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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 4 months ago

Brett Lorin

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to Huddle Up with Gus, with 15 year NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte! On today’s show Gus welcomes former professional baseball player Brett Lorin to discuss his love of all things sports and especially baseball. Brett shares with us what brought him to baseball, how he became disciplined enough to make it to the professional diamond and what life has been like for him and his family since leaving his active playing. The fellas also discuss the latest in what’s going on in the National Baseball League and look to rule changes and which players are going to end up where for the next season.

Hey everyone, Welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback GusFrerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, somepeople say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read.16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latestnews, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favoritepodcast. Follow up with Gusts. Check it out today at Wide. Digital News.com.Huddle up with Gusts is brought to you by Vegas sports advantage, clients ofVegas sports advantage are winning big in 2021 you can be a part of thewinning two. As of june 1st $100 bettors are up $3700 500 dollars.Bettors are up $18,500 and $1000 bettors are up $37,000 and $5000.Bettors are up $185,000 become inclined today by clicking the link in thedescription below and use promo code, huddle up To take 25% off your packagetoday. Thanks to our partnership. Welcome to what surely will be a doozyof a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron atthe diamond or on the links, we can only say, okay, welcome to this week's huddle upwith gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has takenhim on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchiseswith 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the gamesare one. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up.Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it'skick off time so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us.Strange variety, big play two Aleve. Hey everyone welcome to another episodeof heading up with Gus, I'm your host, Gus Frerotte. Thanks for joining metoday. I want to thank all of our our great people that work with us on howto up with Gus Sounder FM. We want we appreciate them for hosting us on theirplatform. I want to thank brian and terry my team and we also want to thankVegas sports uh betting I think that's it. Right brian, I can't remember. Butuh sports advantage, Vegas sports advantage right? They do betting. Theyreally um you know if you want to increase your odds, uh trying to dosome betting on teams on players, especially coming up this fall, go toVegas sports advantage, put my coat in, huddle up and uh, you know, save somemoney, join the team, get all their info and they're gonna help you winsome cash. Uh, so I go to Vegas sports advantage dot com and today's guest, Idid his show, I don't know if it was last week, a week before, but joiningme today is a former major league baseball pitcher and now successfulentrepreneur and has a podcast called Too Tall, too Tall sports podcast. SoI'm assuming Brett that you're way too tall, uh, for most places. That's whyyou called it that. But uh, so joining me today is Brett Lauren, former MajorLeague Baseball pitcher. How you doing Brett? Good. Thank you for having me onGus. I appreciate it. Glad I could do your show now that you're nice enoughto do mine. So I appreciate it. Yeah. So tell me what's too tall? Like, how,where do you come up with that name? Yeah, just I'm 67. So you know, justgeneral stuff that you can't really fit into clothes in the stories. You can'treally buy shoes unless you buy them online now, you know, cars and you know,flying in planes. So it's just, it's a tough life for us tall people sometimes.Yeah. What is that? A 17 shoe? 15? I'm...

...not too crazy. Yeah, no, you're notlike that kid. Like you go in and say, I can't find any shoes and then shotcomes in and buys you some shoes. I wish I could meet him so he could dothat. I love those stories. He's always somewhere buying people's stuff. Ohyeah, he's done a lot of like charitable stuff. It sounds like it'scool, but he's like you to where he's a big franchisees guy right now, aren'tyou? Part of franchisees? Uh you came out you were jimmy john's and somethingelse. Yeah, so after my baseball career I could just kind of have like theentrepreneurial mindset and I wanted to, I don't want to be a franchisees, so umout here in southern California, my cousin and I, we both got intoFranchising world and got a jimmy john's in one store and the plan was todo multiple and you know, have a bunch of locations, but it just, it was thetoughest thing I've ever done for sure. So um owning a store and running itlike owner operator, it's a whole different ballgame. So it was tough.Yeah, I helped my buddy through the pandemic at his restaurant and I kindof ran the, the expo line and just because I wanted to experience it,right, He was the cook. My kids were out front, running the door and doingall the grub hub and everything, and it's it's not just uh doing the food,it's it's the it's the cleaning, it's the prep, it's a all that stuff, it'scrazy. It is. And you're like, you're hiring 18-22 year old kids to run theshow. Like, you hope they were the right uniform, you hope they show up,you, you know, you're not their first priority and they're not going to careas much as you will, at least, you know, most of them, it's a job, right? It'sthe first job for a lot of kids. So you're constantly training and it'sjust it's a and all those rules that you're talking about and it's just hardto make money in a lunchtime business only. it's really not like a dinnerbusiness. So it's just hard. Did you find when you were trying to hire kids,did you find the kids that played sports or a little more um amenablelistened a little better things like that. I actually found that a lot ofour employees were women. Like they just, they at that age they care more,they're more on it. Like they just they just a little bit cleaner with theirprocess. You know, you get those college age guys like they don't care,you know, it's just some way more mature is what you're saying moremature at their age. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, I can see that. So you said youmentioned southern California is where you grew up, correct? What's it likegrowing up in Southern California? Because I grew up in the Northeast, Iplayed baseball every spring was freezing, the bats were cold, You know,we're pitching indoors till like the mud was gone, we didn't have turffields back when I played right, so I can't imagine what it was like to beable to go out the first day of baseball and just throw a real ball.Yeah, I mean you get to play everything you're around. So I think that's that'sone benefit. My mom's actually from new york and my dad's from out here, soluckily she decided to chose to go to California. I didn't have to grow up inLong Island or Staten Island and one of those, you know, I got to grow up outhere, so um it's great, like like I said, you can play everything all yearround. Um so you just, you get exposed to a lot more sports just more often,you know, there's a lot more available and there's just a lot of stuff to doso um it's great, the weather is always great, like even during my career Ialways thought I would come back here because it's just hard to beat, it ishard to beat. Um But you know it's kind of like uh for me if I would have triedto go to California living in the north east all the time it would have beendifficult because everybody I know is back here, right? So I understand that.Uh So growing up, did you grow up in a pretty big neighborhood? Was it a smalllike area or tell me about your area where you grew up? Yeah it's a big likeplanned communities with like cold sacks and you know H. O. A. Like allthat stuff. So it's this big big you know big community, lots of sportsgoing on and it's kinda you just there's just so much stuff going onlike there you've got the beach if you know you're you're basically an hour ortwo away from any type of anything. You...

...know like the mountains, the desert ifyou want to go out there like you know people like the river so you drive fivehours to you know the Arizona California border if you want to dothat. Like there's just there's a lot of stuff you can do. So when you weregrowing up though because for me growing up I you know get on your bike,go to your buddy's house, let's go play something when you grew up in yourneighborhood. Was that a lot of it like you let's just go to get her buddies orwhat's most of it planned? Like a lot of things sports today everything ishey, we gotta have a coach, its all time, you know what I mean Like? Butwhen I grew up we just went and called our buddies and picked up the old diala phone and said let's go play today, we're gonna meet at the field at 10o'clock. Yeah. Yeah, same same for me. You know, obviously I played a lot oforganized sports to. Um and I played everything. I mean, you know did soccerto baseball, basketball and I did a lot of stuff. Never played organizedfootball but we still just, you know, call each other and get the guystogether like play like over the line and stuff, you know, just just go intothe field and doing this. I still, I'm old school to in that way. Yeah. No,that's awesome. So you said you're 67 When did that growth spurt? Hit hit you.I would say in between my sophomore and junior year of high school that I wentfrom like 6263267 So then by senior year I kind of like, I didn't reallyget my I guess man strength until I was like 18. I wasn't like a fully grown atfreshman year. So once I became a senior than like I filled out a littlebit and so I was much, much better athlete. Once I became a senior in highschool, did you have some of those growing pains? Because I grew between8th and 9th grade. You know, I'm 64. And uh, so that that like my wholeninth grade year, they called Osgood slaughter my knees were just killing methe whole year. I remember icing them wrapping them. It didn't matter what Idid. Nothing helped them. Yeah. My sister actually had that she was avolleyball player just in high school. I didn't play college or anything, butshe had that Osgood slaughters. I never had that luckily. But I think it wasjust more like just learning how your body works and you know, long limbs andfiguring out how to, you know, have like body control and all those things.You just don't really get that. So you get a sense of like how big you are. Sodid you play volleyball? No, I mean just for fun, like we just go to thebeach and play, which is also great. Another California benefit. You just goto the beach volleyball so they're being tall. I figured you could havebeen a good because the volume is pretty popular in California. It's verypopular. The only thing, I think it's the same spring season as baseball. Soit's always, yeah I would not substitute volleyball for baseball. Iwas always thinking like what can I do in college And I just didn't see myselfas like a college volleyball player. My um I had a really good friend who grewup in L. A. His name is Danny, farmer and Danny uh played volleyball andfootball because obviously what you said they were different seasons and heplayed at U. C. L. A. Football football. Yeah and he was like the spike guy.Like Danny was like 6 2 you know he was this receiver but he could jump out ofthe building that's you know it's crazy. But I know he always said thatvolleyball volleyball was very popular out in California. Was he there withlike cade McNown? Yeah so he's a good buddy of mine, he still lives out there.Um But yeah, so you're going through, you're playing multiple sports growingup when you get to high school? When did that switch say, okay, I'm justgonna play one sport I'm going to concentrate on on what I love to do. Iactually, basketball is my favorite sport. So I played both all four years.I didn't want to commit. I didn't want to do like baseball year round. Iprobably would have gotten burnt out. Like it's not Oh yeah, definitely. It'snot as fun as basketball is and I still thought my career is probably baseball,but I didn't want, I knew after my senior year of high school thatbasketball is going to be done. So I wanted to play in both as long as Icould and I did and the coaches obviously they want you to pick one ofcourse because they want to build...

...around you all year round and stuff.But I just I stayed with both because I want to enjoy it. So I luckily playedboth all four years. Yeah. So were you like the tallest guy in your basketballteam? Yeah. Yeah so you're the center? Um That had to be I mean being 67 ithad to be a pretty hard choice not to go play basketball in college. Yeah.The thing was you know obviously I'm not as athletic as probably the guysthat are playing D. One. So I think I had a couple like D. Two offerspossibly. But I just like I don't know I could go play D. One baseball or playD. Two basketball. Like I just I always I was thinking long term like okay Ican go four years for basketball and that's probably it or I can go playbaseball and maybe I got a chance to get drafted. So I kind of just had thatlong term mindset of like which one do I have the best career path in? So Ichose baseball. Yeah. No that's smart, I had the same thing where football wasall D. One scholarships and baseball was all D. Two for me, right? Um And soD. Two wasn't much scholarship money, my parents weren't paying anythingright? So chose football just because I was going to get a scholarship, Ididn't think as far ahead as you did. I just knew I love to play the game and Iwas going to go to Tulsa and just enjoy my time and uh you know let the cardsfall as they may. So you make your decision to go to college. Tell meabout that. Yeah, so I was I didn't have any real scholarship offers forbaseball so it's kind of a gamble but I was like a recruited walk on atUniversity of Arizona so I decided to go there. Um I didn't want to go to J.C. Route for baseball. I just figured I'd rather go to a big school, it's farenough away in Arizona. It's about you know Tucson's about seven hour drivefrom southern California. So um you know I had no there were no guarantees.There are a lot of scholarship guys there that were playing ahead of me. Soum I mean I don't know how far down you want to go but go for it just speakingyou like. Yeah I just I red shirt in my first year so I didn't play at all,barely pitched my second year. So I loved going to school. There is a lotof fun but I kind of was like, all right, everyone that's coming in. Myclass, my freshman year is coming back as a junior on scholarship. I got tomake a decision here. So that's when I decided to go to Long Beach State andtransfer to play baseball there. Yeah. So why, I mean obviously it'sopportunity you want to be able to play, you want to go somewhere where you canget out on the field no matter what field it is. I mean I felt the same way,but it's it's hard where, I mean it's competition and usually if coaches havea scholarship guy and a non scholarship guy, we know who they usually pickright, even if your stats are better, right? Yeah, exactly. So you know mysophomore year, I threw a total of nine innings. So it's just like I'm not oneof their guys and that's okay, that happens in sports sometimes, you know,you don't realize it till you get there. Um, and as I'm sure, you know, withcoaches, they'll a lot of these big programs over recruit. So you've gotlots of guys trying to make like a little amount of spots and it's justlike if you're not on scholarship, it's just, it's just not the cards aren't inyour favor. You have to outperform so much that now you become a scholarshipguy, it's hard. So let me ask you, I've always wanted to ask now you pitched incollege, obviously go to Long Beach State and pitch. Do you get stronger bypitching in games or can you be as strong as you can be? But just bypractice, you know what I mean? Like in football, a lot of guys can go throughseven on seven, A lot of guys can be good in practice, but the games, it'sanother story, how do you feel about baseball? Is that, you know, is thatcomparable at all? I think it is probably the same. It's like seven onseven would be like me throwing a bullpen a couple days before my start.Like you're just kind of refining your skills because you don't really knowhow those pitches will play in the session. You have to see how thehitters react when you're in the game. That's when you really get the sense ofokay my stuff works or my stuff doesn't work. So I think I totally agree withyou. The game will tell you like how like where you're at. So yeah, and thenI think it's the competitive side to write, you can pitch a bullpen sessionand kind of be there. But then when the...

...game's on the line you got a guy onfirst and it's really, you know, well it's kind of uh when the you know oilmeets of water, is it gonna mix, is it gonna go part like what's gonna happen?It really puts everything on the line and I've seen so many guys like that.Um So tell me like your your first experience where you had a lot ofpressure on you when you were pitching um in college you're saying. Yeah. Soactually when I was at U. Of a we played against a stacked Arizona Stateteam and I didn't do very well, like I think I walked the bases loaded, gaveup a couple of hits, like it was not good and that was the first time I waslike wow, I'm I'm going against first rounders probably you know, a few firstrounders here. So that was like my first real experience into it. Um, butthen when, when I transferred Long Beach, it was more like my mindset wasdifferent. It was more like a, this is like a business decision, right? I'mstill in college having a good time, but it was more about, this is myjunior year of school redshirt sophomore. I got a chance to getdrafted. I just need to get some exposure. And so in the, when I startedthat year, I was like a fringe middle reliever basically. And then as theseason progressed, my role got bigger and bigger and bigger and I became astarter, ended up pitching in a playoff game in a regional. So you never knowwhen you start the year where you're gonna end up as far as your role isconcerned. So you just kinda have to believe in your stuff and and and workhard to become one of the guys, like I was saying earlier, you know, do youthink like obviously baseball is different than football, football, wehave college and the pros, baseball, you have college minor leagues and thenthe pros and you get an opportunity to grow even more in the minor leagues. UmDo you think it's an advantage for guys to go to college before they try tomake The pros in baseball 100%. I usually tell people like if you're ahigh school draft pick, if you don't get like. I don't know, at least500,000 and up, like even I would say a million because you can't reallysubstitute those those three years of college before you get drafted. And Ijust think the maturity standpoint, you got 18 year old kids haven't been awayfrom home yet, and they're expected to play pro ball and perform in the middleof nowhere. You got, you know, the foreign or latin players coming in,they've never been exposed to really any other cultures before, like it's alot to ask of a high school kid to all of a sudden go from high school to yourplan against college, you know, guys in their twenties now, so I don't, I thinkthere's just a maturity factor that you you can't substitute without going tocollege, so if you get a lot of money, great, you might not see that again,but I feel like if you're good enough you'll get drafted again in college.Yeah, I feel like um, like college, for me, it was my learning curve, like notwith just sports, but just life in general, you know, how to grow up, howto kind of be on your own, how to relate to people from differentbackgrounds, I mean, I grew up in pennsylvania in Pittsburgh, and thenI'm in Oklahoma and I'm with people from texas Kansas, Oklahoma, Arkansas,like people from all kind of poor rich, it didn't matter, but I never had thatin high school, like everybody was kind of the same in my high school, so yougot to go and learn, and I couldn't imagine being 18 and saying, oh, thisis a job, this is my, this is my career on the line right now, like, and youdon't even know how to write a check yet, You have probably haven't doneyour own laundry yet either. Right? That like, that's why. Exactly, andthere's a lot of high school burnouts that get drafted and they're there fortwo or three years and they just can't hang not, they're probably greatplayers. They're just not ready for pro ball yet. It's it's too big of a jumpfor a lot of high school kids. So it's why it's a crapshoot in the draft. Likea lot of these, they just have the draft the other day. Like they'retaking these raw high school kids over a proven commodity in college that'sready to contribute. Its its total crapshoot. Yeah, I was kind of happywith the Pirates first pick. They took a catcher, Henry Davis, Louisville highschool catcher. Right. No, I think he...

...was a college. Okay. Yeah, I think hewas calling like he was the best hitter in college baseball or anything likethat, which we could use some of that. But I I mean I always hope for pitchingbecause I always think that pitching wins you the big games that keeps thescore down. Maybe not now with all the sticky stuff not available. Like it was.Did you ever use the whatever it was pine tar right of screen. I could gooff on this this topic forever. The most like the unwritten accepted waywas this like spraying sunscreen and then the rosin bag that gives you likethe sticky stuff. And a lot of people used it. Like I I never really used it.I didn't need that. I didn't like the feeling of it. So I just didn't do it.But it was kind of like a widely known thing and all of a sudden nobody canhit this year and they take it away. So that's the biggest problem withbaseball is some cheating is allowed until it's too much and then it's notallowed. So it's always been like that. Yeah. I always felt like guys who havesmaller hands, even in baseball, like guys with big hands, probably your 67you're bigger, you got big hands, you can grab the baseball a little easier.Like guys that have smaller hands in football, man, they were so particularabout how the football felt and we'd have to rub it down, do all that stuffbecause you know, you want that grip. That grip means everything on how youspin it. And I'm sure baseball is the same way, right? And I was thinkingabout football, like I watched like teddy Bridgewater, whereas the glove,whereas two gloves or Big Ben, where's the glove sometimes? Maybe on his nonthrowing him. But like guys are like trying it. So what's the differencebetween a quarterback wearing a glove to throw to get a better grip orreceivers putting sticky stuff on their gloves? Like why do hitters get to havepine tar on their back? You know, because it was hard and they want tohelp them a little bit. Baseball is very hard. I've stood in there againstthe pro pitcher once and said, don't ever want to do that again. It looksnot, I mean it's hard on tv but when you get up there and you're getting 95plus right at you, like good luck. Oh my gosh, When Chapman was playing forthe Reds, you know, I'd watch the pirates all the time and he's he'sputting him in there at 10103. It's like don't even know how you hit alefty to down this way. And my gosh, it was like randy johnson when he pitchedbecause he was like your height, right? Yeah, I think he was 6 10, so evenbigger than me and throwing upper nineties, it was unhittable. Yeah. Imean you just can't you know, they're throwing and they're throwing a slidercurve and it looks like it's coming right for your head, you're getting outof the way. Um Now baseball is great. I mean I played in my whole life, I loveit and I can see your enjoyment out of it. But tell me because they can whenyou're in high school you get to play like you get to be a picture but youcan play all the other positions too. And then all of a sudden you get tocollege and you're very singular position. Was that a big change for youknow because I couldn't hit. So I was it was fine. I became a picture only mysenior high school. I was just flying with pitching. Yeah. Like I played thehot corner and pitched and and played outfield. I love just being out thereright now and I love playing it was just like all right, there's really nopoint for me to be out there so I'll just pitch only. So who taught you kindof how to pitch? Like how to throw? Was that your dad was uh just have a coachwhen you were young? Yeah, my dad definitely, but you might remember thisname. Played for the Angels and the Yankees, Mike witt he threw a perfectfor the Angels I think in like 86 or something like that. His son was my ageand he was my little league coach. So at 12 years old he's the one who taughtme how to throw a curveball, he just like mechanics at a young age. And sothen from there on, you know, I got pitching coaches over the years, butMike Witt really helped me as a young kid, like refine my skills even at like12 years old. Yeah, that's amazing. My...

...dad was my guy in the backyard, that'swho he, because I couldn't throw a curveball because it hurt my elbowtremendously. And um, so he taught me to throw a knuckleball, so I threw afastball and a knuckleball and it worked as a curve and changeup andeverything for me, you know, and then when I was a kid listen to spread whenI was a kid, My dad loved baseball every night. He listened to pirates onhis transistors, just a radio and fall asleep. And he said when I was a kid,he was one of 15, he was this tough old guy. He said, well now I'm in LittleLeague, he goes, when you get in there, throw the first one at their head andthen throw the next one over the plate. I'm a little kid. I'm like okay I meanI hit both the ter pack twins, they batted back to back both in the headand he's like that's alright, that's alright, just keep throwing it. I waslike oh my God, I wonder why it was wild when I got older. Yeah, yeah,pitching you know throwing curveballs, I don't there's not really a certainage you should start throwing them, but if you don't throw him right, you candefinitely hurt your album. You know what I mean? If you just don't gettaught the right way, you can definitely get hurt. Yeah, I couldn'timagine like so uh what other pictures you probably have big so you couldthrow splitter? I fooled around with the splitter but I kinda in high schoolit was just fastball curveball changeup and then when I got to pro ball is morelike more sinker, slider changeup guys, so different little lower arm angle. UmBut yeah for the most part of his fastball curveball changeup now did youfeel the coaching between like all three different obviously you take thenext step up in coaching but from college to um the pros, what was thedifference in coaching for you? Was it just film, was it just the knowledge,what was the difference? Yeah I think once you leave school the benefit ofpro ball is it's baseball all the time. You don't have to go to class. You havethe right papers anymore, it's all baseball. You went to class and roadpapers. Yeah I actually did go to class. Yes especially the non scholarship guylike you better do it go to class. Um, uh, I think watching video definitelyhelps a lot. I didn't do it really in high school, did a little bit incollege, but not really. So once you start watching video then you're like,oh wow, that's what that looks like. You know, I can see my arm, I'm lateright now, getting the ball out of the globe, like you can just see morethings. Um, and some organizations are more of like, all right, we're goingwith whatever you got, we're not going to really develop you. And someorganizations are so analytically driven and so on you about, you know,everyone's gonna throw the right way and I hate to say it, but the pirateswere so um mechanical and like I like breaking down video, but not, let'sjust to the point where they're making everybody throw the same way. It wasjust uh, and you can see that well, that's what Jericho always said, right,right? Because they always said that like they have all these dudes in theirback pocket and they can't win with them. They let them go and they becomebetter elsewhere. There's a fundamental flaw in the pirate system, you know? Soit, it sucks. It does suck for being a way to put it. Um, I don't know whythey taught that. It was almost like pitch for contact. Like eric polls like,what are you talking about? You know, and, and you know, we see him go on andhave a career of really what he should have been at the Pirates and probablywanted to stay here because people love the city and um, it just, I don't knowwhy they talk like that, but I think we have a new coach now. I think he's alittle bit different. Um, but that's always interesting to me in on film,you know, because we've, we would watch everything practice the opponents, allof our stuff, old games, old quarterbacks. We, I mean the way youcan break down video now is incredible. And it's baseball pretty much the samenow. It is, I think. So. I got out of...

...the game in 2014. So a lot has happenedsince then with scouting reports are different, but normally we would goover the scouting report of just like what the guys have done lately. Youknow, they call a spray chart or whatever, like what? Um, in the last 10games or something like that and how to attack guys. But in the minors, youdon't really get, you know, no one's really scouting these other teams tohelp us out. You know, you just kind of show up, here's what I got here is whatyou got, lets see what happens kind of thing. So if you go into a game likethat, what's your first pit? You just fastball every time or not every time,but I think it depends on you always have to do it, go with what you do wellright? Yeah, your strength, as they say good pitching usually beats goodhitting. It's just that's how it goes because hitting the heart and you'vegot guys on defense behind you. So the odds are against the hitter. Um but youdefinitely can tell like um where guys are in the box and if you have a goodcatcher who's paying attention, they'll know like is this guy opening his fronthip too early? Can we get in there on him or do we need to go slider here orwhatever? So you kind of just learn based on where the, what the hitters,what the swings are telling you. So when you get to the big leagues, howmany components are there? Is it just you and the catcher? Is that you thecatcher and the coach looking at all the, you know what I mean? Because youknow the hitters coming up, you've studied them, but there's so many games.I don't know how we remember all this stuff. So I actually never pitched inthe big leagues. I got I pitched in one big league spring training so I do havethat a little bit of experience but not a ton. I never got to I got to triple A.So right below the big leagues. But so how does that work though? Like even intriple A. I mean there's more coaches, there's more understanding, you knowwhat I mean? And I always wondered that like because you watch these games andis it is it the catcher knowing the batter? Is it the picture knowing thebatter whose responsibility? Is it more? I think the older you get in the higherlevels you get double a, triple A. The catcher's care more because it's liketheir staff. So it's almost they take it upon themselves if you get a goodone. And usually the older guys have been around enough and they takeownership of learning the hitters and knowing, you know, knowing where tothrow guys. And that's the other thing. You're some guys in the minors, youmove around so much, you don't get the same catcher all the time. So you haveto have great communication with your catcher and say like, like this is whatI do. Well, you know, let me know, you know what you think in the boxes.There's nothing worse than you having to like, no, no, no. Like shake off itsthe worst. There's no flow. There's no rhythm. You know, it's, it's, it's goodto be on the same page to catch her. Yeah, you'd have to be right because ifhe's thinking outside your thinking inside, it's gonna be a big difference,right? It could be the difference between a strikeout and a home run.There's no doubt about that. Hey, everyone, I want to thank you forlistening to huddle up with gusts. We're going to take a quick commercialbreak and we'll be right back. We're talking with Brett Lauren from two tallsports podcast. Uh huh. Hey, how come up with us listenersManscaped. They sent me, uh, they hooked me up with a bunch of tools andformulations for their package, three point oh kit. So, you know, I want toshow you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We all think we got aperfect package, but they sent me the perfect package, three point oh kid. Iwant to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It came in this great box.Uh, you know, and you can see what it says, They will thank you because theysent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us, uh, you know, stuff that makes yousmell better. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this great, uh, someboxers, you what you get right, protect them. And then, uh, you know, they sentme this, cool it, uh, sack, I guess you...

...want to call it to store all your stuffin. So, uh, it's been great. Manscaped, sent me a bunch of product. Um you know,and you know, you can see it all on here. Uh you know, you can go toManscaped dot com and put in the code. Uh gus Frerotte, that's G U S F R E R OT T E get 20% off and free shipping when you use that code, but you can geta kit, you can get individual items like uh this way, cool groomer that hasa little led light, um ceramic. These things come apart, they're waterproof,you can do a lot with them. So, you know, man scape is great. You know,it's funny. So I remember when I was playing with the Denver broncos and I'mnot going to mention any names, but there was a gentleman who was playingon our team and uh, you know, if he ever hears the story, he'll knowexactly what I'm talking about, but uh, he brought his own clippers in one timeand he used it to trim his beard up, his goatee and everything and he hadhim there for about two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner, hewalks in and there's a person, another player that is actually manscaping withhis beard trimmer. So you know, one of the things is, you don't want to usethe same trimmer down there that you use up here. So uh, he kind of freakedout a little bit and he said, hey, how long have you been using that toolthere? And he said, well, showed up here about three weeks ago and I'vebeen using it ever since. So you know, there is a lesson learned that, youknow, don't leave things out and probably if it would have just saidmanscaped on it, we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probably one ofthe funniest, uh, taking care of your ball stories I've ever heard or beenaround in the locker room in the NFL, so it's a great story. Um, but you know,I always said there was no way to know, there's no name on it, and the guy wasjust using it and another guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heck of afunny story. So one of the best I've ever heard in my 15 years playing inthe league. Um, but you know, there's so many great things about Manscapedand what they're doing, because guys, you got to take care of yourself, eventhough I got great hair, um, and getting older, but you still have tomaintain some sort of grooming, right? And so, you know, we all work out forme. I like working in my yard doing those things now that I'm retired. Geta little sweat on and everything. You want to smell good. You know, you gotto take care of yourself, they've got some great products. Um you know, thisone a little uh you ball deodorant, we'll need that here and there um after,you know, working the yard, taking a hike, doing a walk, whatever you do. UmIt's a great thing, but there's so many great products. Um I want to thankManscaped for sending them to me. Um uh the lawnmower 3.0. Obviously you canuse it anywhere in your body, but I'm sure you guys have all seen thecommercials, but this is one just letting you know that the lawnmowerthree point comes with the perfect kit. You can buy the lawnmower by itself byall these products individually. They even sent me this wonderful shirt, youcan see the back, your balls will thank you and then here's the front, so it'san awesome shirt. Have great gear and you know what? Sometimes you can justsit back, take care of your balls a little bit and read the paper. So aman's cape even has their own daily news do so, which is great. So don'tforget that you can go to the code Gus Frerotte and that's G. U. S. F. R. E. R.O. T. T. E. D. Uh and you can save 20%...

...on any products, the complete theperfect uh package gift set and uh you know, you can save 20% and get freeshipping, so use the code Gus Frerotte. G. U. S. F. R E R O T. T. E. Heyeverybody spells my name wrong, they even spelled wrong on the back of myPro bowl jersey. So you know I gotta I gotta help you guys out so don't forgethow important it is that you use these products, take care of yourself downbelow uh and have some fun right? There's nothing closer to you than yourlittle bugs. So use the lawnmower uh use the code Gus Frerotte save 20% andget free shipping and uh order some great manscaped products. Hello everyone, we're back on huddle upwith Gus. I want to thank uh Vegas sports advantage so that you know gothere, use my code huddle up and uh let those guys really figure out the oddsfor you, let them figure out who you need to bet on and let them help youwin some money. So Vegas sports advantage for that. Um And we're joinedby Brett Lauren today Brett we're back. Uh You know, I just think that we'vebeen talking a lot of baseball and I know you're a big sports fan witheverything. Uh and you're probably like me, you try to watch as much aspossible uh on tv. Did you watch the Home Run derby last night? I did watchHome Run Derby. I think the big hype was Shohei Otani right coming in. He'sthe big draw and he's basically the modern day babe ruth. It's pretty coolto see like I never no one ever thinks we'd see that because everyone's soagainst him doing are people doing that. So it was cool to watch. Um You knowand course field obviously the ball flies so it's a little better there butit's a fun event. What do you think I you know what I liked about it was thatthe fans were felt like they were really into it, you know, And I don'tknow if you saw what they did, is that when uh, when the players were up, Ithink they signed their baseballs so that when they hit them out, like thepeople would catch a signed baseball, which was really cool, you know, andbaseball is a sport that has to do more things to keep it pumping, keep itgoing to keep the engagement and the fans into it. And I thought courseField was really, it was exciting, right? And I think that just making abig deal, like, like Otani just making a big deal out of it. People arepumping them up because baseball needs that we need all those guys to be ableto come in there and and get the sport to where it needs to be compared to allthe other sports and I I thought it was great, it was fun, you know, see thefans and everyone involved in it, but I just don't get how they can hit it sofar when it's not coming in at 95 miles an hour. Yeah, I think it's justbecause they're like lifting right there like upper cutting their swingsand they're trying to and maybe the balls are a little bit different forthe home Run Derby who know, just a little bit, I mean I've I've takenbatting practice before and it's not like you can I mean they're hittingthem 500 some feet that's and balls not coming in, like I can see when it'scoming in at like 95 to 100 like the velocity coming in, hitting it with thebat, like it's going to travel faster out but and those guys were crushing it.They're so good at making contact like right on the barrel that it just goesthere, swings are so good. Um, and there, I mean that's a different thingwith the pros and the joes, right? It's just they're, they're that good. Yeah,it was fun to watch. I'm excited and you know, we were talking about johnny,I think, you know, that's like...

...everybody's dream, wouldn't it be likethat? You can pitch, you could play the field, you can hit. Why do you thinkthat? Is that more you being a picture? I want to ask you this, why do youthink it, is that more pictures can't hit? Because we don't work on it. Youknow, when you get to the college and the miners, you're really not hittingthat often, it's not a priority. And plus, you know, forever, it's just thisold stigma that you can't do both. No one's pushed to do both at a high level.So finally we got a guy that can and hitting as hard as you know, so to be apitching side, a lot of guys can probably feel hard but not a lot ofpeople can hit like above to 50 in the big leagues. So I think that's theheart is like how can you be great pitching and also be a great majorleague hitter? That's why you probably just don't see it. But also like I said,it's been pushed away, You're not supposed to do this until someone doeswell. You think that if you're a starting pitcher you'd have way moretime to practice hitting, but then you're not hitting live, which isprobably way harder than even the starting pitchers. If your NationalLeague pitcher you're only really taking BP maybe the day before youpitch just to get a couple swings in because you're gonna get a couple ofbats but in the other days you're not hitting BP, you're just shagging ballsin the outfield so you're not working on your craft. That's why my favoriteever to watch coming up. There was a picture to hit was Roberto cologne. Youknow, he's here's this he's kind of a you know, rounder guy comes up and heremember I think he hit a home run one game and it was like the whole placewent crazy. Bartolo bar, total Bartolo colon. Yeah I can't he's still playingsomewhere I think in like a mexican league or something like that. He'slike 50 years old. Well yeah there's amazing athletes like that. You think,you know, you think of football is like brady, he's played forever, right?Hockey. You had like Gordie Howe, your army younger played forever. You knowsome guys like that. And then if basketball, I think it was Vince carterjust retired and he played A long long time. Those guys came out of highschool playing like I think it's Lebron's like 16th year or somethingand it doesn't feel like that. And then in baseball I feel like you could playa lot longer in baseball But it's still gotta be hard like 100 and that manygames every year. I mean aren't that many you know what's crazy over thelast 10-15 years? Like all the older players have phased out like theseteams don't want to pay the 35 plus guys anymore. Like there's just notthat many older and when I say older it's like 35 and above. Which is notthat old, but The game has gone so young. Just those old veterans that youremember from the 90s and 2000s are just not there anymore. Oh my gosh, mykids. And I collect, we collect cards and then we sell them, we by himself.And we have a certain collection we're trying to get. But I I like vintage car,I like vintage baseball. My dad and I always collect that. And so we'll gothrough cards and my sons will be like, how old is this guy? You know? Then youturn it back over and there's like 20 teams like that he played for. Like,it's not that way anymore. And you're right, like guys guys could playforever if they could come up and hit. You know, you see those guys that playforever, but now it's not that way. Yeah. The 20 year career, like the calRipken's like like that just doesn't happen anymore. Like it sucks you knowbecause you can't really you can't get attached to these guys as much becausethey're just not there that long you know? So it's you think it's the moneyto like they're not like trying to like they made so much money, they don'thave to push to like play forever right? Exactly. And I don't know what it is.Everyone just got so like hyper focused on the young guys in the league beingyounger and they're coming up earlier, they're getting called up like youstill have to put your time in in the minors unless you're a finn. Um But nowit's like 21 22 if you're ready to go you're up there it's you know, it's soit's a different game now. Yeah. That that is crazy because we felt that wayin football as you get older, as a veteran, right? Your minimum goes wayup and then they're bringing these young guys who they can get three youngguys for one veteran, right? Right. And...

...so that was a big difference infootball for us. And so we try to, you try to figure that out through thecollective bargaining agreement to help the veterans because I always thinkthat you need veterans in the locker room to be any good. You do. And Yeah,exactly. They just, I think the organizations, because I don't know ifthey've gotten smarter, but they're just not willing to pay the legacycontract for these older guys, right? You know, it's all guaranteed infootball. They just cut your ass like, right, baseball, they can cut you, butthey're still paying you like bobby Bonnie a million dollars. Yeah, that'scontract in history. Well that's what they were saying on the, for the homerun derby. Peter Alonso is just kind of, he's gonna be the next bobby Bonillabecause he's going to win the home run derby every year, right? Yeah. Justshow up for that and you'll get some exposure and you get paid. There you go.So you have your baseball career. At what point did you say? Okay. I reallygot to start figuring out what my next step is when I was about 28 I think. UmI played my last year, so I played triple A. And when I was in 2013 andthen I got released and then I decided to play one year of independent ball.And I just told myself if I don't get picked up again then I'm done. Like Iwasn't gonna be a baseball lifer like there's dudes that late thirties, 40years old, still playing independent ball. I just never saw myself as thatguy. I just didn't need the game that as much. Um you can't sign yourself. SoI had a good year in independent ball and didn't get signed back to to theminors so I was ready to move on. So it's definitely a tough transition.Like I I tell people a lot, you spend years building a resume that doesn'treally translate to real life. You know, it's just it doesn't help you reallyother than life experience and dealing with adversity and all those things,But it doesn't help you in like selling things or you know, were no, nobusiness. No. Yeah. You're not learning, you're learning a craft, but you're notlearning like for me football, that's what I did football family, those aremy two things. And then I didn't really think about like what I was luckyenough to play for 15 years, right? But I didn't think about, Okay, I'm goingto be 38 when I'm done. What am I going to do next? So like if I want to, if Ilook back on it, if I wanted to be a coach, I should have like really triedto get to know more coaches or figure that out or if I wanted to go into thestaff, you know, go into that part or I should have went back and continued myeducation, but I didn't do any of that. And so when you're done, they don't letyou back in, right? You leave, you're not going back into the business.You've got to figure it out. So, tell me about you left baseball. What wasthe feeling you had said? This is what I want to try and do. Yeah, I think.And another thing to your point when you stop like, right, when you stopplaying, you don't want to coach. A lot of guys don't because you're the sameage as the guys, you just left and you feel like you're bitter, you should bethere still. So coaching, right? Doesn't feel right, right? You're justlike, I'm still, I can still play, you know, everyone thinks that, right? Sothat's I don't that's why I didn't get into coaching right away. Just becauselike, I don't want to be around the game right now. Um if I'm not playingin it, but that's when I went to Franchising right after that. So tellme about that process. Yeah. You know, you have to being a franchise. Yeah,yeah. You have to go like usually you go meet with them at their headquarters.Once you get like the initial approval, then you gotta like interview with themand they got to trust you that you're gonna be follow the rules and do allthe franchise ebs and all that stuff. Um, and then we get approved and then,you know, the real estate team comes out and finds a location for you. Wellunfortunately, so I live in Orange County, which is a great place, but thewhole area was taken. So I had to go through what it's called, the InlandEmpire, which is like 40 minutes to an hour east. So inland, a little bit fromthe ocean, um, to another city out there and that's where they approved mefor. So You know, location means everything as you probably know. Andit's just, it's hard, like I was saying it's not a dinner time business, sofrom 11 to 3, you got to make all your money. So it's just tough to have onelocation and be successful in with...

...bringing a new brand to the area. Youknow, it's not like I built in and out or a Starbucks, which is like gold, youknow, it's tough now. What was your decision on, on that franchise? Wasthat money? Was it? This is like you met somebody like, why, why thefranchise that you chose? I think I heard it was coming to California and Iwas in the midwest for some of my career, and if you were close enough toa jimmy john's, they would deliver sandwiches to your clubhouse. It wasgreat. No one else does this. So I'm like, oh, people are going to love thisin California. Okay, well, little did I know you're competing with, not justsandwich places, Subway, you know, Jersey mikes and firehouse and allthese other places. You've got all of lunchtime business to compete with. Soyou're just one of many for lunch. It's really, it's the restaurant business isreally hard. Yeah. And so you grew up, I would take, you grew up really fastin the business world. Exactly. For sure. Yeah, luckily my dad's anaccountant. So he helped me like financially figure things out with likethe labor costs, food costs all those things because you really, you know,the problem with Franchising is there so rigid and that you have to do ittheir way and like, you know, they're making us stay open till nine PM. Wellwho's buying a cold sandwich for dinner and beyond, It just doesn't happen. Soyou're burning through labor and you learn a lot about how little controlyou have in that world. So you're basically paying for the processes andthe vendor contracts you get and there's some perks to having the nameand stuff like that. But a lot of it's out of your hands. So how long were youin that business? About 3.5 years. And then we decided to sell and we had therights to a second location. So we packaged those together and so we gotout with no, you know, no losses, which is nice. We broke even. So it was goodbut great experience. But it was definitely, I'm glad I got out was kindof like buying about the first day in the last day of the best days. That is100% right. You know what? It actually it bothered me that we didn't see asecond store through. It was the right move to get out. But I wanted to seelike, okay, maybe the first one is not our best store. Let's see if the secondone is another great store. And my goal was 5 to 10 stores. Well you gottafranchise fee every time you buy one and it's just you got it in threeplaces at once. It's it's really, it's a tough gig to run a franchise. Yeah.Especially like you said, there's a lot of competition though. Yeah. You knowfor sure and it like it's not like um you know, I'm sure there's East coastbrands that you grew up with that everybody knows or like a Dunkin Donutsfor instance, out there, it's everywhere. So that's like staple inyour community when you bring in a new brand that no one's heard of the firstyear is just like educating people on what you are and then you can start tobuild the fan base, you know? So that's the hard part two. So then when did youact you sell your franchises? You say, okay, I'm done. And then all of asudden you get to itch again, what are you doing next? The last four years?I've been doing solar, so solar panel sales, so residential and commercialsolar sails. So I I like it, it makes sense. Especially out here, electricityis so expensive. So I've been doing that, but, you know, during thepandemic, I started the podcast, so that's really what I'm trying to focuson and hopefully turning into sports media somehow or, you know, some kindof podcasting career, maybe you're broadcasting radio, but that's I thinkthat's really my calling is what I'd like to do. Yeah. So, selling solarpanels, uh do you go to conferences? Are you the guy in the booth and yougot your solar panel there? And you say, all right, I'm gonna come to your homeand put these up, You're gonna see a lot of money. Yeah, I spent some time,one of the companies I was with that, we had a partnership with Costco. So inthe early in my career I would stand in Costco in the booth and be like, hey,do you want to, you know, free solar consultation? I was that guy for alittle bit. It was, it was humbling to say the least. Oh yeah, I mean I'vebeen there, I've helped companies like we talked about, I was with r. c. 21 X.I'd go around and trying to sell that stuff and it's hard to be a salesman when younever did it right, You know what I...

...mean? Like you didn't learn how to doany of that and then, you know, sales people are good at not listening to theword no, you know, I'm like, somebody says no and I'm like, okay, just moveon, you know what I mean? You can't do that as a sales. It's hard and it'sjust like when, even when, you know it makes sense, you really have to getpeople to believe it also, and it's not like I'm selling vacuums, like it's areal thing that can help. So it's just especially out here, so it's justgetting people to sit down with you laying it all out how how likeridiculous the electric companies are and how much control they have, thenthey're like, oh, it does make sense, so it's just getting to that point. Butyeah, any type of sales outside sales is really hard. Well, you know, and andlike here, it's not like we don't get sun. Obviously Pittsburgh is kind of,you know, we get a lot of clouds, but I mean the soldiers would work. It's justthat we're competing with minors and you know, all these other ways ofproducing energy and solar is available every day. And they're like, oh, whatif it doesn't, the sun doesn't come out? I'm like, well that's why you havebattery storage, you know what I mean? Like, and you can actually make moneyif you have solar and all these things and, and, but it's just crazy like thelast with the last six years or so, uh, taught us political wise of, of tryingto get some of that stuff in. Yeah, and there's tax credits if you want to buyit and there, you know, even if you lease it, everyone's scared of leasingit. It's, you know, basically we're buying the system for you and takingcare of it for 25 years and you just pay us monthly to use it at a reducedrate. So any type of solar is better than no solar. That's what I usuallytell people because it is because the electric company, like you didn't getto choose it when you moved in your house, you just get what you get andthey charge you whatever they want. So you just have to pay it, you have tobuy power forever. So I, you know, yeah, my wife and I, we signed up for likethe green energy, right? Like, you know, but so your electric company stillcharges you their amount and then you have to pay the green amount on top ofthat. So I'm paying like more than, you know, the green energy is supposed tobe cheaper. Well yeah, but our electric company who's delivering the power isstill charging more. So uh we've always talked about we need to get solar, weneed to to get on board. Obviously the weather is a little different whereyou're at, right? You don't get as many Sundays whatever but and you get snowand all that I'm sure. So it's a little different there. But even even whenit's not direct sunlight just being light out, you still produce somepowers. So well, I mean the panels are definitely way different today thanthey were 10 years ago. Right. Yeah, for sure. No, they're much better now.The technologies must they're still big like they're still bulky on your roof,but I don't know if you're going to be there for a long time, who cares whatyour roof looks like? All right. So, so when you're selling a solar panel, doyou get do you get this question? Which which one do they ask you more? Did youplay baseball or do you did you play basketball? I always get did you playbasketball and in life, I get that at least. And I don't say every week, buta lot I get that. Usually it's the, how tall are you then? It's like, okay,here we go. Now. I got to go down this road. It's like, are you sure youdidn't play volleyball? Are you sure you weren't a swimmer? Are you sure?I'm like, yeah, I played baseball. Well, why'd you do that? It's just it's anever ending conversation. So, who's the shortest person you'vehad on your podcast? It's hard to tell because it's all he's told me. Maybethat's what we like in the video on the side, you should put like uh MuggsyBogues. 55 right? Like, like that's too too tall podcast. That'd be great. Yeah,No, but that's the question you get. You know, like even me is a big guy, uh64 you know, I'm over 2 50 it's just like, oh, you had to play sports, likewhat position did you play? You know, then you gotta go down the whole road.I can imagine what you get. Yeah, it happened definitely happens a lot. Haveyou ever go ahead? Have you ever made...

...up like, Yeah, I played basketball. Iplayed for the, you know, I played for the clippers a couple of years and Iplayed, I played overseas that you will never know. Yeah. Yeah. I'm the one whoinvented the Euro step. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. I mean, it just, you know, itjust depends like people just want their questions answered. It's fine.Like I usually tell people I used to be somebody, so that's what I say. Seethis up here. That's a long time ago. I used to do what I did. Uh, so what doyou enjoy about podcasting now? I think I like reconnecting with formerteammates, coaches and just people that I've met throughout my career and alsolike getting cool stories out of people that, you know, like, especially in theminors, it's such a mysterious career. You don't see these guys. So they makeit to the big leagues and nobody, unless you lived it. It's impossible toknow what the lifestyle is like. So when I get a baseball player on, it'scool to get the story of like, wow, really? No job security. You're goingfrom city to city, you don't know where you're going to be next year, makingthe team out of spring training, like just the bus trips and it's, you're notfine first class, right? No, you're not, you're not even taking white stilltriple A. So even in double A, these are some of the best players in thecountry and the world, you're not even flying yet. So at least it's betterthan a greyhound, right? Yeah, Yeah. It's a little bit better now. But evenlike big guys like us sitting on a bus overnight, you know, you gotta, you'reexpected to perform the next day, you know, good every day. Yeah, There's noway to sleep like that. Like when you're scrunched in a seat even thoughyou want to and then the next day you're like, man, I just don't feelgood. Like I believe me, I know, and you better feel good because you got toperform. You know, you have your, and if you don't, they're there, the nextclass of draft picks is coming up. You know, it's a, it's a constant battleand that's why you have to, there's so many outside factors you just have tokind of be like control, you can control and that's it. So being,playing baseball, being your love, how much do you follow it? Do you followlike college players? Do you follow any of that or you just kind of a fan of ateam? I grew up a dodger fan, so I do follow them. Um, not as, it's hard tolike, even as a former baseball player, it's hard to watch a baseball game forthree plus hours and just sit down and watch every pitch during the playoffs,I'll do that. I will watch the games, but 162 I'm not gonna watch everyinning of every game. So I just want to highlight, just follow some games. I'llwatch it there nationally televised, but it's hard to watch a baseball game.It's, what, in your opinion, what do you think they could do to make itbetter? I think they could shorten it maybe seven inning games. I thinkthat'd be better. Maybe, you know, they're not going to do this becausethere's too much money involved. But maybe 100 games, you know, make theregular season matter a little bit more. Yeah, you gotta, there's not enoughaction during the game. You know, like I'm sure you've seen they're notstealing bases as much. They're not doing hit and runs, they're notmanufacturing runs, they're not moving guys over. It's just not the sameaction as it used to be. It's a lot of homer strikeouts and walks. That's justpretty much what it is. And we know with the sports and everything kidstoday are all about actions per minute, right? They're all about that band justkeeps going right. That's why they can play e sports all night and you know,But it's different than golf. You know what I mean? Like golf is not a lot ofactions per minute either, but I think they can switch to a lot of differentplayers. You know what I mean? Where's baseball? You're watching one game.That's why when I watch baseball games, I try to watch two or 3. So you'realways with flipping back and forth to watch. It's happening somewheresomewhere somewhere. But I think the true baseball people, I've interviewedsome people that have written books on baseball, um, you know, that, that areout of new york and things. And these true baseball guys, they still love towatch the game for the data and the analytics and they can sit there andwatch it because they love it so much.

We're, I think a lot of fans are morelike you said, it's, we gotta do something to get this movie. Yeah, 100%.And yeah, the purists that you're talking about, right. Baseball isalways the last to change. So even with instant replay, like they're always thelast to adapt to current society. Right? When you got stars in basketball, evenfootball, it just moves and football like college football. That's a longgame. But there is enough action that you can watch, especially the rankedteams where it's like, all right, I can I can pay attention this or you know,the ball games and stuff like that. But baseball is just, there's not enoughhappening per game to watch every second. So growing up, did you haveanybody you grew up with that were that played professional sports as well? UmI had 11 buddy that made it up to the big leagues with the rangers butactually played, you'll know this name. High school baseball against MarkSanchez because he's like and football and I think he played basketball for alittle bit so he and his high school was ridiculous and they stomped thisbut he was in our league. So I played against Mark Sanchez in baseball. Yeahand you didn't know who he was until he probably you although I mean that theywere throwing the ball like he was like we knew in high school he was good, hewas going to USC when Pete Carroll was still there powerhouse. His high schoolwas really good at football So I thought he could be somethingdefinitely down the road. Do you think if you grew up today you would be adifferent picture? I think so because there's so much moreemphasis on throwing versus pitching. So I think I probably would have thrownharder just based on the technology that's available now. Like spin rate.Like even when I stopped playing in 2014, no one was talking about spinrate like that just came up in the last four or five years. So it's it's adifferent game now. You know it's just maybe if I would have committed tobaseball only forever, I would have played in every showcase tournamentevery college summer league. Yeah. Maybe. But I'm glad I'm still happy Iplayed basketball because I think I would have regretted not playing. Yeah.I think when kids are young and like you said if if you don't play multiplesports, you get burned out really easy for sure. Especially baseball. That'swhy these kids are getting hurt to these travel ball kids. They're playing100 plus games a year. And especially for pitching, there's no way your armcan handle that. And you just and you just don't get the athleticism thatcomes with other sports. Like basketball is going to give you a lotof different athleticism and see the court differently, the field different.So I decide jumping, you know, baseball, you don't get a lot of like as apitcher. Like all right, I'm gonna go run and loosen up. I got to be kind ofin shape, but you know what I mean? It's not like basketball shape, right?And even I don't even like soccer, but I played it as a kid and I think ithelped. I think just the mobility and just learning how to cut and like youknow, pivot and do stuff like that. I think this is the footwork aspect,playing a lot of sports in your younger definitely helps your athleticism. Yeah,there's there's no no doubt about that. So who's coming up next on your podcast?Let's see, I got the former assistant coach that I had at Long Beach State,he's the Nevada Wolfpack baseball coach, they just went to the tournament. So Igot him coming on one former big leaguer who I played actually with thePirates for a little bit. Chase Darnell. Okay, right fielder, his brother is onthe Braves, he's a catcher, was at the Mets for a little while. TravisD'Arnaud. Um So yeah, I got a couple a couple of decent guys coming on, butyeah, I tried to, you know, I'm trying to do more of my opinions on the showas well, so I'm trying to mix those in also because there's there's stillevery week there's something that happens in sports, so I want to reactto that kind of stuff more often. Oh yeah, just like, you know, I try to I'mlike you so you never know where show is gonna go, you never know what apodcast is gonna turn into and the more knowledge you have about differentsports, but I can't be, I can't sit there and watch all them, it's like Icatch all of them up on my phone, like, you know soccer, Italy and England,like, you know, you catch all that stuff up and then the olympics arecoming up so you're trying to stay on...

...top of it all, but not have like goingto the weeds with it. All right. You want to give a general opinion aboutthe big topics, but you know, not so much where people just get uninterested,you know? Yeah, No, I hear you. I hear you. All right. So Brett tell of our,all of our fans how they can find you and, and you know, maybe your websitewhere they can follow you. Yeah. So everything on instagram, it's at twotall sports podcast on twitter. It's at two tall sports. I'm on all theplatforms Youtube and Spotify Apple podcast. Just type into tall sportspodcast. You'll find all my stuff there. But my social media is where I put out.I'm starting to do more content on there and more videos and stuff likethat. So, um, yeah, no, and anywhere you can just type into tall sportspodcast. So I appreciate it. If they want to buy a solar panel, how do theyget uh send me a DM on there and I might help you out of state, but ifyou're in California listening, I can definitely help you out. So uh yeah, ifanyone's interested in solar, it's obviously hot time of the year rightnow, your bills are probably high, so it makes sense real hot. Like in thewest, it's crazy hot. Like if you got, have you noticed that, like the, it'sway hotter than normal out there? Oh yeah, for sure. No, it's, it's, it'sridiculous right now, especially different. I don't know what's it likefor you right now? Oh, we've had like so much rain every day in the 80s, it'sbeen crazy, but I mean it's not like that, like we've had a lot of rain,it's been pretty nice where uh you know, usually July in Pittsburgh is reallydry and this year is way different. I love that humidity on the East Coast.Sometimes man, you just walk outside, you start sweating for us, fat guys,it's not fun at all. I yeah, so no bread. I appreciate you coming on andjoin me. I had a blast doing your show and uh, you know, I hope you have funtoday and I'll let you know when this comes out and our super producer brianwill, we'll put it all together and make me sound better, way better than Iam. But I appreciate you joining me on how to up with us today. Thank you verymuch. Glad to be on the show. Thank you again for being on mine and thanks tobrian and terry and everybody. I appreciate you guys. So, so thanks. Itwas great. Yeah, thank you. All right, everyone, that's our show for today. Weappreciate Brett coming on and sharing his story. Uh, want to thank all of ourpeople Brian and Terry especially we want to thank 1631 digital news uh, for,for having us in their studio. Uh, obviously this isn't the studio, butthey host us and we appreciate that. And we want to thank sounder FM andVegas sports advantage, go to Vegas sports advantage, put my coat in,huddle up and hopefully you can win some cash. So, uh, you know, uh, Iappreciate Brett coming on. It's always fun to hear new people's stories andyou know, it was a great transition that he told us about when you're doneplaying sports, you're done. And sometimes it's really hard to make thattransition and Brett did a great job with it and he's still doing it justlike I am. So we're both podcasting now and hopefully you enjoy it. So makesure you listen to his podcast. Too tall sports podcast and also check outhuddle up with us and we appreciate you listening. Have a great day and we'llsee you next time. And that's a wrap sports fan. Thanksfor joining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another to huddleup with Gus featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus. Theron, huddle up with.Gus is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available on applemusic.

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