalas but gevting from you I'd love to hear what you say: CoachDicko. You know what kind of coach was he you know Mike I mean Mike was I mean my a great personality, Myes, agreat guy. You know so ike my coat. The tight ends, receivers and special teamslike Jus, probably for guys now that do those jobs that anofel seen but Mike was- I mean I got to say Mike, wasn't as aposition coach anyways. He wasn't really big into the like skill development thing I mean,like you know, really helping you with. Like you know you got to stem your rouda little more vertical. You got to stick him at the top of the Rob Michaasmore like you got to figure out a way to get open. You know and and my beststorry about Mike. I remember we were playing itwas J, Sauly Billy, Jo da pre myself,with the three tight ends and we were playing. I think it was a giant and I think I'mnot sure if Mike was there Lawrence Taylor's rookie year, but I think wewere playing the giants in New York and whoever the linebacker was like. Youknow made a couple play, so he is, I remember it. He grabbed all three ofour facemask with one hand pulld us together on the sideline. It said youguys got TA. I don't know what to tell you other than you just got Ta F andBlockam. butthat was my, but in a lot of youknow a lot of competitions, especially blocking there's technic, involve a alot of it is k. ow you got ta want to block Hem more than he wants to get off.The block I mean like a lot of is just afer right. You know and everything in life. Youknow you know, there's skill based on OES, but a lot of it is. You know howbad you want to do it, but you know- and that was Mike it's just like myrookie year. I was on he kickoff team. I never was on a kickoff team and popwanter High School College. I never covered a kick in my life and the firstgame. The opening kickoff of the season I made to tackle and like they thoughtI was like you know like bill based before bill based. I was gonna, be thespecial tax like Goop, like man like that was luck, so I played on all the special teamsfor what you're going to do but IKE by first three years- and you know youknow Mike- was like you know- you're the l three stay in your lane. Don'tgive blockmake a tackle, Kno t the Ers the contain guy? U Squeeze them inside,don't let them get outside. You know the one you know Ho. You know it islike you just got to forgurout how to do it like or we'll find someone whocan a kind of approach and I'm sure that change a little bit as a headcoach. But you know that's my personality. Like you know, you got tofigure it out. You got to work your butt off and you just got to get itdumb and I'm sure it's e same way. He does business seing what he coachedCIUS. You know there's a little bit of a plan, but then you just got to workat it. You got to Goi well that was kind of hi his what he when he talked to us. It wasabout put the work in. Do the hard work, it's not always going to be perfect,but you just got to get the job done and that that's kind of what is wholetalk with us was about right that just just putting the effort. In always- andthat was one thing he said he hated- was when guys didn't put the effort inyeah, and you know, because that's the thing I talkd to kids about you knowthe two things that look for in a player and is te thing. Even coceralsaid he goes, you know athleticism, he looked for, he goes, but notnecessarily the position skill. He goes because I can teach that he said well.He what he wants his attitude, Peo with a great attitude that are going to work,hard, affort, an attitude, but the things that he always talked about is:If they have that athleticism, we can teach them to position skill because heobvaus at Sanford. He won the six five two hundred an forty five pound, twohundred a fifty pound offensiliman that no one else on a pack ten wantedbecause of ther henny. But they're going to red SIRT and then thei junioryear when they're going to start they're going to wait. U Eight UNDRED,Ninety and they're going to be really autritic and and that's the same stuffhe did with the forty niners. He wanted athletes. He teach him skill, but hewante guys that were team, guys that AE workhard yeah. No, I can see that oe gowrong in anything in life with you know, people that work hard and they're in it.For the you know the good of the F, the group which is interesting, becausewhen I was at commadme at schools in Hawaii, I wanted to to get on the back of ourSIRT shut up and work I's. My wife is like O, that's a littleharsh because especially high school kids theyre, just an people in generalthey're making excuses whatever and itst like what you just said Mike said.So I went to ad and say you know: How would you say that in Hawaiian- and youknow they had to get like the Hawaiian cultural person came up with a two orthree different ways, so you would sayit in Hawaiian, but a littletranslation came up to like stop moving...

...your mouth and start moving your hands.But you know it's just like set up shut up and work like and you know is likeno one cares. I mean you know your mom migt carry your wife might carewhatever. But basically you know when you're, when you're complaining aboutsomething that work, especially on a football team. No one really cares.Just like just go to your job, you know and like Roicki Hun Ricky hunly who's,a good friend, whos coachd alot. He has a saying that I'm sure you got fromanother coach saying, don't make your problem my problem, but you know justjust let's just go to work. Yeah Wel. I think that there's nothing thatovercomes any kind of problems like hard work right like if, if your teamdoesn't play well t what you know, we interviewed dictor meal not too longago, and that was this thing. It was like we're going to fix the eagles andhow we got to fix them. We're going to get Tho we're GOINGTO we're going toput in a lot of good hard work, and you know that's the way you fix problemsand that's the way you know ot back in the day really thought about how fixedto fix problems was we're just going to get to work and that's a t, a mentalitythat I think all of the America had back. I mean that was my dad e. no forsure, and you know to thing that I that nothing I learned from coach wallsbecause he's the same thing. He said that he goes. You know if your group,as a group there's things they're not doing well, you know or the startertheres things thare not doing well, you have to come up with a drill, but inthe work on that, no you can't just you know you can't just say you know, can'tlose your black or whatever yeah. You got to tell them that, and you got tayou know. Maybe they need more effort, but you need for the skill part of it.You need to figure out how to teach that skill that he's lacking, that he'snot executing of it stickin the top around or not losing a guy in or reachblock, or I'm speaking to the tightim position. Whatever it might be asn't,you know you got to come up with a drill that they work on that and thenthey can have success on that. Then just going to carry over the game andit is but again it's it takes work as a coach, you got a spensove time going.Okay, what? How can I you know? How do I get them in that position? I mean ittakes some work and some time and then the players got to work at it on thefield. You know you can't just do it. One time you know is I with you know:quarterback drops. If you you know if, if you're you're, hitcing too big, you know you got to work on takinglittle hitches, you can tell them you need to take little hitches, but theykeep hitching too big. You got to start doing a drill taking small hitses right,I mean like O and in the quarterbacks you got to put in the work, no you'rethere to help and guide them and teach them, but they got to do the work but-and you got to put in the work bas a coach before they can do the work rightright, hey. You want to thank everyone for joining us on Hoddl up with Gus. Weare talking to Doug Cosby in the new Sixeden thirty one digital news studio,so doug. I really wanted to ask you about what you're doing today. I thinkyou know you were a tight end. I think I read were now. You are coaching somequarterbacks. You were doing a lot of that work. So where are you coaching quarterbacks andhow did that start for you? Well, I'm. Actually, I'm actually not coachingquarterbacks, but but it'squaterback Av really started withcoach walls. Obviously, and then I was offence a coordinator at cow. Fortwo years I didn't coach to quarterbacks, I coached so whidereceivers, but good friend of mine, Troy Taylor, who's now, college, headcoach, put the quarterback coach and you know,Troy played he's a little bit older than you he played. He was a backup forthe jets for about three to five years back to Kenneo'Brian. So I learned a lot about quarterbackplay from coach, Walson and obviously from coach Taylor. So we started a business called NOCAL Passon Academy onabout fifteen years ago, trading, cor youth and high school, and some collegekids and actually a couple guys, a NFL nowquarterbacks and receivers and troy and another quarterback coachfriend of mine, Bobby Frescas, he's a college quarterback coach. Now, wasn'tthem we're doing quarterbacks, I was doing receivers and then so you know Ijust have done. quarterback training also when the groups got big and then at the high schools. I was at I coastthe quarterbacks, but you know I don't consider myself aquarterback coach, but you know so we still have that businessthey're coaching college now so they're not involved. So there's a a kid that I coach in college. It was aquarterback ECAS ahead. High school coach he's kind of running it. Now Ijust do the business side of it and go out a little bit, but you know t e biggest thing. I'mdoing now is form Te. Nonprofit, Tho Selfis plug here calledInternational American Football Academy. It's IA FA dot. US is a website so becausemy experienceis coaching in Europe...

...there's in two thousand and ten, I helpthe kid from parment Italy, an defensive, an get a NAIA scholarshipplay collse football graduated in the US and then I' mentioned earther's two kids fromItaly that wants the receiver ones are running back that are their last year.It came and play JC football. One got a scholaship. One walked on to four yearschool, there's finishing jus the last year bu because of that beform, thisnonprofit, so actually Ricky Hunley's involved with me in it and he's on herboard and Darrell Pollar. who was a DB for the forty niners is not on ourboard, but he's really involved. So what we do is we try to findinternational players than help them with their skill development and thentry to help them get to normally a junior college to play football, andthey were also talking with people actually Saturday, with some people in Russia,we're talking Abou People in Mexico and China and in and in Europe, Byu doingcoaching clinics and camps once the pandemics over looks like we're going to be doingsomething in May, if we can, they son Covid in Mexico City- and I say we'retalking to the the largest America Footballmagazine publication in Russia on Saturday about what kind of what we'redoing trying to help grow the gameinternationally and try to give international kids of opportunity. Sothere's a there's, a Ganaian kid who's, six three Dand forty that Ricki and Iboth saw in Europe about eighteen months ago, an Ricki workd ff four daysand Ricki after the first day who goes Du, just kickan playing nl be learnshow play football so he had a stud ef visa. He should Beo over her planeright now, but because of the situation, the JSS are playing and so he'shopefully going to come. NEX stairs, ilitle old, Hese turn twenty two buthe'll be a freshman knohe's from Gana, and we have a as a receiver from thatJery othat we're working with. He has not been able to get a student visa even prior to the pandemic, because Ithink Mygerians they herd State Department, tat, Len, a lotof Nigarians in the country, Ye so kind of spending. My time doing that, andthen I coash the last four years at fullsom high school, was on of the bestprograms of a state, a coast, the receivers and for of the wide receivers that I hadbeen to do with me. I helped them but they're all on d. One scholarship andone of them is a sophware Clemson. Jona Gota is like six fourt twenty. He willdefinitely play in NFL. He's hurt right now. He is a part muscle and his Abdaman that he's had all since beforethe season started, he was supposed to be a starter. He Hadn' played hadn'tplayed much Damel Lesom, he said he's the hardest worker he's ever coachedand the kid is unbelievable. His parents are from camerroom that youknow he was born here. He has a brother, that's a Delimein, aUtah and as a frestfran brother is ar running back at Arizona state, verytalented family. You K Ow, so king o help some young by receivers locally,but really this international stuff is a working on so before Co. Let's just take covid out ofthe whole picture, which we know we can't, but let's say it is what?Obviously you started this because you saw a thirst for American footballthroughout the world like have you seen that Growin over years? And you know,because it really is amazing that American football is kind of stayedhere. We've tried your European Leagues and other things, but we haven't reallygrown it internationally, like it maybe should have been yeah. You know, andyes, it's Growin, because I first coached in lastually en two thousandand ten. So it's been ten years now and I coach over in Europe last year innineteen and it definitely has grown the skill sets getting better. Here's alot of players that have the you know the body and athleticism that theycould definitely play college football. Some of them could play professionallyfor sure. But you know the skill sets just not there. So it's getting better coaching and thenyou know just you know getting their coaches better there and then just alsojust getting you know. Good coaches to you know to work with these icollinkids out. Some of them, you know, are young adults, I'm skilled developmentposition, specific skill development because they have the bodies andathleticism you know, and some of them have pretty good football like Qe theyjust you know they never they've, never been coached and they barely understandthe game. But the game is really growing. In Mexico, talking to peoplein Mexico, they've been playing American football down there. They toldme for a hundred years, there's high school leagues. They have collegeleagues down there, there's a a lot of...

...really good players. All around theworld talk to a guy in China. Last week he's an American is living there. Thisrunning of America, Football Organization has six HSAND youthplaying and just one big city in in China because of Covid.They had seventeen academies, six of them close because of Covid, likeFootball Academies Yeah. What was, I think, we're just like facilities,really, you know train them and they practice, but pesays, there's more,which is understandable, because the population there's more Chinese playingAmerican football than people in the US based on Lyopulation it'. The supportis really grown in the, and you know you know, obviously, that AmericanSamoan influence of football's been around for a long time, but it'sstarting to grow the Nigerian there's a number of Migarians playing collegefootball and some in NFL so and the sport is definitely growninternationally and I talked to Roger when I first came back in two thousandand ten about. You know how I thought the League could help grow the game andI thought the grass roots is the way to do it, because that's why we played itright as a little bread. My brother played. You know I played of a fan of the game because I playedit as a kid. Even if I didn't play past high school ould still be a fan of thegame. Right but, like you know, grow it organically, and you know that's kindof not the NF her away. He was very nice about it. You know they want tospend millions of dollars have games, but you know Mexico City every timethey play there. They fill a hundred thousand people in the stadium downthere and the people down. There told me that the XFL, when they come back in twothousand and twenty two and they talk about expanding after that. If they getestablished because they're crazy not to put a team in Mexico City, theywould pack a stadium. You know every Game Day right, you know so the game, the game'sdefinitely grown and there's a number of ex players and coaches that are doing a lotinternationally right now, a lot of people, Dong Mik, you know the Webonarslike Coaching Clinic Webbeners whiths is better than nothing. But you knowit's not the same as being able to get on a field. You know and teach a coachor player. So our plan is once wee can start. Traveling again is you know,we'll do coaching clinic and then m skilldevelopment camp with players, not a competition camp, but like skilldevelopment right and that do you think that's the biggest hurtle forinternational is just you know they don't grow up with it like we do and sothen, all of a sudden they get little snippits or they see it on on theInternet. Now, obviously with what you can get so much on the Internet, butthey staid still, you can watch as much as you want til you go out and do itand work on a time after time and get that muscle memory and everything else.Even like II've done, Fu camps, I've done other camps with the all of fame,and these kids come over from Europe and want to play t e, quarterback and-and you see kids, that are you know five years younger than them have waybetter skill sets and can throw the ball way better, and these kids haveare, like you said, they're good athletes. They just don't understandwhy they can't do these things. Yeah ey're, not een, great, O, no yeah. Inthe quarterback position, internasy is the worst because they don't grow up,throwing anything. They grew up all playing soccer and you N, maybe someplay basketball. I don't they don't throw anything so like internationally,like at the highest level. Normally you can have like two Americans on the team.Everybody brings a quarterback because you know international European, quarterbacks orgood athletes of smart. That is can't throw the all very well, but there aresome teams over there, the really good ones isthead of developd national quarterbacks, like there's ateam in Illyan parmant they've had entine quarterback for the last threefour five years. He's he's not bad, and so now they can bring over. You knowtheir second American doesn't have to be quarterback. You can be a DV safetyreceiver running back and they have a big advantage, because now, if yourquarterback, you know coan run your offense efficiently. Now it's kind oflike playing with three Americans bis, the other two comay other positions, you know, but all the positions, theskill set. They just don't know how to teach them. You know when they startplaying youth. You know all the coaches, some of the coaches played and theywere never taught much skill. You know they watch youtube. Videos like yousaid, and it's just not the same, and they kind of know enough to bedangerous. There are some really good coaches over there there', some reallygood ones. In a lot of Americans go over then coach like I've, been threetimes, but you go for six months and then you're gone the next year. AnotherAmerican comes, he puts in a whole new system. You know you know so, there's the places wherethe Andi'm sure and I'm sure it's really hard tounderstand the cultural side of it and getting to know those students and youyou know when you talk earlier about being empathetic and understandingthose kids woutd. You know that's...

...probably a big barrier for Americancoaches going over to Europe big time, because you know like in the seniorleagues, Theyre adults like the last time I was over the Wen. The wyreceivers is an attorney, but one the kind of the h back big wire receiverwas also attorney. White receiver from he was from African. I think he was fomcameron. He was a nurse so y, like you practice a night because they allthey're in school or working because they're all eighteen and over and thenthey text Youa go. I can't come because you know, like courtcase, won't be donein time or you know I got to do another shift at the hospital, and now you gotthree starters on your offense that aren't there. If you have like no depthand then it's like okay, we got two wide receivers. You know five offenseAlinmen, our American quarterback and one of the running backs, and we playin two days. Gos, like this yeah, a good thing, I'm sure the otherteamis doing the same thing right. They do the same thing. So it's very it is,is very interesting and then you know they're not a great the ninegrade shake they play super hard. They'd love the game, they're, sopassionate for it. You know, but you know I mean they are they play thiys?Don't they play like from different parts to Europe is differentbased on whether but like in kind of western Europe they tart playing inMarch in the end like in June, se start practicing, then of January and likeyou're practicing and you know like snow and like it's can be really cold.And then you know the weather starts getting better and you know, half theteam shows up one day. Then never half shows up two nights later guys got toleave early, they come late, it's a big adjustment. It really is, and then youyou know you take it from our point of view like they don't care, but they doagain. You get another story, I gotto take the bus and the bus broke down. Imean, like you know they all it's a story every time and you just lik. Itis what it is and you adapt and the thing is you think it's just you, then you talk to the coaches before thegame, the team you're playing and like Oh yeah, my you know, our running backwas sick all week or I mean there's always something: There's alwayssomething yeah so before we let you go do. Can you giveus a little bit? I mean we talked to kind of in sporadic mentions of your life and whatyou've done and we've kind of gone over it all. But can you really kind ofclarify for me how sports has shaped your life because I think you have agreat story. You've been through a lot you've seen the old and you've comeinto the new with technology and everything else. Can you tell me alittle bit about how really sports Ave Shaked your life? Yeah? I mean you knowit's. You know, th people talk about football being the greatest game. Youlearn all these life lessons I mean. I agree with that to a point Daes. Ithink most team sports. You learne a lot of the same lessons, but you know I mean like we talked about.You know you just learned that you know you got Ta, you got to be stubborn, youknow D and if you want to do something you got to be stubborn about it and you know you got to work hard andyou know Moni Clark saying, but I would I really took away one of the thingsfrom coach Clark because you plan you work and you work your plan right, butyou have a plan in football's great with that right, there's always thegame plan, but then there's always the you know: Onfield adjustments and thena halftime adjustment. So you have you know your plan for whatever, then youyou have to be able to adjust. You know, as you start working through it andcoach Landry, he voan always set team goals and he always had reasonable andoutstanding goals and he always had contingency plants. You know so a lotof that I've taken when I've coached fot a lot of it. Ie taken in my lifetoo, have a goal. Okay, is it reasonable andthen okay, it is and hen what how you going to accomplish it. What are thesteps? Then? You got to work. Like my dicket said Hen, you got ta work hard.You know and Mi probaly didn't talk about having a plan, but Mike had aplan but you're not going to just work on stuff. That's not going to help youget to where you're going to go. But for me you know it's that and then youknow the other thing. Is You just you never know right like Imean how many times and you probably played in a bunch of games. weeethere's. No, you end up winning you're down by fourteen with three minutes togo in the game, and you know somehow you get fourteen Godo overtime, an winor you know you score twenty one points in th last five minutes and you're downby nineteen. Like you just never know you just don't quit you don't give up.You know it's like it's over when it's over and you know you just you know you it's all about. You K ow the effort andattitude and Yo in the one thing that I learned really is in life, notaccomplising. Something there's two reasons. Why? Basically it Yothat, youcan't do it like you, don't have the...

...skill set like you know, I'm not goingto be a neuro surgeon, okay, either can't or you won't right and riget. Youknow D, and so you have to look at it. I, if you're capable of doing it, thenyou didn't, then you don't want to do it bad enough right. You don't want towork hard enough, and I tell kids that all the time ago you can or won't andI've seen you do it before so now. I know you can, but now it's that youdon't want tot, do it right and with my own kids right, like you, know, superthing with a little make their bed. I know they know how to make their bedwhen they got up and left the school in the bed. Wan made us because theydidn't want to do it right. I didn't have enough time Wel, youcould have got up two minutes earlier and you would have had enough time. Imean like you know so for me. I think those are the big things that havehelped me in my life. Is that things look bad or whatever, but you just keepfighting and working like. I said you have to be stubbing, I think everyprofessional athlete I've ever met hide level. Athlete stubborn. You know someof US till fall right, you're, stubborn right because you justecause it'susteven, for you know Le Bron, James of the world. It's noteasy. You know yeah, he had a lot of God given a Bildy, an size, but heworks his, but off, like you have to be Stubberne by like I don't want to getup a six on the morning. Go the gym, but you got to be like not, but I'mgoing ta go because I want to be out. I want to maximize it my potential youknow, so those things have helped me a lot and you know in life, and you know,and those are the things we try to pass on to people whot coach at it's adultsin in Italy, or you know, fourteen year olds, in South Sacramento. You know it's thesame message: Yeah a yeah and I think parenting and coachingaren't too far apart. But you know they're good thing so dug one lastthing tell us how everyone can find you and and give us again your website andwhere people can yeah, okay, yeah. So the the the bestins o the website is IA FA dot. US BECAUSECOM was not available, so it'sInternatio, Almerican Football Academy. So it's SIS is, you know, thias IAFADodus and it's probably the easiest way to get a hold on O, because on the lastpage es a thing contact us and all those emails. It says: influint, IAFA,Dod, Usthey all go to go to my. You know mail box, all right, goodexcellent and are you on social media? I'm not a social media guy. It's like!I'm of the CAREE Mab Dolger Bar- I saw him say this last year that youknow all these NBA players. You know and athletes. They complain about. Youknow they get. They have a bad game and they get Blaston Social Medie goes nosmaking. You be hone, you don't have to be on souce because they ask them inyour day what, if they had it, because I wouldn't have an an account becauseyou don't have to be on social media, and I just I just I don't do it. Idon't know that the world needs to know about everything I think yeah yeah.Well, there's probably a good thing saves you a lot of time. We are on just for us, so that we canshare our show with everybody and fare what you're doing today. So you know real, quick, Debbie Cruso from FPU andHalfang. You know deb rid yes yesh, so she's on her board, Forafa and she's,the one setting up social media accounts for the organization. I saidlike don't Soll one up for me, O, don't findos go to his website. I Fadotus find out what he's doing today and definitely look them up. If youknow you're interested in hear more of duck story so doug, it was great. It was great catching upwith you. Thank you for sharing your story with us and joining us in thehuddle and we hope all of our listeners enjoyd this episode and can catch usnext time on hotdawap with Yo gess thanks again, dog have a great day, butguess dranks is great. Talking with you CSIXIE you got a new show Comin yourway join me: Gothrot, itee, Yer, NFLQB, and host? U HUDE UP WITH GUS! EverySunday morning at Tenam I talked to celebrities an veterans andprofessionals like nothing to kin of Ha tite o about how sport shake their life,join, gus, Berrock and his guest in the sixteen thirty one digital news studioon Huddle Ov with Gus every Sunday at ten am here on Sports Radio, HAY SIS.

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