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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Brad Mitchell

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

He is the Founder and President of NAPSA, The National Athletic and Professional Success Academy, served under George H.W. Bush in the White House Staff, and also teaches as an external faculty member at Penn State’s Smeal College of Business, Brad Mitchell joins the Huddle. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Follows here and old navies got all thestyles. You need right now with up to fifty percent off stor wide hurry infor the season's biggest trends like Rockstar jeans and Frost, Free Jacketson sale, Jean started just eighteen, bucks for adults, twelve bucks for kidsplus get warm and stylish out or weare for just eighteen bucks for adults.Seventeen Bucks for kids want to save even more redeem. Your super cash nowthrough Sunday, hurry and now for up to fifty percent off store wide at oldnavy and old NAVYCOM fell. I ten twenty six or eleven three selecis. Onlywhat's up Dave, I guss Nat'I much so another interesting guest. This theshow question for you Dave. Okay, what doyou think Napsa? The acronym napsa means Andapsa NAP, that it sounds kind of like me on a Saturdayafternoon, nap on Saturday HAP on Saturday yeah.No, I'm going to say that WHA that when you tiht me naps on my text, t thatwhat that means, yeah tap being on Ted APP, and I don't I'm oesleep as I'mtyping Saturday, so it just itjut just stays away. No, but what does NAPSAreally stand for Dave? Well, I'm going to guess that the first LetterisNational Yep, the national and then because we're talking to this person,I'm guessing athletic national, athletic and professional success, Academy, okay, all right, andso what Napsa really does it? It helps athletes. Take their knowledge, a gainfrom playing supports in turn that language they used in sports for allthose years and helps him turn that language into the business world. Sofor me, as a quarterback and I lorked gout to learn how to read defenses, Igot t learn how to read the whole field o got to know when their blits into allthese things. I can they help me turn that language that I use for years and how to be a team leader on thefootball filld and then all of a sudden. How do I take that into the businessworld it when I think there's a lot of athletes that have skill sets from the athletic field that they don't evenknow can be applied to the professional world? It's a matter of happing thosesometimes yeah. They don't know how to do it. They really dont the athletics,our whole life, but really they actually are much deeper, maybe thanthey think they are yeah. When you, when you play at a high level at aprofessional level, there's no class teaching you about business yeah, youhave to go look for that stuff yourself and notmany guys do but anyway back to our guest. He very interesting story worked forGeorge Bush in the White House for years and he started an online drug store. Legal go yeah, so left the Bush white out,yeah went and started formaceutical company, yeah, online, drugstore andthen, and then just you know, went and becameprofessor at Penn State, an the business SGOOL, big pen, Stafian, big,big, Pin, safe fan, great stories too yeah and just just hearing all his transitions that he had in his life and how he feels likeanybody can do this, but he really wanted to take it to the athlete wantedto help those athletes, because he saw penn state a lot of people playingsports of Penn State. Yes, not just the football team. You know hit peoplewould say th, there's a lot of agriculture majors up there and there are there are they do have ahigh, very high graduation? They do they do they're good at a lot of stuff, butthey are, but so so Brad Mitchell is joining us on the show this week. For this thisepisode- and he is Gonta- really explain to us about NAPSA- explain alittle bit about his career, how his love of sports came in to be, and Ithink hit was one of our wifoball guys. He also wis a wofballguy couldn't be a nicer guy and one of those guys that you meet as soon as you meet him. Youknow this guy's. You know why he was so successful right s e one of those guysthat just has it all together right. Great stories join us in welcoming intothe Hutdo Brad Mitchell. Today, in the huddle on nine eleven, wehave another guest Brad Mitchell. Brad is, hopefully I'm gonna be working withBrad a little bit in in what he's doing he's with a group called Napsa he'sfrom Penn State and I'm actually pretty excited to hear a brad story, and if weare going to stay a hundred percent on what we ask every guest, we will start with that. I do want ofirst conment out he's our third...

Harvard graduate well, we've had thissummer. I think through Dotuso. Don't hold that against me, but or your otheror your other two guys. I at some point Ye have to start getting guess thatwere actually are smarter than I feel like I'm getting smarter as a result. Ithink so it's like it's Wais it. Just I don't know we got to start,maybe finding somebody that that didn't graduate from college. Maybe then, whenI went to the University Arizona, it was called the Harvard of the West.That's t by some that's what they said at Arizon, that's what they doel. Well,we write IISH that a so welcome is the Hoddl Brad Mel Brad.Thank you for being with US Great. Thank thanks for having me it's Real,real pleasure and privilege to be with you guys today, yeah, so we you knowour shows great. We get to talk about life and really how sports influenceyour life, and so we always like to start when you were young. You knowwhat was your first memory was that first love o sports, that that wascreated for you right. I think you know. Fortunately, in our neighborhood when Iwas growing up, we had a lot of kids and we had a lot of kids with a wideset of ages, and so we were always playing out in the yard and we alsolived right next to the high school. So we had the high school field, baseballfootball, and so our little neighborhood games would kind ofmigrate over to the big time baseball diamond that the high school use or thefootball field and those kinds of things so as baseball footballbasketball, I'm from upstate New York, where it's really cold in the winterand we'd, be we'd bee playing basketball in November December t whattown wait for with clubs on ceneca falls? New York, skind of call New York,wet beautiful there, which, which is ite sane, because Tommy cocklan jaguarsgiants he's from the neighboring town, Waterloo, New York, again righpopulation, eight thousand eight thousand people. So well, then, thatleavs, that's very small town. What Gosyou know I know what you want to askGOFOR, nor about we're batting about igt. Fifty with this question, did youplay whiffleball as a youth? I played whiffleball. Absolutely. I was actuallygoing to bring that up and the other thing when we were playing all thesebackyard games were very creative and witfleball was one of our most creativegames, because we take a tennis racket in a whiffle Golf Ball. Okay in playbaseball you bat, with the tennis racket, hitting the whiffle Golf Balland basically play baseball, which was a ton of fun, and you know throwingsomebody out with a whiffleball from like seventy five, you know or even fiftyyards right. That's a thrill yeah can nail somebody on the move like that, soyou GT TA major shots with a o tennis racket for Suryeah Yeah. Yes, so thatwas a lot of fun that sounds fun, but, speaking of that like when we were kids,it was like. Okay, we're going to somebody's house, we don't like. Ididn't, have my stuff, so we got to somebody's house. We just find whateversports AF. They had. We just put the game together and Justte. Redidn't care,like it ha to be perfect, exactly didn't have to be perfect. The otherthing that was great about our neighborhood was we had all thesedifferent ages. So we had big kids that were fifteen sixteen and little kids,eight ten, but we all played right yeah together, yeah, it's like the big kids.Didn't you know little kid, you go away. You know this is just for the big kidsit was. We were all kind of playing together, which was a lot of fun.Everyone found a role where was hey, you know, go play left field orwhatever it was, but you're still playing with this with this group ofpeople. So what do you think eal the BI lessons you learn? Wer You learne fromplaying in a group of kids like that, without coaches without parents, youknow anybody to really wreath what you're doing right. I think a lot of itis it's sort of like you know you accountability to yourself. How do youhave this work, so everybody can benefit from it. Everybody's fairpeople trusted each other. You know if you get called out, you know you're outkind of a thing, so not having that parental. I mean, I don't rememberparents ever being around doing any of this stuff. AENTS were glad people youguys ere out of play, yeah exactly E. exactly you know what you bring up aninteresting point, because I think so many people ar age and older have suchan issue with with instant replay, but I don't think that the youngergeneration really has an issue with it. You know what I mean right. I reallybelieve, because we did that, like you were just out and if you areget it, youargued it and usually the bigger guy won and just we just moved on like itwasn't a big deal well, its the also, if you're using a lawn chair as thestrikes in if it hits a LAWNC chair, it's a straike right. That's your INSERreplay yeah! I matter I fits ad up. Perand came down yeah right right,right, yeah!...

It comes back to this creativity thingtoo. We were so creative. So, as I mentioned, we lived next to the highschool, so we had a regular baseball diamond there and there was a you know: backwall back fence behindhome play right. So there was a wall like chicken wire fence right, butthere was a wallback there to protect foule balls, the houses right behind itright. So what did we do? As kids? We turned the field around second basebecame home played, and now we had a home run wall yeah yeah. So the wholeidea is to hit over the wall over the road yeah in those people's houses. That's vitalWan wa o you need a and this, and that was- and that was baseball that washardball. Oh Wow, okay, so we're playing hardball turn the field aroundsecond base be comes home and it was like so cool, so it was always beingcreative playing. You know: Fumbly bumbly football, all these games, wejust make up. No one said Hey, you know we didn't have the Internet, you know,try this game or try. That game was just like hey, let's figure out whatworm yeah you didn't have that to go to like now, when I'm doing my yard, I'mtyping in on the Internet yeah best way to create NRI'm, watching like twentyyoutub videos from people that aren't even in the same area, yeah Andand you can you don come back tothese lessons to, I think back then, to there wasn't this this this aspirationfor perfection that everything had to be perfect. Everything didn't have tobe perfect right. So your whole sense of fear of failure was so much less in today's world.Everything has to be just so. It's just perfect. You know w the media. Ifsomeone does some little thing wrong, it blows up on Social Medias, make abig big deal out of it, and so that I think, makes people risk averse. Theyfear this more than they. You know more than we did say you know growing up,because nothing was perfect and we were exp free to experiment free to becreative, free to fail and try something else. So if you failed, itwasn't then posted on the right yeah yeah I mean if you go back, even if youlook at like just clothing of athletes and what they're wearing it's like, ithas to be perfect. It have yea. This has to be that. But you go back andwatch like the old steelers like there's jhust tape. Fane off there areevery massive amount of tapes. I like the worst shoes you coan ever wear. Youknow I mean like now- Oh God forbid, that would ever happen. Anybody wouldnot be cut dead, gone to field and en the NFL says what you can't wear thatyou can't look like that. You can't do that now, which is crazy to me EAH.It's like I'm playing. I should be able to do what I want to do well now likewhen the when the it's Offen, the quarterback and dresses the press, thepress conference, it's a whole outfit. You know Ye, it's like a it's allsynchronize through it for whatever. Well. But U occasion isn't it's, butyou can't like it's just crazy to me that the NFL has said, like you can'twear that hat because it has a logo audit right it. I has to be NFL fromthis time before you get in the stadium until this time Youn Ye leave, which itis what it is. That's who we work for, but it's changed a lot right. It'schanged a lot so when what like high school did you go to? Wheredid you write go from youth? Was it your local high school? So you you saidyou grew up by it, so you didn't go very far. Yeah exactly didn't go veryfar and but always love sports and I played allthe sports, but I wasn't a great athlete by any stretch, but on my way home from school, I wouldcut through the high school field and the Varsy football team was practicingthere and that's what I would do on the afternoons for two hours, even before Igot to my house, was watch divarsity football practice and watched thecoaches and what they did, how they interacted with the players- and I wasjust fascinated with with the plays the strategy and how it all worked. You know in junior league football Iplayed quarterback, but then I didn't grow and become big enough to be safeto play. So I really started to follow football in that way and at the sametime, huge Penn state fan not only pen stat football fan but fan of of PennState University. My Dad went there. My two uncles went there and then I reallystarted following college football and started going to games at Penn State.When I was eight years old- and you know one of the first games I everwent to Lidel Mitchell was playing right. Franco Harris was playing, JackHam was playing yeah and back in those days being from a small town. Thislittle small town, we didn't have a hometown team, so my hometown teambecame where those Penn staters went yeah I became a steelers fan because ofFranko Harrison. Jack Ham was that kind...

...of Syracuse country, it's very muchsyracuse country, so that was a huge rivalry back in the day was penn stateversus Syracuse, and that was the game that we went to every year home andaway at Syracuse and at Penn state CENECAIS. That called I ty right it.Ninety Nine D, Ninety to yea up North Yep Yep, it's right between SyrausonRochester off the through way. So what would hat? Take you to get to PennState Fovo, yeah, four hours, yeah exactlt further than here yep littlefurther in here. So what was your? First Year you went to Pennsa. I wentto Penn stage as a freshman in one thousand nine hundred and eighty firsttime I stepped on the campus. I was four years old, one housand ninehundren and sixty six and you know started going to started goingto game one thousand nine hundred and seventy. So I was at pen state during agreat time. Football lies certainly one o our first nationall champion, so onethousand nine hundred and eighty two and had terrific team every year. I wasthere. Actually, I think ight pen state lost two games in four years, somethinglike that. So yeah, just an incredible time for pencstate football, my cousinMitch actually played for pensate back. Then I remember Mitch was there forthree years, I think before he got kicked out Mitchels a wild one. He was a wild manon any team. He we ever played on man he's missed, but he had a goodexperience and I'm with you, I used to go to Penn state. When I was a kid allthe time and go watch him play yeah and sitting into student section. Throwmarshmallows was a pretty cool experience. Yeah Yeah! It was, it wasexciting, it was. It was interesting. First Time, pen had ever had a game under thelights was against Nebraska in one thousand, nine hundred and eighty twopen state went on to win the national championship that year, but I think wasABC sports. Of course, then beaver stadium didn't have lights, so thenetwork brought in temporary lights and set them up for the game. So you canimagine at Abot Tos prob what what it was like on campus for the first nightgame. It was actually one of those split Games. I think it started atthree nthirty yeah, so it started in daylight, but ended at night and PENCstate pulled out a win in the last minute and a half, so it was what is itlike? Really exciting? I've been there. I don't know if you'veever been up there for till gating yeah. Well, my my memory is not as funbecause as in Arizona Grad, we opened against Penn State and in ninety eightI was at ninety nine. I was at that game and we were number four coming in.I was at that game. Little too sure of ourselves and at it was about twentyGht, nothing and half time probably- and I think forty re three maybe was afinal, but it was like twenty one, nothing after like seven minutes andthen you has the game yeah and it was, and we stayed in out to t we weregoving in DC at the time. Okayship is went to Ouva drove up and went and wewere super cocky for whatever reason, I'm not sure why- and we were remindedof that as soon as it was. What, when you have your ufag year on, there wasonly about thirty uafans total in the whole place and weere some of them iswere we got ugly because we were talking a lot of stuff before the gameand it ended so badly what it would a tail getting experience.What I game, atmosphere, thet yeah, that's that's the thing to me is: I canremember that the till gating experience and then walking to theGames and you're just there's so many rvs like there and then every so manybig colleges have that same experience. It's amazing. But then you go to theNFL Games and see the teilgate T's, a big difference between collegetolgating and Professional, big difference N. and what was the placethat when you were student? Where would you go after the game? Where was thatthe hangout that everybody went to an Penn State? Well, the hangout? Most ofthe time that I went to it was interesting whether it was in my dorm to study,okay, believe it or not wat hall or Hamton all on campus. So that wastypical for me, gus, probably a typical of a pen state student, I wouldprobably say right: Cams are producer cane where'd. You go yeah yeah whered. You hang out Soh yeah, Yep, yeah so and ten to Ben to thescaller. Could you fit a hundred thousand people in there? The otherplace the other place to go? Is this place called the Lions Den, which was a pretty cool place that andI'm not sure if it's still there or not US call yeah the dead, the Lin sendyeah. The other pencn experience I had was growing up in Arizona in eighty sixwent to a yeah that was phenomen. Oh yeah, I brother went an stat also so,okay, it Waswas. He and I sitting there. I was younger. He was out of college atthat point, but that was I was an amazing game that was an amazing game.What's interesting, too I'd gone to...

Penn State played for the nationalchampionship the year Beore, one thousand nine hundred and eighty fiveagainst Oklahoma in the orange bowl yeah went down to that game. ShaneConlin played a phenomenal game right and we lost pen, state lost and thencame back the next year in one against Miami o course, and I was Ointempe yeahit was. You know it's Funny Abou that whet. Ijust found out so my daughter's in high school right now, but her boyfriendchippy. We call him SMOM's cousin is John Shaeffer, so that was always ohreally yeah, so it just grat down that out. Yeah Yep Yeph we quarterback toboth those teams yeah, so we're going to have Shane on it. Some point two: Ohyeah. He lives here in Pittsburgh and he'll he'll be able to tell some reallygood stories. If e can remember them all yeah. I give a lot of stuff on the golfcourse yeah yeah. He remembers my cousin Mitch and you know you played inthe League. You kind of have some connections he's a really good guy yeahand you know what a story he has going: Thebills going to super bowls and doing all that stuff. He just pen tat in JoePaterno recruiting him. You know he was not that big, a kid in theire when he was in high school and hebecame a lot bigger and yea. It has a tendency to do thats a lot right right right, tru, intrificgame, you'R,a pensy you're in engineering. You said Yep studied en er study engineering.What did you do after Pensi Yeah? Did you gant to get your masters or Iworked first, I did a couple of things. I work for IBM just just as a coopstudent at IBM and to the nutonal engering. Then I ran assembly linesactually for General Motors in Rochester New York oand. I had fortythree union employees, you know working on our assembly lines, N and Wote. Weildn they were. We actually made electric engine cooling units, believeit or not. So the fan the fan motor, the shroud all that injection stuff andwe so we made them for every model. GM had and shipped them out on rail cars,toall the tall, the car plants and then I went to graduate school. So then Iwent to graduate school and did that for two years and studied business,government, public policy and started doing consulting and and those kinds ofso so like how old would you have been when you were running the the assembly line at Twenty One? Well Imean I'm just thinking like you, forty three ipoys under you yeph that must have been an interestingdynam. That's a great you migtsen, the only one at didn't smoke, that's IGHTIT's a whole different culture.It's a whole different society really inside a plant. But that's a good point and I rememberearly one of my mentors on the plant said to me. She said Brad, you win withpeople, you win with people. You got to defendyour people, you got ta look out for them, you gotta make sure you holdtheir best interests and I thought that was a great little Kolonel having to do with leadership win with people and that's reallyaffected my life since all these different things that have done well, Icoan tell you from all the coaches that I've had in my career, the ones I respect the most are theones who cared the most and it wasn't about. It was always comesdown the winds in the NFL yeah, but it was. You were more than that to them athey just didn't belottle you, because you had a bad game or you know they tryto help. You learn from it, and if you can do that, no matter what businessyou're in, I think it's a plus, and it takes you a lot a lot further than youwould by just denegrating somebody. It absolutely does and there's a greatbook I'll recommend to you guys too. It's called the Culture Code. I don'tknow if you've read it or heard about it, but that's what that book is about and the word culture actually the Latinroot of that word. Cult means to care. That's what culture really is to care,just like you said Gus to care about others in leadership and empathy in thosekinds of things, whether you're in the NFL running a startup or Fortun fivehundred company. It all comes down to the people at the end of the day. Rightso right. So you you go to Grad School Yep go to Grad School. You went to where'd, you go for Hart, HarvardUnivers Harvard left Harvard Yep! You did you that when you got it, you gotinto polifix got into politics. I moved to Washington DC lived in ArlingtonVirginia Wow, and I joined the George Bush for President Campaign in onethousand nine hundred and eighty eight George Herbert Walker Bush, forty onewho was currently vice president and...

...best great grate experience working onthat on that campaign and learned so much met wonderful peopleand how that ties sort of back into sports. To what was great about thatexperience was having done consulting and been working was there was a binary result? You had thisteam, you had this cause and everybody was in it we're all working for thesame objective right to min on you know in November and then November- and youknow, if you wonder, you lost right. Tete was a binary thing. It wasn't likethis dragging out type of a thing. So, okay, we win or lose, and then I gottapped to head up the presidential transition for NASA the SpaceAdministration, which was you know, Fourteen Billion DollarBudget, twenty two thousand employees- I was twenty six come back to winning with people, getall these applications of all these extraordinarily qualified people toserve on our transition team, which I was a leader of right to get all theseresumes. This one guy comes in West poiner, Stamford Business School S, Ova Companye's in his earlys. He happened to be b between CEO GIGS and he wanted to learn about public policy andgovernment and mood check it out. So I hired him as my top guy, and I learnedmore from that guy about business and leadership and Allit was justincredible. So that was a that was a great experience and really thinginteresting thing about a presidential transition. Is You have to start from zero? Do astartup staff UB, deliver the product and then ram down all in ten or elevenweeks which which is crazy, which is crazy. Well, how is Glish as a person?I've always heard really good things. Like Tremeno ulture thing tramendous agentleman I mean so many stories about him and about howhe treated me extraordinarily well. As a junior staffer, I worked in the WestWing in the White House. I was the youngest person there by far and one ofthe first Saturdays were there I'm working on a Saturday afternoon, an inmy office and the president's personal assistant comes around and says: Heythe the family showing a film down in the Family Theater. Would you like tojoin them? I'm like so I look at this inbox of allthis stuff. I'm supposed to do that's why I was there Saturday, but or youknow, in box or a movie with the leader of the free world and his family, so Isaidher I'm there right who'd you sit by so I don't even remember who I sat bythere were five or seven of us. The president was in there were these hugehuge chairs yeah like super cumbent. I've been in there if you've been inthere. So you know those chairs right, gus. These huge chairs supercomfortable, and there were only like five. Mrs Bush was there the president,their dog a couple other staffers, so that was really cool. I've had somepretty cool tours when I played for the red, Kins Yeah and you go in and yeahsee some of the back backroum stuff. It's just an amazing. You know what ittakes, how many people work there, the chefs and you know finding out whatwhat the new president likes to eat in creating those recipes for him, Oh yeahand then the bowling alleys and the bowling yep do all that stuff, so yepYep. I think what it was interesting. What you said is culture right and youtalked about the new Venteou like the stories about President Bush were amazing about howwe treated people and all that and and the then we see the culture today andhow devisive it is and what's going on in politics today, I bet you're, prettyglad you're not in it today, I'm very glad it's a totally different worldtotally different word. What do you think President Bush would say about it? I I'm not really sure, but President Bushwas all about relationships, building relationship with people,whether they were the people that worked on the staff at the White Houseworked in the kitchen worked on his staff, Wer,the National Security Advisor. He treated everybody the same way and thatwent for international leaders as well, so he's a very relationship drivenperson and what we have now, I think in politics generally, and certainly theWhite House specifically, is a very transactional orientation. Everythingis zero sum everything is win, loseeverything is transactional. What's this transactional in the short term,they don't think Ilwhat are the longer...

...term impacts or consequences of actions.Today that could affect things in the future and he was a very long termrelationship driven. I think that's one observation he would say, and the myfavorite quote, the President Bush used to say to US- and you know publicly very very frequently- was anydefinition of a successful life must include serving others and that's whathe was about and I had a great front row seat to see. Probably you know thegreatest leader that believed and then did all that stuff, and you know in ourfirst jobs, whatever it is playing in the NFL whatever we do, we're reallywe're really trying to learn and understand how to be a professional howto act. So I had the great good fortune to watch how heconducted himself and acted, and that was a great example that I've you knowtried I to in the Bush family, ars, they're sports fans. Right absolutelyabsolutely is o. You have a memory of him like, like, oh my gosh, an a gamewith him or anything that he was really. He was a great athlete first basementat Yale. Extraordinarily Competitive Guy played tennis at a high level, and I remember right. This isinteresting because this ties in George W Bush during the etyegt campaign,George W Bush was an advisor and Wewere riding up the elevator one day he and I and and Bush said to me- you see that Texas game over theweekend so is big, Big University of Texas Fan, so they they followedcollege football. They followed pro football. Of course, George. W becomesan owner of the Rangers, but sports was was, was really important to the bushes an and that really camefrom President Bush's forty ones. You know mother, yeah, very competitive,Golfer, competitive tennis player, so yeah. I always think it. Sports is abig part of the bushes for sure it's hard not to get emotional. When you seeGeorge W throughout the first pitch in the world series right after Nineelevenexstrike he's got. Oh, my godhe's got the little to pressure yeanails thatit's the best Eing Yo'll ever son right and withot pressure on him, and everyou know in New York yeah I mean crazy, yeah, yeah, yeah, and just thinkingabout that today it does. It is emotional, a what of our countriesgoing through an and what it means to have a leader who wants to be out there.Hey, you know, wasn't always come out right, but you could tell that he caredright and there was a passion and a deeper thinking than you know that wenton about our country. Exactly exactly O. You got to me Reagan. Also. I never metreganay. Unfortunately, I' met Clinton. I met Presient Clinton a few timesactually, but I never met Reagan. Unfortunately, what have like presentClinton is pretty impressive when you meet him personally, like there's somelike it's hard, not to well said you know us. I got a little anecdote onthat. If you guys want to hear it so love it so Bill Clinton came in, wewere announcing at the President State of the Union address national educationgoals, so education goals are really a state driven. You know, activity andfederal government supports that, so the state of the Union President Clinn who's, then Governo ofArkansas, was going to be up in the box at the at the the state of the Union.Present was going to acknowledge these state goals and present Clinton. SoClinton comes into our office for premeeting before the event yeah, sohe's in there and meeting with my boss, and so BillClinton comes out and Carol Campbell comes out. Carroll Campbell was thegovernor of the Republican Governor of South Carolina and Bill Clinton was theDemocratic governor of Arkansas, so they both come out of the office billCampbell walks by me. Carroll Campbell, sorry, walk by me, doesn't say anythingBill Clinton. On the other hand, I'm walking by stops looks me right in theeyes holds out his hand, says hi, I'm Bill Clinton. What's your name and just startstalking to me in the West wing of President Bush's White House right like the guy, could engage as you asas youjust a I mean I mean like we mightbe unbelievable. We met him a couple timesmy wife and I, and just he does he looks you and the Iy. Youknow it's something that just it just grabs you and yeah it's and it feelsthere's no you're right, I'm wrong. You KDOW' meanit was just like I'm billits. Yes to meet you yeah yeah it was it was. Hewas like that so yeah it. It was pretty interesting and I'm not sure I think hewas a sports fan. I think if, if you're...

...the president, an you're in DC becomelike a sports fan with the all T, the coverage that goes on and right right,Whit all the teams they have there. Now it's just been it's pretty interesting.So then, all right so you' running all this stuff in politics. What was thepoint where you got out right? So we went through that cycle. Twice twobudgets to you know to everything and in that Inter um got married and wemoved to Houston, Texas right, so move to Houston, Texas were excited about living in Texas andstarted working in Texas and Worke for a little known company at that timecalled Enron in one thousand, nine hundred and ninety one right. I wound up leaving Enron, an in onethousad, nine hundred and ninety five in and moving to Ohio. But that'sthat's. When W we lived in Texas, we met a lot of great people in Texas andAustin and University of Texas and all that all that sort of stuff. But thenour company bought a company in Columbus Ohio and I went up tolintegrate that into into Enron, and then I left Enron anbasically started. My first, you know startup what was your first Starto inColumbus, the first wit, the very first one. It was called easy breathe, whichwas a firm that we back it's hard to.Imagine now like before the Internet, but it was back. Then it was verydifficult to get products and supplies to help people with allergies, yeahbelieve it or not. They weren't available like in the drug store theWalmart or whatever. So there were all these specialty stores, so we createdan online catalogue to provide that and we distributed it through allergisoffice, elergis offices and that then, when the com started, going a firm called drug, andporniumcom,Greati Wul. Remember that one down in DC. That's when I first saw drug druganporium right down in the DC area. They that bought easy breathe and Istarted working for drug an PORAMCOM and then transition back to Washington DC andstarted a company called chain drug store, dotnet, and that was inAlexander Virginia. So when you think back to when you were in college yeahat Penn State and then o fast, like any idea that you said I'm going to be inlike the drug business like selling drugs to help with allergy after beingon the president's Staf, yeah right right right right, well, that over yeahthat just opened my eyes to a lot of different things, and I think that iskind of part of my perspective that and itreally plays into Napsa Gus to and what we're doing now, I'm so excited aboutit is, I think you know people kind of almost they get in a box orthey put themselves in a box in many ways. Well, I didn't major that Majorin,that in college or what you know, I'm doing industrial engineering- I didn'tknow anything about politics or ponering, but policy at that time orstarting a company or anything. But if you have like sort of thisgrowth mindset, that's so critical to do that. You can kind of redefine how you can kind ofride the waves and do different things. So No, I didn't really imagine that when I wasin when I was in college right, so one of the one of the great things aboutthe showis that we really try to reach those transition points for all ourcasts. You because there are so many look. How many you had right and you're,not even done with your story. Yet right and Davand. I've had a bunch and-and we all go through these transitions and one of the things we want to reallyemphasize the kids. Is that there's a point to where you start to grow yourfoundation and supports, helps with that and it helps with thesocialization the communication, how to relate to other people all those typesof things, and then it helps. You say you know hey. I know a good team from abad team and I want to maybe move on or not move on. You even spoke about thatwhen you first were went with the bushes and what a team feeling it wasexactly exactly and it- and you know when you're in a good environment, yeahteam, wise and when you're in a bad one yeah usually doesn't take long. You know itiand it ot been in toxic, like the environments to my wife's in that kindof situation. Now, where her team is just she frags about them, talks aboutshe loves them, but the work, it's not necessarily, maybe the word sheultimately wants to do. But it's really hard and they're dealing with peoplewith a lot of issues, but she because the team is so good and she loves thepeople she's with nerall strong. She makes a lot easier and jed loves goingto work every day. Just for that reason yeah, you know if it was opposite likeif she loved like the population, but...

...everybody around her was terrible. ITD,probably be a lot hard to deal with right. You know, and I've been on teamslike that everything. For me, good teams, I've been on start in theLocker Room Yep. You know and the people get along, we work together asone and you know we see it all the time from here from being in Pittsburgh,that when thei lock rooms divided, it makes it hard to win exactly exactlyand I'm sure you've seen that Oyouso. You leave DC right you're in DC nowcoming from Ohio, Texas right after DC, where you go so went to State CollegePennsylvania. After twenty years move, I got involved a lot of advisory boardsat Penn. State got more involved with th university and my kids weren't inage, and we were living in Alexandria right down. Mout Vernon, actually beautiful, yeahright on the Potomac River Jergeton lives down there, yeah yeah I', see I'd,see him at the grocery store from from the Tigar Yeah Tnat, not what I saw but yeah. So so we lived down there and my kids were at that time. Ten and six so in the traffic and old tim was getting and my inlaws had retired to stakecollege. So we go to football games every week andwe said hey well why we just stick around here. We sold chain drug store,DOTNAT that that start up pharmaceucal STU, so we moved our family up to StateCollege Pennsylvania and what a big difference eet, what a big differencethat was. But the great thing about to take college is it's small town, but it's got a lot ofupside in terms of things going on because of the university. So there's alot more than a normal. You know. Thirty, six thousand, you know personkind of population area, so that was a great place to raise ourkids. Actually, you know safe a and who did you get invived with Napsa rightaway when you move at not right away? No, no! So I was doing consulting work.You know on my own starting to work with sea level executives starting todo executive, coaching and basically helping businesses solve businessproblems. They got involved with advisory boardsat Penc date and and was doing that and it was actually when I was working with one of myclients in Executive, coaching he's saying Brad. You know we got to findsome elite talent. We got a you know, elite talent. Let start you know e leaktalent. Well, where do you find eleat talent? Where do you find a LEperformer mean? What does that mean right? And what does that mean? BUSIthiss world right in the business world, but I just started thinking aboutperformance well, who are elite? Performers athletes right, so then you know I'm watching college football andfootball fan and I'm watching a Penn state game, and I just asked myself a question. Isaid you know: Do these guys even get any collegecredit for what they're doing working fifty hours a week in season yeah performing in front ofmillions of people hundred thousand people on Saturdays Learning, new gameplans every week traveling. Do they get any college credit for this? No, they might get one credit for Tishead and I'm like that's strange, because here I amstudying industrial engineering, which is not near in my view. Nearly aschallenging is what those guys are doing on the football field. Well,those guys are doing that on a football field and, like you said, Raseck isstudying an takseting as well exat. So it's it you're, not just playing for you, don'tgo there just to play football now that maybe depends on places right, but inthe school. But I know at pen, state and Joe Paturna was big on making surethose exactly class ye graduated exactly and it was all about. You knowlife after the game, so I said well, you know what I just started, thinkingabout competencies, that football players have that I have hypothesizedthat they would have again. I watched a lot of high school football practicewhen I was a kid right and I hired two PhDs from from Penn State's College ofEducation who happened to be high school football coaches. Believe it ornot, one WAN is a PhD in instructional design. Another one was in adulteducation and theyre from Scranton area, so PhD football, coach, Penn statersgrant like what are the odds of that right. So then we got together, wortero the School Butt Yeah, yes, and we and we literally mapped footballcompetencies. Two MIT sloane schools for capabilities leadership model and found out there's about a seventypercent overlap and because you've seen the matrix of...

...skills, an knowledge competices thatfootball players have or can have and that businesses use to perform essentiallygand. That's how this whole thing got started. I said wow, that's amazing!Now Tha! It is amazing, because when you talk to some of these companies,they want to look for peak performers right who's, Goinna help them growtheir business whov the best minds coming out right. You know they'regoing to look at those people that come out of college just in thatindustry, just a net spot, but the problem, and when I talke to somebodyfrom Microsoft about this, is that they created a leag program where they were getting all the top recruitsfor for for computer. What's it called, I can'tremember, but they were getting all these top mines from Stamford and MITand Yale, and all this right, but theyall had the same kind of rails. They were on the same real anthe same. They had the same perspective. It have a big story to tell with thatright there, just what they did for so long, and they said we need people withdifferent stories, but then train hem to be on this rail and that's whatmakes sense to me is is with what you're doing with naps is. Is a lot ofthese players have been through a lot in their life and h y have a lot ofstories that tell now. Can we make those players right on this railto understand how they benefit a company exactly, and how can we helpthem? Translate these real competencies, these skills, an knowledge that they'vedeveloped over years and years and years of preparation, practice andperformance, because it these it's the ultimate performance enterprise is: Is Sports Spet? When yougo to the NFL level, the NCA level, I, if there's no performance, there's no anything! So that's what's exciting about this,and all of that hard work that went into saying you know in Guss's case youknow, starts playing when he's five years old and all of that hard work and energy thatwent into that and then at some point not in Guss's case put take you knowany kid, there's always an exit ram. It's just a question when you hit thatexit Ram, so you're five years old, you're playing you know, a million kidsplay high school football. Okay and basically seventy five sand playcollege football. So there's that exit Ram after High School of nine hundredand twenty five housand kids that made it investment to put a lot of energyinto thes sport. How can we tap that those compenses that they built andreveal those that don't even know they have at that level? So then you go.Okay got all these college players great, making this huge commitment boom.You Got Sixteen thousand guys that are draft eligible right when they'reseniors and then three hundred guys get drafted.Three hundred and fifty guys get drafted. Sye Got Fifteen thousand sevenhundred and fifty guys that are taking that Exit Rama that there's a minisculedifference. I would argue and Gu Gustnos between okay, you were a highlevel college player and you made it to the NFL. You've still got thesecompetencies. That youv worked super hard to develop. How can we tap them toaccelerate whatever you do next and then you get to the NFL average? Youknow careers three years, three point three years: the ultimate exit ramp,you're still, everyone gets asked to leave at some point and how can we takeall of that? You know those companies Hav beendeveloped and help translate those an. I think it's right, I think, there's alanguage barrier. Hat itacome comes down to it. Every new team. I went tohad to learn a different language, basically or more n offense yeah, butit was that specific coaches mind I had to figure out right. So if you thinkabout the extra Ram strategy, we get off of the sports train that we've beenon, we get off the XRAMP, but then it's like, if you go to a foreigncountry, you get off the Exrar Ham. Nobody speaks a language or speakingyou're like okay, I'm lost, I don't even know exactly and to most of usjust don't go that route right, because we don't have that knowledge of how dowe transfer our skills into a new language that people understand? Icould figure it out. You just don't know you can figure it out exactlyexactly, and some guys do take advantage of goingback to business, school and and ghttrying to learn those skills in thatlanguage. But I think, what's great about what Brad does 't NAPSA. Is hesaying we can give you those skills? It doesn't have to be that long. You guyshave already worked years and years and what you love to do. Let's help youtransfer th skills in as fast as possible, so you get out back in thebusiness world exactly and and it's really, we don't take the approach thatwe come in and drop. You know business...

...competencies on their head frombusiness perspective. We reveal business competencies from a footballperspective, so we're working in the authentic space where they haveexperience, and then we bridge that over and show how it relates in thebusiness rind. A couple, coupleeaks and and guss is a great example of this too.So in football you're in the film room,you know what are you doing and I asked this to NFL pformer ANFL players, allthe Wa, you know what are you doing? You're studying film whit you, you knowwhat are you looking for and the sort of talk about it and I said: Well, youknow what' You're doing what we call that in Businessis pattern: recognition,you're looking for patterns wich for an ofthense player in the defense, whetherit's numbers on the field, whether it's a formation, you know whatever it isokay, so you got that going on. Okay. Now I think it's going to be a run,then. What are you thinking? Okay, you're thinking tendencies want atendency. It's a probability. It's an expected value, just a probability ofsomething happening. That's what a tendency is, and then you startthinking. Okay, think it's going to be a run. What Could Happen Your RUNNNTORACA? We call that scenario planning in business. Oh call that scenariyplaning, then the whole communication thing both on the field and off the few when you're on thesidelines, you're communicating with your coaches, with your teammates withe Bove you're. Looking at data you're looking at pictures, you know you You'e doing sensemakingyou're doing you know it's situational awareness, so all these things thatthese guys have been doing their whole lives. If we can tap thatwe can accelerate their advancebent, whether it's in a current job and oursuccess I mean- is blow me away beyond my expectations in terms of what guysare doing a year later, you know they're going back to school to finishtheir college degree they're moving to a new city to take on a new challenge,they're, getting a promotion. All these kinds of things, and if we can justposition ourselves at each one of those exit, ramps and say, Hey, go through here. First, you may want togo to Grad school great. You may not want to go to Grad School. You may wantto go into this field. You may not want to go in that filmd whatever, but let'sjust you know, reveal what you already have, because you put so much hard workinto it in a very, very high level. It's most likely there you just have totap it. Yeah reveal it reveal it and help develop it yeah. Well, for me,it's like when we started with Riverto and the APP company. The first time Ihad it put, you know a powerpoint together and then go outand present it. I was super nervous right and then, if I would have hadthis information in my head saying Oh, this was just like you game planningall week and then going out and playing in a game. Wellt would have been thesame thing right, Exac that you Wune Bat you're, not Ding, Thela, anseventyhousand people like exactly thinking, t your head. I just I justplayed in front of Seventy Zand people on national TV and for themillions, butlike giving a powerpoint presentation, you fell oneasy which, to the outsider,mi go. How could you feel nervous about that Ain? Well, but you're alsounderstanding that you're part of team right and you're trying to EA in the NFELLUREtrying to win a game, but there you trying to win business right right. Soif you don't win that business, you lost right and that's why they saiddon't get so down. If people tell you no exact ti the NFL you have to, youhave to have a short memory and you have to be able to move on Yep, Yep,absolutely and- and you know one of my favorite quotes too. Is You know our greatest glory is notnever falling, but in rising every time we fall right confuciust and you learnthat and that's resilience. You learn that in football you learn that inbusiness goes back to that creativity thing and like hey, let's not fear,failure! Let's, you know Alearn a little bit and move on. Ithink it comes for a lot from what we talk about time. Daveis when we're kids,we've, no parents, no rest! Nobody around to you get down right! You getknocked down. Sarah Miski talked about that. You get a big punch in the gutand you got to get up. You just got to get up. That's how it is you get up.You know, everybody's all, your friends, arround or your peers around you justget up and keep playing, or he ad break an come back in whatever it is, and Iwant to pick up. You know something you said to guys. was you know when you'redoing that powerpoint it's like. If I have a big event, you know avantpresentation. Whatever do the same thing that that you probably did infootball was visualized. You know I'd visualize, okay, how is this going towork? How is this going to go? What's going to happen and just get used tothat visualization before it actually happens and and I'll say, one thing when I first met gus in this is playingthe quarterback position actually from a business perspect. You come back tothat perspective piece like we 're going through some stuff withgus about our business plan with naps...

...and what we're doing and and it's all good and then and then gussays you know. Well, you know how I see this is a little bit differently, andso he paints a picture that was much broader in perspective than sort of myperspective, which had been more. I guess business train like saleschannels and justrechen channels, and things like that, so guss was looking at it from aquarterbacks perspective. He was looking at the whole field. The whole field, like yeah, that's huge to have thatperspective of looking at a broader set of issues andchallenges. So that's something that a an elite athlete can bring to an enterprise which is likesupervaluable and you don't have Michael Stray and blindsidting rightlike going to kill like Wena Killi. Going back to your point like how couldI be nervous about a powerpoint- and you know I was nervous in front ofSeventy Ozano yeah, but I also was built up and brought up right, highschool college playing a few more and more people like ou just get used to itright first time. I did a power point. I've never done that before I nevercareer riht. When I a I did the expectations of the audience andthere's so many things that were unknown to me and that's what makespeople nervous when things are unknown right. Ou Know absly that Wa yeah washard for me to get over and it took me a long time and then now it's like okaymake one. I don't really like power points, because I think they're kind ofboring, but right you know, but but everybody uses them. You know andthat's part of Business World Yep, but that's Party so tell us what Napsameans and and then kind of. Can you explain it for us, yeah yeah, just it'snational, athletic and Professional Success Academy. So it's our basic belief is that elite athletehave these hidden competencies that they don't even know that they have,and if we can help reveal those develop them a bit will help them either accelerate theircareer or really kick off their career. Basically, and it leverages all theirsports experience in their new venture, whether it'sbusiness, it's not for profit or or whatever it is. So we built basicallyon that that mapping that I talked about with this big grid. We built fivecompetency modules, performance, driven leadership, high performing teams, effectivecommunication, strategic execution and basic business and financial acumen bythe way, those orf, the five things I'm asked about all the time in business asa consultant as an adviser. Those are the things that people need help withyeah and those are the things that athletes have heck of a lot ofexperience dealing with, and they don't even know it and that's that's. What we're doing is there is,do you guys have a website to people can go check you out on yeah. We have a.We have a website, it's www naps academy, dot org. So we have that it's high level, butwe've got great testimonials in there. We've worked with already twenty formerNFL players, former college players, and it's justbeen. It's been the most rewarding part of my career ever by far to havethis type of impact on people that, in you know, working with this cohordof people, as we say this population of people, it's it's so rewarding because they're so engaged, I mean they're so used to working in an elitelevel and it's great to work with people an elite level. That's what I like todo right and so so that a you were Doou taking like. Let's say somebody goesthrough your program rig, helping them find where they might fit in well,whether it's business politics or something else. Yes, W will help themunderstand what they might be good at. Will we play? We don't place them. We work with our network, but it's notabout US placing them, but it's about helping them understand where the bestfit may be for them. I would say yeah so and what's the scenario? Is it likea three day, coursas yeah a it's a three day, intensive inresidentsprogram. We go from eight in the morning to eight at night. Essentially,we have prework before they arrive. We have them. Do Myers, Briggspersonality assessment. For now we have them do a multiple intelligenceassessment. We have do some reading so when they come, we already. We knowfrom a coaching perspective kind of what they're intell. You know what typeof intelligence assessmthat h y they...

...like how they like to learn.Essentially their personality type, those types of things and them willhave follow up with them with them as well and in our game plan, is really togo to NFL cities and really starting in Pittsburgh, and take this to where the formerplayers live. We've done it at Penn state, but now we want to take it to the localarea and really tie in the high school community as well withhigh school coaches. Are there are there multiple students within thatthree day? Yes, it's Fiftwe. We like to work between twelve and eighteen people,because in fifteen is really good because the dynambicause it's just sointeresting, working with with former players they're used to working in aunit of like fifteen guys, whether it's your offensive unit, your DefensiveUnit and then we break down during the day. So you sort of go down in yourposition group. So then we'll have an executive coach work with three to fiveguys kind of like your position. How many people are on your team for forthat, for fifteen person we've got five. People that would be engaged with.Those fifteen is how we would do that. Okay, when we do it yeah, it seems likeyou would need, even with fifteen people, you need a yeah group ofeducators, Aveselp them through that. Absolutely so we break it down and thenthe really interesting thing is athletes are used to giving each otherfeedback te dod learning from each other, which is which is huge. I'vedone this before yeah, yes, and that so that dynamic and it's been an evolutionand the other thing that sort of blew me away. That I didn't really expectwas the age group that this appeals to andprovides value to. We've worked with twenty four year olds to fifty one yearolds with Napsa right, that's a widepopulation. It is wide pupular people in different phases of their life, so that's been an amazing kind of a hagother huge Aha was the emotional intelligence, the ability of athletesto read body language yeah off the charts off the charts. Yeahknow you kind of know, lit right right. When I go O room who I got to deal withyeah, I know Yu, I mean people that are fun and get what you're saying it's notthat hard, but the ones who are negative nancies. That's who you got toget to you really got to tackle and the and the other thing you know, I'm doingtomorrow night. Actually a graduate seminar, Penn State and one of thethings I'm going to talk about is you know? I personally think you know what college should be about,in my view, is learning to learn because the world changes it's so dynamic. Whatwhat what we learned twenty five thirty years ago, a lot of it is antiquated. So it's like you know,but if you learn how to learn, then you got a growth mindset and youcan learn what you need to learn, regardless of the task of hand, kind oflike what you said before. Guson athletes have learned how to learn. Youneed to learn a gaint new game plan. Sixteen consecutive weeks or you knowsixteen UN and seventeen if you're an NFL football player and then perform itat that level on Sunday and then sort of start again now. You know ou gotyour base package, of course, but you're installing new stuff, all thetime yeah and that's learning it's so you know these are. These areexceptional people? It's exceptional professionalwatching film, like Weu,ever watched a movie, but HEU didn't really watch it. It was just like on ershow or O te Uigh when you're watching film N, you don't know, really knowwhat you're learning from it you're just watching it, you kind of end upwatching the game and where the balls going instead of looking at triggerpoints and what's special about. Why am I watching this third and short? Whatshould I be looking for when you, when you get break it down to that, then itbecomes very valuable to you. Otherwise, it's like. Why am I watching this filmwhen you hear about guys who don't want film and play a sport, because theydon't really know how to use it right right, so you have to learn how to useit. It's the same thing once you learn how to use it, then it becomesextremely valuable, because watching film is about little tidbits, it'sabout finding the matchups. You know who can I go after and all that stuffand then we in business? We call that competitive assessment, competitiveintelligence, that's what gus was doing matchups competitive assessment. Wejust call it something else in business and being able to do that. Learning in thatway is, and the other thing is being coachable. You know in business it's more like this today, if, ifyou're, even providing can go back to...

...being kids constructive criticism tosomeone in the workplace today- Oh you know you don't like me or you know youdon't like what I'm doing hith your mean you'r mean or what you just don'tlike what I a you know. Whatever in athletes like hos feed back, give me feed backatwhat. Can I do what can I do better on the Mace Raptes, you look. What Yeah?What can I follow s here and old navies got all the styles. You need right nowwith up to fifty percent off stor wide hurry in for the season's biggesttrends like Rockstar jeans and Frost, Free Jackets on sale, Jean started justeighteen, bucks for adult twelve bucks for kids plus get warm and stylish outor weare for just eighteen bucks for adults. Seventeen Bucks for kids wantto save even more redeem. Your supercash now through Sunday, hurry andnow for up to fifty percent off storewide ad old navy and old Navycomfell. It TN twenty six to eleven. Three selectas only do better on the nexttrat. What Coul I do better on ther next ren we found that so it's it's exciting group of people to workwith, and it's interesting too that we use the word. You know when busines sat you know wellI'm going to handle that professionally. Okay, I'm going to handle thatprofessionally. That means something right, I'm a professional! Well, whatdo we call our our quote? UNQUOTE PRO football players, they're professionalfootball players, right, they're professionals, they're, going to meetings, they'recommunicating theirbime on time and then and then you start to marry thesecompetences that I'm talking about whether you know situational awareness,pater, recognition, accountability, vision, all of those kinds of things,scenario planning and marry those competencies with the character traitsthat athletes have resilience, goald orientation,competitiveness, toughness, grit, all those character, you put those twotogether, Katy bar the door, its like what a phenomenal combination andthat's what we're. After because we know the group has th, you don't get tothe NFL, you don't get to college level without those things yeah, you got tohave a few of those. You got to have a few of those if you're missing any oneof them. It's fiund out right away right becausewe've seen the guys that you watch, you say this cat's got to make it's thebest athlete I've ever seen, but he doesn't make the team, because you'regoing he's missing something grit, a lot of TA L E, it yeah. We had anotherguest betfor Te gn have little grit in today's yeah yeah, but theyre. If youmar that grit also doesn't just mean that you got on the field, you got itin the classroom. You got it about being on time. You got it about a lotof things right, take care of your lock room, treating everybody with respect.You know! Well, Ye can take criticism without trying to fight exact n exactlywell. We got a couple minutes left. What? Let's right, you know we'd loveto hit you with our last part of the show where we do this well or guess. Wecall the no huddle okay like talk about and ask you questions and you just firethe answers back, O statch candr about all kind of random thing. Okay, I'll dothe best. I can right Llrigt. What's your biggest pet peevebiggest peppape, I think people living in a box people notrealizing or leveraging all that they can do, because most people can do morethan they actually believe they can do. And,unfortunately, a lot of people live like that exactly this is thro Da throsaid you know. Most men live their lives in quiet desperation, right,that's a pet peeve! Exactly on my yeah, and you see that a lot in this country.Yes, it makes you said, yeah, okay, if we were going through your phone rightand we were flipping through all O R, your people, who would be the mostfamous person in your phone right, most famous- is probably Mike Collins, Apollo, elevenastronaut, wow it'sso, very good, so he commanded the command module. When NeilArmstrong and Buzzaldron went down to the surface of the moon, we just hadthe fifteth anniversary of Ri Eleven, so I've worked with Mike on onethousand nine hundred and eighty ight campaign for President Bush and didsome things with him after that, so Mike Colle, I yo. What was yourquestion? You asked him like about his experience. What so interesting,because this was back when we were working on natioal position papers and things likethat and he goes Brad well, you know the whole Apollo eleven and was thetwenteth anniversary. Then a whole palmthe goes. It was like the SuperBowl he was. Everybody was watching like the Super Bowl I as and but it was landing on the moon. It was space, youknow, but he related it. Here's this astronaut doing something that mankindprobably the greatest achievement...

...in this tream mankind. In my view,right R and what'. He relating it to the Super Bowl right. That's kind of interesting now you've lived in some great and Youe,currently live ind on some Great College: Football Environments,Columbus, yeah, takly college you're down in Texas,that's ful, yeah, like what about Sois picked between Columbus and StateCollege. Now you currently live in Sing College, an your Stacologi grap. Sothat's yeah, probably a wait, a question, but how does it compare toColumbus on Game Day? I will say this Game Day in Columbus and we lived insuburb called Upper Arlington crazy, I'd, never seen college flagsout on people's houses before living in Upper Arlington outside Columbus. Thatwas a whole other level yeah. They were into it more than the residents ofState College really yeah. Oh yeah, yeah, it's a yeah, THAT'S A it's! It's AIT's, a Texas as a lot like thattarit's an Experiencei yeah again yeah. The thing I think it's unique about yeaOhio on know how to state is it's the whole state, the whole state I mean,there's other colleges or sure right everything's about oat. You, though,yeah and everybody's got it's whether they went there and an andit's so interesting, because you know Columbus is the capital of Ohio, a lotof state government there, but everybody had their buck eyes. I meanthere o flags out and I'm like man, I'm from you know, Penn state like wow.These guys are like over the top yeah. It was another level. It was anotherlevel yeah. It really is even thoug. SINCTOR OIO as Cincinnatiand Cleveland for sports towns as well, but it feels like Columbus is, is justkind of the center of gravity yeah, you know, especially the bangals areespecially the browns are usually garbage yeah right right right, so you Hav you'vedone all kind of things in your career where you've been in politics. Doingsports you've been in. You know. As far as you know, drug copies, helpinpople understand what's best for them, so you have a good sense of history. Itake it it' swhitch places when, with one person dead or alive in going backthrough history Ho, would that be, for you I', probably say Franklin, Roosevelt just to experience kind of what heexperience. I mean to come out of the Depression World War. Two from a wheelchair. Imean it's just incredible. What he was able to accomplish, just like amazingto me put, is back on track. So yeah I mean it's really. If we didn't have agreat leader at that time, our country could have went a wrong way. Yeah Yeah PROMS. Now from the sports perspective,who would you trade places with for a day? Who would I trade place with for aday it passed or either was yea FrankoHarris? That's a good one, because you got alittle pen state in there got kenof state. You Got Steelers, you gotsuccessful business guy. You got cool guy, ilikeimmaculate, erception, yeah,top three plays in NFL history, Grigh, yeah, yeah, Exactin, N, a big loyal pen,stater and very loyal yeah. So just a super nice man just yeah, I know he's areally good guy yeah. I hope we get to work. Yeah, yeah, peppi, subs, ISO,heuns, partof Elo does e Ayestu it's around here. I don't know if it'sanother place: e Jus Frankos ie back in te day. Oh my Godju Tan army sie bestthings in football yeah when it was AO, visited them. Otetro, yeah, yeah, yeah.Captain I mean in his you know. I got great opportunity totalk to Franko just about his his background and is upbringing. You know his mother was Italian and Italy. Shewas a warbride comes back over here stationed in Fort dicx. You know withhis dad and it's just an incredible incredible story. It really is. Itreally is okay, last one because I know we got to go a we got or Meeti yeah. If you go back and tell young bradabout you know hey, I really need you to focus on this. What would that be?What would that be? That one thing you would tell thim I'd probably say: Don'tworry so much, don't worry so much. You feel like ifyou worry, keep yourself in that box a little bit sometimes yeah yeah. It all works out if you just keepworking hard, yeah and you know hey, you know the planet's been spinning forthirteen point. Eight billion years,...

...rightit', okay, we're little just relax it's hard to relax, but Itry to tell Anne then don't don't worry as much Kelly night, I tri to talk to her aboutthe grand scheme of things it doesn', noist, yeah, noreside, no yeah, butBrad. We appreciate you getting in Ta Huddle and joining us and learningabout NAPSA and your passion in life and all those great transitions you'vebeen through. It's just amazing. Well, thanks for inviting me into the huddle,I mean to be in a huddle with Gusfrott and Dave is really cool. You know theother guests you've had on have been been terrific. So thank you very, verymun, witha Boer and Aother Wia Bo. I Sai. We were hitting eight fifty goingin and then ything answered, ys Orb, yeah nother thing to ask you ask yourguess like how many of them had paper roots as a kid? Oh, that's I yeah. Inever had one, but I would IMI buddy had one and when he would go out oftown or something you take over yeah yeah yeah have to fepyeas yeah, that'sa that's a thing: whiping them at the door. Hey. We want to thank you for Joiing USToday on Huddl up with Guss, where we talke to a wide range of guests abouthow suports shape to life. As always, I'm joined by my great friend andCohouse Dave Hager, and we want you to be able to follow us on all of oursocial media at huddle up with Gus, and we really appreciate you and thank youfor your time and listening to our podcast.

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