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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Coach Mike Jarvis

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Former Florida Atlantic Basketball Coach, Mike Jarvis joins our huddle. We talk with Mike about; coaching a high school Patrick Ewing, the racism he experienced in the 70s, and his new books. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I am former NFL quarterback Guspora. Iplayed quarterback fifteen years in the NFL. This is my show called huddle upwith Gus each week I team up with my longtime friend Dave Hager, and wetalked with guests about how sports shape their lives pro athletes,business, executives, community leaders, everyone has a story to tell aboutsport. We invite you to huddle up with gus this week in the huddle, the winnerof over four hundred Gamess, an NCA basketball, an cooch he's written threebooks is a motivational speaker, successful entrepreneur, ISPNcommentator the high school coach of one of the greatest players in collegeand NBA history. Hi Story is inspiring hebattle social and economicadverstetorize to the top of this profession. He's welcomeing to the HIDLMik carvus joining us today on the huddles coach,Mike Jarvis coaches, coached, a lot of wonderful athletes inbasketball that not only college players but have gone onto the NBAA BenHall of famers and some the greatest ever in their positions. I've alwaysbeen a big fan and, as you know, my nitch is like mids college hoops, and Icoach Jarvis was in the middle of that thick and heavy, so yeah yeah. So coachthank for joining us on Huldowop today and we're gonna get you right in thehoddle with us, and and really we want to ask you what started your love of sports like?How were you was it your parents? You know that influence at the firstinfluence. What was that for you? Well, first of all, I always givepraise and gory to you know to God forgiving me an incredible family, a mother who was just the greatest whoallowed her little chubby son. When I was growing up, my nicknae was PRISCO.I was the little fat Gett in the neighborhood and they didn't want tocall me Fedso. So they gave me the name CRISCO and one day cris go back on hiseleventh birthday. His brother, Richard, had given him a basketball, and he wason his way to the basketball courts, but none oe get there. He had to crossthe field eculd, so he was at whatfield in Cambridge Massachusetts on his wayto the basketball courts and all of a sudden, the one of the local heroes.stretchheadly little league coach was calling Crisco Crisco come on overhere, so I ran over as fast as my little fat lays could take me and hesaid, would you like to be on my team, and I said I would love to and I lookedaround and I saw they had eight players and guess what they didn't have aCatcher, and you know back in the old days the little fat kid was always thecatcher. So I became the catcher and when I really became that day was Istarted my my journey in sports, my love for sports and wanting tobasically be a leader, and so I was the captain of the team. I was the leaderof the team and just fell in love with sports and at that same time, that samebirthday, it's amazing how gard worked my brother Richard, who had brought methe basketball and didn't realize he was going to be introducing me tostretch N in baseball. He took me to my first selftigs came and- and you know,Bill Russell was playing in his at tha his first season and I felt in lovewith you know the Celtics wuld ret, our back with the players and without evenknowing it. My Coaching Korea really began on that day. My birthday and you know so that's howI begin and then that led to you know playing out to sports football,basketball, baseball and grammar school. And then, when I got to high school, Ibroke my ankle as e freshman playing football, and I said no more football.I'm sorry! I love the game, but I ten devoted my time to basketballand baseball and eventually you know, I stayed with basketball and that's howhow it began for me- and you know it's really amazing when you think aboutbeginning how each and every one of us have some incredibly, you know just unique beginning. Youmentioned your coaching in Little League T. was that really the first coach thatyou had that really kind of influenced the direction you were going well? My first coach was my mom Dorothy.My second coach was my big brother, Richard my sister trudy. However, myfirst sports coach was a fellow by name of ringe Jefferson, Whu Taut as how toplay games and basketball at the Cambridge community center. So aroundthe same time that I was learning how to play basketball. That's when I metstretch so stretchheadly and ringe Jefferson at the community center withmy first two coaches and the thing about both of them. Is They woere just...

...they? These guys were I mean they justloved? What they did? They love kids. They were. They were very positiveinfluences if you mess. If you us, he bad language, they throw you out. I mean they were real real goodteachers of the fundamental teachers, and I think I really started toappreciate or later on. I realized how fortunate I was to have two. My firsttwo coaches were into fundamentals, were intodoing the little things on andoff the court yeah. I'm sure that that helped you with your coaching career,because fundamentals are a big part of any game. Even when you get to thehighest level. If you don't have yeon the metals, it's not going to work yeah.So your coach is coach, Hedley and and whatwas the other coaches nameDredch, IRINC and rich. They gave you a lot of agood understanding of how O Start andlove the game, andit's all about fundamentals and hard work, so thenyeah. What high school did you go to after you were in your youth? Okay, Iwent to I went to. There were two high schools in Cambridge two public highschools. One was RIN technical wereware, which was an all boys school and theother was high, ind Latin, where my future wife went to school, but I went to rench technical. I went torynch technical because you know that's where the real men went and my brotherhad gone there and he always talked about ring. So I went to ringetechnical and it just so happened that the name of the high school was thefirst name of ringe Jefferson, my basketball coach and in no there was nological connection, so I went to ringe technical high school in high school. Ihad the opportunity to you know continue to play. I told you, I playedfootball until I broke my ankles and freshman, then I played basketball andbaseball. I was a captain of the baseball team and I was very fortunate.I had a really really great guy for a coach and call Han and Aall Thof my neighborhood buddies.In fact, my best friend Larry Stead was the best player in the state and weplayed in. We won the the championship in my senior year at Ringetech. Theyhad what they called the tech tournament back then Gus. They all theteams in Easton Massachusetts would come into the Boston Garden and theywould play and they would compete for the championship where we won thechampionships and the reward for that was besides the fact that you played infront of thirteen thousand d nine on nine, which was the selog number of theGarden Hou got to ride the fire engines through the city of Cambridge after youwon the championship so at midnight after we won this the Tech TournamentChampionship, we rode the firengine through the city of Cambridge, wentback down to my old neighborhood pass my house, and I tell you what I stillget goose funs thinking about that night and and then you know, and then,as the good log would have it. I was seen by a junior college coach during thetournament, and I got a scholarship to Chamberlaine junior college, which Ineeded to go to to bring up my sap scores so that I could eventually go tonortheast an university where I met the guy. That really taught me how to coachbasketball. Dick Dukeshire tellus what it was like as a high school player,Tho walking in the Bossom Garden, I mean you're you're right in the middleof the dynasty, basically of the Celtics. Oh Yeah, well yeah! Well, I tell you what, like I said, youknow six years earlier, my brother had taken me to my first Celtic game andduring that time the bill Russell from fifty six. What you know through the they won nine ten world championship. So I got achance to see every one of them and in those days you could go up to the boxoffice during the playoffs and buy a ticket, and you can buy a ticket andhave good seats for a dollar fifty, which is what my brother used to saveup, to buy our ticket and to be able to be in the Boston Garden to and play on that same co, court thatthe Celtics played on and that my you know my hero, Red Arabac coach. That Imean I can't words, can't even describe it that in itself, even if we had lost you, know, didn't win the championship,it still would have been one of the greatest memories of my life. Do youremember something that Red Arboh said like one of his famous quotes and surehe had a bunch of them? But what was your fen saying? What is your memory ofRidrbark Whi? You looked up to him so much well. First of I looked up to him earlyon because I I just saw how his teams played as a team how fiveguys became one, how he could build a...

...team that was so unselfish with so manygreat players, starting with bill, Russo and Bob Koozy and Sam Jones andCasey Jones, and sat sandas and John Haltlec. I mean he just he had a way ofjust putting teams together that I am always admy. In fact, I trie to put myteams, together with the same mindset that he had years later, we'll get to Gw, I'm sure when I really got to know red and whenwe used to sit together at the end of every year and talk about coaching, notexes Anose, but coaching and people. I remember one thing and I've used thisin a couple of, but the books I wrote and as it relates the character- and Iremember red saying to me he says Mike, he says He. First of all, I rememberhim saying at the Hall of fame the first time I ever met him. I met him inthe mense room at the Holl of fame and springfield okay, and he said to me he said you know. I maynot always be right, he says, but I never been wrong and he says that KidWyou got that newand kid he's going to be one of the greatest basketballplayers did ever live and he was right later on the thing that I remember himsaying to me that I'll take to the grave with me- and he said coach whenyou recruit, recruit character, not characters, and I never forgot thatrecruit character, not characters. And when you look back at his team and youteams and you look at the people he had, he had men of great character. Yes,they had grain ability, but they were men of great characters. That's so important, having greatcharacter being humble and being able to work hard and work within a team andthat's what most great teams are all about. Sorry you're in high school Coachan,you play basketball, your position and basketball. Well, the little fat kid he lost someweight, so he wasn't the little fat Hewas, just maybe pleasingly plump. Icouldn't run too fast that couldn't jump too high, but I could R I could leave, and I so Iwas a point Gud. I had to be a point God and- and I love that, because youknow you basically ave the coach on the teams, just like the catcher on thebaseball fiel, it was always in a position where I was telling otherpeople what to do. I was always much better at telling people what to do andgiving instruction been taking. Well, I think it's important that you tellpeople what to do, but the other side of it are they listening. You know, yes,is a lot of people, try to tell other people what to do, but they don't wantto listen to them. So, obviously, if they were listening to you, they had alot of respect for you, yes and they did and because you knowwhat, because I was fortunate to have hadsome great teachers and coaches, I was fortunate very greaht from thebeginning to have some great players, so I could put together a winningresume and you know how young people are. I mean they want to know. Okay,what have you done? You know? Have you ever won a championship? Who Have youever coache and when you got those kinds of things in your resume? In yourbackground, then they pay a lot more attention to you. So you can get from apoint where you a younger age when I was young and teaching physit at thehigh school I'd have to show them as you get as people start to see that youknow what you're talking about and you get a little older and you get a littlesmarter. You don't have to show them, you can teach them and you can useother people to demonstrate. So I went from being the guy that would take akid on the court and actually physically show him to a guy thatdidn't have to do that. I could use somebody else to demonstrate and Icould do the teaching. So what junior college did you end up going to coach? I went to Chamberlane junior college.It was. There was a guy there, his name everybody had nicknames. Hisname was hockey Powes. He was A. I don't know if he played hockey, but hewas a basketball coast there and he gave me a scholarship to go there andit was in Boston. It was a somewhat of a preppy junior college, most of thekids who went there. They went there because they could afford it and thenmyself and my teammate Larry stead. We went there because he was in theprocess starting a basketball program at the junior college. So we played allthe talk, junior college teams in New England and as well as college teams,we play Boston, College, Freshman, northeast and Bu. We had a greatschedule, a really really fine coach and we had a lot of success and youplayed baseball there too. Didn't you. I did. I played baseball. In fact, Itell you what Heis Hes is an interesting story, one thousand ninehundred and sixty two okay, I'm Cai'm on the the point guard leading our teamto the state to the techtorniy...

...championship in the garden after the basketball season ends. I goto baseball where I'M A catcher. Now I'm the captain of my basefalt team. Sowe go from basically being undefeated to going to not winning a game. Mybaseball team didn't win a game, the same season. You talk about hides andyou talk about lows, I mean, but I loved it anyhow and because I wasplaying you know and having fun with my friends and New England's a great place to grow up and play place. PortsBaseball's tough, because you know the spring is so short by the time. Thewheather gets good, the baseball seasons over yeah like for us. When wehad baseball in high school, we were in the gym for the like till the firstgame, weare traiding off with mounds and and hitting in the bating cage younever were outside because it was just all Mudno Eyou know I mean Havsoh YeahWel we used to play baseball outside in the spring. We would we would take theballs up with different colors so and the balls went out into the snow wecould find them. It was crazy. Now you from from junior college, youended up going to northeastern. Did you want to stay in the Boston area? wasthat the idea, or did you have offers to go other places I didn't have office? They were veryvery few offers for African Americans for black kids forpoor kids to go to college berry. There was so few opportunities I mean it waswhen I played at Northeast and there couldn't have been a handful of blackplayers playing in New England at the time there weren't as many scholarships and fact when I went to northeastenuniversity, I started out with no scholarship. I worked my way all theway up to a half AF scholarship, and that was a lot and I mean at that timeand it really helped, but not theson was a cooperat school wee. Had youworked six months, you went to school six months, and so I was able to affordit. I lived it home, took the train into school every day, and but Iventually worked my way up to a half a scholarship and- and let me tell you this about aboutNortheaston when I was a sophomore, I quit the basketball team. I was verydisappointed with the amount of playing time. I was getting. You know peoplealways talk about. You know you're, not playing Okayo. I quit what it was. Itcould have been the worst mistake. I wel made N my life, but my brother,Richard convinced me to go back to coach Dushia. Ask Him for forgivemess.Ask for a second chance. Thank God. I did. We gave me a second chance to comeback on the team. I still didn't play that much, but that's when I decided. Idefinitely knew what I wanted to do, and I knew that I wanted to be a coach.I Wante to go back to my high school and coach there. So I every day I hadthis big bick blue notebook, three BINDE and I would take notes ofpractice. I would take notes of how he taught and what he taught and that basically was the Bible was tont olike tat my foundation B T I was like the Old Testament for me in coaching, and I used that book andthis Guy Dic Duk Shahi left Northeaston. He went to Greece to become thenational coach and he's the guy that really started Greek basketball to putthem on the map, and I learned so much from him. He was the best I think thebest tea one of the best coaches teachers than ewer taught basketball inNew England. So cout O, you mentioned some things that that I think reallysports transcends. Is You probably went through some racism and some somedifficulties, as you mentioned, kids that were black from inner cities,weren't getting scholarship, Foran doing those things and you had toovercome a lot of those battles. So what was a a little bit of that likefor you and O? You remember some kind of points in your life that, where youhad overcome that and you had to face that adversity. Well, you know what I I always talkabout, not just black kids, because we're in aculture at the time now you know with people are talking about things likereparations, which I totally just don't believe it, but anyhow that's a wholenother story. I always refer. You know to poor peoplebecause see the struggle is not about color. Usually it's about money. Thethere is. There is a color, the colors green, just like the background thatyou guys have and it's more about poor people know trying to to get. You know,get ahead. It's more about poor people trying to go to good schools, get aneducation, get a good job, not just black. Not just has fan it's poorpeople, white people as well- and that's the great thing about where Igrew up in Cambridge in the...

...neighbourhoods. In Cambridge, with theexception of one neighborhood, all the neighborhoods were really hom.witgenius neighborhoods, I mean multiue cultural Portan. You know, and many ofthem were poiragbors like the one that I grew up in we didn't know. We werepoor because we ate we had a we ate. Every day we had clothes on our back.We usually have a peerof, no sneakers ono on our feet and we played sports.We didn't know how poor we AU work. We didn't realize a lot of the strugglesthat people were going through. My mother had to work three jobs, but shenever. She never complained. She went and worked those jogs she put food onthe table close on o back. I, if you ad, asked me when I was growing up, I wouldhave told you. I was a rich kid from Kingbridge, but I mean I was I waspooled, but I didn't know it, and that was good, but what we learned was welearned that in my mother taught me no one could ever take away your education,so get your education. If you love sports and you have the opportunity toplay playing and maybe some day who knows, you might even get a jobcoaching, but the bottom line is, I didn't know it and yes, it were a lotof things like I remember the first time when someone call me in okay. I was riding my bikein another city and I heard it and I said what the heck, who are theytalking to ineed realize they would they were talking to me and but but we were taught, you know what don't letanybody take away your dreams go where you acomfortable going, don't worry about who's there just go and when and whenyou get an opportunity make the most of it. And yes, you know as a poor kidwith you black await, I'm sure that people maybe said to you hey, you knowwhat you may not have as much ability as that other guy. That means you'regoing to have to work twice as high as that other guy, and that's what I wastalking that if I wanted to make it, I could make it, but I'd probably have towork twice as hard, because I may not get the same opportunity and let metell you this. Okay, when I came out of out of Northeaston University, I wantedto go back to teach at the at Cambridge at at ringe etect in Cambridge Tat, myAlmada, and they had a they had a white Irish Catholic Superintenden, the schools. So when Ifilled out my application for the job, because I didn't know who I was or Ididn't remember me, because I wasn't that good, I made sure I put my mentalname on the application. My middle name is the Lany te El Aney delan sy. Iwrote my name out that Midtl name as big as I could. I want them to thinkthat I was an Irishman and I don't know if that helped me get the job or not.But I got the job and I also got placed at the school than I wanted to so thatwas your first cog job, Youer bcame, equipped with your coaching Bible thatyou talked about earlier. Was that your first experience as a coach? No, no! I had at you know it's funnywhen I, when I went back to the high school to teach, I wanted to coach thebasketball team, but they had a coach and I couldn't I couldn't get thebasketball job. So I Mik my high my college COAC coach Dok Sa who I hadquit on but went back to. He really took a liking to me and hesaw how serious I was so I would teach vizette during the day. I then was an assistant football coach,coaching, the defenseof backs right after school, and then I would get intomy bolks wagon and go about a hundred miles an hour down. Staro drive over toNortheaston University, where I worked as an esisting, coach and coached inthe evening, because practices were at night that was my day teach during theday, coach football after school and then get over to the college and coachbasketball. So I was at Northeaston University for five years. The lastyear I was at northeastern university. I mean I had some good coaches to workwith their Dick Dukeshire was my my coach, and I worked with him. JimBowman, who went to the FBI and Jim Calhoun was at Northeaston as the headcoach my last year. No, I couldn't. I couldn't get that head job at not thesethin because they just weren't ready to hire a black coach. then. So that's allright. I got a call from a from my brother Inlaw, who had a friend who isa friend of SAC, Sandus, Great Boston, Selti played on nine world championshipteen and he was just taking the job at Havid, which was less than a ten minutewalk from my high school and we met. He offered me the freshman, the assistancejob mid happit. So once again I would teach during the day and then I wouldgo to Harvard and coach Witd Satch for the next four years. So my first nineyears out of college, I was teaching...

Pisette. I was coaching as an assistantat Northeaston and Harvard and then my tenth year I was I was, I guess, in line to get the head job atHavid, but they hired somebody else as when satch went back to the Celtics tocoach- and I was out of coaching for a year- and I didn't know what I was going todo. Sound of the Youth Basketball Program called shoot straight, which weave talked about and had low and behold the next year of the tenth year. Aftergoing back to the high school to coach, the job finally became Min. So so tenyears later, I was coaching at the high school, but there was a reason for thatand I'm going to go right into it and the reason was- and this is why I thinkall that happened was because I was being prepared for Something GreaterThan Coaching at Habbits. I was being prepared for coaching one of thegreatest players who ever played the game petridewing because in the fall of I want to Ay onethousand nine hundred and seventy three. Seventy four. Seventy three Patrick came into my gym as a twelvetwelve year old, with his pised teacher, who knew nothing aboutbasketball and asked me if I would teach him and Patrick how to play thegame of basketball. So I said great. In fact, this is anothergreat story I said to Steve. I said see: Why do you want this kid to play?Basketball? I thought Heu' tell me well coach, you know he's six three he'stwelve years old, it's a you know, bee's, a big guy and he said to me. Hesaid Mike. I want him to learn how to play basketball, because I want him tomake some friends he does. The kids are making fun of him. He had just movedfrom Jamaica and he had a little bit of an accent. He was tall. He was skinny,he was clumsy, and so we started working together. Four Years Later, I'mcoaching this guy at the high school and together I mean we lost one game.Okay, we went seventy seven and one. We won three consecutive statechampionships. We were tha number one team in the country. I had the numberone player in the country, so I really believe I know for fact that thoseyears those ten years were purposeful and they woere designd for me to makethat transition from being just a coach to Coacho coach when the Green Yearclicon patare doing in high school, I coach a similar player who's in theNFL Esvli, who playes for the cowboys right, really really really good talent,Yeayeah, there's a loot of plays that I had to make up right. It's just getthem the ball so with Patrick, like what did yes, almost probably was likehey, let's get the Balt out cord, let's get him to him. What was your kind ofmindset to like keep him involved, but also keep therest of your team involved as well? Well, the beautiful thing about PatrickPatrick didn't have to squol to be a happy player. He just had to win: Heydidn't care about scoring, so he made my job really easier and I remembersaying to him, Patrick: I want you you're going to be the next BillRussell now. He didn't even know who go russell was at the time so M my mindset regarding pathwasers: Let's help develop the greatest thebest defender in basketball, let's let' use Bill Russell as themodel and when I look prob in love with be Russo, it wasn't because him scorinpoint. It was because of number one him Winni number two, his defenseblocking shots and and yet being in a position where, when you needed him toscore, he could score. So I petrick was easy because he never I v.never once did you say I'm not getting enough touches because he learned thatevery shot that was taken was not going to go in and if he wanted touches, hecould go up and get the rebound or he could block the Shok, and he could helpus win championships and that's what he was concerned with. So Patrick, neverscored more than I mean his senior year in high school. I think he might havefinally averaged twenty points, a game he could have average fifty agame andthe other thing was that most of our games were one sided lot side it. So Imade a deal with Patrick and the rest of the guys that I would not punishthem for being as good as they were by taking away all their minutes, becausethere war some nights. The game was over after two minutes, so I made adeal with my team. I says an we play a team that we're going to bea badlyyou're, going to play the first four miit of each quarter and then the otherguys are going to play. Never ever did...

...he complain about that. Nor did myother players, so they were most nifes. He only played half the game and youknow I mean there were nights when he he scored thirty, because he had tothere were ninets. Then he had twenty block shots because he had to. But youknow it wasn't about numbers, it was about winning and I always told himthat the greatest player Ha I ever seen was bill Russell and he didn't have todescore points to be the greatest player, and he certainly to me he wasthey. If I was picking your team today, so ca e would o your cotaticing he's, probably getting recruited byevery college. You probably had a million coachessitting up in the stands or visiting. What was that, like that, had to be apretty cool experience when you're when you're coaching, high school and you're?Seeing all these you know, college coaches coming in and recruiting himwhen you're, when you're still doing this? What was that like for you? Yes? Well, it was crazy. I mean it almostgets to a point where it's too much I mean we could have charged admissionfor coaches and made a lot of money, but but you know so what happened wasonce again by having been a college coach having been on the other side ofthe recruitent table, we were able to set up a system, in fact Leslie Vishar,the you know, Sports Commenta, that we used to writefor the Boston globe, Rode and wrote some allicles about the the ooing ofvewing and how the college coaches would have to go through this system.So I took you know things that other coaches had done. Coach Dona Hu haddone with Leuel Sinda before coup yeah before he became going whenhe was in high school and some other things. We put them all together in anice package and we basically had a incredible recruiting plan andPatrick's mother, a Dorothy gunressed, her soul. She trusted me and she saidcoach. You know you just do what you think needs to be done. She says I willsupport you, one hundred percent, so she never ever. I mean she just let meyou know, handle the recruitment of Patrick and I I promised her that Iwould try to make the recruitment process as as painless as possible andthat I would set up a system where she would not be bumbothered with phonecalls from coaches every minute that you know we would go. We would we wouldbasically take the recruiting process from the beginning to the end inPatrick, would have as normal a senior year in high school as any kid couldhave, and he did, and so we started out every school in the country recruitedthem, and then we willed it down. I think we ended up coming down tosixteen schools that we invited to come to the High School for visits. You know so we had you know only John Thompson and judgeto were he went but Dean Smith and Dr Tom Davis from Boston College LarryBrown from Ucla Roli Massamino, you name him. We had them in Okay and thenwe whittled tat miss down to six schools that he would visit because hecould take six visits. So you visited Boston College Boston. You jurgetownBillanova North Carolina and Ucla, and then he would wittle it down further tothree and then pick one cut. You Cooch another terrific basketball player inRemeo Robinson. What was that like? Yeah? Another incredible story? Another kidthat was born in Jamaica, moved to Cambridge his story. He should havedone a movie after he made the pre tros against Seaton Hall in the mid S andOnden World Cha the national championship, his story. Honestly, Imean not, you know not. He had some tough times after Michigan but andafter the NBA, but his story up until then I mean high school. I mean he wasa kid that basically was put in out out out in the street. At night I mean whenout in the street, I mean he had no place to go and a woman took him into ahome, and you know- and I started working with remeal, and this is another way God worked.Where Mail became a member of our shoot straight program when he was in grammarschool and that's shut straight program. We started during that year that I wasout of coaching. So all of the kids in Cambridge came up through this youthbasketball program, and so I got to know him during that programm and thenhe came to the high school and he was one of three guys there was Patrickther was ramill Robinson and he was a kid by name of Lampdotton who went toMichigan to play football. Those three were the only freshmen that everstarted atd, ringe and so remeal was, I...

...mean he developed into. I think the you knowthe best product best planing to coe a terrific Ki College player like Houmentioned. His free throws are probably some of those memorable and SA history, so coachyou yeah now e were in highschool. Then you took the next step, you transitioned again and you moved upin to college and then so what was your first callege? Where was that you coach? I was so fortunate once again, Satin out tat, Sandescaused me up. I just taken my high school team to England and Wheeles fora trip, and he says how would you like to coach it be you I says I would loveto. He says: Well, you never know a couple days later, I'm meeting with theAB Rick Taylor a couple of days latermeeting with the President Ron, Sova and Guess John Sofa, and I ended upgoing to Boston University and when I got to Bou they really weren't doing that. Well and but I had some really good playersthat really wanted to do world and we had five and five really good years. Infact, we surpassed Rick Pitinos during his record of Winds Atbu, I think Rickhad Nan name, we ended up. We went on one in the five years and thatbasically was sort of the beginning of my hid, coaching experience in collegeand then in fact, my leading score and Bu. That firstyear was a fellow by name Af Dredrick birving, who happens to be Kairi,Irving's Det, and I mean it's just it's amazing how small the world is, and sowe had some really really super super tough kids, kids, a I mean they couldhave played football with you guys, and you know great kids and Jeff Timberlike,Tony Te Costa. I mean we had some wonderful kids and my son ended upcoming to Beyou and my nephew and tol me was tha IEOGWASH, even if you'replaying sports. No, no, that's right. It's a it's, an eventougher school to stay in and the fact they had a program at Bu. I don't knowif they still have it, they might. When the kid was start of borderline.They put him in the basic studies program that was paratl of the toughestschool in Bu. So if you got through the basic studies program, then you couldgo to any school woul Byou and you are going to be successful, touch chool. Ifyou move out Fomo you you co to George Washington, St John Ford Atlantic, Youhad an unbelievable college. Codye career, so tell us a little bit aboutsome of your highlight from those chools. Well, you know B, you obviously just gettingto the NBAtournament a couple of times. Unfortunately, when you get in atschool, like B wit means your your a low seed, so the first of year we madeit into the tournament we had to play against Connecticut in Connecticut thenext time we made the tournament we had to play against Duke in Outh Carolina,so you ain't winning in the Instoublat. So when I go to GW thanks to BobChurnac, the vice president, he recruited me to Gw. I met him when Iwas coaching a BU when he was in Otford and he and I had a great relationshipand there was the most supported school I've ever been at. I mean Bob Churnakand Joe Tractenberg, the president, I mean the and Jack Ovince and those guys did everything they could tosupport the basketball program. So we built a pretty good program and I wouldsay the highlights bt Gw was Ne Thousand Nine hundred a ninety threefor a couple reasons. One. My son joined me as my assistant coach at Gw,and we became the first African American Father Son, coaching team in ta history, indivisual and basketball, and that same year we had a great endof the season. We ended up being the CINDERALATEAM. We made the tournamentas a twelve sea. We beat New Mexico and we advanced all the way to the sweet.Sixteen and we end up playing in Seattle in front of forty one thousandpeople in a three million plus people on TV, almost upset Michigan, Feb five.We had them, but they we missed him, they missed some freethrows, but they got the rebounds and put them back in that's how they beatus in the Seattle Super Dome. I mean that was that was probably the mostincredible ride. Larry Michael was my radio guy and he went on that onthat incredible run with us, and I've...

...got video that I watch fom tor m fromthat season to this day and we have some great great teams and greatplayers at Gw, and we were the most we became. Not only did we have greatsuccess, recruiting kids out of Baltimore, we got a great kid out of BCand born Jones, who would want Wtho had gone to Demata Sean Te, Rogers Mik King.I mean we had great players, Patrick Gumbu, but then we got really fortunate.My assistant coach one day came back and said coach. I got a kid that Ireally think in help us at Gw. It was he just going to Africa and he saw aYinkadara now yanker at the time had didn't know it. He had asthma, so hecouldn't play very long or very well, but he had the most incredible body. Hewent to play for one of my forma player, Scotch Vanelli at Milfrid Academy. Heeventually came to G W and he helped put us on the Maph and then that led tous being able to recruit other international players like AlexanderCool and Giego, a Micheri COC, and in fact you love this. My last year, I think at Gw at my nextIlik one of my last years we had eleven players from nine different countries.Three of those players came from belerouse and they could highly speak aword of English when they came, but when they left thanks that you know myacademic advise Karriner, Carl and the support system at Gw, they were on a,they were deans, let students, and so that was inrelible, but the run the runtof the sweet, sixteen Nott fgetting Garay. I was talking to guts before wewent on the air today, but his his body type was a lot like yewings. That isabout seven one. I remember h had the longest legs in arms. I I've ever seen. Well the thing about him and don't knowI'm not GOINNA argue with. He was big, but it was more. He was much moremuscular. I mean Chrisopall Bitfoot, he didn't measure seven feet, but when heput those sneakers on, he was seven feet, but he was built like he was thestrongest player physically, that I ever coached and when he dumped theball and that's pretty much all he did was dump when he's down the wholebuilding shok and he put the Fearo Gos Greatinso coach, you've coach. Allthese great players, now your college career you've won over three hundredgames in college. You said: okay, now it's time you coash to flord Atlantic.I think that was your last school. U, you were a coach. Why didn't make? I didn't make thatdecision? Gus? In fact, let me e Ireactually. I went O. I wont over FourHundred Games in college. Okay, to be honest with you, but some crazy thingshappened after I actually coached my last game at sint John's. We had afalling out at Saint John's with the president and eventually he said,listen goodbye. So I experience with most people. Experience in sport oeither get cut at one pointi time when you get old or you get fired. If yourcoach, so I got cut, I got figt cauglt whatever you want, and I had nointention of coaching anymore, because my I really felt that it wouldn't befear to put my wife through that again. So when I moved to Florida, I moved to Florida because I wanted tostay on the you know in the southeast East. I wanted to go someplace. My wifewanted to go for someplace warm and I was going to go to work and I did. Iwent to work for ESPN doing some commentary, a lot of studio work whichI did not like, but so I work with the SPN and theneventually I worked with Fox, but then in two thousand and eight, the job at Florida Atlantitic opened upand I was living in Boca and it was almost like I'm supposed to coach there.So I took the job in flowed Atlantic wow s,because I was looking up Hore withipediand. It said over threehundred games and I didn't realize obefore well and I would say it's over fourhundred, because what happened was there was a situation that took placeat sint John's. I don't want to. I don't even usually get into it were Saint John's a at that time they tookaway like body, wins, Ormin, okay, that's a whole nother story, but anyhow the rel number is four hundred plus. Asfar as head coaching victories it's over six hundred- and I just mentionedthat because it's almost like I, I hate the fact that it's it is writtenin some places as being three hundred and something winch. You know what I'msaying but Wa Test Artetat snt johns...

...when you arrived at. Did you recruithim? Yes, friend Fashella, who the greatannouncer o a commentator who was now with the SPN was the head coaches at at Saint Johns. He recruited runourtest, so I inherited Ronoutess. I came the year after Pilipelopez left, so Ironot test was on my on my first team at Sint, John's and I'll. Never forgetthe first meeting I had with the team Ron says: Hey coach: Do you really think that we can win thenational championship and Hesas in such a way that you know Inormally, I would have said Hey. This is rookie, but I said yes, that's whyI'm here, because I wanted to have a chance to win a national championshipbecause Ronot test was in his, I want to say stopmore Junr year, Eric Bocckley was an all American point,God from Chrisi the King and New York he was coming to school. They had a kidby name of Boosi Thornton from Baltimore who ha got was a great juniorcollege for Headi I mean lava, Postel tyron grant they had great players, but they didn't win the year before atleast they didn't go far enough, so they got rid of Fren Forshel. I came inand immediately things really clicked and we went to the alide a in fact, ifRoyla tes they love Ryn, had played a little better than night. We playedOhio stake, we would have gone and we really should have gone to the fameforthat year, but we did, and but we went a long way we went as far as I guessyou could go without going to the final Ford and we beat a lot of good teams onthe way and so th sint John's experience was great. The next year you know Ronnie runnie decided to go tothe pros, which was fine. We had a great group of kids coming back and we ended up in one week you're going tolove this. In one week we beat Connecticut Syracuse in Duke Okay. In one week we did not lose agame during the month of February and the only game we lost after you knowaround that. Time was a game that we should have really won down at Miami,but you know calls were a little questionable in that year we went to the sweetsixteen and we lost to Genzaga on basically their home court outwe, BArewarded us by sending us out to the West Coast to play West Coast teams, ifthat's a whole nother. So couce to me, you made all these transitions in yourlife. We've heard about Hem al them all. You finished up Aud retire fromcoaching, yes, you're even busier. Now than you were. When you hant to coach,you so tell us a little bit about everything. You're doing now, Welli I well what I did was. I wrote iwe started putting togethersome books, so I wrote a few books skills for life. Everybody needs a head coach and mylast book, the seven seas of leadership, and so what I'm doing now is you know I'm going to write anotherbook and I'm going to basically do a story about how maybe I'll call it transition. Younever know, but I am in the process of doing another book.I'm teaching leadership skills using my book at the South, Florida Bible,college and Dafeld Beach and I've got a ieo great students there. I am doing some speaking so if you knowanybody's looking for a pad speaker, I'm available- and I also just recentlygot involved in a multilevel marketing. Direct seals. Company called Balentus,which basically thei go to product, is diet, coffee and- and I was tellingsomebody yes, it's incredible, I'm telling youand it works. I Gos two years ago guy came to my house and said I want you tostart using this cofee. I want you to get into the business. I said I haven'tgot time if speaking of writing books- and you know setting up this course butI'll buy some product. I started using the product. I waited in this morninggun and a hundred and eighty pounds. Okay and the stuff works. I mean Isuppresses your appetite cuts, Yo, cravins down and they've got some othergreat products. So if you know anybody, that's been in multilevel marketing,okay, I'm telling you that's been in multilevel marketing. That wants to beinvolved in a great company. This is it they can. All the have to is contact meand ill go. That's amazing, coach, so part of our show is about all thetransitions that we make and everything that we can do and throughout yourwhole life. Yes, you have worhard. You have shown that I can leave one spot,go to another spot, be successful and...

...that's Hal. We want to show our fansthat no matter where you are in your stage of life, that you can train locatsomething and make something of yourself and whatever you love to dojust go out and do it and put a lot of passion and hard work behind it, andyou've really shown us that that it's all possible, no matter what age youare, how long you been in the bus. Well, I tell you what I believe that God put us here to work. He gave each and every one of US uniqueskills and abilities. He wants us not only to use them but to shear them, and if I had retired, like most people,think retime ent. Is you play golf every day or you fish every day Ipabably wouldn't be alive today it would drive that would kill me, and Ilove the fact that you know what an you talk about transition and I'm going totell you something Gos, I didn't know what I was going to do. I thought whenI was when I was told I wasn't wanted at Saint John's anymore. I thought my Ithought my world was Ol. I thought it was over because I D put all myidentity into being this big time, college coach and then all of a suddenI mean people, don't even remember your name so, but but I was told long timeago that, whatever whatever gifts, you have figure out how you can use themwhen you have to make that transition. So the gifts that I had was all theexperiences that I had coaching and teaching. So I said you know what whatwould be better than putting it in a book and sharing it. Maybe some day ina movie and- and I love to you- know, I love to help other people. So that'sanother reason why I got involved in Valentas in the coffee business, andit's I mean it's great when you can help other people and you can shareyour story in you know what you can help some other people make thattransition, because guess what this life after basketball, this life aftercoaching, his life after announcing built just like you, I mean, did you ever think that you'd be doingwhat you're doing I mean I thought I was going to coach until the day I die?I thought they would carry me off the court on a stretcher and then an hourlater they would bring me back ono the forboards it e Gadwell. You know whatcoid Crisco came a long way and he's really proved that anything isPOSSIB. Welif you die. Coffee Back, thene might have been a center fielder Welli rentaly played sentafel. When Istop ke co, so hey couch. I know you have two Bos so when we put your showout that week, would you care if we did a little thing on social media, where we coungive a sign autograph book away to some of our fans? Oh Yeah, I tell you what let's do this? I'M GOINA? Yes, yes, the answer is yesand it could be either of oneof. I am in the process, I don't I'm allout ofeverybody needs a head coach, but I might have I'm going to have some ofthose ot I'll have available, and if you want, I could send you apicture of all three books and what you could do. Is You probaly not Anto lead.You want to give me way. I think that would be wonderful. Okay, get away a couple, two three ofeach I'll. Send you a picture when I get up when we get through I'll, sendyou I'll take a picture of the three books together, I'll send it to you andyou can offer sagne books in what they could choose which book they want,because I've got TA. I've got an autof books coming in for everybody and he'sa hit coach. I pick either the skills for life everybody needs Hav to go.That would be one of the same great probem Thatwul be Great Promo, okay, yeah IALL, sign them, and youknow if we know the people's name. I your coach one last thing: We do. Wehave ittle two minute tro we do. It's called no hoddle we're GOIN NA theyfire a lot of questions at you and answer them. Okay or, however, you want.We have a lot of fun with it, but it's called no hok today, let's startthrowing some questions, O coach, all right, coach. Okay, in your opinion,what's the most overhyped thing in sports today, Don' think of that. How about the loudest Errina you everplayed in or coached him Cammo Doing, stadium, Lee petpenes players that think they nothat would be.Almost every coach says that right. I think all my coach us told me that too,if you could ju on o Youan sports today, any sports. What would it be?...

Well, probably the rule T I wouldchange would be if a kid, the clits for the NBA and didn't makeit- and this is from this- is the same rulethat John calliparry would put in that kid could go back to college Hav to sitout O er, but then I yeah that's the great. I, though I agree with that, Ithink that should happen. Yeahbut you mentione, maybe your Bok getting turnedinto a movie. Who would you like to play you in amoving? Yes, Hey, listen! You know when I was alittle bit younger, I would have said Denzel Washington, soI'm look. The next denso Washington I want him to be me- will put well put myold bad on Hem wwill. You know and well make Wel give him some Nice Canae suitswill make them look good, but more important than that is who would plaiymy wife see if there was a time when I would have said we'll get hally barryto play my waywell. You know we get ten son, I played with Himat therams JohnDavid, and you know I think that might be a c, a very good one to play you inyour and your role in, I think John Davwould be greathandsome enough. Yeah definitely is Al Righ coast. Last N. Ithink I know the answer this, but if you could be one athlete ever inhistory of Sports, what athlete would that be? Well, you know who that would be. That would be Bill Russell because he played the red arow backyeah. I really thought that was going to be the answer so couch we really Appruhou Qis en tellingus your story, letting our fans know a little bit about your life history andwe'll. Let you know when this all comes out. We do it every Monday, we're aboutthree weeks out right now, so we'll let you know an when your show is, that isaired and we'll do a great promotion through social media okayasis. If youare on twitter or facebook, or anything like that and have friends that you canreshare it retweet it all those things and then, when the platform is ready,Daus, you can reshare that as well. You can bet on it and let me tell youthis too, when Terry Cholman called me, my old friend, Terry and told me thatyou were doing this and would I be interested. I said youkidding me. I I mean honestly when I came to Washington DC to Maryland and I also fell in love with theRedskins, and I watched you play many and many a game, and you know whereverI live. I root for the home team and I've rooted for you and I will now rootfor you even more, and I wish you as you make your transition. I was you thevery very best and I want I want your side kick to send me his information. Iabsolutely, I think he I would be as first COC sendmecause. You know, I'mnot working out like I use to so. Okay definitely would be O as Faras customer.Well, I'm telling you the stuff: it workd. Okay! Well, listen! I love being on with you.Okay, it's a great great! I couldn't think of a better way of starting today,and I wish you guys the very, very besi theres ever Ani Ancgo Tidhowa. Thank you.

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