Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 11 months ago

Brett Lorin

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to Huddle Up with Gus, with 15 year NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte! On today’s show Gus welcomes former professional baseball player Brett Lorin to discuss his love of all things sports and especially baseball. Brett shares with us what brought him to baseball, how he became disciplined enough to make it to the professional diamond and what life has been like for him and his family since leaving his active playing. The fellas also discuss the latest in what’s going on in the National Baseball League and look to rule changes and which players are going to end up where for the next season.

Hey everyone, Welcome to another episode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, some people say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read. 16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latest news, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favorite podcast. Follow up with Gusts. Check it out today at Wide. Digital News.com. Huddle up with Gusts is brought to you by Vegas sports advantage, clients of Vegas sports advantage are winning big in 2021 you can be a part of the winning two. As of june 1st $100 bettors are up $3700 500 dollars. Bettors are up $18,500 and $1000 bettors are up $37,000 and $5000. Bettors are up $185,000 become inclined today by clicking the link in the description below and use promo code, huddle up To take 25% off your package today. Thanks to our partnership. Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron at the diamond or on the links, we can only say, okay, welcome to this week's huddle up with gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchises with 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the games are one. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up. Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it's kick off time so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us. Strange variety, big play two Aleve. Hey everyone welcome to another episode of heading up with Gus, I'm your host, Gus Frerotte. Thanks for joining me today. I want to thank all of our our great people that work with us on how to up with Gus Sounder FM. We want we appreciate them for hosting us on their platform. I want to thank brian and terry my team and we also want to thank Vegas sports uh betting I think that's it. Right brian, I can't remember. But uh sports advantage, Vegas sports advantage right? They do betting. They really um you know if you want to increase your odds, uh trying to do some betting on teams on players, especially coming up this fall, go to Vegas sports advantage, put my coat in, huddle up and uh, you know, save some money, join the team, get all their info and they're gonna help you win some cash. Uh, so I go to Vegas sports advantage dot com and today's guest, I did his show, I don't know if it was last week, a week before, but joining me today is a former major league baseball pitcher and now successful entrepreneur and has a podcast called Too Tall, too Tall sports podcast. So I'm assuming Brett that you're way too tall, uh, for most places. That's why you called it that. But uh, so joining me today is Brett Lauren, former Major League Baseball pitcher. How you doing Brett? Good. Thank you for having me on Gus. I appreciate it. Glad I could do your show now that you're nice enough to do mine. So I appreciate it. Yeah. So tell me what's too tall? Like, how, where do you come up with that name? Yeah, just I'm 67. So you know, just general stuff that you can't really fit into clothes in the stories. You can't really buy shoes unless you buy them online now, you know, cars and you know, flying in planes. So it's just, it's a tough life for us tall people sometimes. Yeah. What is that? A 17 shoe? 15? I'm...

...not too crazy. Yeah, no, you're not like that kid. Like you go in and say, I can't find any shoes and then shot comes in and buys you some shoes. I wish I could meet him so he could do that. I love those stories. He's always somewhere buying people's stuff. Oh yeah, he's done a lot of like charitable stuff. It sounds like it's cool, but he's like you to where he's a big franchisees guy right now, aren't you? Part of franchisees? Uh you came out you were jimmy john's and something else. Yeah, so after my baseball career I could just kind of have like the entrepreneurial mindset and I wanted to, I don't want to be a franchisees, so um out here in southern California, my cousin and I, we both got into Franchising world and got a jimmy john's in one store and the plan was to do multiple and you know, have a bunch of locations, but it just, it was the toughest thing I've ever done for sure. So um owning a store and running it like owner operator, it's a whole different ballgame. So it was tough. Yeah, I helped my buddy through the pandemic at his restaurant and I kind of ran the, the expo line and just because I wanted to experience it, right, He was the cook. My kids were out front, running the door and doing all the grub hub and everything, and it's it's not just uh doing the food, it's it's the it's the cleaning, it's the prep, it's a all that stuff, it's crazy. It is. And you're like, you're hiring 18-22 year old kids to run the show. Like, you hope they were the right uniform, you hope they show up, you, you know, you're not their first priority and they're not going to care as much as you will, at least, you know, most of them, it's a job, right? It's the first job for a lot of kids. So you're constantly training and it's just it's a and all those rules that you're talking about and it's just hard to make money in a lunchtime business only. it's really not like a dinner business. So it's just hard. Did you find when you were trying to hire kids, did you find the kids that played sports or a little more um amenable listened a little better things like that. I actually found that a lot of our employees were women. Like they just, they at that age they care more, they're more on it. Like they just they just a little bit cleaner with their process. You know, you get those college age guys like they don't care, you know, it's just some way more mature is what you're saying more mature at their age. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, I can see that. So you said you mentioned southern California is where you grew up, correct? What's it like growing up in Southern California? Because I grew up in the Northeast, I played baseball every spring was freezing, the bats were cold, You know, we're pitching indoors till like the mud was gone, we didn't have turf fields back when I played right, so I can't imagine what it was like to be able to go out the first day of baseball and just throw a real ball. Yeah, I mean you get to play everything you're around. So I think that's that's one benefit. My mom's actually from new york and my dad's from out here, so luckily she decided to chose to go to California. I didn't have to grow up in Long Island or Staten Island and one of those, you know, I got to grow up out here, so um it's great, like like I said, you can play everything all year round. Um so you just, you get exposed to a lot more sports just more often, you know, there's a lot more available and there's just a lot of stuff to do so um it's great, the weather is always great, like even during my career I always thought I would come back here because it's just hard to beat, it is hard to beat. Um But you know it's kind of like uh for me if I would have tried to go to California living in the north east all the time it would have been difficult because everybody I know is back here, right? So I understand that. Uh So growing up, did you grow up in a pretty big neighborhood? Was it a small like area or tell me about your area where you grew up? Yeah it's a big like planned communities with like cold sacks and you know H. O. A. Like all that stuff. So it's this big big you know big community, lots of sports going on and it's kinda you just there's just so much stuff going on like there you've got the beach if you know you're you're basically an hour or two away from any type of anything. You...

...know like the mountains, the desert if you want to go out there like you know people like the river so you drive five hours to you know the Arizona California border if you want to do that. Like there's just there's a lot of stuff you can do. So when you were growing up though because for me growing up I you know get on your bike, go to your buddy's house, let's go play something when you grew up in your neighborhood. Was that a lot of it like you let's just go to get her buddies or what's most of it planned? Like a lot of things sports today everything is hey, we gotta have a coach, its all time, you know what I mean Like? But when I grew up we just went and called our buddies and picked up the old dial a phone and said let's go play today, we're gonna meet at the field at 10 o'clock. Yeah. Yeah, same same for me. You know, obviously I played a lot of organized sports to. Um and I played everything. I mean, you know did soccer to baseball, basketball and I did a lot of stuff. Never played organized football but we still just, you know, call each other and get the guys together like play like over the line and stuff, you know, just just go into the field and doing this. I still, I'm old school to in that way. Yeah. No, that's awesome. So you said you're 67 When did that growth spurt? Hit hit you. I would say in between my sophomore and junior year of high school that I went from like 6263267 So then by senior year I kind of like, I didn't really get my I guess man strength until I was like 18. I wasn't like a fully grown at freshman year. So once I became a senior than like I filled out a little bit and so I was much, much better athlete. Once I became a senior in high school, did you have some of those growing pains? Because I grew between 8th and 9th grade. You know, I'm 64. And uh, so that that like my whole ninth grade year, they called Osgood slaughter my knees were just killing me the whole year. I remember icing them wrapping them. It didn't matter what I did. Nothing helped them. Yeah. My sister actually had that she was a volleyball player just in high school. I didn't play college or anything, but she had that Osgood slaughters. I never had that luckily. But I think it was just more like just learning how your body works and you know, long limbs and figuring out how to, you know, have like body control and all those things. You just don't really get that. So you get a sense of like how big you are. So did you play volleyball? No, I mean just for fun, like we just go to the beach and play, which is also great. Another California benefit. You just go to the beach volleyball so they're being tall. I figured you could have been a good because the volume is pretty popular in California. It's very popular. The only thing, I think it's the same spring season as baseball. So it's always, yeah I would not substitute volleyball for baseball. I was always thinking like what can I do in college And I just didn't see myself as like a college volleyball player. My um I had a really good friend who grew up in L. A. His name is Danny, farmer and Danny uh played volleyball and football because obviously what you said they were different seasons and he played at U. C. L. A. Football football. Yeah and he was like the spike guy. Like Danny was like 6 2 you know he was this receiver but he could jump out of the building that's you know it's crazy. But I know he always said that volleyball volleyball was very popular out in California. Was he there with like cade McNown? Yeah so he's a good buddy of mine, he still lives out there. Um But yeah, so you're going through, you're playing multiple sports growing up when you get to high school? When did that switch say, okay, I'm just gonna play one sport I'm going to concentrate on on what I love to do. I actually, basketball is my favorite sport. So I played both all four years. I didn't want to commit. I didn't want to do like baseball year round. I probably would have gotten burnt out. Like it's not Oh yeah, definitely. It's not as fun as basketball is and I still thought my career is probably baseball, but I didn't want, I knew after my senior year of high school that basketball is going to be done. So I wanted to play in both as long as I could and I did and the coaches obviously they want you to pick one of course because they want to build...

...around you all year round and stuff. But I just I stayed with both because I want to enjoy it. So I luckily played both all four years. Yeah. So were you like the tallest guy in your basketball team? Yeah. Yeah so you're the center? Um That had to be I mean being 67 it had to be a pretty hard choice not to go play basketball in college. Yeah. The thing was you know obviously I'm not as athletic as probably the guys that are playing D. One. So I think I had a couple like D. Two offers possibly. But I just like I don't know I could go play D. One baseball or play D. Two basketball. Like I just I always I was thinking long term like okay I can go four years for basketball and that's probably it or I can go play baseball and maybe I got a chance to get drafted. So I kind of just had that long term mindset of like which one do I have the best career path in? So I chose baseball. Yeah. No that's smart, I had the same thing where football was all D. One scholarships and baseball was all D. Two for me, right? Um And so D. Two wasn't much scholarship money, my parents weren't paying anything right? So chose football just because I was going to get a scholarship, I didn't think as far ahead as you did. I just knew I love to play the game and I was going to go to Tulsa and just enjoy my time and uh you know let the cards fall as they may. So you make your decision to go to college. Tell me about that. Yeah, so I was I didn't have any real scholarship offers for baseball so it's kind of a gamble but I was like a recruited walk on at University of Arizona so I decided to go there. Um I didn't want to go to J. C. Route for baseball. I just figured I'd rather go to a big school, it's far enough away in Arizona. It's about you know Tucson's about seven hour drive from southern California. So um you know I had no there were no guarantees. There are a lot of scholarship guys there that were playing ahead of me. So um I mean I don't know how far down you want to go but go for it just speaking you like. Yeah I just I red shirt in my first year so I didn't play at all, barely pitched my second year. So I loved going to school. There is a lot of fun but I kind of was like, all right, everyone that's coming in. My class, my freshman year is coming back as a junior on scholarship. I got to make a decision here. So that's when I decided to go to Long Beach State and transfer to play baseball there. Yeah. So why, I mean obviously it's opportunity you want to be able to play, you want to go somewhere where you can get out on the field no matter what field it is. I mean I felt the same way, but it's it's hard where, I mean it's competition and usually if coaches have a scholarship guy and a non scholarship guy, we know who they usually pick right, even if your stats are better, right? Yeah, exactly. So you know my sophomore year, I threw a total of nine innings. So it's just like I'm not one of their guys and that's okay, that happens in sports sometimes, you know, you don't realize it till you get there. Um, and as I'm sure, you know, with coaches, they'll a lot of these big programs over recruit. So you've got lots of guys trying to make like a little amount of spots and it's just like if you're not on scholarship, it's just, it's just not the cards aren't in your favor. You have to outperform so much that now you become a scholarship guy, it's hard. So let me ask you, I've always wanted to ask now you pitched in college, obviously go to Long Beach State and pitch. Do you get stronger by pitching in games or can you be as strong as you can be? But just by practice, you know what I mean? Like in football, a lot of guys can go through seven on seven, A lot of guys can be good in practice, but the games, it's another story, how do you feel about baseball? Is that, you know, is that comparable at all? I think it is probably the same. It's like seven on seven would be like me throwing a bullpen a couple days before my start. Like you're just kind of refining your skills because you don't really know how those pitches will play in the session. You have to see how the hitters react when you're in the game. That's when you really get the sense of okay my stuff works or my stuff doesn't work. So I think I totally agree with you. The game will tell you like how like where you're at. So yeah, and then I think it's the competitive side to write, you can pitch a bullpen session and kind of be there. But then when the...

...game's on the line you got a guy on first and it's really, you know, well it's kind of uh when the you know oil meets of water, is it gonna mix, is it gonna go part like what's gonna happen? It really puts everything on the line and I've seen so many guys like that. Um So tell me like your your first experience where you had a lot of pressure on you when you were pitching um in college you're saying. Yeah. So actually when I was at U. Of a we played against a stacked Arizona State team and I didn't do very well, like I think I walked the bases loaded, gave up a couple of hits, like it was not good and that was the first time I was like wow, I'm I'm going against first rounders probably you know, a few first rounders here. So that was like my first real experience into it. Um, but then when, when I transferred Long Beach, it was more like my mindset was different. It was more like a, this is like a business decision, right? I'm still in college having a good time, but it was more about, this is my junior year of school redshirt sophomore. I got a chance to get drafted. I just need to get some exposure. And so in the, when I started that year, I was like a fringe middle reliever basically. And then as the season progressed, my role got bigger and bigger and bigger and I became a starter, ended up pitching in a playoff game in a regional. So you never know when you start the year where you're gonna end up as far as your role is concerned. So you just kinda have to believe in your stuff and and and work hard to become one of the guys, like I was saying earlier, you know, do you think like obviously baseball is different than football, football, we have college and the pros, baseball, you have college minor leagues and then the pros and you get an opportunity to grow even more in the minor leagues. Um Do you think it's an advantage for guys to go to college before they try to make The pros in baseball 100%. I usually tell people like if you're a high school draft pick, if you don't get like. I don't know, at least 500,000 and up, like even I would say a million because you can't really substitute those those three years of college before you get drafted. And I just think the maturity standpoint, you got 18 year old kids haven't been away from home yet, and they're expected to play pro ball and perform in the middle of nowhere. You got, you know, the foreign or latin players coming in, they've never been exposed to really any other cultures before, like it's a lot to ask of a high school kid to all of a sudden go from high school to your plan against college, you know, guys in their twenties now, so I don't, I think there's just a maturity factor that you you can't substitute without going to college, so if you get a lot of money, great, you might not see that again, but I feel like if you're good enough you'll get drafted again in college. Yeah, I feel like um, like college, for me, it was my learning curve, like not with just sports, but just life in general, you know, how to grow up, how to kind of be on your own, how to relate to people from different backgrounds, I mean, I grew up in pennsylvania in Pittsburgh, and then I'm in Oklahoma and I'm with people from texas Kansas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, like people from all kind of poor rich, it didn't matter, but I never had that in high school, like everybody was kind of the same in my high school, so you got to go and learn, and I couldn't imagine being 18 and saying, oh, this is a job, this is my, this is my career on the line right now, like, and you don't even know how to write a check yet, You have probably haven't done your own laundry yet either. Right? That like, that's why. Exactly, and there's a lot of high school burnouts that get drafted and they're there for two or three years and they just can't hang not, they're probably great players. They're just not ready for pro ball yet. It's it's too big of a jump for a lot of high school kids. So it's why it's a crapshoot in the draft. Like a lot of these, they just have the draft the other day. Like they're taking these raw high school kids over a proven commodity in college that's ready to contribute. Its its total crapshoot. Yeah, I was kind of happy with the Pirates first pick. They took a catcher, Henry Davis, Louisville high school catcher. Right. No, I think he...

...was a college. Okay. Yeah, I think he was calling like he was the best hitter in college baseball or anything like that, which we could use some of that. But I I mean I always hope for pitching because I always think that pitching wins you the big games that keeps the score down. Maybe not now with all the sticky stuff not available. Like it was. Did you ever use the whatever it was pine tar right of screen. I could go off on this this topic forever. The most like the unwritten accepted way was this like spraying sunscreen and then the rosin bag that gives you like the sticky stuff. And a lot of people used it. Like I I never really used it. I didn't need that. I didn't like the feeling of it. So I just didn't do it. But it was kind of like a widely known thing and all of a sudden nobody can hit this year and they take it away. So that's the biggest problem with baseball is some cheating is allowed until it's too much and then it's not allowed. So it's always been like that. Yeah. I always felt like guys who have smaller hands, even in baseball, like guys with big hands, probably your 67 you're bigger, you got big hands, you can grab the baseball a little easier. Like guys that have smaller hands in football, man, they were so particular about how the football felt and we'd have to rub it down, do all that stuff because you know, you want that grip. That grip means everything on how you spin it. And I'm sure baseball is the same way, right? And I was thinking about football, like I watched like teddy Bridgewater, whereas the glove, whereas two gloves or Big Ben, where's the glove sometimes? Maybe on his non throwing him. But like guys are like trying it. So what's the difference between a quarterback wearing a glove to throw to get a better grip or receivers putting sticky stuff on their gloves? Like why do hitters get to have pine tar on their back? You know, because it was hard and they want to help them a little bit. Baseball is very hard. I've stood in there against the pro pitcher once and said, don't ever want to do that again. It looks not, I mean it's hard on tv but when you get up there and you're getting 95 plus right at you, like good luck. Oh my gosh, When Chapman was playing for the Reds, you know, I'd watch the pirates all the time and he's he's putting him in there at 10103. It's like don't even know how you hit a lefty to down this way. And my gosh, it was like randy johnson when he pitched because he was like your height, right? Yeah, I think he was 6 10, so even bigger than me and throwing upper nineties, it was unhittable. Yeah. I mean you just can't you know, they're throwing and they're throwing a slider curve and it looks like it's coming right for your head, you're getting out of the way. Um Now baseball is great. I mean I played in my whole life, I love it and I can see your enjoyment out of it. But tell me because they can when you're in high school you get to play like you get to be a picture but you can play all the other positions too. And then all of a sudden you get to college and you're very singular position. Was that a big change for you know because I couldn't hit. So I was it was fine. I became a picture only my senior high school. I was just flying with pitching. Yeah. Like I played the hot corner and pitched and and played outfield. I love just being out there right now and I love playing it was just like all right, there's really no point for me to be out there so I'll just pitch only. So who taught you kind of how to pitch? Like how to throw? Was that your dad was uh just have a coach when you were young? Yeah, my dad definitely, but you might remember this name. Played for the Angels and the Yankees, Mike witt he threw a perfect for the Angels I think in like 86 or something like that. His son was my age and he was my little league coach. So at 12 years old he's the one who taught me how to throw a curveball, he just like mechanics at a young age. And so then from there on, you know, I got pitching coaches over the years, but Mike Witt really helped me as a young kid, like refine my skills even at like 12 years old. Yeah, that's amazing. My...

...dad was my guy in the backyard, that's who he, because I couldn't throw a curveball because it hurt my elbow tremendously. And um, so he taught me to throw a knuckleball, so I threw a fastball and a knuckleball and it worked as a curve and changeup and everything for me, you know, and then when I was a kid listen to spread when I was a kid, My dad loved baseball every night. He listened to pirates on his transistors, just a radio and fall asleep. And he said when I was a kid, he was one of 15, he was this tough old guy. He said, well now I'm in Little League, he goes, when you get in there, throw the first one at their head and then throw the next one over the plate. I'm a little kid. I'm like okay I mean I hit both the ter pack twins, they batted back to back both in the head and he's like that's alright, that's alright, just keep throwing it. I was like oh my God, I wonder why it was wild when I got older. Yeah, yeah, pitching you know throwing curveballs, I don't there's not really a certain age you should start throwing them, but if you don't throw him right, you can definitely hurt your album. You know what I mean? If you just don't get taught the right way, you can definitely get hurt. Yeah, I couldn't imagine like so uh what other pictures you probably have big so you could throw splitter? I fooled around with the splitter but I kinda in high school it was just fastball curveball changeup and then when I got to pro ball is more like more sinker, slider changeup guys, so different little lower arm angle. Um But yeah for the most part of his fastball curveball changeup now did you feel the coaching between like all three different obviously you take the next step up in coaching but from college to um the pros, what was the difference in coaching for you? Was it just film, was it just the knowledge, what was the difference? Yeah I think once you leave school the benefit of pro ball is it's baseball all the time. You don't have to go to class. You have the right papers anymore, it's all baseball. You went to class and road papers. Yeah I actually did go to class. Yes especially the non scholarship guy like you better do it go to class. Um, uh, I think watching video definitely helps a lot. I didn't do it really in high school, did a little bit in college, but not really. So once you start watching video then you're like, oh wow, that's what that looks like. You know, I can see my arm, I'm late right now, getting the ball out of the globe, like you can just see more things. Um, and some organizations are more of like, all right, we're going with whatever you got, we're not going to really develop you. And some organizations are so analytically driven and so on you about, you know, everyone's gonna throw the right way and I hate to say it, but the pirates were so um mechanical and like I like breaking down video, but not, let's just to the point where they're making everybody throw the same way. It was just uh, and you can see that well, that's what Jericho always said, right, right? Because they always said that like they have all these dudes in their back pocket and they can't win with them. They let them go and they become better elsewhere. There's a fundamental flaw in the pirate system, you know? So it, it sucks. It does suck for being a way to put it. Um, I don't know why they taught that. It was almost like pitch for contact. Like eric polls like, what are you talking about? You know, and, and you know, we see him go on and have a career of really what he should have been at the Pirates and probably wanted to stay here because people love the city and um, it just, I don't know why they talk like that, but I think we have a new coach now. I think he's a little bit different. Um, but that's always interesting to me in on film, you know, because we've, we would watch everything practice the opponents, all of our stuff, old games, old quarterbacks. We, I mean the way you can break down video now is incredible. And it's baseball pretty much the same now. It is, I think. So. I got out of...

...the game in 2014. So a lot has happened since then with scouting reports are different, but normally we would go over the scouting report of just like what the guys have done lately. You know, they call a spray chart or whatever, like what? Um, in the last 10 games or something like that and how to attack guys. But in the minors, you don't really get, you know, no one's really scouting these other teams to help us out. You know, you just kind of show up, here's what I got here is what you got, lets see what happens kind of thing. So if you go into a game like that, what's your first pit? You just fastball every time or not every time, but I think it depends on you always have to do it, go with what you do well right? Yeah, your strength, as they say good pitching usually beats good hitting. It's just that's how it goes because hitting the heart and you've got guys on defense behind you. So the odds are against the hitter. Um but you definitely can tell like um where guys are in the box and if you have a good catcher who's paying attention, they'll know like is this guy opening his front hip too early? Can we get in there on him or do we need to go slider here or whatever? So you kind of just learn based on where the, what the hitters, what the swings are telling you. So when you get to the big leagues, how many components are there? Is it just you and the catcher? Is that you the catcher and the coach looking at all the, you know what I mean? Because you know the hitters coming up, you've studied them, but there's so many games. I don't know how we remember all this stuff. So I actually never pitched in the big leagues. I got I pitched in one big league spring training so I do have that a little bit of experience but not a ton. I never got to I got to triple A. So right below the big leagues. But so how does that work though? Like even in triple A. I mean there's more coaches, there's more understanding, you know what I mean? And I always wondered that like because you watch these games and is it is it the catcher knowing the batter? Is it the picture knowing the batter whose responsibility? Is it more? I think the older you get in the higher levels you get double a, triple A. The catcher's care more because it's like their staff. So it's almost they take it upon themselves if you get a good one. And usually the older guys have been around enough and they take ownership of learning the hitters and knowing, you know, knowing where to throw guys. And that's the other thing. You're some guys in the minors, you move around so much, you don't get the same catcher all the time. So you have to have great communication with your catcher and say like, like this is what I do. Well, you know, let me know, you know what you think in the boxes. There's nothing worse than you having to like, no, no, no. Like shake off its the worst. There's no flow. There's no rhythm. You know, it's, it's, it's good to be on the same page to catch her. Yeah, you'd have to be right because if he's thinking outside your thinking inside, it's gonna be a big difference, right? It could be the difference between a strikeout and a home run. There's no doubt about that. Hey, everyone, I want to thank you for listening to huddle up with gusts. We're going to take a quick commercial break and we'll be right back. We're talking with Brett Lauren from two tall sports podcast. Uh huh. Hey, how come up with us listeners Manscaped. They sent me, uh, they hooked me up with a bunch of tools and formulations for their package, three point oh kit. So, you know, I want to show you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We all think we got a perfect package, but they sent me the perfect package, three point oh kid. I want to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It came in this great box. Uh, you know, and you can see what it says, They will thank you because they sent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us, uh, you know, stuff that makes you smell better. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this great, uh, some boxers, you what you get right, protect them. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this, cool it, uh, sack, I guess you...

...want to call it to store all your stuff in. So, uh, it's been great. Manscaped, sent me a bunch of product. Um you know, and you know, you can see it all on here. Uh you know, you can go to Manscaped dot com and put in the code. Uh gus Frerotte, that's G U S F R E R O T T E get 20% off and free shipping when you use that code, but you can get a kit, you can get individual items like uh this way, cool groomer that has a little led light, um ceramic. These things come apart, they're waterproof, you can do a lot with them. So, you know, man scape is great. You know, it's funny. So I remember when I was playing with the Denver broncos and I'm not going to mention any names, but there was a gentleman who was playing on our team and uh, you know, if he ever hears the story, he'll know exactly what I'm talking about, but uh, he brought his own clippers in one time and he used it to trim his beard up, his goatee and everything and he had him there for about two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner, he walks in and there's a person, another player that is actually manscaping with his beard trimmer. So you know, one of the things is, you don't want to use the same trimmer down there that you use up here. So uh, he kind of freaked out a little bit and he said, hey, how long have you been using that tool there? And he said, well, showed up here about three weeks ago and I've been using it ever since. So you know, there is a lesson learned that, you know, don't leave things out and probably if it would have just said manscaped on it, we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probably one of the funniest, uh, taking care of your ball stories I've ever heard or been around in the locker room in the NFL, so it's a great story. Um, but you know, I always said there was no way to know, there's no name on it, and the guy was just using it and another guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heck of a funny story. So one of the best I've ever heard in my 15 years playing in the league. Um, but you know, there's so many great things about Manscaped and what they're doing, because guys, you got to take care of yourself, even though I got great hair, um, and getting older, but you still have to maintain some sort of grooming, right? And so, you know, we all work out for me. I like working in my yard doing those things now that I'm retired. Get a little sweat on and everything. You want to smell good. You know, you got to take care of yourself, they've got some great products. Um you know, this one a little uh you ball deodorant, we'll need that here and there um after, you know, working the yard, taking a hike, doing a walk, whatever you do. Um It's a great thing, but there's so many great products. Um I want to thank Manscaped for sending them to me. Um uh the lawnmower 3.0. Obviously you can use it anywhere in your body, but I'm sure you guys have all seen the commercials, but this is one just letting you know that the lawnmower three point comes with the perfect kit. You can buy the lawnmower by itself by all these products individually. They even sent me this wonderful shirt, you can see the back, your balls will thank you and then here's the front, so it's an awesome shirt. Have great gear and you know what? Sometimes you can just sit back, take care of your balls a little bit and read the paper. So a man's cape even has their own daily news do so, which is great. So don't forget that you can go to the code Gus Frerotte and that's G. U. S. F. R. E. R. O. T. T. E. D. Uh and you can save 20%...

...on any products, the complete the perfect uh package gift set and uh you know, you can save 20% and get free shipping, so use the code Gus Frerotte. G. U. S. F. R E R O T. T. E. Hey everybody spells my name wrong, they even spelled wrong on the back of my Pro bowl jersey. So you know I gotta I gotta help you guys out so don't forget how important it is that you use these products, take care of yourself down below uh and have some fun right? There's nothing closer to you than your little bugs. So use the lawnmower uh use the code Gus Frerotte save 20% and get free shipping and uh order some great manscaped products. Hello everyone, we're back on huddle up with Gus. I want to thank uh Vegas sports advantage so that you know go there, use my code huddle up and uh let those guys really figure out the odds for you, let them figure out who you need to bet on and let them help you win some money. So Vegas sports advantage for that. Um And we're joined by Brett Lauren today Brett we're back. Uh You know, I just think that we've been talking a lot of baseball and I know you're a big sports fan with everything. Uh and you're probably like me, you try to watch as much as possible uh on tv. Did you watch the Home Run derby last night? I did watch Home Run Derby. I think the big hype was Shohei Otani right coming in. He's the big draw and he's basically the modern day babe ruth. It's pretty cool to see like I never no one ever thinks we'd see that because everyone's so against him doing are people doing that. So it was cool to watch. Um You know and course field obviously the ball flies so it's a little better there but it's a fun event. What do you think I you know what I liked about it was that the fans were felt like they were really into it, you know, And I don't know if you saw what they did, is that when uh, when the players were up, I think they signed their baseballs so that when they hit them out, like the people would catch a signed baseball, which was really cool, you know, and baseball is a sport that has to do more things to keep it pumping, keep it going to keep the engagement and the fans into it. And I thought course Field was really, it was exciting, right? And I think that just making a big deal, like, like Otani just making a big deal out of it. People are pumping them up because baseball needs that we need all those guys to be able to come in there and and get the sport to where it needs to be compared to all the other sports and I I thought it was great, it was fun, you know, see the fans and everyone involved in it, but I just don't get how they can hit it so far when it's not coming in at 95 miles an hour. Yeah, I think it's just because they're like lifting right there like upper cutting their swings and they're trying to and maybe the balls are a little bit different for the home Run Derby who know, just a little bit, I mean I've I've taken batting practice before and it's not like you can I mean they're hitting them 500 some feet that's and balls not coming in, like I can see when it's coming in at like 95 to 100 like the velocity coming in, hitting it with the bat, like it's going to travel faster out but and those guys were crushing it. They're so good at making contact like right on the barrel that it just goes there, swings are so good. Um, and there, I mean that's a different thing with the pros and the joes, right? It's just they're, they're that good. Yeah, it was fun to watch. I'm excited and you know, we were talking about johnny, I think, you know, that's like...

...everybody's dream, wouldn't it be like that? You can pitch, you could play the field, you can hit. Why do you think that? Is that more you being a picture? I want to ask you this, why do you think it, is that more pictures can't hit? Because we don't work on it. You know, when you get to the college and the miners, you're really not hitting that often, it's not a priority. And plus, you know, forever, it's just this old stigma that you can't do both. No one's pushed to do both at a high level. So finally we got a guy that can and hitting as hard as you know, so to be a pitching side, a lot of guys can probably feel hard but not a lot of people can hit like above to 50 in the big leagues. So I think that's the heart is like how can you be great pitching and also be a great major league hitter? That's why you probably just don't see it. But also like I said, it's been pushed away, You're not supposed to do this until someone does well. You think that if you're a starting pitcher you'd have way more time to practice hitting, but then you're not hitting live, which is probably way harder than even the starting pitchers. If your National League pitcher you're only really taking BP maybe the day before you pitch just to get a couple swings in because you're gonna get a couple of bats but in the other days you're not hitting BP, you're just shagging balls in the outfield so you're not working on your craft. That's why my favorite ever to watch coming up. There was a picture to hit was Roberto cologne. You know, he's here's this he's kind of a you know, rounder guy comes up and he remember I think he hit a home run one game and it was like the whole place went crazy. Bartolo bar, total Bartolo colon. Yeah I can't he's still playing somewhere I think in like a mexican league or something like that. He's like 50 years old. Well yeah there's amazing athletes like that. You think, you know, you think of football is like brady, he's played forever, right? Hockey. You had like Gordie Howe, your army younger played forever. You know some guys like that. And then if basketball, I think it was Vince carter just retired and he played A long long time. Those guys came out of high school playing like I think it's Lebron's like 16th year or something and it doesn't feel like that. And then in baseball I feel like you could play a lot longer in baseball But it's still gotta be hard like 100 and that many games every year. I mean aren't that many you know what's crazy over the last 10-15 years? Like all the older players have phased out like these teams don't want to pay the 35 plus guys anymore. Like there's just not that many older and when I say older it's like 35 and above. Which is not that old, but The game has gone so young. Just those old veterans that you remember from the 90s and 2000s are just not there anymore. Oh my gosh, my kids. And I collect, we collect cards and then we sell them, we by himself. And we have a certain collection we're trying to get. But I I like vintage car, I like vintage baseball. My dad and I always collect that. And so we'll go through cards and my sons will be like, how old is this guy? You know? Then you turn it back over and there's like 20 teams like that he played for. Like, it's not that way anymore. And you're right, like guys guys could play forever if they could come up and hit. You know, you see those guys that play forever, but now it's not that way. Yeah. The 20 year career, like the cal Ripken's like like that just doesn't happen anymore. Like it sucks you know because you can't really you can't get attached to these guys as much because they're just not there that long you know? So it's you think it's the money to like they're not like trying to like they made so much money, they don't have to push to like play forever right? Exactly. And I don't know what it is. Everyone just got so like hyper focused on the young guys in the league being younger and they're coming up earlier, they're getting called up like you still have to put your time in in the minors unless you're a finn. Um But now it's like 21 22 if you're ready to go you're up there it's you know, it's so it's a different game now. Yeah. That that is crazy because we felt that way in football as you get older, as a veteran, right? Your minimum goes way up and then they're bringing these young guys who they can get three young guys for one veteran, right? Right. And...

...so that was a big difference in football for us. And so we try to, you try to figure that out through the collective bargaining agreement to help the veterans because I always think that you need veterans in the locker room to be any good. You do. And Yeah, exactly. They just, I think the organizations, because I don't know if they've gotten smarter, but they're just not willing to pay the legacy contract for these older guys, right? You know, it's all guaranteed in football. They just cut your ass like, right, baseball, they can cut you, but they're still paying you like bobby Bonnie a million dollars. Yeah, that's contract in history. Well that's what they were saying on the, for the home run derby. Peter Alonso is just kind of, he's gonna be the next bobby Bonilla because he's going to win the home run derby every year, right? Yeah. Just show up for that and you'll get some exposure and you get paid. There you go. So you have your baseball career. At what point did you say? Okay. I really got to start figuring out what my next step is when I was about 28 I think. Um I played my last year, so I played triple A. And when I was in 2013 and then I got released and then I decided to play one year of independent ball. And I just told myself if I don't get picked up again then I'm done. Like I wasn't gonna be a baseball lifer like there's dudes that late thirties, 40 years old, still playing independent ball. I just never saw myself as that guy. I just didn't need the game that as much. Um you can't sign yourself. So I had a good year in independent ball and didn't get signed back to to the minors so I was ready to move on. So it's definitely a tough transition. Like I I tell people a lot, you spend years building a resume that doesn't really translate to real life. You know, it's just it doesn't help you really other than life experience and dealing with adversity and all those things, But it doesn't help you in like selling things or you know, were no, no business. No. Yeah. You're not learning, you're learning a craft, but you're not learning like for me football, that's what I did football family, those are my two things. And then I didn't really think about like what I was lucky enough to play for 15 years, right? But I didn't think about, Okay, I'm going to be 38 when I'm done. What am I going to do next? So like if I want to, if I look back on it, if I wanted to be a coach, I should have like really tried to get to know more coaches or figure that out or if I wanted to go into the staff, you know, go into that part or I should have went back and continued my education, but I didn't do any of that. And so when you're done, they don't let you back in, right? You leave, you're not going back into the business. You've got to figure it out. So, tell me about you left baseball. What was the feeling you had said? This is what I want to try and do. Yeah, I think. And another thing to your point when you stop like, right, when you stop playing, you don't want to coach. A lot of guys don't because you're the same age as the guys, you just left and you feel like you're bitter, you should be there still. So coaching, right? Doesn't feel right, right? You're just like, I'm still, I can still play, you know, everyone thinks that, right? So that's I don't that's why I didn't get into coaching right away. Just because like, I don't want to be around the game right now. Um if I'm not playing in it, but that's when I went to Franchising right after that. So tell me about that process. Yeah. You know, you have to being a franchise. Yeah, yeah. You have to go like usually you go meet with them at their headquarters. Once you get like the initial approval, then you gotta like interview with them and they got to trust you that you're gonna be follow the rules and do all the franchise ebs and all that stuff. Um, and then we get approved and then, you know, the real estate team comes out and finds a location for you. Well unfortunately, so I live in Orange County, which is a great place, but the whole area was taken. So I had to go through what it's called, the Inland Empire, which is like 40 minutes to an hour east. So inland, a little bit from the ocean, um, to another city out there and that's where they approved me for. So You know, location means everything as you probably know. And it's just, it's hard, like I was saying it's not a dinner time business, so from 11 to 3, you got to make all your money. So it's just tough to have one location and be successful in with...

...bringing a new brand to the area. You know, it's not like I built in and out or a Starbucks, which is like gold, you know, it's tough now. What was your decision on, on that franchise? Was that money? Was it? This is like you met somebody like, why, why the franchise that you chose? I think I heard it was coming to California and I was in the midwest for some of my career, and if you were close enough to a jimmy john's, they would deliver sandwiches to your clubhouse. It was great. No one else does this. So I'm like, oh, people are going to love this in California. Okay, well, little did I know you're competing with, not just sandwich places, Subway, you know, Jersey mikes and firehouse and all these other places. You've got all of lunchtime business to compete with. So you're just one of many for lunch. It's really, it's the restaurant business is really hard. Yeah. And so you grew up, I would take, you grew up really fast in the business world. Exactly. For sure. Yeah, luckily my dad's an accountant. So he helped me like financially figure things out with like the labor costs, food costs all those things because you really, you know, the problem with Franchising is there so rigid and that you have to do it their way and like, you know, they're making us stay open till nine PM. Well who's buying a cold sandwich for dinner and beyond, It just doesn't happen. So you're burning through labor and you learn a lot about how little control you have in that world. So you're basically paying for the processes and the vendor contracts you get and there's some perks to having the name and stuff like that. But a lot of it's out of your hands. So how long were you in that business? About 3.5 years. And then we decided to sell and we had the rights to a second location. So we packaged those together and so we got out with no, you know, no losses, which is nice. We broke even. So it was good but great experience. But it was definitely, I'm glad I got out was kind of like buying about the first day in the last day of the best days. That is 100% right. You know what? It actually it bothered me that we didn't see a second store through. It was the right move to get out. But I wanted to see like, okay, maybe the first one is not our best store. Let's see if the second one is another great store. And my goal was 5 to 10 stores. Well you gotta franchise fee every time you buy one and it's just you got it in three places at once. It's it's really, it's a tough gig to run a franchise. Yeah. Especially like you said, there's a lot of competition though. Yeah. You know for sure and it like it's not like um you know, I'm sure there's East coast brands that you grew up with that everybody knows or like a Dunkin Donuts for instance, out there, it's everywhere. So that's like staple in your community when you bring in a new brand that no one's heard of the first year is just like educating people on what you are and then you can start to build the fan base, you know? So that's the hard part two. So then when did you act you sell your franchises? You say, okay, I'm done. And then all of a sudden you get to itch again, what are you doing next? The last four years? I've been doing solar, so solar panel sales, so residential and commercial solar sails. So I I like it, it makes sense. Especially out here, electricity is so expensive. So I've been doing that, but, you know, during the pandemic, I started the podcast, so that's really what I'm trying to focus on and hopefully turning into sports media somehow or, you know, some kind of podcasting career, maybe you're broadcasting radio, but that's I think that's really my calling is what I'd like to do. Yeah. So, selling solar panels, uh do you go to conferences? Are you the guy in the booth and you got your solar panel there? And you say, all right, I'm gonna come to your home and put these up, You're gonna see a lot of money. Yeah, I spent some time, one of the companies I was with that, we had a partnership with Costco. So in the early in my career I would stand in Costco in the booth and be like, hey, do you want to, you know, free solar consultation? I was that guy for a little bit. It was, it was humbling to say the least. Oh yeah, I mean I've been there, I've helped companies like we talked about, I was with r. c. 21 X. I'd go around and trying to sell that stuff and it's hard to be a salesman when you never did it right, You know what I...

...mean? Like you didn't learn how to do any of that and then, you know, sales people are good at not listening to the word no, you know, I'm like, somebody says no and I'm like, okay, just move on, you know what I mean? You can't do that as a sales. It's hard and it's just like when, even when, you know it makes sense, you really have to get people to believe it also, and it's not like I'm selling vacuums, like it's a real thing that can help. So it's just especially out here, so it's just getting people to sit down with you laying it all out how how like ridiculous the electric companies are and how much control they have, then they're like, oh, it does make sense, so it's just getting to that point. But yeah, any type of sales outside sales is really hard. Well, you know, and and like here, it's not like we don't get sun. Obviously Pittsburgh is kind of, you know, we get a lot of clouds, but I mean the soldiers would work. It's just that we're competing with minors and you know, all these other ways of producing energy and solar is available every day. And they're like, oh, what if it doesn't, the sun doesn't come out? I'm like, well that's why you have battery storage, you know what I mean? Like, and you can actually make money if you have solar and all these things and, and, but it's just crazy like the last with the last six years or so, uh, taught us political wise of, of trying to get some of that stuff in. Yeah, and there's tax credits if you want to buy it and there, you know, even if you lease it, everyone's scared of leasing it. It's, you know, basically we're buying the system for you and taking care of it for 25 years and you just pay us monthly to use it at a reduced rate. So any type of solar is better than no solar. That's what I usually tell people because it is because the electric company, like you didn't get to choose it when you moved in your house, you just get what you get and they charge you whatever they want. So you just have to pay it, you have to buy power forever. So I, you know, yeah, my wife and I, we signed up for like the green energy, right? Like, you know, but so your electric company still charges you their amount and then you have to pay the green amount on top of that. So I'm paying like more than, you know, the green energy is supposed to be cheaper. Well yeah, but our electric company who's delivering the power is still charging more. So uh we've always talked about we need to get solar, we need to to get on board. Obviously the weather is a little different where you're at, right? You don't get as many Sundays whatever but and you get snow and all that I'm sure. So it's a little different there. But even even when it's not direct sunlight just being light out, you still produce some powers. So well, I mean the panels are definitely way different today than they were 10 years ago. Right. Yeah, for sure. No, they're much better now. The technologies must they're still big like they're still bulky on your roof, but I don't know if you're going to be there for a long time, who cares what your roof looks like? All right. So, so when you're selling a solar panel, do you get do you get this question? Which which one do they ask you more? Did you play baseball or do you did you play basketball? I always get did you play basketball and in life, I get that at least. And I don't say every week, but a lot I get that. Usually it's the, how tall are you then? It's like, okay, here we go. Now. I got to go down this road. It's like, are you sure you didn't play volleyball? Are you sure you weren't a swimmer? Are you sure? I'm like, yeah, I played baseball. Well, why'd you do that? It's just it's a never ending conversation. So, who's the shortest person you've had on your podcast? It's hard to tell because it's all he's told me. Maybe that's what we like in the video on the side, you should put like uh Muggsy Bogues. 55 right? Like, like that's too too tall podcast. That'd be great. Yeah, No, but that's the question you get. You know, like even me is a big guy, uh 64 you know, I'm over 2 50 it's just like, oh, you had to play sports, like what position did you play? You know, then you gotta go down the whole road. I can imagine what you get. Yeah, it happened definitely happens a lot. Have you ever go ahead? Have you ever made...

...up like, Yeah, I played basketball. I played for the, you know, I played for the clippers a couple of years and I played, I played overseas that you will never know. Yeah. Yeah. I'm the one who invented the Euro step. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. I mean, it just, you know, it just depends like people just want their questions answered. It's fine. Like I usually tell people I used to be somebody, so that's what I say. See this up here. That's a long time ago. I used to do what I did. Uh, so what do you enjoy about podcasting now? I think I like reconnecting with former teammates, coaches and just people that I've met throughout my career and also like getting cool stories out of people that, you know, like, especially in the minors, it's such a mysterious career. You don't see these guys. So they make it to the big leagues and nobody, unless you lived it. It's impossible to know what the lifestyle is like. So when I get a baseball player on, it's cool to get the story of like, wow, really? No job security. You're going from city to city, you don't know where you're going to be next year, making the team out of spring training, like just the bus trips and it's, you're not fine first class, right? No, you're not, you're not even taking white still triple A. So even in double A, these are some of the best players in the country and the world, you're not even flying yet. So at least it's better than a greyhound, right? Yeah, Yeah. It's a little bit better now. But even like big guys like us sitting on a bus overnight, you know, you gotta, you're expected to perform the next day, you know, good every day. Yeah, There's no way to sleep like that. Like when you're scrunched in a seat even though you want to and then the next day you're like, man, I just don't feel good. Like I believe me, I know, and you better feel good because you got to perform. You know, you have your, and if you don't, they're there, the next class of draft picks is coming up. You know, it's a, it's a constant battle and that's why you have to, there's so many outside factors you just have to kind of be like control, you can control and that's it. So being, playing baseball, being your love, how much do you follow it? Do you follow like college players? Do you follow any of that or you just kind of a fan of a team? I grew up a dodger fan, so I do follow them. Um, not as, it's hard to like, even as a former baseball player, it's hard to watch a baseball game for three plus hours and just sit down and watch every pitch during the playoffs, I'll do that. I will watch the games, but 162 I'm not gonna watch every inning of every game. So I just want to highlight, just follow some games. I'll watch it there nationally televised, but it's hard to watch a baseball game. It's, what, in your opinion, what do you think they could do to make it better? I think they could shorten it maybe seven inning games. I think that'd be better. Maybe, you know, they're not going to do this because there's too much money involved. But maybe 100 games, you know, make the regular season matter a little bit more. Yeah, you gotta, there's not enough action during the game. You know, like I'm sure you've seen they're not stealing bases as much. They're not doing hit and runs, they're not manufacturing runs, they're not moving guys over. It's just not the same action as it used to be. It's a lot of homer strikeouts and walks. That's just pretty much what it is. And we know with the sports and everything kids today are all about actions per minute, right? They're all about that band just keeps going right. That's why they can play e sports all night and you know, But it's different than golf. You know what I mean? Like golf is not a lot of actions per minute either, but I think they can switch to a lot of different players. You know what I mean? Where's baseball? You're watching one game. That's why when I watch baseball games, I try to watch two or 3. So you're always with flipping back and forth to watch. It's happening somewhere somewhere somewhere. But I think the true baseball people, I've interviewed some people that have written books on baseball, um, you know, that, that are out of new york and things. And these true baseball guys, they still love to watch the game for the data and the analytics and they can sit there and watch it because they love it so much.

We're, I think a lot of fans are more like you said, it's, we gotta do something to get this movie. Yeah, 100%. And yeah, the purists that you're talking about, right. Baseball is always the last to change. So even with instant replay, like they're always the last to adapt to current society. Right? When you got stars in basketball, even football, it just moves and football like college football. That's a long game. But there is enough action that you can watch, especially the ranked teams where it's like, all right, I can I can pay attention this or you know, the ball games and stuff like that. But baseball is just, there's not enough happening per game to watch every second. So growing up, did you have anybody you grew up with that were that played professional sports as well? Um I had 11 buddy that made it up to the big leagues with the rangers but actually played, you'll know this name. High school baseball against Mark Sanchez because he's like and football and I think he played basketball for a little bit so he and his high school was ridiculous and they stomped this but he was in our league. So I played against Mark Sanchez in baseball. Yeah and you didn't know who he was until he probably you although I mean that they were throwing the ball like he was like we knew in high school he was good, he was going to USC when Pete Carroll was still there powerhouse. His high school was really good at football So I thought he could be something definitely down the road. Do you think if you grew up today you would be a different picture? I think so because there's so much more emphasis on throwing versus pitching. So I think I probably would have thrown harder just based on the technology that's available now. Like spin rate. Like even when I stopped playing in 2014, no one was talking about spin rate like that just came up in the last four or five years. So it's it's a different game now. You know it's just maybe if I would have committed to baseball only forever, I would have played in every showcase tournament every college summer league. Yeah. Maybe. But I'm glad I'm still happy I played basketball because I think I would have regretted not playing. Yeah. I think when kids are young and like you said if if you don't play multiple sports, you get burned out really easy for sure. Especially baseball. That's why these kids are getting hurt to these travel ball kids. They're playing 100 plus games a year. And especially for pitching, there's no way your arm can handle that. And you just and you just don't get the athleticism that comes with other sports. Like basketball is going to give you a lot of different athleticism and see the court differently, the field different. So I decide jumping, you know, baseball, you don't get a lot of like as a pitcher. Like all right, I'm gonna go run and loosen up. I got to be kind of in shape, but you know what I mean? It's not like basketball shape, right? And even I don't even like soccer, but I played it as a kid and I think it helped. I think just the mobility and just learning how to cut and like you know, pivot and do stuff like that. I think this is the footwork aspect, playing a lot of sports in your younger definitely helps your athleticism. Yeah, there's there's no no doubt about that. So who's coming up next on your podcast? Let's see, I got the former assistant coach that I had at Long Beach State, he's the Nevada Wolfpack baseball coach, they just went to the tournament. So I got him coming on one former big leaguer who I played actually with the Pirates for a little bit. Chase Darnell. Okay, right fielder, his brother is on the Braves, he's a catcher, was at the Mets for a little while. Travis D'Arnaud. Um So yeah, I got a couple a couple of decent guys coming on, but yeah, I tried to, you know, I'm trying to do more of my opinions on the show as well, so I'm trying to mix those in also because there's there's still every week there's something that happens in sports, so I want to react to that kind of stuff more often. Oh yeah, just like, you know, I try to I'm like you so you never know where show is gonna go, you never know what a podcast is gonna turn into and the more knowledge you have about different sports, but I can't be, I can't sit there and watch all them, it's like I catch all of them up on my phone, like, you know soccer, Italy and England, like, you know, you catch all that stuff up and then the olympics are coming up so you're trying to stay on...

...top of it all, but not have like going to the weeds with it. All right. You want to give a general opinion about the big topics, but you know, not so much where people just get uninterested, you know? Yeah, No, I hear you. I hear you. All right. So Brett tell of our, all of our fans how they can find you and, and you know, maybe your website where they can follow you. Yeah. So everything on instagram, it's at two tall sports podcast on twitter. It's at two tall sports. I'm on all the platforms Youtube and Spotify Apple podcast. Just type into tall sports podcast. You'll find all my stuff there. But my social media is where I put out. I'm starting to do more content on there and more videos and stuff like that. So, um, yeah, no, and anywhere you can just type into tall sports podcast. So I appreciate it. If they want to buy a solar panel, how do they get uh send me a DM on there and I might help you out of state, but if you're in California listening, I can definitely help you out. So uh yeah, if anyone's interested in solar, it's obviously hot time of the year right now, your bills are probably high, so it makes sense real hot. Like in the west, it's crazy hot. Like if you got, have you noticed that, like the, it's way hotter than normal out there? Oh yeah, for sure. No, it's, it's, it's ridiculous right now, especially different. I don't know what's it like for you right now? Oh, we've had like so much rain every day in the 80s, it's been crazy, but I mean it's not like that, like we've had a lot of rain, it's been pretty nice where uh you know, usually July in Pittsburgh is really dry and this year is way different. I love that humidity on the East Coast. Sometimes man, you just walk outside, you start sweating for us, fat guys, it's not fun at all. I yeah, so no bread. I appreciate you coming on and join me. I had a blast doing your show and uh, you know, I hope you have fun today and I'll let you know when this comes out and our super producer brian will, we'll put it all together and make me sound better, way better than I am. But I appreciate you joining me on how to up with us today. Thank you very much. Glad to be on the show. Thank you again for being on mine and thanks to brian and terry and everybody. I appreciate you guys. So, so thanks. It was great. Yeah, thank you. All right, everyone, that's our show for today. We appreciate Brett coming on and sharing his story. Uh, want to thank all of our people Brian and Terry especially we want to thank 1631 digital news uh, for, for having us in their studio. Uh, obviously this isn't the studio, but they host us and we appreciate that. And we want to thank sounder FM and Vegas sports advantage, go to Vegas sports advantage, put my coat in, huddle up and hopefully you can win some cash. So, uh, you know, uh, I appreciate Brett coming on. It's always fun to hear new people's stories and you know, it was a great transition that he told us about when you're done playing sports, you're done. And sometimes it's really hard to make that transition and Brett did a great job with it and he's still doing it just like I am. So we're both podcasting now and hopefully you enjoy it. So make sure you listen to his podcast. Too tall sports podcast and also check out huddle up with us and we appreciate you listening. Have a great day and we'll see you next time. And that's a wrap sports fan. Thanks for joining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another to huddle up with Gus featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus. Theron, huddle up with. Gus is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available on apple music.

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