Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Brad Mitchell

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

He is the Founder and President of NAPSA, The National Athletic and Professional Success Academy, served under George H.W. Bush in the White House Staff, and also teaches as an external faculty member at Penn State’s Smeal College of Business, Brad Mitchell joins the Huddle. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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...graduate. Well, we've had this summer. I think throughout. Don't assist some don't hold that against me, but or your other or your other two guys, at some point we have to start getting guests that we actually are smarter, that I feel like I'm getting smarter as a result. I think. So it's like it's waiting Yale getting from Yale. Yeah, it just I don't know, we got to start maybe finding somebody that didn't graduate from college. Maybe then why I went to the University Arizona. It was called the Harvard of the West. That's by something. That's what they said at Arizona. That's what they do. Well, we writing check. So welcome to the huddle, Brad Mit's. Brad, thank you for being with us. Great thanks for having me. It's a real, real pleasure and privilege to be with you guys today. Yeah, so we you know, our shows great. We get to talk about life and and really how sports influenced your life, and so we always like to start when you were young. You know what was your first memory was at first love of sports that that was created for you, right, I think you know. Fortunately, in our neighborhood when I was growing up, we had a lot of kids and we had a lot of kids with a wide set of ages, and so we were always playing out in the yard and we also lived right next to the high school, so we had the high school fields, baseball, football, and so our little neighborhood games would kind of migrate over to the big time baseball diamond that the high school used or the football field and those kinds of things. So is baseball, football, basketball. I'm from upstate New York where it's really cold in the winner and we'd be we'd be playing basketball in November December. What would town would fromth clubs on Seneca Falls, New York. Sena Falls, New York. Wautiful there, which is interesting because Tommy cocklin jaguars giants. He's from the neighboring town Waterloo, New York, again right population eight thousand, eight thousand people. So well then that leads very small town. What that's you know, I know you want to ask go for about we're batting about eight hundred and fifty with this question. Did you play whiffleball as a youth? I played whiffleball. Absolutely. I was actually going to bring that up. And and the other thing when we were playing all these backyard games. We're very creative and whiffleball was one of our most creative games because is we take a tennis racket in a whiffle Golf Ball. Okay, in play baseball. You'd bat with the tennis racket hitting the whiffle Golf Ball and basically play baseball, which was a ton of fun. And you know, throwing somebody out with a whiffle ball from like seventy five, you know, or even fifty yards, right, that's a thrill. Yeah, nail somebody on the move like that. So yes, tea major shots with a tennis racket, for sure. Yeah, yeah, yeah, so, so that was a lot of fun. Sounds Fun. But speaking of that, like when we were kids, it was like, okay, we're going to somebody's house. We don't like, I didn't have my stuff, so we got to somebody's house, we just find whatever sports stuff they had. We just put the game together just you. We didn't care, like yeah, to be perfect exactly. Didn't have to be perfect. The other thing that was great about our neighborhood was we had all these different ages. So we had big kids that were fifteen sixteen and little kids eight hundred and ten, but we all played right. Yeah, together. Yeah, like the big kids didn't sell. You know, little kids, you go away. You know, this is just for the big kids. It was. We were all kind of playing together, which was a lot of fun. Everyone found a role where was hey, you know, go play left field or whatever it was. But you're still playing with this with this group of people. So what do you think really the Google lessons you learn were you learned from playing in a group of kids like that without coaches, without parents, you know, anybody to really reath what you're doing right? I think a lot of it is it's sort of like, you know, your accountability to yourself. How do you have this work so everybody can benefit from it? Everybody's fair. People trusted each other. You know, if you get called out, you know you're out. Kind of a thing. So not having that parntal. I mean, I don't remember parents ever being around doing any of this stuff. Parents were glad people, you guys are out play. Yeah, exactly, exactly. You know what, you bring up an interesting point, because I think so many people our age and older have such an issue with with instant replay, but I don't think that the younger generation really has an issue with it. You know what I mean? Right, I really believe because we did that, like you were just out and if you argue it, you argue it, and usually the bigger guy one, and just we just moved on like it wasn't a big deal. Well, so, also, if you're using a lawn chair as the strikes in, if it hits a lawn chair, it's a straight right. That's your answer. Replay. Yeah, it didn't matter if it started up here and came down. Yeah, right, right, right. You know, it comes back to this creativity thing too. We were so creative. So,...

...as I mentioned, we live next to the high school. So we had a regular baseball diamond there and there was a you know, back wall, back fence, behind home plate. Right. So there was a wall like chicken wire fence, right, but there was a wall back there protect foul balls the houses right behind it. Right. So what did we do is kids, we turned the field around. Second base became home plate and now we had a home run wall. Yeah, Oh, yeah, so the whole idea is to hit over the wall, over the road. Yeah, into those people's houses. That's vital and you need a home and this and that was because and that was baseball, that was hardball. Oh Wow, okay, so we're playing hardball, turn the field around, second base becomes home and it was like so cool. So it was always being created, playing, you know, fumbly bumbly football, all these games we just make up. No one said Hey, you know, we didn't have the Internet to, you know, try this game or try that game. was just like hey, let's figure out what works. Yeah, you didn't have that to go to. Like now, when I'm doing my yard, I'm I'm typing in on the Internet. Yeah, best way to create. I'm looking about, I'm watching like twenty youtube videos from people that aren't even the same area. Yeah, and I you can you don't come back to these lessons too. I think back then to there wasn't this this this aspiration for perfection, that everything had to be perfect. Everything didn't have to be perfect right. So your whole sense of fear of failure was so much less. In today's world, everything has to be just so, it's just perfect. You know, with the media, if someone does some little thing wrong, it blows up on social media. It's make a big, big deal out of it, and so that, I think, makes people risk averse. They fear this more than they you know, more than we did, say, you know, growing up, because nothing was perfect and we were expert, free to experiment, free to be creative, free to fail and try something else. And then if you failed, it wasn't then posted on the right. Yeah, I mean if you go back, even if you look at like just clothing of athletes and what they're wearing, it's like it has to be perfect, it has to do this, has to be that. But you go back and watch like the old steelers, like there's just tape phone off, there are every massive amount of tapes right like the worst shoes you could ever wear. You know, I mean like now, I'll God forbid that would ever happen. Anybody would not be cut dead, gone the field and in the NFL says what you can't wear, that, you can't look like that, you can't do that now, which is crazy to me. Yeah, it's like I'm playing, I should be able to do what I want to do. Well now, like when the when the it's off in the quarterback addresses the press, the press conference, it's a whole outfit, you know, it's like it's all synchronized through it for whatever. Well, but you occasion isn't it's but you can't like. It's just crazy to me that the NFL's has said, like you can't wear that hat because it has a logo on it. Right, it has to be NFL from this time before you get in the stadium until this time you do leave, which it is what it is. That's who we work for. But it's changed a lot, right, changed a lot. So when, what, like high school, did you go to? Where did you write? Go from? Youth was at your local high school. So you said you grew up by it. So you didn't go very far. Yeah, exactly, didn't go very far. And but always love sports and I played all the sports, but I wasn't a great athlete by any stretch. But on my way home from school I would cut through the high school field and the Varsity football team was practicing there and that's what I would do on the afternoons for two hours, even before I got to my house, was watch the Varsity football practice and watch the coaches and what they did, how they interacted with the players, and I was just fascinated with with the plays, the strategy and how it all worked. You know, in Junior League football. I played quarterback, but then I didn't grow in become big enough to be safe to play. So I really started to follow football in that way and at the same time huge Penn State Fan, not only Penn State football fan but fan of Penn State University. My Dad went there, my two uncles went there, and then I really started following college football and started going to games at Penn state when I was eight years old. And you know, one of the first games I ever went to, Lydell Mitchell was playing, right, Frank Oh Harris was playing, Jack Ham was playing. Yeah, and back in those days, being from a small town, this little small town, we didn't have a hometown team, so my hometown team became where those Penn staters went. Yea, I became a steelers fan because of Frank o'haris and Jack...

Ham. was that kind of Syracuse country. It's very much syracuse country. So that was a huge rivalry back in the day, was Penn state versus Syracuse, and that was the game that we went to every year, home and away, at Syracuse and at Penn State. Seneca is that close? Eighty right? It ninety nine, it's ninety. Yeah, so north. Yep, Yep. It's right between Syracuse and Rochester off the thru way. So what would it take you to get the Penn State about? Yeah, four hours, exactly further than here? Yep, little further in here. So what was your first year you went to pennst I went to Penn state as a freshman in one thousand nine hundred and eighty. First Time I stepped on the campus I was four years old, one thousand nine hundred and sixty six and, you know, started going to start to going to games in one nine hundred and seventy. So I was at Penn State during a great time football wise. Certainly won our first national championship in nine hundred and eighty two and had terrific team every year I was there. Actually, I think Penn State lost two games in four years, something like that. So yeah, just an incredible time for Penn State Football. My cousin Mitch, actually played for Penn State back then. I remember Mitch was there for three years, I think. Before you get kicked, Mitch was a wild one. He was a wild man on any team he we ever played on. He's missed, but he had a good experience and I'm with you. I used to go to Penn state when I was a kid all the time and go watch him play. Yeah, and sitting in the student section throw marshmallows was a pretty cool experience. Yeah, yeah, it was. It was exciting. It was. It was interesting. First Time Pence had ever had a game under the lights was against Nebraska in one thousand nine hundred and eighty two. Pinncetate want on to win the national championship that year, but I think was ABC sports. Of course. Then beaver stadium didn't have lights, so the network brought in temporary lights and set them up for the game. So you can imagine some what about is probably what. What what? It was light on campus for the first night game. It was actually one of those split Games. I think it started at thirty. Yeah, so it started in daylight but ended at night and pen state pulled out a win in the last minute and a half. So it was. What is it like? Really exciting. I've been there. I don't know if you've ever been up there for till gating. Yeah. Well, my my memory is not as fun because as an Arizona Grad, we opened against Penn State and in ninety eight I was at the ninety nine. I was at that game and we were number four coming in. I was at that game little too sure of ourselves and what it was about. Twenty nothing in halftime, probably, and I think forty one three maybe was a final, but it was like twenty one nothing after like seven minutes and then we got the game. Yeah, and it was and we stayed in ult we were going in DC at the time and O counch of us who went to you have a drove up and went and we were super cocky for whatever reason. I'm not sure why, and we were reminded of that as soon as it was twenty have your you have a gear on. Yeah, there was only about thirty you have a fans total in the whole place and we're some of them. And Weird we got ugly because we were talking a lot of stuff before the game and it ended so badly. What it what a tail getting experience? What a game atmosphere that? Yeah, yeah, that's that's the thing to me is I can remember that, the tailgating experience and then walking to the Games and you're just there's so many RV's like there and then every so many big colleges have that same experience. It's amazing. But then you go to the NFL Games and see the tailgate. It's a big difference between college tell gating and Professional. Big Difference. And I and what was the place that you when you were student? Where would you go after the game? Where was the hang out that everybody went to a Penn State? Well, the hang out most of the time that I went to it. It was interesting. Other it was in my dorm to study. Okay, believe it or not, Watts Hall or Hamilton Hall on campus. So that was typical for me. Guy's probably a typical of a Penn state student. I would probably say you're right, camps are producer can where'd you go? Yeah, yeah, where'd you hang an shams or you probably remember the scaler. Oh yeah, yeah, yeah, so and been to the bend of the scaler. Could you fit a hundred thousand people in there? The other place, the other place to go is this place called the Lions Den, which was a pretty cool place and I'm not sure if it's still there or not. Just then. Yeah, the den, the lion said. Yeah, the other pensive experience I had was growing up in Arizona in eighty six went to. Oh yeah, that was phenomenal. Oh Yeah, I rather one don state also. So, okay, it was was he and I sitting there. I was younger, he was out of call to that point, but that was what an amazing game. That was an amazing game. What's interesting too, I had...

...gone to Penn State, played for the national championship the year before in one thousand nine hundred and eighty five against Oklahoma in the Orange Bowl. Yeah, went down to that game, Shane Conlin. Yeah, played a phenomenal game, right, and we lost. Penn State lost, and then came back the next year in one against Miami, of course, and I was not believe in Tempe. Yeah, it was. You know, it's funny like that. What I just found out. So my daughter's in high school right now, but her boyfriend, chippy, we call them, MOM's cousin, is John Schieffer. So it was always Oh really? Yeah, yeah, so it's just great that out. Yeah, Yep, Yep, quarterback down both those teams. Yeah, so we're going to have Shane on it some point too. Oh yeah, he lives here in Pittsburgh and he'll he'll be able to tell us some really good stories. feak. You remember them all? Yeah, I give a lot of stuff on the golf course. Yeah, yeah, he remembers my cousin Mitch, and you know you played in the League. kind of have some connections. He's a really good guy. Yeah, and you know what a story he has, going the bills, going to the super bowls and doing all the stuff. You just Penn state in Joe Paterno recruiting him. You know, he was not that big a kid and they're when he was in high school and he became a lot bigger and we have say it has a tendency to do. That's a lot right, bigger, right, right, truly terriffic guy. Your pen say you're in engineering. He said, YEP, studied and there studying engineering. What did you do after Pennsi? Did you go on to get your masters or I worked? First I did a couple of things. I work for IBM, just just as a coop student at IBM and did industrial engineering. Then I ran assembly lines actually for General Motors in Rochester, New York. Oh well, and I had forty three union employees, you know, working on our assembly lines and and model we building. They were we actually made electric engine cooling units, believe it or not. So the fan, the fan motor, the shroud, all that injection stuff. And we so we made them for every model GM had and shipped them out on rail cars, tall the tall the car plants. And then I went to graduate school. So then I went to graduate school and did that for two years and studied business, government public policy and started doing consulting and those kinds of so so like, how old would you have been when you were running the the assembly line? At Twenty One? Well, I mean I'm just thinking like your you have forty three UNIS plaise under you. Yep, the that must have been interesting, dynamic. That's a great you men say, the only one who didn't smoke. That's as you're right. It's a whole different it's a whole different culture, it's a whole different society really inside a plant. But that's a good point and I remember early one of my mentors on the plant said to me. He said, Brad, you win with people. You Win with people. You got to defend your people, you gotta look out for them, you gotta make sure you hold their best interests and I thought that was a great little kernel you having to do with leadership, win with people, and that's really affected my life sense all these different things that I've done. Well, I can tell you from all the coaches that I've had in my career, the ones that I respect the most are the ones who cared the most and it wasn't about it is always comes down the winds in the NFL. Yeah, but it was. You were more than that to them and they just didn't belittle you because you had a bad game or you know, they tried to help you learn from it. And if you can do that no matter what business you're in, I think it's a plus and it takes you a lot, a lot further than you would by just denigrating somebody. It absolutely does. And there's a great book I'll recommend to you guys too. It's called the Culture Code. I don't know if you've read it or heard about it, but that's what that book is about and the word culture actually, the the Latin root of that word cult means to care. That's what culture really is. To Care, just like you said, guys, to care about others in leadership and empathy and those kinds of things, whether you're in the NFL, running a startup or fortune five hundred company. It all comes down to the people at the end of the day. Right, so, right, so you you go to grab school? Yep. Go to Grad School? You went to would you go for Hart, Harvard, Universe Harvard? You left Harvard? Yep, you did. You that. When you got it, you got into politics. got into politics. I moved to Washington DC, lived in Arlington, Virginia, wow, and I joined the George Bush for President Campaign in one thousand nine hundred and eighty eight. George Herbert Walker Bush, forty one, who was currently vice president,...

...and at best great, great experience working on that, on that campaign and learn so much, met wonderful people and how that ties sort of back into sports to what was great about that experience was, having done consulting and been working, was there was a binary result. You have this team, you had this cause and everybody was in it. We're all working for this same objective. Right to win on you know, in November, and then November and you know, if you want are your lost. Right. It was a binary thing. It wasn't like this dragging out type of a thing. So, okay, we win or lose. And then I got tapped to head up the presidential transition for NASA, the Space Administration, which was, you know, fourteen billion dollar budget, twenty twozero employees. I was twenty six. Come back to winning with people. Get all these applications of all these extraordinarily qualified people to serve on our transition team, which I was a leader of. Rights. Get all these resumes. This one guy comes in West Pointer, Stanford Business School, CEO of a company, is in his early s. He happened to be be between CEO GIGS and he wanted to learn about public policy and government Mon check it out. So I hired him as my top guy and I learned more from that guy about business and leadership and all. It was just incredible. So that was a that was a great experience in that really think interesting thing about a presidential transition is you have to start from zero, do a start up, staff up, deliver the product and then ramped down, all in ten or eleven weeks, which which is crazy, which is crazy. Well, how is it? Bush? As a person? I've always heard really good things like tremendous thing, tremendous a gentleman. I mean so many stories about him and about how he treated me extraordinarily well. As a junior staffer, I worked on the West winning the White House. I was the youngest person there by far and one of the first Saturdays were there. I'm working on a Saturday afternoon and in my office and the president's personal assistant comes around and says, Hey, the the family showing a film down in the family theater. Would you like to join them? I'm like, so, I look at this inbox of all this stuff I'm supposed to do. That's why I was there Saturday. But or you know, inbox or a movie with the leader of the free world and his family. So I said, I'm there right, would you sit by? So I don't even remember who I sat by. There were five or seven of us. The president was and there were these huge, huge chairs, like super compen I've been in there. If you've been in there, so you know those chairs right, guys, these huge chairs, super comfortable, and there were only like five. Mrs Bush was there, the president, their dog, a couple other staff or so. That was really cool. I've had some pretty cool tours when I played for the Redskins. Yeah, and you go in and yeah, see some of the back back room stuff. It's it's just an amazing you know what it takes. How many people work there, the chefs and you know, finding out would but the new president likes to eat and creating those recipes for him. Oh yeah, and then the bowling alleys and the Bowling Yep, do all that stuff. So yeah, yeah, I think what it was interesting. What you said is culture, right, and you talked about the new even said I like the stories about President Bush. We're amazing about how he treated people, all that and in the and then we see the culture today and how device of it is and what's going on in politics today. I bet you're pretty glad you're not in it today. Very glad. It's a totally different world, totally different. Or what do you think President Bush would say about it? I I'm not really sure. But President Bush was all about relationships, building relationship with people, whether they were the people that worked on the staff at the White House, worked in the kitchen, worked on his staff or the National Security Advisor. He treat did everybody the same way and that went for international leaders as well. So he's a very relationship driven person. And but we have now, I think in politics generally and certainly the White House specifically, is a very transactional orientation. Everything is zero sum, everything is win lose, everything is transactional. What's this transactional in in the short term? They don't think what are the longer term impacts or consequences of actions today...

...that could affect things in the future, and he was a very long term relationship driven. I think that's one observation he would say, and the my favorite quote the President Bush used to say to us and you know, publicly very, very frequently, was any definition of a successful life must include serving others, and that's what he was about and I had a great front row seat to see probably, you know, the greatest leader that believed and then did all that stuff. And you know, in our first jobs, whatever it is, playing in the NFL, whatever we do, we're really we're really trying to learn and understand how to be a professional, how to act. So I had the great good fortune to watch how he conducted himself and acted and that was a great example that I've, you know, tried to in the Bush family or their sports fans. Right, absolutely, absolutely this. Do you have a memory of him like like, oh my gosh, and a game with him or anything that he was really he was a great athlete. First basement at Yale. Extraordinarily Competitive Guy, played tennis at a high level and I remember right. This is an interesting because this ties in George W Bush. During the eighty eight campaign, George W Bush was an advisor and we're riding up the elevator one day, he and I and and and Bush said to me, see that Texas game over the weekend. So it's big, Big University of Texas fans. So they they followed college football, they followed pro football. Of course George W becomes an owner of the Rangers. But sports was was really important to the bushes and it and that really came from President Bushes s you know mother. Yeah, Very Competitive Golfer, competitive tennis player. So yeah, I would think it's sports is a big part of the bushes for sure. It's hard not to get emotional when you see George W throughout the first pitch in the world series. Right after eleven eggs straight, he's got all, my gosh, he's got the bull. Talk about pressure and yeah, nails that. It's the best yeah, she'll ever see right, without pressure on him and every you know in New York. Yeah, I mean crazy, yeah, yeah, yeah, and just thinking about that today, it does. It is emotional of what of our country is going through and and what it means to have a leader who wants to be out there a you know, wasn't always come out right, but you could tell that he cared right and there was a passion and a deeper thinking than you know that went on about our country exactly, exactly. So you got to meet Reagan also. I never met Reagan, unfortunate. I met Clinton. I met President Clinton a few times actually, but I never met Reagan, unfortunately. Would have liked to. President Clinton is pretty impressive when you meet him personally. Like there's some like it's hard not to well said. You know us. I got a little anecdote on that if you guys want to hear it. So love it. So Bill Clinton came in. We were announcing at the President State of the Union Address National Education Goals. So education goals are really a state driven you know, activity in the federal government supports that. So at the state of the Union President Clinton, who's then governor of Arkansas, was going to be up in the box at the at the the state of the Union. President is going to acknowledge these state goals and President Clinton. So Clinton comes into our office for a pre meeting before the event. Yeah, so he's in there and meeting with my boss. And so Bill Clinton comes out and Carol Campbell comes out. Carol Campbell was the governor, the Republican governor of South Carolina, and Bill Clinton was the Democratic governor of Arkansas. So they both come out of the office. Bill Campbell walks by me. Carol Campbell, sorry, walks by me, doesn't say anything. Bill Clinton, on the other hand, I'm walking by, stops, looks me right in the eyes, holds out his hands as hi, I'm Bill Clinton, what's your name, and just starts talking to me in the West Wing of President Bush is White House right, like the guy could engage as you is as you just a I mean, I mean like we may mean unbelievable. We met him a couple times, my wife and I, and just he does, he looks you in the eye. You know, it's something that just it just grabs you and yeah, it's and it feels there's no, you're right, I'm wrong. You don't even mean it was just like, I'm bill, it's yes, I meet you. Yeah, yeah, yeah, it was, it was. He was like that. So, yeah, it was pretty interesting and I'm not sure. I think he was a sportsman. I think you've a few of the president your a DC become like a sports fan with the all the...

...coverage that goes on and right, right, with all the teams they have there. Now. It's just been it's pretty interesting. So then, all right, so you're running all this stuff in politics. What was the point where you got out? Right? So when went through that cycle twice, to budgets, to you know, to everything, and in that interim got married and we moved to Houston Texas. Right. So moved to Houston Texas. We're excited about living in Texas and started working in Texas and worked for a little known company at that time called Enron. In one thousand nine hundred and ninety one, right, I wound up leaving Enron and in nineteen ninety five in and moving to Ohio. But that's that's when we lived in Texas. We met a lot of great people in Texas and Austin and University of Texas and all that, all that sort of stuff. But then our company bought a company in Columbus Ohio and I went up to help integrate that into into Enron and then I left and Ron in basically started my first you know, start up. Well, your first starting in Columbus, the first with the very first one. It was called easy breathe, which was a firm that we back. It's hard to imagine now, like before the Internet, but it was. Back then. It was very difficult to get products and supplies to help people with allergies. Yeah, believe it or not, they weren't available like in the drug store, at the Walmart or whatever. So there were all these specialty stores. So we created an online catalog to provide that and we distributed it through allergis office, allergis offices, and that then when thecom started going a firm called drug and poriumcom creative, remember that one down in DC? That's when I first saw drug, drug and porium, right down in the DC area. They that bought easy breathe and I started working for drug and POUMCOM and then transition back to Washington DC and started a company called chain drugstore dotnet, and that was in Alexandria, Virginia. So when you think back to when you were in college, yeah, a Penn state and then you fast like any idea that you said I'm going to be in like the drug business, like selling drugs to help with allergy, after being on the president's staff. Yeah, right, right, right. Well, that open. Yeah, that just open my eyes to a lot of different things and I think that is kind of part of my perspective. That in it really plays into naps gusts too, and what we're doing now, I'm so excited about it, is I think. You know, people kind of almost they get in a box or they put themselves in a box in many ways. Well, I didn't major that major in that in college or you know, I'm doing industrial engineering. I didn't know anything about politics or pop the policy at that time or starting a company or anything. But if you had like sort of this growth mindset, that's so critical to do that you can kind to redefine how you can kind of ride the waves and do different things. So No, I didn't really imagine that when I was in when I was in college. Right. So one of the one of the great things about the shows that we really try to reach those transition points for all our guests, you know, because there are so many look how many you had, right, and you're not even done with your story yet, right, and Dave and I've had a bunch and and we all go through these transitions and one of the things we want to really emphasize the kids is that there's a point to where you start to grow your foundation and sports helps with that and it helps with the socialization, the communication, how to relate to other people, all those types of things, and then it helps you say, you know, hey, I know a good team from a bad team and I want to maybe move on or not move on. You even spoke about that when you first were went with the Bush was and what a team feeling. It was exactly exactly and it and you know, when you're in a good environment, yeah, team wise, and when you're in a bad one, yeah, usually doesn't take long. You know and analyze and it because I've been in toxic environments to my wife's in that kind of situation now where her team is just she brags about them, talks about she loves them, but the work it's not necessarily maybe the work she ultimately wants to do, but it's really hard and they're dealing with people with a lot of issues. But she because the team is so good and she loves the people she's with. They're all strong. Makes a lot easier and yeah, loves go and work every day just for that reason. Yeah, you know, if it was opposite, like if she loved like the population but everybody around her was terrible and probably be a lot harder to deal with. You know,...

...and I've been on teams like that, everything for me, good teams I've been on starting the locker room, Yep, you know, and the people get along, we work together as one. And you know, we see it all the time from here, from being in Pittsburgh, that when the locker rooms divided, it makes it hard to win. Exactly exactly, and I'm sure you've seen that. You so you leave DC right you're in DC now, coming from Ohio, Texas right after DC. Where'd you go? So, went to State College Pennsylvania. After twenty years moved. I got involved a lot of advisory boards at Penn State, got more involved with the university and my kids weren't an age and we were living in Alexandria, right down and Mount Vernon, actually beautiful. Yeah, right on the Potomac River. Yourorson lives down there. Yeah, yeah, I'd see I'd see him at the grocery store from from the other guard. Yeah, and not not when I saw them, but yeah. So, so we lived down there and my kids were at that time ten and six. So in the traffic and old I was getting and my in laws had retired to stay college. So we go to football games every weekend and said Hey, well, why we just stick around here? We sold change drug store DOTNET, that that start up on pharmaceutical stuff. So we moved our family up to stay college Pennsylvania. What a big difference out of what a big difference that was. But the great thing about state college is it's small town but it's got a lot of upside in terms of things going on because of the university. So there's a lot more than a normal, you know, thirty six thousand, you know, person kind of population area. Right. So that was a great place to raise our kids actually, you know, safe and and who did you get involved with naps right away when you move that not right away. No, no. So I was doing consulting work, you know, on my own, starting to work with sea level executives, starting to do executive coaching and basically helping businesses solve business problems. Then got involved with advisory Boards of pence, date and and was doing that. And it was actually when I was working with one of my clients and executive coaching. He's saying bright, you know, we got to find some elite talent, we gotta, you know, elite talent. I started, you know, elite talent. Well, where do you find elite talent? Where do you find elite performer? Mean? What does that mean? Right, and what does that mean? Is this world, right, in the business world? But I just started thinking about performance. Well, who are elite performers? Athletes? Right? So then, you know, I'm watching college football and football fan and I'm watching a Penn state game and I just asked myself a question. I said, you know, to these guys, even get any college credit for what they're doing? Working fifty hours a week in season? Yeah, performing in front of millions of people, hundred thousand people on Saturdays, learning new game plans every week, traveling. Do they get any college credit for this? No, they might get one credit for FIZZ head. And I'm like that's strange, because here I am studying industrial engineering, which is not near, in my view, nearly is challenging is what those guys are doing on the football field. Well, those guys are doing that on a football field and, like you said, Rassak is studying in exactly as well, exact so it's it. You you're not just playing for you don't go there just to play football. Now, that maybe depends on places, right, but in school. But I know a pain state and Joe PA Turner was big on making sure the exactly last you graduated exactly and it was all about, you know, life after the game. So I said, well, you know what, I should started thinking about competencies that football players have that I hypothesize that they would have. Again, I watched a lot of high school football practice when I was a kid, right, and I hired two PhDs from from Penn State's College of Education who happened to be high school football coaches. Believe it or not. One was a PhD and instructional design, another one was an adult education and they're from Scranton area. So PhD Football Coach Penn State or Scranton, like, what are the odds of that? Right? So then we got together order the school, by the way, yeah, yeah, and we and we literally mapped football competencies to Mit Sloan schools for capabilities leadership model and found out there's about a seventy percent overlap, because you've seen the matrix of skills and knowledge competencies that football players have...

...or can have and that businesses use to perform, essentially right, and that's how this whole thing got started. I said, wow, that's amazing. Now that it is amazing because when you talk to some of these companies, they want to look for peak performers. Right, who's gonna help them grow their business? Who the best minds coming out right? Well, you know they're going to look at those people that come out of college just in that industry, just a net spot. But the problem, and when I talk to somebody from Microsoft about this, is that they created a leak program where they were getting all the top recruits for for for computer. What's it called? I can't remember, but they were getting all these top mines from Stanford and MIT and Ye and all this. Right, but they all had the same kind of rails. They were all on the same rails and the same but they had the same perspective. They'd have a big story to tell with that right, the right just what they did for so long and they said we need people with different stories, but then train them to be on this rail. And that's what makes sense to me. Is is with what you're doing with naps is is a lot of these players have been through a lot in their life and they have a lot of stories to tell. Now can we make those players right on this rail to understand how they benefit a company exactly and how can we help them translate these real competencies, these skills and knowledge that they've developed over years and years and years of preparation, practice and performance, because it these it's the ultimate performance enterprise. Is Is Sports SP when you go to the NFL level, the NCAA level, it if there's no performance, there's no anything. So that's what's exciting about this and all of that hard work that went into saying, you know, in Gust's case, you know, starts playing when he's five years old, and all of that hard work and energy that went into that. And then it's some point, not in gusts case, puts take. You know, any kid, there's always an exit ramp. It's just a question of when you hit that exit Ram. So your five years old, your plan, you know, a million kids play high school football, okay, and basically seventy five thou play college football. So there's that exit ramp after High School of nine hundred and twenty five thousand kids that made an investment to put a lot of energy into this sport. How can we tap that, those competencies that they built in reveal those that don't even know they have at that level. So then you go, okay, got all these college players great making this huge commitment. Boom, you got sixteen thousand guys that are draft eligible right when they're seniors, and then three hundred guys get drafted, three hundred fifty guys get drafted. So you got fifteen thousand, seven hundred and fifty guys that are taking that exit ramp that there's a miniscule difference, I would argue, and Gust Gust knows, between okay, you were a high level college player and you made it to the NFL. You've still got these competencies that you worked super hard to develop. How can we tap them to accelerate whatever you do next? And then you get to the NFL. Average, you know, careers, three years, three point three years, the ultimate exit ramp. You're still everyone get asked to leave at some point. And how can we take all of that? You know, those companies have been developed and helped translate those and I think it's right. I think here's a language barrier that it come comes down to it. Every new team I went to her to learn a different language, basically, or or an offense, yes, but it was that specific coaches mind I had to figure out right. So if you think about the exit ramp strategy, we get off of the sports train that we've been on, we get off the extra ramp. But then it's like if you go to a foreign country, you get off the Xtra, have a nobody speaks the language or speaking. You're like, okay, I'm lost. I don't even know exactly. And so most of us just don't go that route right because we don't have that knowledge of how do we transfer our skills into a new language that people understand. But I could figure it out. You just don't know. You can figure it out exactly exactly in and some guys do take advantage of going back to business school and and right trying to learn those skills and that language. But I think what's great about what Brad does and NAPSA is he saying, we can give you those skills. It doesn't have to be that long. You guys have already worked years and years and what you love to do. Let's help you transfer skills and as fast as possible, so you get out back in the business world exactly in it. And it's really we don't take the approach that we come in...

...and drop, you know, business competencies on their head from business perspective. We reveal business competencies from a football perspective. So we're working in the authentic space where they have experience and then we bridge that over and show how it relates in the business room. A couple couples and and gus is a great example of this too. So in football you're in the film room. You know, what are you doing, and I ask this to NFL former NFL What you you know? What are you looking for? And the sort of talk about it and I said, well, you know, what you're doing. When we call that in business is pattern recognition. You're looking for patterns, if you're an offense player in the defense, whether it's numbers on the field, whether it's a formation, you know, whatever it is. Okay, so you got that going on. Okay, now I think it's going to be a run. Then what are you thinking? Okay, you're thinking tendencies. Well, what's a tendency? It's a probability. It's unexpected values, just a probability of something happening. That's what a tendency is. And then you start thinking, okay, we think it's going to be a run. What could happen? You're running through a we call that scenario planning in business. Oh, call that scenario planning. Then the whole communication thing, both on the field and off the feel when you're on the sidelines, you're communicating with your coaches, with your teammates, with above, you're looking at data, you're looking at pictures, you know, you're you doing sense making, you're doing you know, it's situational awareness. So all these things that these guys have been doing their whole lives, if we can tap that, we can accelerate their advancement, whether it's in a current job, and our success, I mean is blow me away, beyond my expectations in terms of what guys are doing a year later. You know, they're going back to school to finish their college degree, they're moving to a new city to take on a new challenge, they're getting a promotion, all these kinds of things. And if we can just position ourselves in each one of those exit ramps and say hey, go through here first. You may want to go to Grad School, Great. You may not want to go to Grad School, you may want to go into this field, you may not want to go to that field, whatever, but let's just, you know, reveal what you already have, because you put so much hard work into it at a very, very high level. It's most likely there. You just have to tap it. Yeah, reveal it, reveal it and help develop it. Well, for me it's like when started with Roberto, the APP Company, the first time I had it put, you know, a powerpoint together and then go out and present it. I was super nervous right and then, if I would have had this information in my head saying, Oh, this was just like you game planning all week and then going out and playing in a game, well, it would have been the same thing. Right, example, that you wander, but you're not doing a layer of seventyzero. People like exactly thinking that in your head. I just I just played in front of Seventyzero people in National TV, in front of millions, but like giving a powerpoint presentation, you felt uneasy, which, to the other sider, Macho. How could you feel nervous about that? You know well, but you're also understanding that you're part of a team, right, and you're trying to in the NFL you're trying to win a game, but there you're trying to win business, right, right, so if you don't win that business, you lost, right, and that's why they said don't get so down if people tell you know exactly thing. In the NFL you have to you have to have a short memory and you have to be able to move on. Yep, Yep, absolutely. And and you know, one of my favorite quotes to is, you know, our greatest glory is not never falling, but in rising every time we fall. Right, Confucius. And you learn that and that's resilience. You learn that in football, you learn that in business. Goes back to that creativity thing and like hey, let's not fear failure, let's, you know, learn a little bit and move on. I think it comes for a lot from what we talked about the time, Dave, is when we're kids, we have no parents, oh rests, nobody around up to you get down right, you get knocked down. Sarah Misky talked about that. You get a big punch in the gut and you got to get up. You just got to get up. That's how it is. You Get up, you know, everybody's all your friends around, to your peers around. You just get up and keep playing or exactly come back in whatever it is. And I want to pick up. You know, something you said to gus was, you know, when you're doing that power point, it's like if I have a big, you know, Evan Presentation, whatever, do the same thing that you probably did in football was visualize. You know, I'd visualize, okay, how is this going to work? How is this going to go? What's going to happen? And just get used to that visualization before it actually happens. And and I'll say one thing, when I first met gus in this plane, the quarterback position actually from a business perspective. Come back to that perspective piece. Like we're going through some stuff with gus about our business plan with naps...

...and what we're doing and and it's all good. And then, and then Gust says, you know, well, you know, how I see this is a little bit differently, and so he paints a picture that was much broader in perspective than sort of my perspective, which had been more, I guess, business train, like sales channels and distribution channels and things like that. So guss was looking at it from a quarterbacks perspective. He was looking at the whole field, the whole field, like yeah, that's huge to have that perspective of looking at a broader set of issues and challenges. So that's something that a an elite athlete can bring to an enterprise which is like super valuable. And you don't have Michael Strahan blindsiding you right like gonna kill it, like to kill you. Going back to your point, like how could I be nervous about a powerpoint? And you know, I was nervous in front of Seventyzero. Yeah, but I also was built up and brought up right high school, College, playing it for more and more people like you just get used to it. Right, first time I did a powerpoint, I've never done that before. I never created an one. I had no idea the expectations of the audience and there's so many things that were unknown to me, and that's what makes people nervous, when things are unknown. Right, you know, absolutely. That was yes. Fear was hard for me to get over and it took me a long time. And then now it's like, okay, make one. I don't really like power points because I think they're kind of boring, but right, you know, but that everybody uses them, you know, and that's part of business world, Yep, but that's part of so tell us what naps a means and and then kind of a can you explain it for us? Yeah, yeah, just it's national athletic and Professional Success Academy. So it's our our basic belief is that elite athlete have these hidden competencies that they don't even know that they have and if we can help reveal those develop them a bit, will help them either accelerate their career or really kick off their career, basically, and it leverages all their sports experience in their new venture, whether it's business, it's not for profit or whatever it is. So we built basically on that, that mapping that I talked about, with this big grid. We built five competency modules, performance driven leadership, high performing teams, effective communication, strategic execution and basic business and financial acumen. By the way, those are the five things I'm asked about all the time. And Business as a consultant, as an advisor. Those are the things that people need help with. Yeah, and those are the things that athletes have a heck of a lot of experience dealing with and they don't even know it. And that's that's what we're doing. Real Sero, is it? You guys have a website to people can go check you out on. Yeah, we have a we have a website. It's www naps academy dot org. So we have that. It's high level, but we've got great testimonials in there. We've worked with already twenty fourmer NFL players, former college players, and it's just been, it's been the most rewarding part of my career ever by far to have this type of impact on people that in you know, working with this cohort of people, as we'd say, this population of people. It's it's so rewarding because they're so engaged. I mean they're so used to working at an elite level and it's great to work with people in an elite level. That's what I like to do. Right. And so then, are you what we're doing? Taking like, let's say somebody goes through program right, help them find where they might fit in well, whether it's business, politics or something else. Yes, will help them understand what they might be good at. Will we play? We don't place them. We work with our network, but it's not about US placing them, but it's about helping them understand where the best fit maybe for them. I would say yeah. So, and what's the scenario? Is it like a threeday course is yeah, it's a it's a threeday intensive in residence program. We go from eight in the morning to eight at night. Essentially we have pre work before they arrive. We have them do Myers Briggs personality assessment for now. We have them do a multiple intelligence assessment. We have do some reading, so when they come we already we know from a coaching perspective, kind of what they're until you know what type of intelligence assessment that they liked, how they like to learn, essentially...

...their personality type, those types of things, and then we'll have follow up with them, with them as well, and in our game plan is really to go to NFL cities and really starting in Pittsburgh and take this to where the former players live. We've done it at Penn state, but now we want to take it to the local area and really tie in the high school community as well with high school coaches. Are there? Are there multiple students with and that three day? Yes, it's fifty. We'd like to work between twelve and eighteen people, because in fifteen is really good because the dynamic is it's just so interesting working with with former players. They're used to working in a unit of like fifteen guys, whether it's your offensive unit, your defensive unit. And then we break down during the day. So you sort of go down in your position group. So then we'll have an executive coach work with three to five guys, kind of like your position. How many people are on your team for that? For fifteen person, we've got five people that would be engaged with those fifteen. is how we would do that. Okay, when we do it? Yeah, so it seems like you would need even with fifteen people, you needing? Yeah, group of educators absolute them through that. Absolutely. So we break it down and then the really interesting thing is athletes are used to giving each other feedback. So they're learning from each other, which is which is huge. I've done this before. Yeah, yes, in that so that dynamic and it's been an evolution. And the other thing that sort of blew me away that I didn't really expect was the age group that this appeals to and provides value to. We've worked with twenty four year olds to fifty one year olds with naps right. That's a wide population. It is why up of people in different phases of their life. So that's been an amazing kind of a Ha. Other huge ha ha was the emotional intelligence, the ability of athletes to read body language. Yeah, off the charts, off the charts. Yeah, you know, you kind of know it, right, when I go in a room, who I got to deal with? Yeah, I know, it's you. I mean people that are fun and get what you're saying. It's not that hard. But the ones who are negative, Nancy's, that's who you got to get to. You Really gonna tackle in the and the other thing you know I'm doing tomorrow night actually a graduate seminar Penn State, and one of the things I'm going to talk about is, you know, I personally think, you know what college should be about, in my view, is learning to learn, because the world changes. It's so dynamic. What what what we learned twenty, five, thirty years ago? A lot of it is antiquated. So it's like you know, but if you learn how to learn, then you got a growth mindset and you can learn what you need to learn regardless of the task at hand. Kind of like what you said before. Gust and athletes have learned how to learn. You need to learn a gain new game plan sixteen consecutive weeks, or, you know, sixteen out of seventeen if you're an NFL football player, and then perform it at that level M on Sunday and then sort of start again. Now. You know, you got your base package, of course, but you're installing new stuff all the time. Yeah, and that's learning. It's so you know, if these are these are exceptional people. It's exceptional professional watching film, like you ever watched a movie, but you didn't really watch it. It was just like ours show, or Sofront and we want right. When you're watching film, you don't know, really know what you're learning from it. You're just watching it. You kind of end up watching the game and where the balls going. Instead of looking at trigger points and what's special about why am I watching this third and short what should I be looking for? When you, when you get it, break it down to that, then it becomes very valuable to you. Otherwise, it's like, why am I watching this film? When you hear about guys who don't want film and play a sport because they don't really know how to use it right right. So you have to learn how to use it. It's the same thing. Once you learn how to use it, then it becomes extremely valuable, because watching film is about little tidbits. It's about finding the matchups. You know, who can I go after and all that stuff, and then we in business we call that competitive assessment, competitive intelligence. That's what Guss was doing. Matchups, competitive assessment. We just call it something else in business. And being able to do that learning in that way is in the other thing is being coachable. You know, in business it's more like this today. If if you're even providing contin go back to being kids constructive criticism to someone in the...

...workplace today. Oh, you know you don't like me, or you know you don't like what I'm doing. Where your mean, your mean or what you just don't like what I am you know, whatever in athletes like that has feedback. Give me feedback. What can I do? What can I do better on the next trap? Is You? What? What? Yeah, what can I follow? is here and old maybe's got all the styles you need right now, with up to fifty percent off store wide. Hurry in for the season's biggest trends, like rock star Jeans and Frost Fery Jackets on sale. Jeans started just eighteen bucks for adults, twelve bucks for kids. Plus, get warm and stylish outer where for just eighteen bucks for adults seventeen bucks for kids. Want to save even more? Redeem your super cash now through Sunday. Hurry and now for up to fifty percent off store wide at old maybe and old Maybecom fell a ten, twenty six through eleven three, select styles only do better on the next rat. What can I do better on their next Frat? We found that. So it's it's exciting group of people to work with and it's interesting too that we use the word you know when business say you know, well, I'm going to handle that professionally. Okay, I'm going to handle that professionally. That means something right I'm a professional. Well, what do we call our our quote unquote, pro football players? They're professional football players right there, professionals. They're going to meetings, they're communicating their time on time, and then, and then you start to marry these competencies that I'm talking about, whether you know situational awareness, pack and recognition, accountability, vision, all of those kinds of things, scenario planning, and marry those competencies with the character traits that athletes have. Resilience, gold orientation, competitiveness, toughness, grit, all those character you put those two together, Katie bar the door. It's like what a phenomenal combination, and that's what we're after because we know the group has the you don't get to the NFL, you don't get to college level without those things. Yeah, you got to have a few of those. You got to have a few of those. If you're missing any one of them, it's found out right away, right because we've seen the guys that you watch. You say, Oh, this guy's got to make it's the best athlete I've ever seen, but he doesn't make the team because you're going he's missing something great. A lot of teams love me all right. Yeah, we had another guests before the gonna have a little grit in today's yeah, yeah, but they're if you married. That grit also doesn't just mean that you got it on the field. You got it in the classroom. You got it about being on time, you got it about a lot of things. Right, take care of your locker room. Treat everybody with respect. You know well, you can take criticism without trying to fight. Exactly exactly. Well, we got a couple minutes left. Let's let's right. You know, we'd love to hit you with our last part of the show, where we do this well our guests we call the no huddle. Okay, like talk about and ask you questions and you just fire the answers backspatch can or about all kind of random thing. Okay, so I'll do the best I can right, start us all. All Right, Um, what's your biggest pet? Peeve, the biggest pet people, I think, people living in a box, people not realizing or leveraging all that they can do, because most people can do more than they actually believe they can do, and unfortunately a lot of people live like that. Exactly. This is is thorrow day. Throw said, you know, most men live their lives in quiet desperation. Right. That's a pet peeve, exactly my yeah, and you see that a lot in this country. Yes, and makes you sad. Yeah, okay, if we were going through your phone right and we were flipping through all your people, who would be the most famous person in your phone? Right, most famous is probably Mike Collins. Apollo eleven astronaut, Woh so, pretty good. So he commanded the command Modu when Neil Armstrong and buzz aldren went down to the surface, to the moon. We just had the fifty anniversary of them, right, eleven. So I've worked with Mike on the one thousand nine hundred and eighty eight campaign for President Bush and did some things with him after these sold my Collin's what was your question? You asked him like about his experience. What so interesting, because this was back when we were working on NASA position papers and things like that. And he goes, Brad, well, you know the whole Apollo Eleven. It was the twenty anniversary, then a whole pol he goes it's like the Super Bowl. He was everybody was watching. was like the Super Bowl. It was, and but it was landing on the moon. It was space, you know, but he related it. Here's this astronaut doing something that man kind probably the greatest achievement in history mankind in my view. Right, what's he...

...relating it to? The Super Bowl? Right, that's kind of interesting. Now you've lived in some great and you've currently live in one some great college football environments, Columbus. Yeah, stink the college you're down in Texas. That's for yeah, like, what about? So it's picked between Columbus and State College. Now you currently live in stee college in your State College Grad. So that's yeah, probably wait a question. But how does it comparable to Columbus on Game Day? I I will say this. Game Day in Columbus and we lived in a suburb called Upper Arlington. Crazy. I'd Never Seen College flags out on people's houses before living in Upper Arlington outside Columbus. That was a whole other level. Yeah, they were into it more than the residents of state college really. Yeah, Oh, yeah, that's a yeah, it's a it's, it's it's a Texas is a lot like that. Yeah, it's an experience. Yeah, yeah, the thing I think it's unique about Ohio, it a high to state, is it's the whole state, the whole state. I mean there's other colleges, are sure, right, everything is about Oi, she though. Yeah, and everybody's got it's whether they went there not in it. And it's so interesting because, you know, Columbus is the capital of Ohio. A lot of state government there, but everybody had their buck eyes. I mean they're old flags out and I'm like man, I'm from, you know, Penn State, like wow, these guys are like over the top. Yeah, it was another level. It was another level. Yeah, it really is wool even though Cincinnat or Ohio as Cincinnati and Cleveland for sports towns as well, but it feels like Columbus is is just kind of the center gravity. Yeah, you know, especially the bangles are especially the browns are usually garbage. Yeah, right, right, right. So gravitate. You've done all kind of things in your career where you've been in politics, doing sports, you've been in you know, as far as you know, drug copies helps people understand what's best for them. So you have a good sense of history. I take it it's which places when with one person dead or alive, in going back through history, who would that be? For you? I'd probably say Franklin Roosevelt just to experience kind of what he experience, I mean to come out of the Depression World War II from a wheelchair. I mean it's just incredible what he was able to accomplish. Just like amazing to me put it back on track. So yeah, I mean it's really if we can have a great leader at that time, our country could have went a wrong way. Yeah, yeah, problems. Now from the sports perspective, who would you trade places with for a day? Who would I trade places with for a day? It passed, or either one here, Franko Harris. It's a good one because you got a little unipen state in there. Got Can stay, you got steelers, you got successful business guy, you got cool guy, immaculate exception, top three plays in NFL history, right, yeah, yeah, yeah, exacts going to be in in a big loyal pen stater and very loyal. Yeah, so it's just a super nice man. It's just yeah, I know he's really good guy. Yeah, I hope we get the work. Yeah, yea, peppi's subs Oh, he uns hard ads apy stuff. It's around here. I don't know if it's another place. Me Just Frank. Was it good? I could day. Oh my God, army mess things in football. Yeah, when it was not your visited them at latrow. Yeah, yeah, yeah, captain, I mean in his you know, I got great opportunity to talk to frank. I'll just about his his background and his upbringing. You know, his mother was Italian in Italy, she was a war bride. Comes back over here, stationed in Fort Dicks, you know, with his dad, and it's just an incredible, incredible story, and it really is. It really is. Okay, last one, because I know we gotta go. We got our meeting. Yeah, if you go back and tell young brad about you know, hey, I really need you to focus on this. What would that be? What would that be? That one thing you would tell him? I'd probably say don't worry so much. Don't worry so much. You feel like if you worry, keep yourself in that box a little bit sometimes. Yeah, yeah, it all works out if you just keep working hard. Yeah, and you know, hey, hey, you know the planet's been spinning for thirteen point eight billion years. It's okay, we're a little just...

...relax. I Don's hard to relax, but I try to tell Anne then don't, don't worry as much. Kelly night I try to talk to her about the grand scheme of things. It doesn't owe. Yeah, that reside now. Yeah, but, Brad, we appreciate you getting in a huddle and joining us and learning about naps and your passion in life and all those great transitions you've been through. It's just amazing. Well, thanks for inviting me into the huddle. I mean to be in a huddle with gusts, Farrat and Dave. This is really cool. You know, the other guests you've had on have been been terrific. So thank you very very much. With Bowler and as other wiffle boy, I said we were hitting eight hundred and fifty going in and then he answered yes or yeah. Other thing to ask you ask you guess, like how many of them had paper roots as a kid? Oh, that's it. Yeah, I never had one, but I would. I buddy had one and when he would go out of town or something, you take over, you know. Yeah, yeah, I have to fall outa yeah, yeah, that's a that's a thing, whipping them at the door. Yeah, but hey, we want to thank you for joining us today on huddle up with guests where we talked to a wide range of guests about how supports shaped to life. As always, I'm joined by my great friend and Co host Dave Hagar, and we want you to be able to follow us on all of our social media at huddle up with Guss and we really appreciate you and thank you for your time and listening to our podcast.

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