Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Dick Vermeil

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Super Bowl winning-head coach, Dick Vermeil joins myself and Marnie in the huddle to discuss his championship winning ways. An honest man who is not afraid to be himself.  Marnie's Grandfather hired Coach Vermeil to change the culture in Philadelphia. He helped the Eagles reach new heights and still lives near Philadelphia to this day.   https://pro-football-history.com/coach/429/dick-vermeil-bio   Calistoga’s native son, Dick Vermeil (aka Coach), had a singular passion for two things in his life – football and wine. He decided early on to pursue football first, getting his start as an assistant coach right out of college and beginning a professional career that would span decades. A mechanics son, he inherited his father’s relentless work ethic and was known for his tough-as-nails practices and for regularly saying “No one ever drowned in sweat.”  But he was also known for his emotional and inspirational coaching style as well as the willingness to approach seemingly insurmountable challenges head on. As head coach of UCLA, he led the underdog Bruins to a Rose Bowl win over the undefeated and number one ranked Ohio State Buckeyes in 1975; as the head coach of the long-suffering Philadelphia Eagles, he led them to their first Superbowl appearance in franchise history in 1980; and as the head coach of the St. Louis Rams, he led them to a stunning turnaround season and Superbowl XXXIV win in January 2000. Coach’s last professional coaching job was as the head coach of the Kansas City Chiefs who he coached for five seasons; leading them to the AFC West Championship in 2003. Retiring from professional coaching for good in 2005 and, with a little help from some friends, Coach began the next and current chapter of his life; actively pursuing his second passion -  making wine. https://www.vermeilwines.com/Team     See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey everyone. We appreciate you joiningus in the Huddle, I'm your host fifteen year, NFL quarterback Gasprot,alongside my longtime friend and cohost Dave Hager, where we talk to guestsabout how sports shape their life be sure to check us out our website houwdlup with Guscom, where you can listen to more episodes. Just like this. Now,let's join the huddle, hey everyone pess pride there thanksfor joining me again on Huddl up with Gus. You can find us on RADIOCOM orwherever you listen to your favorite podcast, and you can also see us onsixeunded and thirty one digital news, just like the Intro said I'm usuallyjoined by my friend and Cos. Dave higger Dave is not with us today, but Ihave a much better looking coose today. Marnie is joining me again Marnie. Howare you doing I'm doing great? Thank you gus. Ialways appreciate the Nice compliments on my introso. Thank you. Well, you know Morny. I think youdeserve all those compliments and I think that you know Dave would completelyunderstand Y, why we say that so you know Marni. I think we have aspecial guest of yours on today. Somebody that you've known for a longtime that he's known you since you're little sojoining us in the huddle today is none other than coach head. Former headcoach, Dick for mill coach for mill, has now coach. You know he coach withthe Eagles of Rams ind the chiefs. He was coach of the year on four differentlevels. I think that's most impressive to me. So he understands you know wherefootball starts and and what how kids are made into professional athletes,and I think we went through all that so joining us in the huddle today SuperBowl winning coach of the St Louis Rams Coach for miall coach. How are youdoing today? I'm doing fine? I marnie Iyou know. As you know, I was screwedup. I had this on my counter for tomorrow morning, as I said to Marni aswe were visiting, I you know, I'm so spoiled all my ears, an procoaching. Ihad somebody with a desk outside my office. It kept me straight and did allmy calendaring and all that kind of stuff, and I screw up my personalcounter all the time it's Amparas I get mad at myself for doing it, GussYeahyour so flexible that you know how to you know: Maneuver Onom off thefield coach and get, I hope so mor yeah. It got it's great to see how youhaven't changed at all. Oh, I got a lot of Gray Hoi W. I saw you lastn Alantafew years ago. REMEMBER: Yeah Yeah! No! That was great, and you know I'veprobably been about the same since I retired I drink too much red wine, andyou know that that's kind of how it goes yeah. It can happen, but coach, youknow our show is really we want to find out about you from your humble beginnings, how youstarted and really about how you fell in love with sports. It could have been.You know, somebody that took you out in the yard everyday, like your dad. Yourgrandfather for me was. It was kind of that way. I could have been an idol.You had watching grow up or you listen to on the radiothings like that. What was that humble begame for you and how you fell in lovewith sports? Well, my humble beginning, I was bornan Kalos Toga, the North Ando Napa Valley at that time, eighteen hundredpeople in town, a hundred and thirty kids in my high schools. It totaltwenty nine of my high school class, but anyway, so very humble biganing. Iwas born in my great grandfather's home in the Italian side of my family in Nthonded. Eighty, as I told Marni, we restored that home after the eightysuper bowl loss and I ran out of money and her grandfather Leonard Toes, camein and paid for the rest of it. He paid fifty five percent of the remodelingjob, and so you know I've always made a debt to her grandpap and I alwaysconsidered him one of the finest individuals I had ever been around onmy lifetime. But anyway, that's where I started with the high school ere playedfootball tere. We have pwenty kids on the team and my senior year, a guy bythe name of Billwood, came to Kalishdogan his first head coaching jobout of college, and he is the guy, probably along with my dad, alwaystalking about how much he love playing high school football himself short ofcentered me and got me directed in their direction. I hadn't planned to goto college. I was going to stay it and work in my dad's GARAG. He was going totear down the Old Barn and build a newit for MEA and sun's garage, andthat kind of thing my high school football coach Bill.Wood said you know. If you want o young man, you could you could play God'sfootball, and I no one ever told me that and th that sort of stimulated mee said, but to do so you're going to have to go to junior college becauseyou haven't done anything for four years in high school and I said wellyour. I know that you know. I know that I rebuilt o thirty six Fourd, you knowis I drove that, but anyway, so he started me thinking about it and I haverespected him so much. We remained close and I went to juniorcollege and had a little success. I...

...walked on as an as I state made. Theteam earned a scholarship, and but I stayed in touch with bill wood and themore I played the game, the more I was fascinated by it, not so much in theplaying side of it, but he the exes and Os, the introcracis it and the buildingof a team and all it. So I decided I want to be high schoolfootball coach and fortunately, for me I got a job after getting my master'sin one thousand. Nine hundred and fifty eight at Delmare High School is anassistant football coach and head track coach, and I was there one year and Igot the head coaching job at hills day, high school and San motail right acrossfrom the airport in San Francisco there- and I was there a few years- We wonchampionship my second year my third year. We got beat, we didn't, have agreat team. I went to junior college coachings and assistant enre from thereI wunt to Stamford University as the freshman coach and it just every timethe phone rang and it was about a job. I took it and I liked every job I had.I just you know it was an opportunity to grow, maybe get a little better andlearn more and t. You Know Bill Walsh was a good friend because he was aSANSA state. When I went there as a graduate student and we became goodfriends to develop a relationship and then from then on it was alwaysfootball football football and I recognized I didn't want to stand in agym and watch kids take a shower on my career. So each time I had anopportunity to advance in in a football situation. I took it so we moved a lotcarol and I moved a lot and you know we had three children yeah by the time wewere like twenty eight six, twenty seven years old, and now I have elevengrandchildren because it it but that's where it all started. Wel The influenceof a high school football coastshut and- and I said Jeez I'd like to be him- I'dlike to I'd like to go righ school football and it's amazing coach,because you know everybody that knows you or it's even had an opportunity tohear you speak. They all say the same thing like listening to coach for meallthe lessons that you can teach everybody through your coaching. So youhad great coaches and then you passed all those. What do you think were likeone of the one things that you learned from one of the coaches that you hadthat you have now implemented in your coaching career money? That's good! Thestrongest contribution anyone made. One single statement was John Wooden. Okay,when I was a UCLA recruiting season had ended the day after it ended in JohnWooden's office sort of pouding. I said Coachwooden, I lost some real goodplayers to USCE and he looked me right in the eye he leaned forward at hisdesk, and he said you know coach, don't worry about USC, don't worry aboutthose! She lovs they're always going to have better players than you just workto make every player you have on your roster, the best e can possiblilm best.He could possibly be both on and off the field, and everything else willtake care of itself so, and I have from that time on. I have had that behind meand reinforcing my thinking and reinforcing my actions and decisionsmaking based on that statement, and you know it's simple, but very sound. Wellit. You know, it really goes with your whole theory of you believe in peoplelike I've never been around. Somebody like like you, because I watched youand I've had the opportunity to see what you've done, but I think thatbelieving in somebody is really truly like this great this great way toencourage them and to make them the best that they can be both on and offthe field, and you Larnin my hope by approach. If I entergect your talkingout believing in me, my approach was first off the most important person tobe believed is the person believing in himself what you do as a leader in acoach. What I tryd to do is reinforce this belief that he really has something to give. He hasa gift and what he has to do is to work and develop that Gif. My job is to findwhat that give is giving the tools and the advice and the leadership thatwould allow him to be the best he could be somewhere down the road. But it'sgoing to take time and patience and and hard work fit coach. Do you think that when youtry to find that gift in somebody as a player, you have to understandthat full person right, because I think that a lot of guys that I've known they,you see a lot of talent come through the NFL but and they all have giftsright. But how do you pull that out of them? You have to understand thatcomplete person. So tell me: What did you do to get to know those players ina way that they really believed and trusted in you? Well, first off you commuyoucommunicate honestly. You know, you know if you tell some kind of a fib to a player,it's a secret for about thirty seconds in the lockerroom and everybody knowsyou can lose credibility instantly in...

...an NFL, lock rout and you have to makedecisions, not always the popular decision, but the right, deecisions andand not be impulsive about it. Then, if you have a deep enough philosophy, thedecisions you make sometimes seem impulsibly, but it's you've been thereand done it before, and you know how you think- and this is how I'm going torespond to the situation I'm in. But the number one thing is be honest: withyour claents Tellem, the truth. Sometimes they really don't want thetruth. They don't want to be told they're, notquite good enough. They don't want to be told that they haven't worked hardenough. They want, they don't want to be told that they they've overlooked.Some talent they've had for too long as too late. The NFL doesn't sit around await for you to grow up. You know, and I neaned a long time ago, Gos thatthere's no correlation between maturity and age. You know I've coached, kids,eighteen years old that were mytouris hell and I've coached guys thirty fiveyears older, we're still growing up yea. So that's what I would do, Guss and andworking with the kid thing is number one, and then the number two thing isto be a good example for him. You better do what you ask them to do in a way thatthey can see that you really believe and what you're trying to teach them.You reinforce everything you believe an by your example. Your team will not bewhat you are, not okay, your family rity with you are not that's all thereis to it and it so I use that and I've actually had NFLplayers come to mea lock room says goat. You know you know, because in the offseasons inthe NFL we would have position dinners at the House Carolond. I would cook forhim. The Big Table I have sitting up stairs, we sat at last night. We tookit with us because we could see eighteen people on it and we'd haveplayers around there and I had a number of times e had players coming up coachin my marriage. I want to try to develop the relationship that you andyour wife have and pass it on to my family. Now that goes, you know youdon't get that on football field. You don't get that in the meeting room orNoeday. You get that in these other little things you add to who you reallyare and what you believe in, and you know, by being an example, some ofthese kids have never had UF have never seen a perenmtal relationship, some of them no, no Hartheir Dad is.You know. I've experienced all these conversations behind glote stores, so Ifelt that wit. I didn't realize that phase was an impacting certain kids, but it wasbrought to my attention and made me feel good. Now I didn't have to changeanything, but that's what we are El. You know that's what we do and but Ithink the big thing is when you look hem in the eye, you got to tell thimthe truth and, and you have to be believable and the only way you can bebelievable is be consistent and then see you. They see in you you'R in your actions. What you'reactually talking about yeah, wait. Sorry Gos wee you going to saywell, Lome Real, quick, Mor youw coach. I've always felt like your example of how you lead. I was ahigh school coach after I played, and you know I just didn't go any furtherafter high school, but I people would make fun of me becauseafter the season was over and you do the banquet and you talk about the kidsand I get really emotional, I always cried. I mean it's just how I am I veryemotional because I cared and- and you know people used to say that about youas well, and I always thought that was wrong. That doesn't mean that you're,weak or you're, not strong or you didn't push the kids to be better. Itwas, I always felt like I knew them intimately and they were like my kidsas well. Yeah. Well I'll, tell you this it all. It always used to really botherme, but there's no shame in being who you are right and a few years ago I wasreading one of Schwarzkouf's books. Okay and in there there's a statementit says you know he didn't worry about the guys thatcried or got emotional. He worried about those that didn't right. No ey agreen when I was younger, I used to SeenoCarol, would Saye to me. No DIC, don't get emotional. Well, that's it's likesaying Dick, don't take the next step. You've got to be who you are and Iwould walk into NFL stidiums and I can remember you want tem to fit so vividly.I'm thinking, walking, Inthe Forty niner stadium and the old one is ostadium and I look up atd. So go some Guy Yo'l SAV for me. Don't you cry forme, you know so I learned to live with it becausethat's who I am- and I you know when you're eighty four years old, who givesa damn with someone else, thinks you got to be yourself Ri, I think at anyage yeah who gives a damn because I've gone through that coach. You know I'v EI've had situations come up in my life, I'll, be on a spen for the rest of mylife. For U something Thot happen to me. While I was playing and and peoplestill make fun and talk to me about it, when I do radio shows and all that andI'm just like hey, it happened to me,...

...you just move on and, and you live on,it's not going to bring me down it's just like being emotional. It's part oflife, an that Tonaoman yeah I can define. I can tell you what makes meemotional. So when I get into situations now, I try to not move mymind in presentation into that specific area, because I do get emotional andit's about a person. It's a boutle relationship. It's about a feeling you have in in when youremotional person like I am that left out of your brain. You can't it just happens and you know- and I learned to live with it,but I know how to say out of it, but sometimes when I'm trying to stay outof it, I don't get to where I ought to go.Righi have that o know what I mean I co. I totally understand right and havingthe opportunity. You know you stepped into certain places that were, I wouldsay, hostile enenvironments like moving from California to Philadelphia, andyou know using all your emotion and grit and everything to win that cityover. If you were not the emotional coach, I don't think you would have hadthe love of the city that you ended up. Having and so being yourself. You knowthere is a Latin taying SSA, Quam Wadairy, which means t be rather thanseem to be, and that is definitely coached it for me all all the way. Well,thank you. You know me as well as anybody, but yeahyou got to be who youare, and you know that and I whent every whenever young coach is talk tome and I communicate with certain coaches and- and I don't have all theangers, but I just tell him how I feel and more also tell him in broadcasting.For Fourteen years I was on somebody else's football field. You know the two Mery football coaches,I've ever seen coast. Football were bill: Scnyder, Ganja, state, okay andTom Offlin, a Bouston college they're, the two best on the field, footballcoaches leaders and success o producing football coaches. That I'd watchedbelieve me and you know a don and Badben on Don shootiis practice feelyou know and those kind of guys you walk away, and you say my God. I wish Iwas good as they are. You know, that's just hap they make you feel so anyway, you learnd. I learned a lot by broadcasting game, visiting lock ofrooms being on practice, fields and walking off some fields and say youknow, they're really overrated. They just loaded with Downn, with averagecoaching and ther winning yakw I'd, say to myself evand. I could go back andwin here, you know, but when you walk on a field and see the other where theplayers are ar marginal and HR they're playing AK Games, an beating them, yousay: There's real coaching, making somebody the best it could be as acollective organization. Well, it's funny. You say that coach, because myfather inlaw h recently just passed. He coached for forty two years, an highschool level and he was my high school coach and when my sons came back hometo Pittsburgh and he went to Pittsburgh Central Catholic and played there, hewould come to the Games and he said look you know we would have twenty fivethirty kids come out for football. We didn't have twenty five thirty athletesand we Wen a lot of games because he taught them how to play football andthey were gritty and they wanted to win for him. He said if I would have hadthis kind of talent. I who knows what I would have done. You know he says thatall the time- and he says you guys- should never lose a game with thetalent you have on the field. So you know I can say this and I'm Marniknows I'm no ego guy, but in on thousand nine hundred and eighty if wehad a first. Second Third Roum pick in seventy six and seventy seven and atfirst and the second pick in eight N, seventy eight we'd have blownthe raiders out. Okay, Wedidn't have those at those eight nine real, highquality football players. We did a great job. My coaching staff did greatjob, making seventh eighth nineten free agents, good players and collectivelyputting together. We end up with some guys. You know they're going to the proBo. They weren't picked to go the Probo they worke to get there. Yeah I meanthat's the withology, that's why I think people really claim to certainyears and certain teams, because of the mythology behind it like did, and youwere able to go into the locker room and create an environment which was youknow you would walk into this situation where there weren't. You know a playerson the team and make them into a players, and I know everybody talksabout your training camp. I want to hear about. You know how you said: Okay,this is my time in Philadelphia. We're going to make this training campexperience as difficult as it is, but really make the players enjoy it,because the results are going to be there yeah. Well, the big thing is yourvery way: what the need each position, each situation, each area of your team,offensivaly defensing with special team, and then you die design practices thatallow you t t make each area that were...

...not good enough in better and what itit acts up to a lot of time. You know if you're an average golfer. You maynever be. You Know Sam Sneed, so to speak. But if you go practice, you'llget better the same thing with the football player if you, but you have toprovide it in an environment in an temple that'll carry over to Gameday.You know. Now you go to football. PRACTICEES looks like dancing withstars. You know team o. They can almost point to each other. I got you blockall right, you block me. You know that kind of thing, but no there's, I don't think therere any secrets. Theproblem with I wer Hav what Hav in the NFLS I couldn't do it in the NFL today,it's all controlled by what the leagued and the Union collectively put togetherin the bargaining Grouk reoment. So it's not what you as a leader,determine that team needs it's controlled time. Contact work, padsdouble days, is all controlled by the Union. You know, team has already beenbeaten, you fifteen times in a row. They don't need as much work as you doI's trying to catch up. You know, but Rightt's all no fight now, so it'sharder to take a losure and make him a winner, byout working somebody yeah. Ihave a good friend, grey Goson WHO's, a OC of the raiders, and you know we weretalking back in the spring and I was telling h m about when I first came into e Onethousand, nine hundred and Nigety four. You know I could go out inthe fill W th with Cam Cameron all day and we would just throw and I'd havereceiver and I'd throw you know come back after come back after comeback,dig an te dig, you know just learning the timing and throwing and all that,and he, like, Oh yeah. We can't do that. Today we get a certain period with time,with quarterbacks and being a backup. That's where you get your reps. youknow Wans raizing to me guys and Mornin. What's a really amazing to me thisfirst weekend, starting with the Thursday night Gana how well theseteams are playing, I mean it made me. I was wrong. Maybe Ididn't have to work em as much to get him to play as well as they play,because right now now see, I think the football they play today in the shorterperiod of time. Its alignment and assignment football, rather than takenyou individually and teaching you how to play your position better physicallywithin the scheme and take your scheme and coach areas of the scheme, so theycan be executed better. Now it's a you have an alignment. The signment youplay because you just didn't have enough time. N, I'm very impressed withthe quality of play yeah. I thought the Games Ere Righ, but I think also,though coach, that back in the old days you know the grit, and that was reallyhow people, let you led by the amount of time by the amount of everything youdid. So I think it's different people now have a you know. Just all thedifferent training methods, the training nable is different. Everythingis so completely different than it was back in the S and early your drightmoney, but Thi. One thing: that's always true. Everybody thinks erworking hard. These guys Reedin the paper right now it's how hard they'reworking boy it was it tough we had pads on today. Oh my God, it g, it's a jokein comparison. So it's you know, everybody likes to believe their Hartworkers. They may not like to work hard, but they like to believe it in it'svery easy to tell somebody a hard they're working. They will alwaysbelieve you well. You know t no just funny. You say that, because I playedfor the bengals one year, Ind Kenty Anderson was my quarterback coach andthe Lal Ta. What's that hellthat befor yeah see bill was what their offencincoordinated, or a few years, yeah yeah. Well Dick Lebowas, a heay coach, Kenny,Addirson Wis, my quarterback coach, and he used to tell us stories about howthey used to dode three days when he, when he first came ESA, we didn't havean offseason. We were all working other jobs and Wewou start early July. We'dhave three days and we had to go through all this and that and and sowhen we go out there and we complained about you- know, wed- have a practicein the morning then we'd be in. You know, shells in the afternoon. He justlaugh at us. He goes all right. Boys were going to work, so he'd put usthrough the ringer every day because he said yeah. You know I've done this well.I believe- and you probably do too were in the the reason, a lot of things. TaCutback is try to prevent injury and they know the Cte situation and aret.Actually, with I cut back so far now I think they're creating more injuriesbecause they aren't contact. insingably ready for contact at the temple wasplayed on Sunday and I so I think we're getting more injuries. And now I nevergot you know that I hear all the time. IAS A soft soft issue problem softdigwe used to call thim bruises, that's what you call it right: Caus, SoffTissue Injury, yeht bruise, you play you move, you work, Ou Grigt, you MotavBot, tem put you go out and do it, but so that's all changed and some of it isfor the good ther, no question right now. You know, and I gothroughhat coach, because when I was in eighth grade my dad he was a mill guyhere in Pittsburgh. He worked for a...

...plant called PPG and when I was ineight grade e bought me new par of cleets o play football and the firstpractice. I hurt my foot and I said Dad. I think I broke my foot. He goes. Idon't care what happened Yo. I just bought you, those cleats you're, goingto wear hem all year. Just tie your shoet tighter and I did. I played thewhole season and had a not it didn't hurt you did it, it didn't hurt you gothrough a little bit, but you learn how to fight through pain and deal with it,and- and you know I still deal with that- get mentality today and I thinkthat's what made me a okay, quarterback yeah, and so I grew up. That's my dad was thesame way. My Dad. I think he could be the originator, overbal abuse, okay, an unbelievable way of getting on yourButt Right. Well, I think my grandfatherwould say injured is different than her like an injuiy is very different thanbeing hurt, like winters playe her if you're injured, then you know you'lldeal with that, but I think that that gritty mentality, which was so exciting-and you know, having and being able to kind of play through that. I think it'swhy we I fell in love to Myflin love with football, just watching people outthere, give it their best and go out there and play and do everything theycan to make those ten yards. Yeah no yeah. When you can see that inpersonality to some people have said to me, you know you're a good motovate, Isaid no, I was a good evaluator right. I brought people that I saw certaincharacteristics within their personality and performance before weever drafted him or signed him, and that's why they're here you know andthey might not be the biggest fastest martist, but there's something I likedabout the combination of all these attributes. You know, but out there wead, we had some lousy drafs in Phildelphia, my last couple, O years orto we didn't, do as good a job drafting when we had first and checkit thirdground Pixas, we did when we didn't have them. So we learned a lesson thereto later on so coach. When you would go from youwent from high school to College. To you know all the stops you did beforeyou got to the eagles. Did You keep a notebook? Did you do things that youwrote down to to remember all the stuff, or did you just have a still tramp upthere? They remember everything I' a big writer, Downer. Okay, I yeh I've sent boxes of stuff of football stuff. I'vesaid box is full of John Bruden wo's, a personal friend and and other youngcoaches. I've sent him stuff that on the more matore side of my career, whenI was doing it more, you know I had assistance to type it all right, it alland all that kind of stuff but yeah. I believe in writing it down. I really do,and you know i Mani's been with me hen. I have a commentense principalpresentation- is takes an hour to give and do it right an I work on that every week. Every time Icould go down, I could go get it out now and the last time I worked on it.Wiht have been middle last week. I think it something I read somethingit's better expressed. What I believe than I would express it. I incorporatethat in my presentation, so you know otherwise you get a little stale. Youknow and right don't grow in and I read to learn not to like I say justto enjoy and relax and carrols always looks at me thinks that crazy, becauseshe reads three books a week to just relax and it aid a great book Tan. It'sgood ior taning, so es Anya Ave, you always learning so I woud join everyoneby Cook, dicfermill we're going to take a short break wit, you right back, hey listeners, thanks for joining Daveand I in the huddle we invite you to join our exxcusive huddle throughPatreon, where you can get access to content made just for VIPs likeyourself, head to our website, huddle up with Guscom and hit support ourpodcast on the pop up ad. Once again, that's huddle up with guscom. Now,let's get back in the huddle, everyone wert back with former NFL headcoach, Dick formeal coach for mill has been telling us some great storiesabout his life growing up and you know how he got started in coaching and andthe people that made an influence in his life and now we're on to the eaglesand telling us some great stories so Marni. I know you have some incrediblequestions for coach Vor meal. You know growing up seeing him in that buildingevery day, with your with your grandfather with your mom there so goahead. I know you have some incredible questions for coach. For meal well, you know, I would definitely saythat coach for me all taught me the work ethic that I believe I have. Iknow that his work ethic was incredible. So coach, you obviously have not. Thatis not slipped away as you've aged you know gracefully. So what do you I mean?How do you continue to have this drive and great like? What are yourmotivators to do that? Well, I think...

...it's very a very important, as you getolder, to keep moving, but not not just your feet, your headas well, okay- and I think it's so easy to wind down. Let see I'll be eightyfour this coming month, I want to wind up to be. I want to be on the upper onepercent of eighty four. You know not that I'm t trying to live longer. Ijust like to live older, better okayand and I haven't stopped doing anything I liketo do because I'm eighty four that I did a forty four okay, some things Idon't do as well. I'm sure ut, Hey I'll, begin Montana. First Week in November,hunting the hills of a ninety threehousand, Acre rain for ELT and andand there'll, be guys a lot younger that are staggering when they come inand I feel great, but you have to work at it. You know you have. You have makea contribution every day to to your own personal health. You know so all right. How do you deal withtdisappointment, poorly that'sthat's, a good question? You know,that's a good question money. You know the first thing to do is evaluate thedisappointment and what percentage of the reason of the disappointment isrelated to you directly rigt. You know a lot of people handle disappointmentimproperly in that they look for other people to blame. You know I'm not a blamer, infact, probably a fault. Sometimes I want to assume too much of the faultfor the disappointment or the loss or whatever me ore, the real problem andI've learned over the years. At many times it was, I was a atleast eightpercentage of it. So first you got to be grateful for what you have. You gotto be grateful. What you are- and you got to look forward to trying to bewhat you'd like to end up being. You know you'd like to be a little betterthan you were yesterday or last month, and you don't have to be fifteeneighteen or thirty to do that. You do that the rest of your life. I just liketo be better on my eighty fourth birthday than it was on my eighythirdin certain things within my life you know, and- and it can happen and Ithink for you- I think that people that are really good at what they do they'reresilient enough to say, like I'm, going to set an egg timer with thisdisappointment and when that's over I'm going to move right on turn the pageand keep going yeah more opportunity ahead of you. That'strue money! U Now that's w one reason I left h coaching in Eiy two I got so Idid a very, very poor job of that I would blame ha loss on Sunday tosomething on. I did rather than the overall picture why we lost. Maybe wegot beat by Better Pean Ora guy fumbles a ball. He fumbles a ball. Wer Guythrows an interception I would fight. I should have run a running play. Yo,wouldn't you wouldn't have thrown an interception, all thes sai an theybuild up. So pretty quick you're not handling the loss properly, becauseit's a distraction from preparation to do something better next week and itwas a snowball effect on me. I mean it just really bothered me and I canremember we were in Dallas and we beat Dallas. You know it was a second timewe beat Dallas in Dallas and we're landing in Philadelphia that night and I'm I got my notes out on my lab I'm working on next week and allthat and Carol looked at me, and she said my God Dik. Why did you Chacke aminute and just enjoy the fact that you won and I got so tthe joy of winning didn't last verylong, because I was moving my thinking to the nextchallenge too soon before I relaxed and really enjoyed it. Then, when I wouldlose, I couldn't get over the Losh, because I kept going evaluating why welost and what I could have done as the coach to have prevented it. You knowand that you start doing that ill. Tell you it's Sno, bold on me. It just woreme out so coach, O tai learn Howyo Mov, yeah yeah, you move from the Eagle, so thereyou have some some. You know at the end of Your Eagle'scoaching career, that had to be tough for you because you fell in love, ofh,the city, the city loved you and and as we know, a lot of coaches will move onand then you go to St Louis. So tell us what you took to St Louis of all thosethings you learned from Philadelphia. Well, first, off August I took a way tocoach a football team in one thousand nine hundred and eightywith me, tunein o Hou Ninehuneen, Seventy Tousan Ninetneen, ninety sevenokay to nobody was doing it. That way anymore guys would come to our Trainicap visiting college coaches and they good travel around the training campsduring the training. Cam Season and then then their college season startslater and they would always come up to...

Mesi Coachan. I was so and so practiced.Like the last couple of days. I was over here OIA and out there there it'snot a kind of football practice. You're running, hear I said I don't know anyother way to do it. The only way to de better you know, there's there's, likeI say, Manny's heard me say: There's no correlation between working, listen,getting better, never has been rever willby right. You know, hat right yeah I took the ability. Kino do makethings. I took the ability to when I walked away from me and went home oroffseason to relax and enjoy that kind of time, and we won the ball game. Ienjoyed the bus rigdt from the stadium to the airport to the flight home tothe first day of the week, and then I started preparing the next game. Youknow and I didn't dwell on why we lost. I was dwelling on getting ready to dothe next thing. We have to do better, Yeu. Well, you know coach. You talk about.You know if you would have had that talent in one thousand nine hundred andsevty nine. You know when you went and played theraiders. Now you have that talent in St Louis. You know you have some amazingtalent, and then you have trink green as your quarterback who I've knowntrend for years, we're together at the redskins and then he goes down and then the emotional rollercoaster that you gothrough your team to find the next quarterback and Curt Warner steps up.So tells u a little bit about that journey for you when you know thepieces are there and then one piece goes down. How do you? How do you dealwith that? Well, you know we dealt with it. The only way we could.We didn't have much of a choice, but we had Kurt there and the one I'd learnedin not being my own quarterback Oachan own offensive coordinator and callingmy own PLAC when you're on the practice field. You see more righty, I would seeevery player every day knew everything and and I'm standing on the defensive,secondary during a defensive period with Curt Warner running the opponent'soffense as the quarterback and he's Eatin a salite throwing the ball, and Iwould walk off the field and I'd say to my defensive coaches eve either we areterrible on defense or this kid in the play you ten, you tend to have an attitudeas a coach in the Nflis. Well, there's no way Yo'd ever do that in life situation in a game he just runthe plays off a card. You know no way that anyone could do that. You know,and but you know sooner later- I notice things. For example, Gush Youtooappreciate this they would have a pass pattern on a card and circles to wherethey wanted the ball, throwing against the definds our defense yeah. I hatethat, but yeah I get Kurt would go back, drop, look boomboom and he throwit to the open guy over here to the left. You know twentyyards away from where he was supposed defensive. Coaches would hey come on.MEO Say cut, he was covered. I went over here, you know he just you knowsome thing. Some people just see that and h and they have that instinctively approach or feel that they can do itWei Realy thinking about they just do it. You know- and that's what's really started separatinghim as he got the opportunity to play. You know it's amazing. If you look athis fir, his first five games are the finest first five games ever played bya quarterback in the history like, but the numbers was as incredible yeah. You know in talkingto me, you interasted, Isin, talking to I've, been invited to the leadershipcollege in lect in Kansas, where they trained fom militaryleadership, the militiary brace there, and they have leadership programs going onall the time and they're trying to determine what makes a person become a meddle ofonerwinner big is first off thet, come alldifferent size, shapes and frames of mine, all that and they're trying to doit. So they could do a better dop of teaching these quaities when young military kids come into the programsand it's the same thing with a quarterback. You Know Al Guys BecomeHall of famers that they never. You know Kurt warners a perfect examplehe'se an Ma, Lov honor winner from a football stand point. No one expectedhim to do that. He did it. You know their guys that throw themselves onhand grenates and Wen the MEDL monor, yes, they're gone, but no one expecteder or trained him to do it. It just something, compels them to do the theright things right at the right time and that's what was curred plus. He wasextremely accurate off ballance. He didn't have to have everything perfect.Now I listend to these commented this weekend. I laugh at of it well Jeez. Hedidn't have his feet right. He just you know there isn't a defensive limemandesign to allow the quarterback to...

...emisphe if you're playing against Aaron DonaldJeez, Oh yeah he's the best he's absolutely UN. They shouldn't comparehim with anybody else, because no one compares with him. I watched him Monday as Sunday night, my God and I'vewatched other defensive tackles that make as much money they don't play like.He does. No, no, you know in coach and you look at Patrick myhomes and I thinkwhen you were talking about that, that's who comes to mind just throwingoff Baance throu different ways. Different y know he is Kurt Warner, butwith more athletic ability. I don't know if he throws a ball any better,but he has more any athletic ability, movement, skills of flexibility, andyou almost hope when you're playing againstPatrick homes, you don't create a broken play for him to go, beat you on RHE's, better, letting him executeperfectly and try to defense rather than create havoc in his face and himget out of there and boom throw a touchdown pest. A somebody wasn'tsupposed to you know, that's just him and I don't think you can coach allthose secondary reactions. I think they just sort of come to you yeah! Well, Hey Marnin! Before I know youhave another question, but before you go coach, if you see what PatrickMahoms his contract, he just got and you think about when you first startedcoaching at the Eagles and how the times have changed that you got intothe NFL it's kind of flaborgaiting, to kind ofunderstand how that went, because I have a lot of friends that were older.You know all these old steelers that I know that because I live here inPittsburgh and I do Charity Golf tournaments with them and you just hearhim chirping about that all the time. IT'S INSANE YEAH! Well, it's you knowit fits with a TV dollar. You know really right, it really does. When Icoach you know, when I left UCLA, I was making thirtysandolars a year. No nowwher they pay chip, four million five Miliot, I don't know, and it justproduct of our times when I coach, I coach the Eagles for seven years, madefour hundred fifty thousand dollars total, but I had deferred compensationthat that hell, I thought it was great and I've got a Twentythosan dollar raisa minute. I signed the contract that was big money in those days and Iwasn't underpaid. I was paid better than the average coach in the NPL atthat time and they didn't have deferred comversation and they didn't haveLeonard Toast O cover up mistakes. He made financially andhe paid for him.Okay, so itknow, it's different an I selfishl say it's about time. Theystart paying the coaches. You know the first guy that gets fired. When teamslose the coach. If he's at important, then you ought to pay him that way. Ifhe's the most important he's the reason you lose, then he might be part oftheer a big biggest percentage of the reason you win guys like Don Shula, aBill Walsh Force ownership to start paying difference makers because theyfound out that a coach could come to a program. That's been losing and change,it change the community change the cultureon the team and changed the Windlos's records, and they said well, my God,you know I had. I had three coaches ornfl hall frame right now. Tab told mein the Old Days Coaching Football coaching positions in the NFL are something the owners looked for. isthey have to have it because it's mandatory? They would just as soon notallow the coach to become the figure head of the organization, though thatwasn't my case Whitleonard dose, but there have been coaches e. You knowthat it coached in that environment. You know that yeah. So when all of a sudden, they startedhating coaches more, it's because guys proved that they could go somewhere andchange at all and just change it all dramatically. You Know Jon pags done inNew Ormang and you've done so much off the field coach. You know yourempathetic heart radiates, so I mean Yo. I think that you know you're socharitable. What drives you to want to give back off the football fields? Whatare some of the things that make you feel compelled to do that? Well, youknow I have a unbelievable respect for the blue collar workers. My family, mydad, was a black collar work. Greesi an I never saw im with clean hands untilwe buried it. Okay, at seventy six years old with the guy tof cancer, thePancras, but he was always greasy, always Dartyn, always working sevendays a week, myour family never went on a vacationso and I see hard working people. I have great compassion for, and I geta I see how I was raised. I see peoplethat I was raised by that were friends on my family, my bites family and theFreddy Anni family. These people that I all grow. I grew up, but I'm stillaffiliated with these families but theyre other generations is that...

I just identify with him much more thanI do. Somebody else way up in the upper class. Now I respect them and I like tobe around people that have been extremely successful financially inevery way, because I just like seeing how how d they do it or you know,wasn't an accident, it was it a gift or did they inherit, you know more oftenor not. It was because theyere, honest and workd hard, O o Yehat's right, sothat was yeah and- and I know you know, I've forwarded you emails from peoplesaying Oh coach. For me all did this for me and coach for me. Also, you havealmost such a a touch that everybody feels connected to you and you've,given back so much, certainly in this city of Philadelphia, whether it's thewrong wcdonald house or finding time as you're walking through a hospital andsomebody will flag you down and say coach, my mother sick when you come sayhi and it's really amazing. You put all your energy into stopping and makingpeople feel good about themselves, because, obviously you really likeyourself too, and you have confidence in your own skills and that's reallyjust so refreshing and so unique, and what make Ethin Nowi callt a gratitudeattitude. Wif You're really grateful if yourreally sincerely grateful for Everythingis a regardless of there's alot of money whatever it is. If you're like, we just lost our entire redwinecrop in an APPA valley dudith this week. Okay, no red wine for two thousand andtwenty Carol's first comment to me, as am about ready to cry in Mi, show hershoulder. She says you know, did weall be grateful. Wouldn't Wedi, no one'shouse burn down the vineyard, didn't get burnt up. You know it's not inflames like a lot of people out there er experience, and so you know she'sright. You got to be. If you remain, like, I say, a gratitude attitude, youcan make a positive out of a negative. You keep adding the negatives to it. It pulls you down, you don't lookforward to getting hem in the morning yeah. You really don't, and I see inother people traites all the time that I appreciate and they don't even know,I'm avaluag. You know you know. If you go to a market in the teller is, is you leavether and said Jees? What a great lady she was. You know and you can leaveanother in the same building and walking what a painte as he was. Youknow right, so I just. I just believe that I thatthat Youw in out also, I believe, when you recognize something you reallyappreciate it, you better let the person that stimulated that thought, nolife yeah. You know yeah. I've said that many I up sad ma time boy, you owsomething er, really good at what you do and they look at it. You know startlYeah Yeah. Well, I always have this little test cop. When I go somwhere whet I go Ar Marniand coach, I love toopen doors for people to see how they react. If they say thank you or theyappreciate, or maybe he they'll carry on it to somebody else. You know andand that just kind of lets you know like when my wife and I go all over thecountry like you do coach. We do that all the time just to see the reactionand the people that arearound some people don't say anything. Some peopleare very grateful and and really stay, stop and talk to you and it's just away to something small gesture like that that my dad always drolled into my head,that you should be grateful and help other people yeah. You know I give youstory on Kirt Warner. He first comes into the League he's making MinimumShowerin as my third quarterback in nine Igteen, ninety eight, okay and allof a sudden he's making three hundred forty thousand whatever it was at thattime. I'm Meithe, rich man in his mind right. He and his wife would go out todinner in invaribably. He would look around the room and he would pick upsomebody sitting there with their children's check and pay it as hewalked out on of Segot. Not once often often so you know that that's the greate example I can give you what you're talking about of a personactually being truly grateful for his opportunity and spread that gratitudeto somebody who doesn't even know you know o Mazin, say Sivility is not a sign ofweakness. NOFOR. My Ba nat was his saying with sability. Is Not a sign oft e weakness, so I think that B, those are great labro Al used to stay. You use a trum. The term will he'sreally improven. I've said God he's really improven and IHE heard me saythat Om Gote, really improven he'd say you know, sit Ne Git. You know you candie of improvement. He said my own father died of improveen.This is he talgt me on your Gran, great grandfather. I'm S. Horulhe would seehim when he wousd Zilll and the doctor would say he's improving.

Then he passed on, like like yourGRANDPA Shaid Hehe died from improvement right. Oh my goodness, that's a goodstory! Yeah! It's a good lesson improvement. I mean we have to reallymake the action happen, not enoter thing your grandpa used to say andCarol had this sticker on the refrigerator. For years there aregivers and their aret takiers. True, that's that's how he that's why I loveto give somebody out O hundred donlar Bill Y, never saw one before EC. You know, What's interesting to me.Is that you've dealt with owners right. You had to do with owners as the headcoach and GMS, and you have to deal with every side of it as being a headcoach, and so when you were with Leonard for all those years, you knowand and then you go on to the rams and then the chiefs and and you havedifferent owners and different. You know not only different players, butyou have to deal with the front office people as well. So what did you learnfrom Marni's grandfather that you took with you through all those other places?All the other stops that you had well Leonard had been firing. People inleadership positions there for a while, because they weren't getting goodresults and he's Cinpulsave Fire Wi get him out of there, pet rat left coachesand this kind of stuff, and I felt well if I'm going to be successful here, I'dbetter get to know this guy, I better develop a relationship with it. AAND.As I got to know him, I better understood him the oher thing he woulddo in the offseason my first year, because you don't coach a game. You getthere in January or February, you don't coach a game until September, so you'rethere in your office, all the time and Mr Tos's officer s right across thehall fom me and on Friday, night boy, you're going home boy, your God yer theweekends free, you're, going to Goin, home and relax and I'd be walking out,says, stop and have a drink with me. So I said inher I hated Scotch okay, I didnot licot. I learned to like Scotch because I pretended to like Scotch tohave a common conversation piece with etter. What doyou think of that SCOTCO? I love it. I love it that doers is really good downe.I don ot O, I hated it it just. Oh I get home it. A girl I drink, doscotches when I ge, Oh, my is terrible, and now my leady Drak is got and I'lltell you. I don't think I ever drink, I a scotch without thinking of Mr Coast. You knowreally Develo. You know I, on the only guy, that's in the history of the NFLcoach, three teams and never got fired. Maybe I left prematurely but but Inever got fired, and but I had a great relationship with each owner and whencoaches asked me what's the first thing I ought to do, I always say coach, theowner, because he's going to be sitting in apress box with everybody thinks he knows everything and all they're goingto hear about art when it's bad are the real bad things that man this a coachisfault. It's amazing, Doug Peterson loses a game. Thet forget he wones asuper boot. You know it's amazing yeah, so I made it an AF. I made a realeffort to be in the owner's office when they were in town at St Louis e owner'soffice was not even in town, an in Kansas City. The owners offic was inTexas, but I made an effort to build and create a positive relationship withhim. So when I told him something they really believed and what I said in myprocess that I was applying to what I was trying to do and if they really beon Lenard, we used to go on vacat lenar would take us on a vacation to get meout of the building. You know and then he take our kids along too. You know RSand, and we would have a great time we would have a great time and then you goback to work. So you know he knew all my strengths and weaknesses. Andy E. Iknew his and I know certain areas where I don't go. I can remember sodistinctively walking in his office one day and I say a Mr Tosi got this probem andhe lookd me right up. He looked up over his eak desarand. He says that he says Dick. I heard you to handle thepropesis Wen. He says I don't need to behaling these problems, that's yourjob, so I would go to Jim Mury and Jim Murray. You know he should have beenthe popes offensive coordinator, but right we saw problems together. You know hesaid I don't need. The aggravation would be mister tose's comment. I don'tneed the aggravation I got too many other things going on and that's sawthat really freed me up. It's St Louis Georgia. I knew her because I had towork the one you first year that the rosand blooms took over the rams. I hadworked there and when they fired the head coach, they asked me to stay and Mister Rosablum said to me: Youknow if you were older, I'd make you my head coach, that's exactly what it'sdid. So years later I became his widows...

...head coach. You, okay, ieand in KansasCity was Lamar Hunt. There's no finer man hat ever held that position that asa lead, NFL owner, you talked about you know, billionaire humble you know itrifty, not a big spenfor, but just a sincere wonderful human being really. Ithink one of the all time great guys, but you know, if you don't spend timewith your owner, you don't get to find these things out. He really don't yeahand you know- and I heard that Georgia she loved to eat dinner really late. Sodid you get youing dinners late with her yeah yeah I'll, tell you a story. Thisis true. This is ounineteen ninety nine our last year and we're starting to getgood. Georgia would go to t way, games she'd fly into St Louis Sbend a coupledays and then fly with the team and she was an after almost I don't know howmany times we'd be landing into St Louis. You know we're going to land atseven o'clock, eight o'clock, five o'clock whatever and she asked me to go-have dinner with her and I'd always say Georgia. I got to be in the office towarning seven o'clock. We just lost the game whor we just want. I got it now. Ijust can't go out to dinner. I've got to go to work so now, the third year init and We'e Beatin a few teams and we're really playing well- and shecomes up to me as she's hurt exact comment. I suppose you won't havedinner with me to night when we land carrol hits me in the arm. I Sai, Oh,no I'll. Do it. George, your right money, nine o'clock Sunday night werein t a restaurant that had closed. Okay was closed and opened it for her, and it was, I mean it set it up likethe queen of England was coming in and she sit back ot the table and thenyou'd have to have a Martini with her. She loved her Martini and hersignificant other was a great guy, a big reinforcement guy and we did it,but it took me three years before I did it, but ea actually Caro was the onesaid: You've beetter Doit Yeah, so you evolve those relationship. You developthese relationships and you never forget those. I think I think about therelationships more than I do. The Games yeah I'm the same way on the same way, coach really quick, tell us aboutbefore we get into our last segment or two minute Jole, but tell us about howyou took all your experience in football coaching and leadership intothe making of wine. In the wine business well, first off the winebusiness became a natural to me. I grew up course in Kalotoga and mygrandfather, vermil made all our family wine by great grandfather in theItalian side got a ball. Do I carry own a portion of the Freddy Anny Binyard,for which we get our grapes today? Okay, and so my grandfather for meal wouldmake why and as I got a little older, then my brother and I would be assignedto help and do some of the physical stuff that wasn't tough for anything.But I developed the interest, then the communication at the dinner table inthe holidays and everything the conversations always centered around mygrandfather's wines and this vintage compared to this minagand to taste thearoma and all these different things that fascinated me and hell. If Iwanted a glass of wine at ten years over the dinner tape, I had a glass ofwine. It was expect Rigt, you know, so you know that's how I developed theinterest and then my dad's best friend, WIS Jeane, Freddy Annie, my dad didn'tunt Jean was a hunter wh took me as a kid, so we developed a really goodrelationship and he built a small family veneyard into a hundred andseventy Acre bineyard as it exists today in Calisoga part of it in thiscity limits. You know it's a gold mine, Shittina right now it no not selling tegrats bigcause they're, all tanted due to the smoke. As I said right anyway.That's why I developed the interest in wine. I started making wine as a hobbywith friends that I grew up with Ha new, the friddyanny family and the son ofVal. We had a little winery. I asked him to make some JEN lever meal Caberne.That was my dad's name and my great grandfather's name from Franch Sat I'dlike to put that on a wone livid, because won was always a symbol withinour family of something that's really good anyway, Right Tho, I guy did it wemade about a hundred and fifty cases, and I had no money in it. He sold it ashis Cabernet made by on the edge one re pulshmit. Well, we were in the SuperBowl. Ninety nine he sold of Fi hundred fifty cases in other than what and Ipaid retail price for what I bought out, because he paid for everything andBraon was gone, so he said Hell. Let's do this again, so we did it again andI'm out of coaching and we did it again and that we just kept doing it that way,all away till two thousand and eight. In fact, last night I shared a bottleof two thousand two John, Lea Vermil Camerney, had totally different labeland everything, and and not nearly a sophisticated o process, as is today,but it was an outstanding bless et one. We had it for dinner last night anyway.My friends came in with real money who...

...don't like, don't mind, losing it andsaid: Let's turn your hobby into a full flesh business. You have all theconnections, so they yeah well their first tought. They get unther privatejet, we flie the Napa Valley. We look at vineyards to buy and wait wine reacsto Buya and all of a sudden they start putting the numbers together and e said.You know something. Maybe we ought to just buy the GREAP from fitty any vener.Okay, THAT'S THA! You don't have to do all the service work, just pay for thegreat right, don't have to own the land and pay the taxi, and they said wellrether than buying a winery. Why don't we customcrush like a lot of these top one res? Do A lot of people? Do you you, renttheir facilities and use them, and your winemaker goes there and work? Is itthat's good? So we're still in that process? Okay and it's a good thing. Wedid it that way, though, if that we had purchased the one place that we reallyseriously looked at purchasing that a homon and had a ten acre, Cabana Venyarand all that they turned it down and didn't buy it. These guys had the moneyto buy it, they didn't buy it it's worth about four times out a much today.If you talk bout, it's aazing yea the feel really bad for all those people ewe elaros EA. The only thing we really own is the label and the process andthe business routine an that, but we have yet to break even in the businessand but that my partneris one of us, one of my closest friends, is not gonto allow us to fail. Our wines are reaching very high quality, I qualitinglines, and then we don't make a lot of it, but right now we can't sell itbecause we're not open, so it's online selling is going better than it everhas, which, when we are able to open up, will help us get at least break evenhaving eight in eight season. You know something like tright right. Well, youdrinking AL, your Properta, you knw you'R, runnin away. The Super Bowlitwas going great guns at January and February, but what wet in the toilet?Well wit INFACTN awine business, and I often think now we won't have a twothousand and twenty. I don't know what we're going to do. We haven't figuredthat out yet ow you'll figure it out. I'm sure you know how to win coach and I'm surethat you're going to pull your team through a Yo a lot easier in the winebinses. If I were in the NAPPA valley right right, Philadelphia, there's SOCno vincelance in en miles away. You know- and I don't know therewas a timeI wouldn't mind going back at all. But if I were there in the valley, it wouldbe easy for me to sell the wine. I have never poured the one for somebody thatdidn't like it. Okay, right and the big thing is to get the right people inthere toport to which, if I were there, I'd be able to do it, but fom doing itfrom here. I've got a hundred and two wine clup members on Philadelphia. Ihave more wine clum members in Philadelphia than we have in the stateof California, Okay Right, I'm there I'm here. I cancel five wine events inthe last two months. I've got six on the schedule coming up and yeah. Here Ican sell it. If I can get the people there, you know, but anyway, hopefullyI can get in your wine club someday get pitts for going yeah a lot tougher thanthe NFL. You talk about Forbittsburg, Chuck Kno was a much more knowledgeablewine taster than me. He had the palate. You know he was a wine nut. He used tochuck with he fly in California. He would. He would fly back with NapaValley wines on his plane that team planed one time we're playing pitwereplaying, chuck, Nol okay, here in a preseason game and before the game Isent over a box of riht of Napavalley high qualty wines. Now I wasn't in theWine Business Han, but I could always get what I wanted and I put it in hislocker as a gift, because I knew he's a wine nut and we beat the hell out ofthem the preseason game and whe walk. I meet him at midfield, et grabbs my hand.He said Remeal, don't ever set me up with a case of whine. Again, that's Awsomati sent a lot ofour vermiawine to chuck before it passed away, even though he had all shimers. Hestill had a he still liked ine and his famys wife, Wt port form yeah yeah. Iusually have a cuper to every night at dinner as well. So hey coach, we'regoing to get in our two minute, Jo Real, quick, so hey sonor, put that twominutes up for coach. You Ready Go Marty, I'M READY ALL RIGHT COT! ReallyQuick! Would you rather have a gas or electric car? Guess all right? Coach, your hidden talents, barbecue? What's your biggest pet peeve people that are lazy, yeah, your favorite charity, just acounty boy scouts and children'sHospital love, it love it all right, coach, Hott or cold, whichone do you prefer all right? How about your favoritequarterback frent grade love? It love it. I coach,...

...if you could change places for one daywith a person who would that person be trump? That's a good one. What about yourscariest moment by scariest instant moment was about a month ago wehad a lightning storm out here in the country and a lightning boat. I was inthe garage at six o'clock at night and a lightning boat hit right near itknocked the lights out of the Gro, and I have never heard an explosion likethat. In my life. I don't know what a bomb sounds like when you're near it,but it just I mean I just it scared the hell out of me. It really did. I didn'tI would looked around. Couldn see was dark and I di expected to see flamesand everything else going in and that it you know it was probably not twentyfive yards away, but with the everything we have out here in theirbuilding is grounded because we do get lighting stores right, yedoesn't,muffle, the noise right all right coach. We know you like wine, but what is yourfavorite flavor of Ice Cream? Lately, it's anything with coconut init. Oh that's a new one coconut! I like itall right last one morning e going to kick the fill go here. Okay, wait aminute, I'm I'm going behind this behind the behind the current here, allright. What about your favorite sports movie? I think the one about the hockey teamwhen we won the Olympics? Witho? U Ryeah ar you know I've alway seenitvisible one time, Yeahi see. As I said, you know, throughJohn Wood's advice, I don't go back and reach stuff look at stuff. I don't liketo see myself. Okay and I really enjoyed the movie. I thought they did avery good job in the quality. The movie- and I see bench all the time but e the The hockey story was unbelievableyeah. That was, that was a great story. Tho speech, everything it's just anamazing. It's an amazing movie! So coach. That was our two minute drill.We didn't make it in the ends Zon, but we kicked the fillgoal. I'm sure thatyou felt that a few times and Youan Peope Ou that SOM undefeated teamsaround to make right right. So coach, please let all our fans know how theycan follow you or find you where they can go, maybe to buy your wine. Well, Idon't have anything Av for MEA wines, just Google for MEO wines, that's ourwebsite! Okay, I'M NOT! On ingrahm! I have an instagram that they put up fromthe Wunch. I don't use it. I don't use any of that stuff. Okay, but my my email address as rav coach at Com,Castdot net okay, my cell Phoneisi on ive, six threeeight, eight ight, seven,and I'm here and I'm always well. I'm surprised your grandkidshaven't, put you on everything. Yeah cause my couender and do those kind ofthings, but go ahead. I don't that's you best wayto contact me all right. Well, hey coach! We really appreciate you Marniany last words for coach, no other than just thank you coach. You know you'resuch an inpiration and I'm so grateful I you know for me, Whenieveeri seenyour name cop up on my phone. It's like! Oh, my gosh coach. I mean that is I'mvery fortunate and I know you've influenced so many people and thank youfor that. Just thank you for that gift and thank you for saying, yes andmaking the decision to move to Philadelphia all those years ago. Thankyou well, thank you to your sweetie always have been all right. Coachey. Thank you for allthe hard works that you give to the NFL to everyone and thank you for joiningus on huddle up with Gus. We really appreciate your time all right. Youtake care of both of you. I lie all right. Thank you by that's our showeveryone you could find us on RADIOCOM or wherever you listen to your favoritepodcast check us out on nthixeundren ND, thirty, one digital news and everyone have a great day. Thank you for joining Dave, and I inthe huddle. We hope you enjoyed our podcast if you like, to hear morepodcast, just like this go to huddle up with Guscom, where you can find oursocial channels subscribe to hear more by our merchandise and join ourexcusive huddle through patreon. Please Jon US next week when we talk to moreguest about how sports shaped their life.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (144)