Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Bret Boone

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Third-generation MLB player Bret Boone joins Gus and guest host Marnie Schneider in the huddle for what is yet another star-studded episode! Boone talks about growing up in a life surrounded by major leaguers before talking about his playing days. The three-time all-star also talks about his brother's job as the manager of the New York Yankees and his own life post his playing days. Join Boone in the huddle by listening to this week's star-studded episode! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome everyone to huddle up with gusts where we talked to our guests about how sports shape their life. I'm your host, gust far at, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and I'm joined by my longtime friend and cohost Dave Hagar. You can now find us under the big top with the sports circus and ring master. soal look for us on amp TV, a a MP tvcom. Hey everyone, thanks for joining us another episode of Huddle of Guss. I'm your host, Gust Brock, fifteen year NFL veteran quarterback. I'm usually joined by my longtime friend and CO host Dave Hagar. Dave is not here today. I have a new cohost, as much better looking Marnie sider. Marnie, say hid everyone, are you? I'm good. Hi. Thanks for that night's introduction. Yeah, I would say that you're way better. Look a good day's fifteen balls, so I think that take the cake in that one. Today we're we have a great guest, one of the first families in baseball. You know, you see the name, you hear the name. It's anonymous with Major League Baseball. He's been a, you know, a son to a player, a grand son to a player, a brother to a player they've set records with. When he played for the the reds, the Larkins were out there, the boons were out there together. I think that's never been done before, and in Major League Baseball. He's also a three time all star, our four time Golod glove winner and a two time silver sucker. Brett, thanks for joining us on in the huddle and it's a pleasure to talk to you today. We don't get to talk to a lot of baseball players, so it's a it's an honor to have you here. Thanks for having me. Guys, looking forward to this. This this beat down I got coming. Well, I don't know if it's a beat down. We martie and I interviewed Tom Arnold yesterday. So so, Hey, you got a lot of a lot of work to do. We asked about three questions. Yeah, he just talked all the time. It was great, but the problem with Tom's was it didn't record. So we get to do it all over again. Yours is recording. I made sure. So Brett, where we always going? Where I always start with? This is that moment, that time, and I'd love to hear us from you of when you fell in love with sports. It had to be very early for you. What's that first memory for you? A full love of sports? Why? I think you know, from an early, early standpoint. My story is kind of wellknown as far as in the baseball world. But my earliest influence, and has spend most of my tient was my grandfather at an early, early age. You know, from the time, you know, one to four, I was with grants a lot and you know, I just remember and and you know how when you're that young, Hey, do you remember when you were one? You know, not too many of us remember when we were one, right, but I do have flashbacks and and backyard with GRANDPA and hitting whiffleballs. Used to tell me I'd wake them up at five in the morning. Well, you know, bull catchers gear and they grapp let's go play ball, let's playball, and that's that's really, you know, the earliest memories I have. But he was big influence on my life, going board starting at a young, young age. Was it always baseball or did you play other sports when you were young? Guys, you know what I dabbled. I put yeah, I was knowing my when I was ten, eleven, twelve, getting to high school. I played basketball football and I got to high school and I was I was really small when I got to high school freshman and and it kind of dropped me out of football. I kept playing basketball. I kept playing basketball, but even then, by my junior year, I just dropped out of that. Just played baseball full time and that and you know, that was a time and when offseason we were starting to get into those not necessarily travel ball...

...like it is now, but but you could. You could kind of play your sport year around. So in the winner I had a league that I was in and you know, in the summer, which school is over, we had a league I was in here in southern California. So I just started concentrating a hundred percent baseball. But yeah, as a kid I did it all. So let me ask you a question. Like when I would go and coach my son's and youth football, I think that people always felt like they should be doing more or better than they were and I'm always like no, they're just a kid. Grown up. Did you feel like when you were playing like little league and things like that, that the kids maybe thought you should be more than that? You know what I mean? Because Your Dad was there, your GRANDPA was there. They were Major League baseball players. Did you fill me that? You know, I really didn't pay attention to that. Now, now, looking back on it, it was more a I think I found more of the other kids. Oh yeah, he's thinks he's there. You know, it's kind of the more negative, but I really could care less, though it was about, especially on the baseball field. Is Like I went out there and I'm going to kick you, but no, I'm better than you and I don't. Let's talk about my dad later. That wasn't a really big deal. I mean right, and my real friends, my buddies, you know, made it so it wasn't a big deal because growing up in Philly and and you know, growing up in that life style, me and my buddies, we're no different. I didn't think it was any big deal that my dad was you know, I went to the Ballpark with my dad every day and hung out with Mike Schmidt and Pete rose and that was just a normal day for me. And what the cool part was is my buddies around me. Oh, they kept me real humble about that because they let me know extra special that we don't care what your dad does. So that that was very cool for me, but I think when I went out I was competing as a little kid. Yeah, that that's statement. was there, but it didn't bother me one bit. That's awesome. So when did you meet? Did you ever meet? When you were in Philly, you may have, you know, remember Marnie's grandfather with the eagles. Now we've discussed it quite a bit and and I don't think we ever. We ever crossed past, but I definitely know no of them. And but we were actually at the world series at the same time because, yeah, we'll played at the the vet. So Brett was there and I was there. So we had very similar the same age, we had very similar experiences and and so you having your friends keeping you humble, and that's what good friends do, is they're like, he put the choke chain on here and they're like Nope, you're not going to put that and it's great. You have a great legacy with your grandfather and so do i. and now how about your kids? How about Your Dad and your children? What's the like to see the relationship that they have with your dad? You know, I always they have a good relationship with my dad. You know, they have a good relationship with the grab. Actually we're getting up tomorrow morning at four o'clock of coming fish and graps, all these all exciety chartered a boat from we're going to go out fishing with all the boys and they have a good relationship. But I do, you know, I have fifteen year old twins and I have twenty eight one year old. That's that's it. You know, he's going into a senior year in college and I've got a daughter this out of the house. But I always encourage him. You know, I was just the other day. He came over and you know sometimes, yeah, grants ask the same questions over and over and as kids really goto graph or come back. But I always encourage them that. Hey, you know, cherish these times because they're not there forever. And I had such a good relationship with my grandfather, but I remember those days where he you know, he's going to tell me that Ted William Story for the tenth time and I was like gramps uncle on the Ted Wilam story. Yeah, but once I'm gone, you know, once he's gone and I and I move out, moved through life and people ask me about my childhood and my grandpa and what was it like? And it's like wow, those stories were really cool that I took for granted at the time.

We're really cool and something it's a part of my life now that I have can share with with my kids and one day my grandkids. So I always encourage the kids. Hey, take advantage of GRANDPA. Everybody doesn't get to have a grapple with cool stories wrote a big portion of their of their lives. So take advantage of you know, I think that's wonderful because when my kids were little they actually videotape my wife's grandparents and you know, he was in Pearl Harbor and so my daughter asked them a ton of questions about Pearl Harbor. He never talked about it and that's the only tape we have of him ever talking about being in Pearl Harbor. And so you know those like you said, I mean how much would you give right now to hear that Ted William Story again? Yeah, exactly, exactly, and and I think it's just like anything else. You know, you think you take things for granted in life and as you get older and as as you start to experience more thing, you realize Whoa, I better. Maybe I'm going to maybe I'm going to appreciate this little more right now. But I think that's part of growing up, it's part of mature and this part of navigating through life. You know, you tend to gain a little respect for your elders. You know, as you get older you realize how much more they know than you and how much more do you. So what's what's the one piece of advice, like lessons today? Right, no, what's the one piece of advice that you remember your grandpa given you that still sticks with you? Oh well, I always told me him be careful and women care for them women. I said, well, grass you've been married from like a hundred years. He said, yeah, that she's different, different generation. Always just to tell me that growing up. You know, it's funny when we interview Tom Arnold yesterday, we said what, what advice would you go back and give your a young tarm arnold and he said I would date more, never get married, because he's been this. He's on his fourth divorce and and he's like, I would just tell myself take it, to take your time, going ten dates, don't get so such that it so it's pretty funny that two days in a row we get that advice. You know, maybe it's because there's a woman on on with you guys that you know that's what it is, but definitely that was probably very good advice from your grandfather. And what about his legacy? I mean, how do you sustain in his legacy, Brett? I know the book is really dedicated to your grandfather, but how do use to stay in your family legacy? Well, I mean, I don't know. What. What do you actually mean by that? Well, I think you know, your dad had, your grandfather had, you know, had, he was kind of a pioneer in many ways in baseball and then created a son who loved the sport and then has a grandson. And so how did like, how did that translate down the family line? Okay, no, that that makes a little easer for me. Um, you know, graphs is is and as my dad's getting older now, you know, I see a lot of GRANDPA's dad. I mean he was here yesterday and you know, he's making some comment on something. My Mom's you know, they're giving me the look like Oh, oh, your father, and I'm going to just like GRANDPA. So that's GRANDPA right. There reincordinated. But I'll tell it. Grant was the was, you know, the pioneer dad takes over as much as my dad and myself or oil and water. We're completely different. We come from a different cloth. But but you know, being his son and I just know my upbringing, how how there was absolutely zero pressure on me to achieve anything. It was, you know, he was a tough dad, but but he didn't make it like baseball was that big of a deal. It's like here's baseball, hopefully you enjoy it, you know, and but there was never a pressure on me. There's never oh you need to achieve, achieve, achieve, there's just...

...kind of hair here's, here's the game and I hope you enjoy it and kind of go on with the family legacy. I try to do that with my son. I've got a junior in college. He's a baseball player and I try to have that same thing. It's, you know, and he's certain to get it now to is though, for generation. You know, that's never happen to accord and for me growing up, it's like I saw that he liked the game, I saw he was he had a knack for this game and I encouraged him to play it do it right, but I never you know if he would have come to me one day and said, Dadd you know, I just don't want to be a bitch where I want to be an engineer as I support him in doing that. So that's the way I just I just try to try to be. I've got fifteen year old boys that are that are playing baseball right now. I don't go to the game. If I go to their game, you wouldn't even know I was married. And it doesn't matter what happens. It doesn't matter if the greatest game of all time or the worst. You'll barely know him there because I'm not really going to react if my kids have something to talk to me about athletically. What I'm trying to say is I'm not that parent that goes home and critiques. Yeah, what about that third of beat? You know, what about the fifth in with a runner on second? That's not me, it's I watch the game. You know. I watched the game, so you know I know everything that happened. If you'd like to discuss something, Your Dad's here. If not, I'm gonna let you be a kid. You know, that's that's the most important thing is is let these big kids be kids. It doesn't. You don't have your childhood forever, and especially nowadays with the pressure these kids have on them with the sports and in the offseason training at all this and all the parents know that there's their kids, the next this and that they're really not the next this and that. So I miss those times of growing up where you play a little league game or you play Pop Warren football game and when the game is over, when loser draw, you go have a press on a slushy with your bread. I mean that's what it's all about and I've tried to instill that in my kids, that it gets serious soon enough. If you're good enough and you continue to go up the ladder, this gets serious soon enough. So enjoy, enjoy your enjoy your youth as much as you can, because then you got to work for a limp. So when you great advice, that's great guidance. First. It is who one who really feel so passionate about getting their kid to play sports? But it's really about, you know, having fun while they're doing it, and then it will happen or not. It's okay, and I see a lot of these kids today and it's like, why is this pressure being put on you? You know it, and I not to be rude or to be too harsh, but you know, I see these kids come in and out all the time and I can look to you get the kids got no chance on planet earth of being a professional major league baseball player. No chance. So why are we acting like he has a chance? Why can't we let him enjoy it? Let him enjoy this. He's going to resent you parenting that way one day and I'll look back and go, you know, I wish I would. You would let me just enjoy my little league team, enjoy my my high school varsity team, whatever it may be. It and to put these pressures, at these expectations that you're going to be a professional is ludacris because the the percentages are so low. Yes, somebody's got to make it and I never discourage kids. You know, chase your dreams, without a doubt, but but be a little bit realistic. Well, I think you you hit the nail in the head, though it's a lot to do with parents and not two kids. When I was going to my son's youth football games and he was I think they were eight years old and the dad came up to me and say, Hey, have you met Andrew? And I said Yeah, I met Andrew. What a nice kid. He came up and he said Hey, how you doing? It's nice to meet you, Mr Fries. It's nice to meet you, Andrew, and he said Yeah, he told you that he's...

...a nice kid. He said, do you think he's got a chance, and I said a chance at what? And he said a chance to play in the NFL and I said I'll said you got to be kidding. They said the kids eight years old. He can never grow another and she could play baseball. I don't know what he's going to do. Like, how could you even ask me that? But it goes back to your point that some of the parents are really kind of that push their kids. Are the have that thought of their kids going to be a professional or major league and I have to push them to get there, which I don't think it's true. Just like you bred, I think your camera reversed on you. There you go. So you said you grew up in Philly. Did you go to high school in Philly? Where you in California when you went to High School? I started in Philly as a freshman and my dad got traded to the California angels and they kind of picked us up and we moved. You know, when I was I was a back east kid and you know, when you're when you grow up in Jersey, California ain't cool. Right, like, we're moving, we're moving and I'm going, you know, I'm kicking and scream I hate California. Surfs up and about four or five months and I said, well, this California stuffs pretty cool. Well, stens, you know, ended up being the best move for me. I mean to put me a climate where, from an athletic sample, what I could play year around, good weather, better competition. You know, I ended up going to USC and going there for three years and enjoyed my time there and you know, then my pro career started. So yes, sometimes the moves and let it once again, it's goes back to we don't know too much. Our elders usually know better. I remember my dad telling me, hey, we're going to move to California. Well, Dad, how could you possibly do that to me? I'm fourteen, I know every thing in the world. You can't do that. Well, he's playing for the California and to kind of makes sense that your family goes with you out there and and you know, for bread at forts. You could have them leave a few friends, but but you know, those are the things we go through and you know, it end up being pretty pretty awesome for me and you know and my brother. Yeah, you know what's what? He got those same southern cow athletic advantages we have. You know, it seems like southern cal and Texas and where we can play, you're around it, that's the place to be, especially from a baseball start your day sunny side up at the Weston Bonaventure Hotel and sweets and enjoy breakfast for two on us. No matter how you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles, start every day with a hearty meal to kick start your morning. Enjoy breakfast for to on US each day you stay. For reservations, be sure that Promo Code S for B appears in the Promo codebox when making your online reservation at Marriottcom. BACKSLASH LAX BW or call one eight hundred two to eight one thousand two hundred and ninety and asked for a promotional code s for B. Well, I grew up in Pittsburgh and I know all about cold weather and Spring Baseball and being in a gym until you could go outside. And there's nothing worse than hitting the ball and when it's, you know, twenty five degrees out and try and you know you just can't do it. I couldn't. I was always jealous of the guys who played in Florida, you know, because I was a we played baseball. I played baseball my whole life and one state championships and baseball to what I thought I was going to do and end up being football. So you never know what's going to happen. But I couldn't imagine playing year round in Nice weather. I mean just just thinking about my dad worked in PPG, which was a Pittsburgh play glass as a mill factory, and he used to bring home these cotton gloves to put underneath our baseball gloves because you know, if you're catching a ball in a cold it does not feel good. It's just just something about it. You got to catch him right. Yeah, you gotta know. Let it hit here. Oh...

Yeah, you learned that really quick. You learned that really quick. But all that had better in stadium is where you learned it right. Yeah, so anytime it's cold, you learn how to do things a little bit differently. So you go to USC what was that experience like for you? You know, I was never asked about it. All the time now because of my son and is playing times and Hey, bret, you know, people bring it back because you know he's a Princeton and that was a USC which is pretty reputable school. But you know what about your college days? And that laugh is as my son and my boys know. You know, their student athletes and their student athlete and I was definitely at USC to play baseball and from day one withst my camp or what do I need? You need a two point out. To Day all is born. I got a two point out, you know, and it's so much different watching my son his team play, because it's like these guys are real students, like real student and then athletes, you know. And and at those Ivy Leagues, when I found it's pretty interesting because most top athletes and division one schools, they're there to play, there to to you know, as kind of as a stepping stone in the next potion after their life. You go to those Ivy League schools and it's you'll see some true student athletes where these are definitely guys that are students first and yeah, baseball. They're pretty good at baseball and they just happen to do it as a hobby. There's a few guys on the team that are serious and are going to sign professionally. There was one guy, nobody got drafted this year because of the funky five five round draft, from from the Ivy League, but we had a couple kids from from Princeton's side. So there is they take it serious a little bit, a few of the guys, but for the most part there their student athletes. So short story that I just made long. I enjoyed my time at USC but it was definitely there to play baseball, not much else. Yeah, no, I hear you. So you get drafted after your third year and you weren't looking back at that point. You weren't say, man, I got to go back and finish my degree. Oh No, now I was always going to track mine and and draft. I got the opportunity to go Seattle and you know, I race it in Minor League pretty quick. I got there about in a couple years and I thought, you know, this is going to be easy for me. Big Leagues is simple and there were some humble pieweight for me. Know, I got through the minor leagues really fast and I succeeded every level really quick and I got to the big lags and and the next thing I know I'm it's two months into my season and I'm hit in one hundred and ninety eight, having a beer with a friend after the game and I'm looking at him, I look up at every but I said, wow, big league's tough and he looked at me and he said, no shit, I don't know if we can say that here. No, yeah, definitely say whatever you want. It was just a different level that I never experienced. You know, the minor leagues is one thing and it definitely prepares you for the big league, but the big league is definitely something else and it's something that a major adjustment has to me and you know, I found my way. It was just one of those things where you get you get knocked on your ass, you get up and and you make an adjustment and you find a way to make it work. so I went through that ringer and those those tough times. I got knocked down a lot, but you just keep going move it on, making adjustments and it works out for you the longer run. Did you? Did you have a mentor beside your father or grandfather that used you could call or rely on? I did not. You know, Grahams was was. He's a guy that was going to be hard on me. He was going to be you know, I every time we come to see and Diego's interesting because I we pled podres and all right, I've got a lot of family in southern California,...

...all born and raced here. So all dad, sisters and brothers and MOM's. Mom's got five sisters and a brother and their family. So San Diego was a nightmare for me. Know what I'm talking about. I know it's talking about Mary. I need to leave forty to night. The graps would always show up and afterwards when we come out, greet the families getting on the bus to go back to the to the hotel. So I try. You know, I have forty family members are there and grant wood always sit the back, gotta wait like he was. We have the one on one, you know, the cousins of the ants. They were night. We were important. The one on one s come. So I you know, I'd make my way through it. I'd go, gramps, what do you think? You know, I could have been three, forty, four, homer double three, RBI's great game. We win and he'd look at me and go, Hey, what happened at fourth a bat we talking about? I said, what about the other three? Because I'm not talking about the other three. We know what happened to the other three. What happened on that fourth through bath. So that was grants for me. Dad a little different, especially professionally. We had a very good working relationship. We were able to take the father son caps off and really be like you said. I think that's a good word for how I how I compartmentalize my relationship and my dad. In my career. It was a mentor in some capacity, I could call him. We he do the the father's son thing. They know, how's mom doing? To the okay, here's what's going on, here's like you know, back then I said you got to put some Tation, watch the last you know, this, this and this, and he say okay, and watching. Sometimes he'd say you got any time, because that's been working in and out of the game for a long time. Right. He managed a few years. You know, for the last twelve years he's been with the Washington nationals. He's a VP, so he's always been in out of the game. But but if we could work it out, I said, I dad, what do you got the next two days? All Right, I'm open and I you know, all right, I'd send him a plane, take it, he fly out. We get to the ball park early, you know, when nobody was there, and secretly work on my way. So we had that relationship that's obviously develops a year. As a kid. I didn't have that relationship with him, you know, through high school. But once, once my professional hit, we had a real knack to be able to go, take off the father, son, the family thing and just go mentor player or player instructor, and it was really cool. Did you ever give you an advice on how to deal with your GRANDPA? No, no, but but I could give him some advice now on how to not act completely like Gret he did that point. You know, he's getting funny enough to because he's a pit point where he really doesn't, you know, give a rip about anything said. Yeah, you know, in certain places you can't, you can't say that or this or that I don't really care. How about that? I'm seventy two years old and I'll do whatever I want. I'm beyond carrier, you know. So I have those talks with him. So it's it's entertaining. They believe that's a generation though. My Dad was the same way. I'm like, Dad, you can't eat that. You just had a heart transplant, you can't eat that. Nobody's going to tell me what I can and Canny, I can. I could do anything I want. You right, right. My grandfather had open heart surgery and he was drinking and smoking a cigarette on the Guarney as they were wheeling him into the operating room. He did, you know, and you're like, well, this is what it's more so it's interesting to become, I mean what we become like that, Brett, do you feel like that's like you're heading in that direction of being like, I'm just gonna not you know, whatever I say is okay. I don't think so. I like I said, I think dad and me or oil and water. We're different. I'm not really like my dad and I'm not really like my grandmother. Aaron, my brother, has a little bit more.

He has more of their characteristics so as life goes on, it wouldn't surprise me if Aaron kind of morphed into my dad. But I, but I. we're just completely different personalities. So I don't see Myselfie. I'll never say never, believe me, life keeps hit me with things. I thought, did I go away? I'm am I back, you're back. Well, you can imagine. That was dad calling it. No, you know, and I go. I'm going through life and it keeps hitting you with things that it it's so funny to think because we always get to certain certain levels in our lives. Would okay, now I've accomplished this, so I really know what I'm talking about, and then life hit you with another thing, like wow, I didn't know that. All Right, I've learned that. Now you go here, here, so you never so I'll never say never, but I don't see myself be dad or grow. Well, it's funny you say that because when my kids get mad at me, whether we're golfing or doing something, I know they're tired of me when they call me coach because I'm coaching them or I'm saying too much of them. So, like we were golfing up, it's in a sarcastic way. I love, I love it. Yeah, yeah, no, because I've coached them when they were little and I've coached him through all their sports and been there and I had to learn real early how to not be like my father, because my father was pretty tough on me, you know, is just like what your grandfather would do to you. And I I would throw four touchdowns but missed too, and my dad be like what happened on those? Well, the Guy Blindside me. Well, you got to get away from that, you know. And no, that's how he was. And then I caught myself from my son got really angry with me one game and I said I had a deep talk with my wife and you said, you know, you're just like your dad, and I'm like, Oh Shit, you know, I didn't want to be like that, you know, because my dad was tough on he was a mill guy like you. Didn't screw around with him, and so it's funny that you say all those things. And so then makes me think, did you have a kind of a better relationship with your brother because of that, or did you guys? How did you guys get home, because it's pretty extraordinary that you're both are playing in the league. Yeah, and looking back at the time, you know, we didn't think this be. I get to play with Aaron for for a year, you know, at the highest level and in one thousand nine hundred and ninety eight. And I can only speak for myself, but I really kind of took it for grant, like I didn't look at okay, Aaron's Flint thirty. That was my third base and that wasn't are and I don't care if he's my brothers, it's my third base when I got to work with and that's why I turned double plays with and it really didn't the brother thing. You know, Aaron and myself, like I said, Aaron's more like my dad. They're kind out of the same club. We're completely different people, we're completely different personalities. We get along break and we've always got along break, but just different. Aaron. You know, I speak about the relationship I have with my father, how we had a really good professional working relationship when it came to take to the game and my swing. We work great together. Aaron and my dad pletely budded heads and I always tell you that sarcastic coach line, that that's kind of how Aaron was a day. You know, he couldn't. They couldn't get past the father's son. It was those like shut up, dad, you know. Yeah, where's mine? All Right, dad, let's work on this, because you know my swing as good as anybody. Let's work on this professionally, like I'm speaking to another adult, not like I was speaking with and Aaron and my dad. Somehow I saw that dynamic from afar. They just really couldn't get past that father son. It always turned into that well, Daddy, always get at once, you shut up son, you know. And and they can never get past that dynamic where I luckily found a point in my life where I could...

...get past that and it really was beneficial for me. It helped me professional. Yeah, now I see that with my son's as well. Gave my younger he's always asked me questions about golf and how's my swing? Look, what can I do to get better? And gunners just like leave me alone down on watch videos and figure it out, like don't, don't, he tells me. Is Kryptonite when we play because he's always worried I'm going to say something to right and there's certain that's his personality and he'll it doesn't have to be dad that works with you know, I have a son that that comes to me definitely for advice and definitely for the mental side of the game, but the physical side his swing, me and him don't really Mesh. And that's not a slight on dad or or son, it's just certain people in life you work with on certain things and if he has a question about the aim, like Brett or Great Dad, what do you think about that? Second EVAT, you know, I had a set up for this and this. I love talking about that stuff and me and him can talk about that for hours. But when it comes to the physicality of its swing, it's tough for me to you know, I know exactly what's it's helling, but from here to here it we're on a different wave leg. So sometimes he'll go to his grandfather for that, which is perfect for me. Yeah, which is good right. You know, it was a lot of boys in the family and you do have a daughter, so courage your daughter too. I mean, what do you think the advantages of hacking all this like baseball and sports in her life? How is that benefited her? Because I believe like sports are the universal language, so I'm sure that with your daughter, she's definitely been the beneficiary of all this, you know, sports talk. So what did you get? What kind of been? You know? And and Savannah she was great. I mean she grew up around this game and listening to me and listen, you know, she loves spending time with her uncle Aaron. She loves when when she's in New York she's going to go to uncle Aaron. Says, first of all she likes going the Yankee Games and be a cool and then, you know, she's great like me in the FO. But let's be honest, what's most important. But now, getting past that, she's been around the Gamer whole life. She went to you you she was to and that athlete herself. She's a volleyball player. She went to USC she get it. She she got her degree in four years in business. She went in. She's in the sports world. She's in that I can't exactly describe what she does, but she's in that techy handling social media accounts for athletes and and companies that affiliate themselves with sports. So she's always been in it. She's just a real smart she's a real sharp girl and she really knows and I don't know if she just because she's been around the game her whole life and because she's been around her myself and her uncle and her GRANDPA, she just kind of has a I'm even impressed sometimes when she'll explain things to me that had. You know that, dad, come on, this is my life and it's pretty cool to hear it from her. But also she's had that being the only girl, she's had that princess role that she gets played too. And you know, I see it when she goes to Grahamy's House and Oh, we're going to get facials and massages. She I'll tell you what, she knows how to work the Princess Route GRANDPA's and then she'll sneak by her mom's. They come by my house maybe for dinner. She gets it all come she she knows how to get it all covered but hot. Now how to her brother's treat her, because I know, like my boys are pretty tough on their sister, my oldest son. You know, they kind of have a an adult relationship chere where they're kind of cordial with each other. That the fifteen year old. It's just kind of whatever. They don't really pay each other any attention.

Oh Man, it's funny because now, like all my kids have been dating. They're all been single and now they're kind of dating and they just they just rag on each other and they're their boyfriends are girlfriends, and we had them all on the phone the other day just like this, saying, okay, what are you guys doing? Why you have to pick on each other so bad all the time? Just layoff, let the other one be happy. And then they just well, she started it and because I was dating this girl and she used to say all this and it's it's pretty funny. But they're all super competitive and just like you, my daughter has been around sports forever and I think the drive the thing that they've she seen because all my boys played football. It's been in my family. It's just a competitiveness and they're so competitive and everything we do, playing board games, at home, whatever it is, and that it's just that drive that they get from being competitive and that's what sports gives you a lot of times I don't know if I've seen that now, without a doubt, not a doubt. So you get to see addle you're in the minors. How many years were you into minors. I was there. You know, write it about two years. About two years. So your first Major League at Bat. Who was the picture? You had a face. Arthur road. It was my first minor Leagu get bat and was my first big Leagu get that really, which is you know, at the time I didn't, I didn't make much of it, but look at that. It's very I think I'm in very rare for players that can say their first minor league get bats, it gets the same guy that face first. About the big yeah, ver, just just weird time. What was Arthur known for? What was its pitch like? You had to study all that. So it was what were your reading time? You know, this is one thousand nine hundred and ninety now. He was just and I based them. He pitched for the Orioles. He's in the Oriel it was able, I think it was Frederickson and which was in the Carolina League, and Arthur was known as back then. You know, as time goes on, it's two thousand and twenty now. You know, it seems like the guys are throwing a little bit harder. They're getting bigger and more physical because of the training and the technology we have in our fingertips these days, but back then it was pretty rare to see a randy Randy Johnson, a lefty that's rude, really hard. You know, there's a lot of hard her right he's but the lefties were kind of known, you know, to be cunny summers or soft toss and lefties they like to call. So it was rare to see if a guy fired from the left side. And Arthur had that reputation. And I remember pulling up to the stadium, you know, my first game in the minor leagues, and they said, kid, you, you picked a rough one to have your debut on. What's the big deal? As to Arthur Rhodes is pitching. You know's a number one prospect for for the Orioles and throws ninety eight. I said you left your right? He said left, yes, is no problem, because lefty, you know the lefty. I always you always have that advantage, a little bit of the right hitter because it's coming. You can see the fish come from the other side. I was kind of relieved that I wasn't going to fish based on a nasty writing with a with a great break a ball from my neck. You had a left at least they I knew I had a chance to not embarrass myself. So right, yeah, good. I had I think I had a double off the left few wall, my first bad in my our league. He set up the middle first about a my big league, my big league debut it so same, same re's and then played with Arthur for three years in Seattle. He was he was a setup guy for the mariners. So went full circle. Good Morning. Well, okay, did you ever have Game Day Jitters? You had a good question. You know I have. Let's say, I think that's a good call. They are. That's exactly what they are. The jitters there. There butterflies in your stomach, if you want to call it that, and I'll tell you. They never went away from and it was always...

...only on certain games. I get the spring training after a long winter, that first a bat and spring training. How it doesn't matter how irrelevant it is, and in the big picture it is completely irrelevant bad, but for me it was important. It's like I got ready all winter. First Time out there. Whatever you do, don't embarrass yourself, and I was so worried about being embarrassed I didn't care if I get to hit, I didn't care if I had a great bat I just wanted to say face, get through the first of Batman, I'd be all right. So I always got it. Then I always got it opening day, always and it was the same thing. Yeah, I want to get a hit because now it counts and it's on my bubble gum card, but the most important thing is not embarrassing myself. So so long as I can get through the first day. But always had a you know, I was fortunate enough to go to the three or four postseasons. It seemed like every postseason. You know that first day you go line up on the side and their announcing your name like it's opening day, but you know now it's the postseason. I always had butterflies then, if I was fortunate enough to make an all star game that team that year, always when they announced me there. So it's not like I had them a lot, but they never went away and and that's the cool thing about the game. You know, it makes you know you're alive. You know you played this game for fourteen years and if you're still getting butterflies on opening day, you still got that fire in your belly and I think it's actually the cool thing valet stay and play on your next getaway to Los Angeles. The Weston bondadventure hotel and sweets offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotels just moments away from all the action and accessible to Hollywood, beaches, museums and theme parks. The I could includes a guest room and valet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code PSF in the code box when making your online reservation, or call one two hundred and thirty six, two four Onezero and asked for Promo Code PSF. It in the game. Yeah, well, I agree. I've always had them as well. My thing was they only went away when somebody hit me, and that usually was a lot. So you know the rocky belboa theory? Yeah, right, you know. and Said Mine, we're guys that were three hundred pounds and could run up for five and they wanted to take your head off. I don't envy one bit for that. Now you know, and I don't envy you because when I lived in St Louis, I used to work out with Chris Carpenter and he was rehabbing. He was rehabbing his shoulder and, I would say in that batter's box when he was rehabbit and not then throwing in the you know, H s and working on his stuff, and I'm like, I don't know if I could do this. I'm thirty five years old. I could never hit this thing, you know, but I think it just goes without saying that the more you do something you'd get used to it. You know what I mean? Because, you know there's carp who six, you know, like you said, he's a righthanded guy, and it's coming right at my head and then it breaks in. I'm like, Whoa, that was pretty good. You know. I think that's the cool thing about sports is, you know, a lot of times the other like in your you know, in football, for you your you step in against the you know, pick anybody now. If you stick in against the Garrett Cole now, it probably blow your mind, like how does anyone possibly well, I would be the same thing if I had to drop back and have these guys chasing me and I got to hit, you know, my a B or c receiver or however you do it right. You know, that would be mindboggling to me. You know, for for a, for an NBA, you know, power forward, to to run a route and have to catch a touch. It's stuff that it makes you appreciate the other sports and...

...how cool it is. And I think the easiest thing for us in our respective sports how we see that is go out and play golf with a tour player and just sit there and just watch how pure they hit shots and it's just like wow, it's really cool seeing somebody that's that good in another sport at, you know, played at our level, at in another sport. It's really fascinating to me and I love being around it and just being and that's really one of the only sports that you can go out with other professionals and see later, you know where. I've played golf with a lot of hockey players, you know, and they can swing it, just like baseball players can swing a club like no other and you can pound it. But then you go play with the little you know, a guy who is a professional golfer who's about five hundred and ten and he hits the ball about thirty and you're going, what the hell, I'll come this guy's out driving me. What the Hell's going on, you know, and it's just timing. Everything's perfect. He understands his body, you know, and there I'm leaning on one leg because my left knees killing me and I'm trying to swing guard and it doesn't work that way. It's and you know, Golf was always you know, I don't know about you, but golf for me was always my kind of soon as that season ended, that was kind of my my refuge to as that are now I get to go do something that really isn't a stress stressful. It doesn't matter whether it play good or bat I just enjoy doing it's my release and I always appreciate it. And it didn't seem that to be a top player. You know, it's a tour player. Could be a guy on the mini tour. It they it's just different when you yeah pro. You know, just to consider this sound when he hits it. You know, you can kind of shut your eyes and and you know who hit it. An amateur or bro it is pretty cool to see that. Well, you know, it is the other they just had that match on right with with Tom Brady and Peyton and then it was tiger and and you watch ti, tiger and Phil hitting the ball compared to Tom and and Peyton. You know, it's like they're not even swinging, and Tom and Peyton are out there swinging. You know, it looks like they're swinging. They're trying hard, you know, and it's just it just shows you the difference. And well, it was funny for me. I had we were when I I played in the Atlanta one year, one thousand nine hundred and ninety nine. So I lived in Orlando and we trained to Disney is thing was our conflict and tiger was a member at the course I was at. So we had tiger come out for batting practice one day and it was funny. Talk about a fish out of water. Here's the Great Tiger Woods, Greatest Golfer, form. I mean he can't get a ball out of it. He can't hit a ball out of a shadow VP and I remember coming to me saying, Booney, I didn't realize how much strength is needed in this game, and I said it ain't strength, man, it's technique. He goes it's unbelievable and I said, well, now you know how I feel standing over a wedge right for me it's really an easy skill. For you it's really tough. But but me hitting a wedge and I got to Tuck it in here and I got to spin it. That's tough for me, it's easy for you. So it's all relevant, but it's it's easy and other guys coming and, you know, in our arena kind of so we could be the big guy for the day because we go out of the golf course and we're definitely a very you know, it's it's just kind of cool. I think what athletes go and and get to kids to be on the field with a nut, with another athlete and their sport makes them appreciate that and I think it's a pretty cool interaction. Right, right. So so you get to the end of your career. Did you know you were going to retire? Did you wait till the season's over and then figure it out? No, man, might the end of my career was copicate. I played two thousand and five and it was real rough year for me. I was coming off with see, oh one hundred, two hundred and three, really big years. Oh four, I had a you know, kind of a down here, but not I'll you know, I'll read down...

...back. Two Thousand and five is when I really started to notice a physical different you know, my knees were starting to buy us feeling a little bit older and my whole life I've never felt a little you know, I was always the guy that could get to the ballpark for that first swing. was was as hard as you could swing in the older guys. I let's say, I don't know how you do that. I said, what do you mean? And everybody doesn't. Everybody's back feel like this. And then one day and then one day it didn't, you know, and I noticed that two thousand and five I had a rough year and I contemplated retire, but I forget why I didn't assigned with the New York mets. My time in Seattle was done. I signed with the New York mets. I went to Camp Ready to go. You know, I hired my trainer from Florida. I flew him out and out to Seattle for the winner. I trained, I got in the best shape I could be and I got the Florida for Spring Training and that first week it just wasn't the same for me and I was looking around it and I wasn't enjoying myself. I couldn't wait to get out of there. I saw the young players in camp in that passion that that you have, in that look in their eye that I've had my whole life and all of a sudden I didn't have it. But when in I believe it's. Yeah, Willie Randolf as the manager, I said, William, I'm done. It goes. What do you talking from it? You know, you look great this and that. I said, I don't have it in here anymore. He said, I understand that, you know, because I got to a point in my life. So I you know, I went home and I took a year off, decided I was going to make a comeback. I I felt like a jumped the gun and retiring and I had what if's in my brain and I want to have one. So I sign went to Washington national because the general manager there was my general manager and Cincinnati and over the years we had he had developed a report and a really good relationship and I called him I said listen, I'll come ready to go and you know, I appreciate the opportunity. I signed with the nationals and went back. This is after skipping a year, which you know, I would never suggest. That little lion of thirty state. So He's right. What I and baseball was really hard for me this at this juncture, and I went through the spring and I remember he he came to me at the end of Spring said what do you think? I said, I think I'm not ready. Let me go to the minor legs. So I believe at the time it was Columbus. I said, let me go to Columbus, let me play a couple weeks, much you know, went down there. I kind of figured out where I was physically and got a phone call from his name is Jim Bogue. got a phone call from Jimmy said what we're you at? I said well, he goes, give me some numbers to what can you do? I said, well, I can give you four days a week. Said I could probably hit you too hundred and seventy, not because I'm that good, just from experience, for I hit to ten or twelve homers and and however many you know, however many days I play that open. I don't say how many I'll drive in right that it's second. I can still turn double play as good as anybody in the world, but I've lost this step both way and he said to me that's better than what we got. How about I call you up to the Big Leagues Tomorrow? And I thought about I said, Jim, I'm going to I'm gonna fly home real quick. Discusses in my family. I'll get back to I went home and because, you know, I'd played this game for so long and at might peek and in my heyday pan it was really hard. Then, you know, I got to play some great teams where we want a hundred and sixteen games one year and I had the career year of my life. And still baseball was really hard. And now I'm thinking I'm gonna be playing for the Washington nationals, who I've seen that team. They're going to lose a hundred games. I'm a shell of what I used to be. Is this really worth it? Yeah, and it really wasn't. And and I ended up retiring then, you know, officially final and put it. But it was cool because I got some closure and there was no more...

...thoughts, there was no more what apps that I knew that I was too old, I couldn't play like I used to do. Yeah, and for all the Times. And you know, it's time for me to add. Farewell. Well. I for me. I called some friends when I was getting week, because I played fifteen years. I had a broke my back that year. I had a bad knee and I was calling friends and I said, how do you know? And they said you just know. You know. Yeah, you have those what if questions and if they always told me that if you have what if questions, you're not really short as you're done, you're gonna know when it's over for sure. So what do you what are you up to now? You retired from baseball. You've been out for a while. Are you just happy in retirement? You have? Did you start a companies? What are you doing now? Are you involved in some charities? I well, I've we've been locked down for what now? Three months right, still coming slowly. Where I'm at? Yeah, now, over the year I man I retired, I did I coached my kids quite a bit. I did that for two or three years. You know my son's now because they missed their their junior year in high school baseball. So now we got summer ball, so I'll probably go out and coach them for this. I coached in the in open as Organization for a couple years on the minor leagues side. Really enjoyed that, yeah, just took too much. It just took too much time away from from my kids. So I kind of scratch that. I'm doing some stuff. Right before this I was on it, I started doing some MLB network stuff and hopefully I'm going to pursue this that when we come out of this. I've been doing a lot of you know, a lot the radio shows, a lot of serious x down a lot of a lot of podcasts or yeah, I've been starting to get in this arena and think about pursuing something in this genre actually, but other than that, just being a dad. That's awesome. That's awesome. So one of the last things we do on the show, we call it the too minute roll or no huddle, where Marnie and I will fire some questions at you and that's how we end the show them when we're done, will let people know how they can get ahold of you or find you or whatever. But so for me one of the things was, you know, you've had some idols and mentors, like you mentioned. Did you have anybody else that when you watch baseball growing up, that you said that's kind of who I really want to be like? Did you have an idol besides your dad or your GRANDPA. I didn't you know and it was weird because when I was growing up, especially early troushood, it's like everybody would ask me who's your favorite player? I don't care, prayer, I love all those guys. You know, I go to Ballpark in a Shag as many trial at Pete School, but I like Schmitty. So all the guys are my buddy. You know it's not. But if I had to really break it down and say, and not necessarily saying, who I want to be like, but who did? WHO WOULD I want to emulate how you play the game? Once he stepped on that field, who did I want to play like? Pete rose that I don't think I can really there's nobody that comes to mind that that is like him. Just watching when he took the field at seven o'clock and that game was over ten. If you watch to each in it, this this is the most intense. Never gave up in a bat. You know, he was that guy that was four hundred and forty to go up for his fifth beat, and the rest of US would be happy with four forty five, and Pete wasn't. He had to buy it maybe that's what made him Pete Rose, but he and I necessarily wouldn't say I don't, but but I. If I had to put a favorite player on, it's got to be Pete. Right, go ahead, money. All right. So, what did you like when you would go play baseball and have a game? What was more fun for you to play with people cheering for you or play with people booing at you? Oh, depends, depends where they're bullying me. They're booing me at home. If they're booing me in my home field, I'm in trouble. Yeah, probably going...

...to feel really bad if they're buoying me on the road. Right, that is endearment. Yeah, Hey, I'm something if the visiting, they're taking the time out of their day to boom me. So I took that as a badge of honor, I think. You know what I think. If it's all said that, I got to choose one, I'll take the cheering, right. Okay, what's your what's your biggest pet peeve? That's he oh, all, this doesn't have to be sports. Can Be anything, anything. All right, biggest pet peeve, thats a no brainer. It's people that okay, when the elevator door opens and you're in the elevator, the people that rush on it the elevator before you get off. That is not the protocol. The protocol is when the door opens, you let the people exit the elevator before you come on. And the pushy people that push their way on before you even come out right, that bee and I always let them know. I said that's not how you do it, as I'm walking in right, that's not how you do it. Great, good morning. All right. So what would be your best one liner? Like it's like somebody's going to say, like Bret Boon is known for this one line or this word. What would that be? We're worried about yourself. I like it. Get my answer. Enter anything. If you get into my bed worried about yourself. Right, that's perfect. All right. So if you go back to a young breat boon and give him a piece of advice, what would that advice be that you would give to yourself? Let's see, stop and and smell the roses a little bit more it stop, take the time to look around and appreciate what you have and how lucky you are to do what you do, it seems, looking back, and that's probably. You know, guys, I don't know if if you have them same feelings. I think when we're when we're playing at our height and it's so competitive and it there's so much on the line that you really don't have a time to just, you know, fit. They're Wrigley Field in a day game, look around and go how cool is this? I get to do this for a living. I think we're grinding so much and worried about who were pitching, who's pitching tomorrow, who were facing it. I'm for for my last twenty and you know, if I could give myself advice, it say enjoy myself a little a little bit more, slow it all down. Everything isn't isn't life and death and just, I don't know, stopping. I agree, because one thing I say I wish I would have done was just kind of not that I'm a I'm a journal Guy, but even from high school, just write like if I had a game, what was something I remember from that game like that, because you know, I've played in so many just like you. You've played in so many games you can't remember every good thing, but to go back and then just kind of write down some special moments that happened to that day. That, that would be my advice. Is really taking to account what's going on with you. Write it down so you never forget it, because for me, been hit and had a lot, so I forget a lot of stuff. Good, Marnye, two, one. So then what would do you have? One Best Memory, one best one, favorite memory? Favorite? I don't think so. Maybe. No, I don't think I can name just one. And maybe the day I got called up, maybe my first my first game in Baltimore. But I've got a lot. You know, I don't have any just defying moments in my career. I have a lot. That would really cool.

But there's not that one stubtle. You know that. There's not not that one moment that really jostle. Wasn't me right now. Have you ever played arm chair manager with your brother when you're watching a Yankees game and he makes your decision? To give me an example, without a doubt, okay, because we talk a lot about it too. He'll call me and once in a while he's fishing for some advice, right you know, and sometimes I give them, I tell them what I tell them, and sometimes it takes my advice, sometimes he does but I know if he's calling me late at night, he's he's puzzled. They don't know what do. Aaron's got a little bit of a quick hook when it comes to pulling guys out of the game and I worry a lot about the mindset off my guys are around me. So so, for instance, if a guy I'm going to rely on every fifth day for the entire season, I keep taking him out of the game in the fifth before it's considered an official game, so he's not going to get the winner the loss. Eventually he's going to start to resent me and be Piss in and I always tell the air and you know, it comes out and it's it's three, two, one in the fourth and I just I question a lot of times when he makes a pitching change now to one, he's winning. So by taking him out he gets a no decision. Let him get through the fist so he gets a decision. I know the game's changing and the numbers are changing and they're not considering wins and losses as heavily as they used to, but they're still wins and losses and, believe me, to that picture it's important to him to get into win versus not get to win. You know, really, that's like telling me, as a hitter with that R be I wasn't really important to really pretty important to me, right. No, I love that. I question a few things with are in there and and usually his talks with me. or who should I go with tomorrow for this plaayoff, you know spot, and the only advice I give there and all the time is listen. I can, I can tell you what I see on TV and what I think and give you my advice, but when it comes down to to a gut decision, you got to go with your gun. You're the only one that knows. You're the guy in the clubhouse with you. Guys are a family for a hundred and sixty two games. So only you know what that guy's thinking. Yeah, that's the interesting part of managing and being a people person is to be able to look in another guy's eyes and know is he done or does he have a another two innings in them? Only you can know that. I can't know that from watching on TV. Yeah, no, here is one last one. So I'm assuming baseball has got to get started again at some point. It's going to be a shortened season. WHO's your pick for WHO's going to win it all this year? The Yankees are healthy. On paper, nobody's better and that has nothing to do with Aaron. That's just an off my analyz it my analytical side. I think Houston's going to surprise people and be better than they think. They got a big cloud that they've got a no, they've got a they've got a play out of you know, they did themselves and they prd themselves that way. Right. I'm not a guy that's really, really thrilling them for what happens because I think it's a lot more widespread than people think. If there were electronics involved, we don't have all the facts, and that there were electronic ball on the on your person, that's a different level and I think they look at it. Yeah, that's a conspiracy theory to me. As of now, I think it's widespread, but the scrutinies going to be pretty heavy, especially the way they came out and defended themselves. They went to the podium and read a BS letter. Yeah, you know, when you get caught and stuff like that, you got to come out and show me some reports and I didn't see that, but I think they're surprisingly can have a better year than people think because of the talent level on that team. I still believe that's a hugely talented team. I gotta go to the Yankees and I think it's...

...a no brainer. In the National League dodgers are definitely the class of the League still. All right. Well, last thing. So tell us about real quick about your book and how people can find it and your autobiography. I think it's very interesting, Martie. Let them know. I have no idea. I haven't, I haven't. It's I think now you can only get it like on a kindle, or what's it called? The the E books. I have some copy. If somebody I don't even know, I haven't, I haven't give it. You know, it seems like it seems like it's two thousand and seventeen. I haven't talked about my book at a long time. It's a pretty cool book, though. You want to pick it up. Pretty cool. You guess them interesting stories and you touched out earlier about GRANDPA is the you know, that's when I first hit me on how special the times were with my granhas. When I wrote books. I really didn't want to write the book kind of get talked into it and then I as I got into it, it brought up old stories and memories and I wrote it. I thought, you know, that was the coolest part, is just reliving my childhood and relationship with my GRANDPA. That was the most important and there's some pretty some pretty cool stories in there too. And how those days this weekend. I think that you know, certainly the people that download the books and listen to him online. What is that call? Audio books on? I think Audio Bookscom is where you can get home game. Go Out and purchased it. Now I love this. We'll throw it out there. We'll throw it out there. Well, Marnie, you have anything else? No, you know Whad I'm hopefully you'll end up on m I'll be at work because you're great to watch and gratulate you too, and a certainly an expert at many subjects, including including a fault. Of all. Thanks it along and yeah, yeah, so good luck you, Brett. You'd luck to all your kids. I'm sure there's going to be a fourth generation in the MLB and I can't wait to see him. The succeed. So best of luck you and thank you for joining us on Huddle. Up With Guff. All right, thank you, man right, see you by everyone. Hey, we want to thank you for joining us today on huddle up with guests, where we talked to a wide range of guests about our supports. Shape the life has always been joined by my great friend and Coho a pager, and we want you to be able to follow us on all of our social media at huddle up with dust and we really appreciate you and thank you for your time and listening to our podcast.

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