Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Brian Michael Cooper

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Brian Michael Cooper is president of the XFL football team in Houston, The Houston Roughnecks. We are excited for one season to end and another to begin. The XFL will do a great job of continuing Americas passion for football. Let's get in the Huddle with Brian and find out more!!! Cooper, who most recently served as a partner in the Houston and Denver offices of Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP and as a member of the firm’s Entertainment, Media and Sports Practice, will be responsible for the team's fan engagement and business operations, including ticket sales, corporate partnerships, marketing, content, communications, community relations, and the game day experience.   Before returning to his law practice in 2017 at Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith, he served as Director of Sports Programming for DISH Network. Cooper served as Senior Associate Athletic Director at Rice University from 2010-2013, and as President of the Rio Grande Valley Vipers from 2008-2010. The Vipers are the NBA G-League affiliate of the Houston Rockets.  Before joining the Vipers, Cooper spent six years as an attorney at Haynes Boone LLP in Houston from 2002-2008, where he worked on matters for the Harris County Sports and Convention Corporation. For his work in Houston sports, he received the Outstanding Service Award from the Houston Bar Association’s Entertainment and Sports Law Section in 2009 and 2012, along with the HBA ESL Chairman’s Award in 2014.  Cooper began his legal career at Proskauer LLP in New York, where his clients included the NBA, NHL, ATP, and MLS.  A graduate of Cornell University, the Harvard Kennedy School, and Columbia Law School, Cooper has served on the boards of Texas Accountants and Lawyers for the Arts and Interfaith Ministries of Greater Houston.  An avid runner, he also has completed five New York City Marathons and two Houston Aramco Half Marathons.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome to our podcast huddle up with gusts, where we talked to guests about how sports helped shape their life. I'm your host, former NFL quarterback gusts fraud, and I'm joined by my longtime friend and coach, Dave Hagar. We are a RADIOCOM original podcast and you can find us on the new RADIOCOM APP or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcast. Now let's get in the huddle. Hello everyone, another episode of huddle up with Gusts. I'm joined by my good friend a Dave, WHOA and today our show is sponsored by the Weston bonadventure hotel out and beautiful La. So if you want to go, stay somewhere, go stay out in La at the Weston Bonaventure Hotel. Today, Dave, our guest is Brian Michael Cooper. He's the president of the Houston roughnecks, which is the new XFL team, and want to I think it's going to be a lot of fun to watch because the last time the XFL was on they did some some really exciting things to football that a lot of us weren't used to. I was a big xfl fan in its first version and so I can't wait for this. Yeah, so we're going to dig into Brian's pass a little bit, but joining us today in the Huddle Brian Michael Cooper. So, Brian, thanks for joining us. Thank you, thanks Gus. Thank you for having me. Appreciate it. Yeah. So, so, Brian, really looking back at your past, where you grew up, give us a little bit of your background of where your group grew up and where you're from. So I was werener raised in Evansville, Indiana, border town, right on a Border Kentucky. Went to memorial high school in Evansville and then, you know, my parents still live in Evansville. You know, it's a great town. It's a wonderful people there. I guess my parents have bit their entire lives and I think it's just just so. It's a wonderful place. Was a wonderful place to grow up and be part of things there. It's, I always put it's in the middle of just about everything. It's about two hours south of Indianapolis, about two hours north of Nashville. You know, Cincinnati's to the east and St Louis to the West. So it made for some great young experiences for me as a kid growing up getting to go over and see a lot of sports in it, with a short drive to meet those places. Right. So growing up for you there, what was it like? What was what do you go back to? What's that first sports experience that you had that you really remember and say, man, this was why I love what I do? A couple of them, you know, like I'm a I am a lifelong Chicago bears fan and it was part of because I grew up in Evansville. You know, I'm old enough to remember the St Louis Cardinals for football, and so my dad would take me over to St Louis and generally the bears and the cardinals will play a preseason game and I just remember, as a small kid, seeing Walter Payton and then I distinctly remember the first time I got to go up to soldier field and that was it. I mean I just you know, I was seven years old, I walked Dan. I remember everything about it. I remember, you know, just the you know, walking into the you know the old colonnades, the you know, just the feeling of being in the stadium. You know, this late seventy so the bears weren't that good, but obviously they have Walter Payton and I just became a huge Peyton fan and it was just, you know, love struck ever since then, forty years later, you know there, you know it does it. It doesn't go away. So did you play other sport? Did you play football growing up? I play football, going up and play football and a ran track in high school and Love, love football. That play. Started playing football, play flag football as a young kid, you know, through about the fourth grade, and then I moved to tackle football and always love football again. Tried to emulate Peyton, doing to spin moves, trying to do the dive over the the you know, that over the over the scrum, and I was actually a quarterback. I wasn't a great one, but I played quarterback through high school and then I was played at Cornell and I'll say played up at played in very, very but that's when I got to Cornell. They have about six of us there and I...

...was so proficient a quarterback they move me right to tailback and so they're like yeah, you're throwing ball. Let's see. Can you know you're in trouble? When I like what can you run, you know like like yeah, it's sure, I'll give you that. So I could do that. But I love I mean I've always, you know, I've loved sports as a kid growing up, but just all the things about it. I remember my first NBA game. You know, I'm Big Pacers in and I you basketball and it's just, you know, it's a great thing. GROWING UP IN INDIANA, we had to you know, it was it was the time where you had the you know, the great thing about you know, basketball is obviously huge in Indiana and when I in his kid growing up, we still have a single tournament, Single High School Tournament, which I you know, I think is it's just amazing. My cousin got to play in the tournament, the eighty two tournament, and Scott Skyles, I've never I won't forget that experience either. We've up to market square. Everybody takes the caravan up there. The team, his team was like thirty two and oh they go up to the state was I think I was in sixth grade. Skyles is playing for Plymouth and you know he tears it up. We by cousins team lost to Gary Roosevelt at the Buzzer on a lay in and it's just, you know, all that entire season going through regionals and semi state and state and you get up there is this four teams in the entire state playing for the state title. It's a really you know, I get why they moved out to the you know, to they moved to a you know, the the the seeing the class system, but before then it was just it was just amazing to have that kind of tournament with all those schools and they culminate with four of them. It just was really incredible experience and that's one thing I definitely remember as a kid is the Union State High School Basketball Tournament. I Scott skiles is my all time favorite college player really. Yeah, point guard at Michigan State. Yeah, he was just he was really doings. He's got to be behind your other all time favorite, Arizona. Well then Steve Kerr. Course, Arizona Grad. They're brand but yeah, but Scott skiles, no look passes and all that. He was it's phenomenal, even as a high school or any you know. And the fighting was I think you know he just looked at him. You're like, oh no, yeah, it's just amazing. I know. I mean you know this and I think the school plummet. I think wasn't a relatively large school and I think they won the whole thing. I think the end up eating Gary Roosevelt in this finals. My cousin with the happens will bossy, and so I think that they I think they ended up beating Gary Roosevelt a title and it was yeah, it was. It was amazing. What about like in the neighborhood? Do they were? Had to be tons of pickup basketball games in your neighborhood and stuff like that? There were, I think, you know, I was, you know, football is really my sport. I wish I was better in basketball. You know, coming from Indiana, I think it was always was always difficult. I wish I would have been better as a kid at basketball, but I did love it. But yeah, there was. There was that, you know, to pick up football games as well in the backyard. I think it's you know, those were the those were the great things as well. So it was a lot of a lot of really cool stuff there without what do you think you take from from that when you're growing up like because we talked about this all the time with almost all of our guests. Talk about growing up and you had your neighborhood and you went out, there were no parents, there were no coaches, there were no referees and you had to learn to deal with each other and you had to learn to battle through all these different situations. What do you would you take it from it when you're growing? That's it, and that's a great analogy because that's really yeah, you had to you know, one you know, you you had kind of a sense of making sure that you know the you know, you everyone play together and like the obviously going to be disputes and they disagreements and there were always some really phenomenal ones. I had a I had a basketball my dad built a basketball court in my backyard when I was, you know, I guess maybe eight or nine, and so we kind of where the location for those games. And so you get kind of the trash talking and, you know, and everybody coming together. But at the same time you're right, there wasn't you know, everybody kind of self police themselves and I think we all kind of had a sense of like look, you know it's not going to you know, it won't be fun if we spend an hour to arguing back and forth. Let's just go ahead and get it. And I think the thing was. You know, it's going to regulate it self out. You know, I would say athletics is is like the best meritocracy, right, it's going to you know, you know...

...it. We're not going to somebody's not going to get short changed in the pickup game because ultimately we're going to win and we're going to come back and get it and are just motivates us to do better. And I think kids just kind of had that mentality then where I was like look, we're you know, we'll argue for a few minutes, but we're not going to dwell on it and we're just going to go ahead and play. And I think with that that that does start. You know, it gets you thinking about you know, sents you for life, right, like there's going to be adversity. Ultimately have to work through it and and all you need to get to that next goal. You're going to want to do. They just can't get bogged down and continue debates over things. Right. No, I agree with that. So did you. When did you start running track? I mean, because sometimes it's I can. I ran track in freshman year in high school. I started running track. I ran and I read more distance run I did eight hundred meter and four hundred and it's a team by four, by four, I guess, one six hundred relay. So that was your really your first spirits of when you refreshment in high school. Yes, yes, so, yeah, and it was kind of like I just did lack the hand eye coordination for baseball, high arm, but I high school at an incredibly strong baseball team and I, you know, I kind of gravitated towards track and field. Good. I thought, you know, this will be something I can do, and I can, and I actually can. You enjoyed it. It was. It was definitely I think the track season was a completely different feel from football season. You're running more. I was running more long distance. You know, I wait fluctuated, you know, I drop weight during the spring and I enjoyed it a lot. I think it was a and it was. It was good to kind of start, you know, building up that something new and building that endurance to run. I love the eight hundred. I always felt the eight hundred was one of the greatest races in sports because it's kind of in that that that middle area of it's a it's not, you know, it's not a real long distance rate it's not as all out sprint like the four hundred, but the strategy involved there is, you know, there's speed, there's pacing, there's getting, you know, it's it brings a lot of it's good. I thought it was the best of both worlds. Am I be? Well, there's a lot of strategy in it too, right. I mean I mean it, because you got it. It's a sprint. Yet it's just some endurance to la here. You know you're at last two hundred. I mean you're kind of you know you won. You're joking for a position, because it starts out everybody's got to kind of merge and then you kind of you kind of get a sense of where you're going to be as your as you're running and then, yeah, at you kind of you're saving your energy and then all of a sudd and you've got that all out sprinting last two hundred and fifteen, and it's I thought was one of my was. I like the race. I love wearing the sixteen for well, I'll run, I mean I'll running the form before as well. Did you so never wanted to do hurtles. No, now I'm too short. I was. I was too short and too clumsy. That would have just been you know, that could, I would have been a disaster for me. I would I would have you know, a parents had paid a lot for my braces, even though I did okay, I could just easy to ruin them on on the front of a hurdle was not have been good. Like, if there's this obstacle, I'm gonna find it. You know, I'm I'm always have. I've never been the most graceful individual and I always I always joke when we go hiking or something and there's like a stream and there's like, you know, there's like kind of that that, you know, the log to walk, you know, the walk across, and then like it was like, Oh, come on, I got like if it's slippery, I'm going into water. It's just gets. It's how it is. Yeah, I'm going to be. I'm going to be the entertainment for everybody today. So so, yeah, I never thought about the hurdles where your team is pretty good in high school, not too bad. I mean I think I, you know, I was, you know, I like I was, I was middling. I think our track team we weren't we weren't a powerhouse track team. We were good. We were good. We're better in long distance running. You know it. You know there were other schools in the city that did better in various events, but we were bad. We were bad. I just enjoyed it. I just doing running, you know, I did. It wasn't something I would have definitely not done collegially. I was nowhere prepared to do that. So but it was so it was still a lot of fun. How do you feel about multiple sport as late? That's a great question. You know. So I spent time at Rice as a senior AV and and you know, by time I got there and I was about, you know, ten years ago, I mean players had stopped you doing it. I really think it's a great thing. You know, you see a lot of kids now they don't do it right. They if they playing...

...baseball, they can play fault baseball and football the spring and so forth. I would like to see you know, you know, I think it's it's great for them to be able to have that, have that ability to do a couple of sports. I'm I've missed the fact that I think many students now don't do it. So I would love to see it more. I think it's great to have one, you get different experiences. I mean it's my football season was completely different from my track season and I think it was. I think they were. I took I took something from both of them and so I liked it. Yeah, no, I agree. I played three in high school. We actually had a guest on. Was it sally that did that? She played six? Six, yeah, Sally Jenkins, she's a writer. It was it Christine Brenn and I can't remember which one. I thinks I think sally. You she's from a high and she played six sports in high school. That's amazing. Preimous season. I love you know, there were kids of who did. They could double up and would play, you know, was additional sports, even in the same season. I didn't think I was that talented to do that, but I think, you know, I would love to. You know, it wasn't for to me, it was lack of talent. It wasn't for lack of desire. If I could play baseball and run track, I'man as a kid. I Love Baseball. I mean I really I loved it and I think the funny thing was I think I stopped really following it as much because I felt like I you know, I wasn't good at it and I stopped caring about it as much as I got kind of a higher level. You, Babe, Ruth and Pony, and I, you know, I would you know, I could not hit a curveball to save my life, which which knocked me out completely in out of any upper lower, you know. So at that point I stopped kind of following it, which was alsome a little bit disappointed me because I just felt like I wasn't with it. But I as a kid, I love playing all those sports and you know, even now I love watching my daughter she plays, she plays Lacrosse and soccer and you know, and being able to see her play those. I want her to play multiple sports. Will you cubs fan them? No. So I was a Detroit tie. I was and still is a Detroit Tigers Fan, and that's because the evansville triplets in the s played in Evansville. Right that was a Detroit Tigers AAA teams. So I got to see, you know, you think about the eighty four tigers, they all kind of to come through AAA Evansville. So as a kid, as a small kid in the S, we've got to Bussy field, you know, bossy field probably held two thousand seats and I mean I don't know how Evans will had Aria a team then, but they did and it was really kind of a glorious time. But then to have a AAA team and the triplets were great and you know, as a kid, right, you want to find well, where are these guys going? Oh, they're going to Detroit. You know. Well, that would become my favorite team and and I'm just about that time right that they got as I was. You know, I really love baseball. The Tiger started getting good and sparkingers and took early S in. Then eighty four team. So you know that that just kind of cemented it. And then obviously we've had you know, between my bears and the Tigers we have a not too many titles sense, unfortunately. Well, Dave and I are pirate fans. You talk about like your first game, you went to the bears. My first game was a pirate game and you know, filling out the scorecard and you know, when you go in and you get to follow the game, do all that, I was hooked. Ever since then I've been a pirates fan. In Our last what since? What season? I don't know. He said anything. It's very trying, though. Brian like is. It's I'm still sore from last season. So it's new and started on Ye I's pirates teams. To Man, I think. I don't mean it like they has some heartbreakers, like all, like I. Yeah, we could, you know, we could go an hour just the SOB stopping of a tigers and pirates. I'm still pissed. It said Dream scored from second back. I don't want to bring up Steve Bream. I think. How's that happened? That guy was the solest player in major league. Beast. Well, well, bonds throw it was like a whiffle ball. It like it would just it took up eight seconds in the air and seam like. But yeah, it was very that's that's, I think, my single worst that sports moment. That's probably why he started doing a little extra curricular activity so he can throw them a little order. Yeah, farm it up. Yeah, so you go on. So you graduate high school, I feel.

How did you pick cornell? So I had started, you know, I really thought, you know, obviously, I like I was I knew you know it. Ultimately I was academics. We're going to need my looking to me. My serio. I mean I love sports, but I was also realistic. But I did want to continue to kind of up I could to play and it wasn't. I didn't certainly the pick cornel for that reason. But we toured colleges in the East Coast. Some friends of mine had suggested it a couple of years earlier, and I got up to school and I just fell along with the campus. I went. I always joked, I went to see Cornell in I went in July, which was, you know, and that's great time to go see cornels up state New York. It's July right, it's you know, it's eighty five, it's beautiful, like you know, the cornels got all the you know, the plantations in the flowers and what I know was awesome. I just fell in love with the campus and just it was great. And then four months later, when I was waking up thinking are two a year and four months later I was, you know, our first snow in October and I was like wow, it's October, we're getting now. That's no state. So but now I loved. I Love Cornell. Still Do. It's just a was a wonderful place. I met my wife there. You know, it's always feel like, you know, like that's you know, that's the greatest takeaway from my college education as well. And so, but that's how I ended up there. I went up there, visited and just falling up with the campus. New this where one to go. What's cornels sick named? Dave, I notice it's the red. Okay, Ascot, Mascott, and we got a nickname. All Right, so I'm you. You always really good at these. I'm good at like h under eighty other schools. You and you know when it's funny. When you were before, you ask me that I was trying to think of the nickname. I go, I hope this doesn't come up, so glad this, but you're like, you're like, my God died for Nick Nay, now let me okay. So what is it? What is the mask of was it? I think it's the big red and that's that is a bear. The mast is a bear. Yeah, we, the IVY's tend to have the you know, darkmous, the Big Green Harvard to Crimson. So they've got, you know, we we tend to stick with the colors, I guess in the Ivy's. But yeah, that's that's yeah, we're a big red. So what years were you at Cornell? I was there from eighty eight to ninety two. I graduate a little bit earlier. Actually spent my last year in school, my senior year, over to England at Oxford. Got Road there and that was a lot of fun. So I graduated in January, Ninety two semester early, and and stayedd. I was in Oxford for my last year of my seniors. I left. I left in ninety one and then went to school in England for that last year. But graduating. So out of all the Ivy League stadiums, which one of the was like was your favorite to play? Well, I got to go at Shell coff initially, but I will say a close second it's probably Yale Bowl and then and then Franklin field. Franklin field is just amazing. I mean it's really kind of cool to see. You see those schools and you think about the history MC Franklin field. When you put an NFL championship there, I mean it's mean he's amazing, old stadium him. But probably Franklin field was really great as well. Yebow was just massive right and it's just it just it just seems like an expands for so I like that as well. I think those are probably to the two that I that I really liked the most. So brand what was your first job out of once you graduated? So I guess you went to Oxford and I guess after Oxford, so after Oxford I thought I was going to go into government. So I spent my my my years in as in turning. I interned for William Gray Sophomore Year in college. He was a majority whip at the time, and then I enjured for Ted Kennedy the following year and then I thought I was going in to go to government, and so I went. My first job out of school was to go back to work for Congressman in Indiana. I worked in his Washington DC office, named Frank mccloskey, and I worked for him for about a year until I went to grant school.

And so that was I was as legislative assistant. Handled embarrassed, you know, items I made, made next to nothing. You know, lived, lived with like three other guys out in Virginia, Little Mart Peer. You know, unfortunately, though, three guys in early S. obviously we probably could be better at hygiene. It's close times. You think yourself like wow, I cannot believe that I was you know what we were doing. So it was, it was, it was. It was good, though. Was a great experience, though. I really enjoyed it. One of those hours like we in your your Barnet. They were amazing. I mean you're young, right, so you just you know, you're young, your own Capitol Hill. You'll do anything right, so you'll you know, they were long, right, you get their thirty eight in the morning, they're genuit till eleven at night, and you know when your two thousand one and twenty two, you know it's just, you know, you kind of like he's got kind of a drill and flow and you know what, but I had nothing else to do budgetarily, so I was working, you know, working you're coming back and it was. It was a lot of fun. Frank was a great guy, really good congressman. We had a district that was it was right on. It was right on the costs, I mean politics, society. It was you know, it would go democratic to go Republican, and frank was kind of right there. It was just one of those again, not, you know, not to wax along about life now, but it was kind of those things where people just kind of they all work together, and frank was kind of like that guy. He was he'd been mayor of Bloomington, Indiana. It was just a really, really nice guy and and he was a really good congressman and, you know, just he was good guy. He would be passed away about twenty years ago. Valet, stay and play on your next getaway to Los Angeles. The Weston Bonaventure Hotel and sweets offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotels just moments away from all the action and accessible to Hollywood, beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room and valet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code PSF in the code box when making your online reservation or call one, two hundred and three, six, two, four, one tho and asked for Promo Code PSF. Yeah, so so you do that? You do you guys get like some tickets on the side and they say, Hey, here you, we know you're not making any money. Go Go see the the you know who's at the bullets? Bullets. Well, it's skins. Who else would it be? That's capitals. The redskins tickets were a little bit harder to come by and then early not anymore. Not Anymore back then. Yeah, a little bit difficult, but definitely more bullets games at the time. You know, pretty wizards and Orioles. I went to a lot of orios games and campon yards at just opened at that moment and so that was a lot of fun. You know, he took the train up to Baltimore and that was they had just opened camped in yards. I'd seen a couple games in Oldam OREAL stadium. When they opened camped in yards, it was just it was like a revelation right, it was they were you know, everything was just, you know, it was great at a Boog Pole Barbecue and you know, and it was I mean all it was just kind of like it was now. Obviously they we created those stadiums, you know, going forward, but back then it was just kind of like wow, okay, this isn't one of those cookie Cutter Stadium just cust imperfect. Had that old school field to it. It was really nice and you could you know, we'd sit in it. You know, he's sitting there out in the outfield. I mean you just it was a really it was that I had im I don't remember many of my sporting events and DC. I do remember going to Orios Games. Yeah, yeah, it has like a I think it was like one of the first one that put like the brick factory wall, you know what I mean? Were they really tried to port right into the city and everything? Yeah, and as really and I've been there and I've had big powe barbecue as well. I've always loved you right quite like one of my favorite players. He's big. I always like it's pretty well's that I'm a big foody. So that's where I remember. Like you know, my train of my train of memory thought is always back to you know, like well, the restaurant was there, so I that that's my first impression. was like Oh, yeah, barbecue was outstanding. So what was your restaurant? You guys used to have frequent in DC.

So prank like to go to place called the doublinger and I don't even still open, but they used to have like these Eddie's great hamburgers and used to have these yard beers which probably you know. Didn't you know? It didn't. It didn't help the Diet. But that was a great throughout of like right off Capitol Hill. I used to love it places near I think it's still I could turn around here, but I think this new union station. It was a cool place. Well, I don't know if when's the last time you've been back to DC. It's been a while. It's been a while. I'M gonna get back there, you know. Well, no, I guess the actually DC's coming here to play us in March twenty two. So, but I'm looking for to getting back. I've not been there probably a couple of years. That whole area where the national play, it's just amazing. What they call it the shipyards or something like that. Yeah, it's just the area and that they rebuilt that. I do remember enough when I was living in there in the late s s that it wasn't a lot over there. And he I understand these. Yeah, they've built it. I have not. I have not been the nationals park see games. So then you go on to Grad School. Where you go to Grad School? So I started Grad School, went to Grad School to Kenny School, government at Harvard, and so again I thought I was going in the government and politics, and so I went to the Kennedy School and started there and knit a did a joy. I was, I've been a minute, to a joint degree program between the Kennedy School and Columbia Law School. So I started at the canny school and then I was going to take my first year at Columbia the following year, and so I would it's kind of a weird price. Usually if you're going to do something like that, you do at the same school. You kind of some Cottin duity. I was generally going to be going through between, basically going between two schools, and it was great. I had great experiences, but it was a little bit weird because I was kind of jumping between. You know, I'd be in New York one year and that was in Cambridge one year, and so it's the continuity wasn't there. But but you know, I enjoyed both experiences and so, yeah, I started at Kennedy School and then went to Columbia. Nothing like Aman High Hun Dave. He's he's covering Ivy League them. Yeah, well, walks for anyway, you know, and then they running. He's we keep having these these. I really guys on we need some guys more our level. Yeah, I went to university or zone. I went to Tulsa. So, you know, what do you? I left also, man. That's why I was our converence USA. Follow with Rice man, they all there. You Go. So, yeah, we're going to bring it up in a second. So okay, so you get out of Grad School. We do that. What was your next? Would you do next? So after that, I so around Grad School, law school. I really just kind of gravitated towards towards law and, in particular, going into like a career in sports law at that point. So Midyear, midyear and my graduate training and started really thinking about when I was going to go into government or just going practicing law. I was able to do a couple things in Grad school that were great. I did a project on it was an any trust. It was a joint law school Grad School project on any trust law, and and a professor asked me what I really was interested in. You know, what really was a passionate honesty, and I'm really passionate about sports. I hadn't really given sports much of thought after I'd stopped playing. I just figured, you know, it was just, you know, it was usually players are coaching and I wasn't going to really do either of those and I didn't think that, you know, I thought that even on like a going into kind of the industry was it just didn't seem like that was that was a path. Let start working on the project and I really liked it. Did well on it and then I in the kndy school. They put you in what's not as a policy analysis exercise, and I my pae was on midnight basketball, which in early S it's very interesting social project where they had kids come in, you know, like I kind of keep them off the streets, have basketball a basketball leagues, and so my project was to evaluate the the efficacy of midnight basketball and I did it for the NBA. And so at that point I started thinking about, you know, maybe this is something I can look at and I started thinking about meshing those two together, law and Sports, and you know, I started focusing on that. And you know the great thing about sports laws as a firm in new work Ed Prosscauur rose, where as I think it's now just prosscaure. At the time when I was when I was there, as Proscu rose gets in Middleson, I think they've since truncated at Prosscauur, but David starting had been a...

...partner there, Gary Batman had been a partner there and you know it kind of and they had a they were represent in the NBA and I was fortunate enough to get a clerkship there and olds me a fulltime job there. And so that was that was going. My first experience at law school was to go to proscaut and I got to do some really cool stuff. I got to work on the NBA cases, American the ATP tennis tour, NHL and the major league soccer. I worked on a big any trust major league soccer case called Fraser versus MLS, which was it was great. Was the defense of the single entity theory which had a full circle, which is how l xfl is structured now as a single entity. So I got really cool experience there. So I was my first first job, first law job out of out of law school, was going to proscure. So were you? Were you ever going to get in? Or maybe we're for giving them run on this. Become a sports attorney. So that's like a agent, like an age. Yeah. So so ultimately, yes, I we I been talking with friends about representing players, you know, for a while and ultimately we started to make that move over to that. I left my I left Prosscauur to to venture out to do to represent players. I was there about three years and then I did that. A lot harder than it looks. It was really funny. I always still post I said, you know, we were just young and arrogant and idiotic enough to think hard could this be? And it was real hard. But I love the experience. End Up doing it for about ten years. We're representing mostly basketball players and it kind of man I went back into private practice and it made up a component of my practice, but it was good and it was kind of good to get that big firm experience and the kind of move into doing some of that stuff as well. So I did ultimately end up doing it and I love that part of getting that experience because I told people now, I said, you know, there's kind of like the I think, kind of Romanticized Jerry McGuire type, you know, then there's kind of like, you know, that was us right, which was, you know, making a phone calls, driving six hours to meet people. I go. It's a lot of work and in the players who were representing. You know, you know they work so hard. You know, right, these are guys who aren't you know, they're not you know, they're not going to be first round picks, right, they're late rounders, are free agents and they're going to workouts and they're crying and they're you know, they're failing and they're trying again and it's a it's one component of sports I think a lot of people don't see. They don't think about it as much. I kind of think that a lot of these guys they have things he given to them and I think they don't get to see that back component and it's really fascinating. Meat at least, I'm so happy I had the experience. I mean I was never, you know, I wasn't a level of Lee Steinberg, but I enjoyed the clients I had and the people work with. I thought it was just a why to me it was it. I think it's hopefully helped me be a better executive now because I can kind of I know where these guys have kind of come from and I know the hard work, day plan and it's always been good to me. So no, that's great. Yet we've had Lee Steinburg on earlier in the year. He was a great interview and telling us his stories of how he started it and who got a minute. So who was one of your clients that you had? I represented Josh King was one of my first client. He's a player out of out of Rhode Island. I mean a lot of the guys I had, you know, they had small cups of coffee and went overseas. Not another no, I really know, I major, but Josh was great. I think he's still we still keep in touch and I just you know, I guess I enjoyed, you know, those, those moments as well, and I got to kind of move into as I got into my practice, I started moving into representing companies on deals is opposed to players, which to me was also much more exciting and I like that to anything with the players, but certainly less stressed to be able to represent player at represent a company and a sponsorship deal than try to write player. So where was your office? So I officed so ice first office in so moving forward a little bit on the timeline, that's around two thousand,...

...two thousand and two, I let we let this is about time. I also left New York to move to Houston, and so I moved down. My wife and I moved to Houston in two thousand and two and I joined a firm. Off Firm and Houston go haynes and boom. So in there at this point. I moved to Houston and we were lived being in the woodlands, which is about Twenty Mile at twenty five miles a bore to eat we still live. And then I was obviously in downtown in Houston and Haines and Boone downtown of a couple blocks from my office here. So what's your wife's name and what did she do? So Jacqueline as my wife's name. We met like is. We met in college. Jackie is a real estate executive and in Tourney. So she ret. We manage a number of kind of residential properties and Jackie does, Jackie works and she's a she's really the she's the brains of the operation. She makes all that she makes it all work. And so we've she's a she is, you know, CFO, you know, General Council or of our court, our family corporation, and she's awesome. She we've been married. We'll be t'll be twenty two years in June. I can't, I'll kick my coverage. Yeah, well, mind, twenty five years. Next week, February first. Is that next week? Or we have after that? Yeah, week, Super Bowl Week, will be in Miami, right before the Xf all day is right. Water is my daughter's birthday's February second, Brownhog Day handle and she's a yeah, she'll be a fifteen on the second. So you start to countdown on the car with sure it's coming day's kids are right there. Yeah, I hear junior and Sophomore in high school. Yeah, one driving. Right. Yeah, what was that life for you when she started driving? Like we're nervous. I'm still just getting over that experience. Yeah, it was ice. My kids all drive back from Ledge and I wait up for him, like we'll get home at one in the morning and I can't go to sleep until they're home. Well, the problem with here is now I grew up in Arizona, so like ice wasn't a factor and stuff, so driving was, you know, there's just dust and stuff. It wasn't. Yeah, but here now we just had a lot of ice over the weekend. That's I'm going, okay, this is their first thing. She's pretty good at parallel parking, but now she's got a well, the first time we met you literally hit black ice and wrecked her. Would you have a jeep? I still have like a wrench. She let me borrow one time. I did. Actually I was playing on my tool drawling. Yeah, that was that was in one thousand eight hundred and ninety eight. Yes, a long time ago. Good. Yeah, going to drive, going to Gusta's house. So I hit black ice and smashed into his neighbor's tree. Yeah, but didn't have any money, so I just kept my hood bent for relived Great Falls Virginia. So you kind of had there's a lot of woods out there, a little single lane roads, all that stuff. And so I remember Dave was coming over because he met his wife there and and and her. His wife and my wife are best friends, and so he was coming over and then next thing you know he wrecked and we're going out help and trying to figure out how to help. Daves. You learn me your ranch to see if I got Ben the hood back. Yeah, exactly, help that didn't see. Thank you though anyway. So how did you get the rice? So a couple jumps to I'll so I first was that it was in a d league. So fast forward a couple more years, two thousand and eight. I am so practicing law, but I've got about I've got a decent sports practice now where I'm representing companies on sponsorship deals and I'm negotiating on their behalf on, you know, the number of kind of product offerings and whatnot. And late to mid two thousand and eight I get a call from a friend. He said look the there's a there's an NBA d league team in Real Grand Valley, Texas, looking for a team president. And I know you're you know you're looking to make me jump back into executive sides. It's something to be interested in. I said Yeah, so I met with the League. I put together kind of an idea of where I wanted to know. I friends might and say look, they're going to probably be looking for a minor league baseball president. So you need to explain why. You know, coming from law, how you can help the team. I put together kind of a proposal for the team outline. I kind of my objectives on where want, what I saw the team doing. Went down. That league liked it, sent it down to their ownership group. Ownership...

Group liked called me down there and, as fate would have it, my wife every year they they go on this cruise, my wife and all my aunt's, my motherin law, they all go into they go in this night cruise or trip over to Europe, and they've done it like every year. And so they were on the trip while this was going on. And so the things were starting to move pretty fast and I went down the Real Grand Valley, met with the owners. Loved it. They love the idea and, you know, they offer me a job right then and there and I'm like, well, I got my wife's out of last out of the country. I need to kind of tell her abouts. I'm calling her like so, what's happening? I go well, job to D team and Real Grand Valley Texas and I think I want to take it. You know, I think it's good, exciting and it's so he's like well, okay, I'm like, you know. So thankfully we got brought she got back. We both drove down here. She loved it too, and we did it. And so, you know, a month and now later I'm you know, I'm introduced as a president of the vipers. George Gervin actually was our director of basketball operations at the time and you know, he was at the press conference and it was just great. He's he's just a great guy. And Yeah, what is George like? And very cool, Great Golfer. I Love Golf, but I I am not a good golfer and he's a really good Golfer. And so, but he's a really Nice Guy, really wonderful guy, and he was. He couldn't have been more helpful. And so we had we did that and I started, you know, down there and we had about three months till we tipped off. Was the second year the team. We had a lot of challenges, a lot of things that we had to kind of get a new ownership group and come in a year too, and we just kind of had we had to get things going and it was a lot but it was a lot of work but a lot of fun and I enjoyed my time in the valley. And so next two years I was we rebuilt the team ended up winning you, we did. I we did what's known as the hybrid agreement. Was the first time an NBA team had invested in a NBA d league team. The rockets became our single affiliate and we built it just like it is and made in baseball, where it was local ownership group, but you had an affiliation, a single affiliation with a parent team. We did that with the rockets and it just it was it couldn't have been a better, better situation. They came in, revamped our player personnel side end up winning a championship in two thousand and ten and that's that was just it was just an amazing experience for me. I love the people down there and love the valley and I was doing a lot of communing, though I still had my house in Houston and I was kind of moving back and forth from so ultimately, the rice ultimately ended up at rice because I came back into the city and was able to kind of was able to to Kenna was just about to start kindergarten and I decided to take a job at rice as their senior athletic director and senior Sociot leg director. And just you know again, also, Rice was just a wonderful experience. I loved it. So, Dave and I have a friend who you may know as well, Kevin Rabbit, a little slightly. I'm not, mightbe, not as much as I probably should. The inciter ring a bill, but I don't. Knows me know him as well? Probably I should. I know Kevin played there. Yeah, played basketball there, and then is I think he's on the board there too. He's does a lot of stuff. He does a lot where, helps with hirings and all that stuff. He's been there for how long, Dave you think? I don't know. I mean it very awful long. Gustion, he's a he's a CEO of n EP okay, Awesome. The name sounds fromiliar, but I don't know. Well, I'm I was here for two ten, two thousand and thirteen. Probably shouldn't know him. So you know better. You probably met him, but I want to ask him a vipers question. Who is the best vipers player when you're with the vipers? That's a tough one, man. I will I love them all. I will say this. The one that probably struck with stayed with me the most was Mike Harris. Mike was Great. Rice Al for rice out like was just natural leader. Was the two thousand and ten. You know MVP. I remember after the first game we had...

...a really strong team made a great coach, Chris Finch, who's now assistant hit coach in the New Orleans and first game that right out we got blown out. Were up in Austin playing the Austin at the time of their Toros, now Spurs, and after the game, I think I had got backtoback games up there and after the first game he came out apologized and then he had a players only meeting and I was wow. And then they end up, you know that whenever they did they right at the ship, but we they were eleven and two out the gate and then we end up going forty and eighteen won the title and Mike was he's one of those guys who was just you know, you can he kind of moved back and forth between NBA, you know d league, but he he was just amazing, and so I think he's probably one that really struck with me. You know, in the time I was there I just thought he was and still I still maintained contact with them and he's just a good guy, just a really good guy, though. That would be by one, I thought again, all of them. I thought Chris. So keep in touch a Chris and he's doing I I fully anticipate that Chris finch will be a head coach in the NBA someday, and he's going to be. He's one titles wherever he's been and he's also just a phenomenal coach as well. Yeah, that's awesome. So, so then you go to Rice. You get done with Rice and and so what was your last year rice? So ry started two thousand and thirteen and I taught there as well. So I taught a you know, I had a sports finance, sports ECON class there, which I loved. I love my time at Rice. Ultimately I ended up, I got a moved on to dish network and was director sports programming there. And so so did that move to Colorado or a few years? No, ultimately went back into private practice, but I love my time in Colorado. Denver's definitely an interesting place to be a little bit cooler than Houston, I mean colder and temperaturalized. We're very cool here in Houston. But what did he where did you live in college? In Denver? She started out we lived in Littleton and then we knew that to Morrison, and I love Morrison. Was Awesome. I yeah, and we're out. We were we were within we could see red rocks from our house. We couldn't hear it. We always even there as a concertart going on and I love music. So, you know, going out to going over to red rocks and seeing, you know, walking around here, I'm just, you know, blown away. And you know, being able to see at venue so many great bands and played. The Beatles played there and go you go in and see all that stuff. It's really cool. So I'll you know, we lived near the Food Hills and so it's you know, it was. You know, I was a big fan of the snow, but I love the mountains. We used to go hiking and do anyone stuff and I you know, dinver. The summertimes just outstanding. So it is and you and it's so close, because I lived in lone tree when I played for the Broncos and you could just literally get in the car go like thirty five miles and yeah, they're your hiking these incredible trails and mountains and there's no better exercise. And you know, and then you got a kid on your back and you're like man, this is crazy. It's a lot of work. Yeah, I mean it's really amazing. I think you know, it's you know, your point is exactly. I mean you could go twenty minutes from what we were. We were right there and, you know, right driving down seventy, right in the mountains, and you know, the temperature drops about ten and fifteen degrees and it's it's really I get. I loved it. In the summer I was not, you know, well, what friends and college like those blizzards. Not a big fan of it. You know, they told us when we moved there. They said, you know, it's going to snow and then it's going to be war. You know, there's like three hundred days of sunlight and Denver, so it's going to be it's going to be a lost one. Video are yees. So there, Yep, okay, it you know, three hundred days of sunlight was, you know, is there and and and you saw it right, it was. You really did get. We did see it snow ten, you know, ten feet, and then, you know, ten inches. Sorry, and then and then all of a sudden they would, you know, midday, it was gone. Yeah, it did happen that way, but I'm still still wasn't a big fan of the snow. Yeah, I always liked it, but I did Miss Pennsylvania...

...because Colorado was more like where we lived in Denver's more Brown you know what I mean. Like there were a lot of trees and hardwoods and all that, and like Pennsylvania really has a lot of that low humidity there too. Oh, yeah, very try, Oh man, very much. So, yeah, every yeah, we had to wear lotion every day. Yeah, that's yeah, not so much in Houston. You. Yeah, Ye, see, opposite exactly. Abest Betty, when you get off the plane you know where you are, you know. So then you've had an amazing life already. You've had all these incredible jobs. And then how does the Houston job get presented to you? Who Calls you? How does that work? So I was on spring break with my family and March, mid March this two thousand and nineteen, I got a call from a recruiter and he said, you know, someone's recommended you for position, you know, except L team in Houston looking for a president. And we started chatting. We talked for about our loved everything saying. He talked with my thankfully I was on vacation with my family and talk to him about it and about two weeks later I was interviewing at Stanford and you know, just, you know, I just you know, I've been following what the league had been doing. I felt like this was going to be, you know, a great experience. The fact that they'd been tomanded hard Oliver Luck as the commissioner, I thought was just an incredible move. I thought that that was really a game changer. I think Oliver is incredibly well respected in the sports world and I think when, when, I think people set up when that happened, they were like, you know what, this is going to be a very good thing. is so just like everything I heard about it and, you know, I've you know, eight months later we're, you know, it's just been exposed to spend great so I think I'm just so happy to be here in Houston building a football team in Texas. Valet stay and play in your next getaway to Los Angeles, the Western Bonaventure Hotel suites offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotels just moments from all the action and accessible to Hollywood, beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room and valet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code PSF and the code box when making your online reservation or call one, two, one hundred and three, six, two, four, one thousand and asked for Promo Code PSF. So what your first game, first inaugural game, new new whole new league. What is your expectations for your first game? What are you excited about? You know, I'm excited about that's a great question. I think my most excited about our ability to extend the football calendar but also, like Stin kind of access to games pro football to people who may not necessarily have been able to access it. I think that's going to be the biggest thing for me. It's I kind of heard and back to like, you know, my seven year old self right. I'm I'm all about you know, what I love about sports and even as an executive, what I've really enjoyed in my time with the vipers and even at Rice was connecting with fans. You know, people come out to a game and sought. My excitement's going to be those individuals coming into that stadium getting that same kind of feeling, hopefully, that I got. You know, the smell, smell the stadium, the food, the hot dogs, the you know, the band, all that stuff that goes into it and I'm hoping I'm going to have that same experience for a young person. To me, that's the excitement of having somebody come in there and having that first experience of seeing the players and seeing a pro football game at that, you know, up close and live. That's what I'm excited about and I think that we're going to really you know, I can't wait to see our fans have that experience because I think that's going to be to me, that's just what it's what it's all about. I just I love seeing people go to games and, you know, we do things the right way, right our fan experience. If we do it the way we're supposed to do, they leave that stadium with a lifelong memory...

...right and and hopefully for most of it, it's like, you know, that's one of those things that they can hark back to say, you know, I went to the roughnext game and I know, you know, it was such so great. You know, they become our brand ambassadors as well. So that's, to me, is going to be the excitement component for us and I can't wait to see that. We've we've seen that as some of our fan events were have gotten a meat fans and talked about what they want and that's the that's to me, that's what it's all about. I mean we don't if it's not about the fans and it's you know, it's it just it loses its luster, and I think that's what's going to be great. So go through some of the team dynamics. Like how many guys are on the team? How many did you start with? Did you have to cut some guys? Like how? How did that all come about so that we drafted? We drafted seventy one players. I mean, obviously you building a new league, got a new team and run after everybody. So seventy one came in a October and June Jones is our as our head coach. Randy Mueller is our director of player personnel and June and Randy of worked countless hours putting together, I think, a great you know, both their pedigrees are incredible. June, coming from, you know, from why, is head coach the Falcons as a head coach, and he was. He and Mouse Davis created the running shoot offense and and the S and June's one of those few coaches as coach to hall of Fame Quarterbacks and Jim Kelly and Warren Moon and he's gonna throw up some points. I mean it's going to be great. And Randy, you know, incredible career in the NFL as a GM and so they've been putting a great team together. So we drafted seventy one in October. They came into mini camp in December for about a week and a half and some great practices there and then it just had training camp three weeks here and all the XFL teams were actually here in Houston for training camp. So that was really cool. We had a couple joint practices, one with Tampa Bay apple named the vipers as well. So this one one day. I can't really forget for it's and we also played the we play. We had a joint practice in St Louis and then one against one against La and so they're they're starting to Narra down the roster now. Will make that official early next week, but ultimately our roster will be forty five active and seven on the practice squads. Well, fifty two total, forty five that will dress for Game Day. So if you had a look at a few things, that would be completely different from what the NFL is doing. What could you name a few things for our fans of what they should look for be an alert for when they come out and you know they watch these first xfl games. Absolutely, though, and I try to kind of I really try to stay away from the comparisons between the league. I'll tell you what are you about our XFL product, but some of the cool things I think we're doing. Two things that come to mind. I think they are great. One is the kickoff. We are we you know, I think, in Tim both to make sure we've cut down on kind of the collision and also to to engage you know players. The players will line up both on their on their thirty or five yards apart. On the thirty five, the kicker will still kick from the thirty five. For the wanting to put the the players will line up five yards apart and they don't engage until the kit till the kick returner catches the ball. To me, I think that's going to be it's to me, I think I will be surprised if that is not adopted by all levels of football in the next three or four years. I think it's a great I think it's a great meld between you know, recognizing that you want to cut down that. You know that that that running start collision, but at the same time you put bring the kickoff back into the fold where you're not just kicking the ball out of the end zone. You know, just you know and there's no run back. So that's a great one. I love the PAT's. Well we go. So going back to the kickoffs. So what about like in the NFL? One of the things is is that used to be exciting, not so much anymore, but is when a team is trying to catch up the onside kick. What are you guys going to be doing about that? Great question and my my quick answer is I know that they're looking at it, but you know, and that may be that's probably an Oliver luck question of Brine Cooper questions,...

...but we'll go back to the point. To us in the forty year. Yeah, another look, another looking at it, but I think that I think with that. So this kind of segues a little bit into whether or not you know it gets into the what what we call it kind of the comeback period. I'll I'll counter a little bit here and pivot back to the point after because I think this my answer to your question a little bit more. One of the things we have in the xfl that's great is the fact that you can opt for you there's no kicking, there's no kick pat so instead now you have three options. You can go for one point at the two, you can go for two points at the five, or you can go for three points at the ten. So what it will allow you to do is, if you know, if you're down seventeen points, eighteen points, you have a chance to come back in with two scores. What also happens is the clock stop us in the after two minutes on every on every play, no matter what, incomplete past pass, even a run, the Ballton has to be reset the clock was start. So you can't just milk the clock inside two minutes and, you know, run out the clock. It requires you know, it requires you still run play. So there's there's a more robust comeback period. So kind of a more circular answer. As to what happens to the only side kick, I think some of that's gonna be obviated by the by the by the comeback period in the things that we're doing inside two minutes. Change the field goal at all. No Jill Phil goal is the same. So we had Morton Anderson on. He was talking member. He was telling us about how he always thought that if it was a sixty plus field goal before, should be four points. You know, because that's like it, does you know? Look, I know they've always kind of tinkered with the potential four points shot and basketball, for example, and I mean that's a you know, it definitely you know. I think look, the ideas, we've got a product. I think, look, you know, you know you want to make sure you don't know you'll get into you don't want it to be gimmicky, right, and I think don't have that. You want. I think what we've done. They worked very hard. Oliver, Jeffrey Pollock, who's president of the League, who's got background and built the NFL and NBA. They've been working for two years on gaging fans and what they want to see in football. And you know, the fans want to see a faster game. They want to see you know, they want to see you. So the Games going to be a little bit fast. Starts running clock until they get to the two minute morning. So you took out replay, then no, replay is still different. We were ever here to see you took out replay. If you can do anything, get it out in baseball. It shouldn't be in baseball. Well, but it's a you know, I think we're going to have faster game. I think the again, I think the things that they've done, they've done to really one recognize what fans want to see. They want to see. They still once to see football. You don't want to get into a situation where we're deviating away from football and I don't, you know, we're not in this product. I just think it's exciting. We have an overtime rule as well, where the teams will will basically kind of they will off set each other for five different possessions and the team who scores the most points after five possessions would win the overtime. And that's it. Just it's one possession from the five yard line and that team will be able, that team will have a chance to score touchdown. If they do, they will score point in overtime and then they will they will go back and forth four, five times. Now a little bit more like soccer and penalty kick situation. I think it's designed to kind of you don't have the long touchdown, a long overtimes Jad in college. You know where you remembering the last year and Lsu and Texas am played and then, you know, I think I fell asleep during the game. I woke up the game was still long and they were in the fourth overtime and if it sures, game was long too. Like I mean, it's crazy. So all the other rules are the same. So motions got have to have so many guys on, a lot of scrimmage as in fact, everything else. That's exactly what're not deviating from. You know that it's you know, it's when you see an xfl game, it's a football game. I think there are things that we did when we gaged what fans wanted to see and we respond to them, but it's at...

...the end of the day, it's football. It's, you know, our mottos. That's for the love of football. We do not want to deviate from what a fan was to see on the field. This is you know, when you go to a game, you're going to see you know, it's you know they'll be a few tweaks, they're here and there, but it is fundamental and high collog I like the idea that Pat's and choices and Pete. Yeah, I like that too, I had on this. It meaned, be honest, disappointing going for one, I mean as a fan, I yeah, doing in the first game, right right out there. Well, you know, on the old excess fell gave us things in technology that also that we so tell the point. Yeah, in football today, what as far as technology goes, there's AI, there's AAR, there's virtual reality, there's all kind of stuff. What are you guys playing on doing, not only from during the game and for the fans that are watching, but also your fan experience at the game? So a little bit more there. I think I probably came. You know, probably I can talk more about the fan experience and what we're going to do that I can probably actual technology that's involved. But I think one thing I can promise you on what we're doing is we're grinding more access, you know, our mottels fans above all, and so with that, you know, our goal is to provide our fans would have you know, more exist that they've had. So you'll see, you know, players will be interviewed. Maybe, if you know, you may see players interview mid game, you know, for example, or you know there's us, there's there's going to be things where fans can can connect with the with the players and on our personal level, both, you know, after, you know, before and after the game. We're going to make sure, I think that what I've seen. We I've gone over the city of Houston with Fan Events and the one thing that keeps coming up with their fans is that keep saying, you know, we really want to be a you know, we don't. We never feel like, I think sometimes we don't have that kind of access to get to meet and talk to the players and engagement they're doing, and I think this league, above all, is making sure that those fans have that kind of access. We had a fan of it back in December or we I brought a season ticket holders on to the field and they got to meet the players and it was such as it is incredible. Many of these people never know, I've never been on field and never met you know and kind of had that kind of up close and personal feeling with a fan, and I think it was just one of those things, as we just it was amazing and so you're going to see more of that in the fan experience. is going to be much more of I think, you know, getting back to the basis to football, but also bringing a fan a lot closer to the game, and so you're going to see that in the broadcast and you see that on the field. I'm excited. So when is the first game and our personally, our first game is February, eighth, Saturday February, four clock central. We play the LA WILDCATS IN LA or in Houston. In Houston we are opening at home. So we are we are opening at home and we play at td Ecu Stadium on the campus of you have h so that is our first our first game. So very exciting about is. About eighteen days from now we're going to be we're going to be tick kicking it off. Well, I'm excited to watch. Well, one of the last things we do here are we have a no huddle segment. So that's our two minute drow. We fire some quick questions at you, give us some quick answers. We try to have some fun with the go ahead day. Okay, name one thing you wish you were better at. May that probably probably coming up with a coming up with coming up with a quick answer. Fair enough. All right. What what would you tell Young Brian Michael Cooper? You know that's a great question. I would tell him. I would tell him that respect time and I think that you know that don't take time for granting. I think we tend to kind of you know, you know, it says youth had always wasted on the young. I think we're so eager to get to the next step we don't take time to kind of recognize and by the time we get there right, we look back and I think, you know, enjoy the time, you know, recognize how precious it is with family and friends, and I think that's well, that's one of the things I would tell younger Brian Cooper to say hey, you know, make sure you keep...

...the main thing, the main thing, particularly with that. All right, Brian, if you could trade places with anyone in the world for a day, who would that be? Man, that's a that's a that's a great question as well. See's you got to go sports or political. I'M gonna I go spear. I was gonna saying Mitchell to Biscay, but I don't know if you know well your real big bears fan in you might have fos down. So you know, I think, I think is I think my thirteen year old self would say. You know, I you know, I want to trade my trade plays with the quarterback in Chicago bears, I think, but I think the humble Vince McMahon or, arguing that, Jim Myckman. I'm sorry that I would be better. Look, that's a great all. He's a great guy. I think that would be a great I think that would be a I would love the trade places with him for a day. I think he's a credible businessman. So yes, that would be a great tree. That would be a great, great trade. All Right, biggest pet peeve? HMM, the money more in quarterback. It is my biggest pet peeve coming you know, I always tell I've told my staff this is well, I said look, you know, if you got there's no bad idea. There's you know, the only bad ideas when you don't raise it and then after we do something and then you kind of come up and say, yeah, I wish we had done this. That's my biggest pet peeve. I got you. How about it? This is along the same lines. But we're sports cliche. I always see what people say how competitive everyone is. It's like, well, yeah, if you're in the NFL, your competitive, you access all your competitive. You know that's it's such a true yeah, everyone who says it it's like, okay, that's a good that's a good one as well. You know, I do. You know, there's so many right, you know, take it, take it one game of the time. Well, it's it's, it's those. I think. What else you gonna do? Like we're play every game right now. Yeah, don't all at once. Yeah, all right. So when Dave and I come to Houston, what your roughnecks? What restaurant are you going to send us to see? So that's a also a great question. Look, that's a that's out. There a number of different you know, I'm going to be very diplomatic here, because we have a number of good restaurants and good partners and that's one of those. You know, mine feels that I could. I was named one and I'll name another. I will tell you this. Houston is the best. There's three great food groups here. Creole, you know, the the East Texas, Louisiana Influence, Text Mex and barbecue, and you can't here's a number of restaurants here and you cannot go wrong with any of them. So I would at least stick with those three food genres. And Houston and you will be very happy. I think I'M gonna go for Barbecue when I come down. That's hard to beat Houston Barr we don't have good barbecue in Pittsburgh. So there's a lot that's a little shaky. All right, all right, last one day. Okay, Brian, if you're going to make him Mount Rushmore of Houston Sports, who would be the four people? That's you know. So that's a great question. I think one of the things I might my personal belief from Houston is the number thirty four is sacred. So Nolan, Ryan Earl, Campbell A, Chimolajuan right now. Those, those three definitely had it know, so that I did. Think those are three that we can all agree on. I think Ford is going to be that's A. that's a that's a tougher one for me. On the fourth, you know, last night rudy t was here and he did you know, he's inducted into the hall of fame. He's smell sports hall of fame. I think the world of him. I think he's just a phenomenal. Phenomenal. Was a phenomenal for the you know, for his coaching. You know, never under ustimate the heart of a champion, and there so many. On that fourth, I guess I'm going to go to Florida for A. I think the three are are the best definites. I think there's some. You know, man, that's a. that's a that's a that's a great, great fourth. You know, there's so many, the people to pick from about maybe rudy tea, you know, coach Yeoman, I mean guy, Lewis, Elgin Hayes, but Moses Malone, I mean, I put Bum Bum Philips. Yeah, Phillips, and we love you. Blue oilers. Yeah, stally. I...

...mean there's you know, there's some, there's some, there's some really great man, to have more than one Mount Rushmore. Yeah, it meant to make a few for you using so big. You know, we're a big meal it. We do everything big in Texas, so we probably have to have six or seven spots in Houston, right. Yeah, you do everything overside. So Hey, Brian, it was awesome. Thanks for sharing your story with us and joining us here on how to up with gusts and and we really appreciate your time. Thank you, thank you, guys, thanks so much. All right, right, thanks, Brian. Take care. Take care. You too, thanks, thanks so much,.

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