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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 months ago

Bob Socci

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to Huddle Up with Gus, with 15 year NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte! You’re in for a real treat as Gus interviews “The Voice of the Patriots,” Bob Socci who gives his firsthand account of what life is like as the main play-by-play announcer for one of the NFL’s powerhouse teams. Gus digs down into what life was like for Bob growing up, what motivated him towards sports announcing and how his journey started in Annapolis, Maryland announcing the Navy games. Bob then details his departure from Annapolis and onto Boston – you’ll love his story of determination, drive and even some dreaming. Enjoy your time in today’s huddle with Gus and his special guest Bob Socci. 

Hey everyone, Welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback GusFrerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, somepeople say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read.16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latestnews, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favoritepodcast. Follow up with Gusts. Check it out today At www. 16:31 DigitalNews.com. Huddle up with Gusts is brought to you by Vegas sportsadvantage, clients of Vegas sports advantage are winning big in 2021 youcan be a part of the winning two. As of june 1st $100 bettors are up $3700 500dollars. Bettors are up $18,500 and $1000 bettors are up $37,000 and $5000.Bettors are up $185,000 become inclined today by clicking the link in thedescription below and use promo code. Huddle up To take 25% off your packagetoday. Thanks to our partnership. Welcome to what surely will be a doozyof a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron atthe diamond or on the links, we can only say welcome to this week's huddle up withgusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents passion for sports has takenhim on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchiseswith 114 TVs under his belt, Gust knows who the players are and how the gamesare one. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up.Okay, Sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it'skick off time. So snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us two left. Hey, everyone, Welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with gusts. I'm your host, Gus Frerotte, 15 year NFLquarterback. And I want to thank all of our partners. I want to thank 16 31digital news sounder FM in Vegas sports advantage. So, uh, please go to Vegassports vantage, check them out and put in my code, huddle up and go and getthere. Data and analytics I would say is the best way to put it becausethey're going to tell you what bets are working and where you can make the mostmoney because they are just making people some phenomenal money on theirbets. So you get a 25% discount, which would be great. Um, don't come to mebecause I'm terrible at betting, That's why I never do it. And uh, you know,it's kind of funny. Uh, I tried it before, I'm not good at it, so I haveto go to these guys who are professionals and, and, and get thebest odds. But today we're talking to a guy that you may want to listen to whenit comes to anything patriots. He's been with the flagship station at, at98.5 sports hub in, in um, in boston for a long time, talking about thepatriots. He's now doing it with an old Pittsburgh guy, scott Zolak. Uh, asmany of you may know, went to Maryland, played for the patriots now has been,he's had a great career after sports up there. But joining me today is bob um,soc right, is that, is that right, bob? Soc. So, uh, I had to I had to liketake a minute there because I wanted to say sochi, So bad. But it's so see I'mglad you correct me because as I told you before, people screw my name up allthe time. Yeah. I think my family must havescrewed it up because everybody else looks at it and says, so it's yourmaybe sake once in a while, but you know, from the time that I was uh, youknow, could, could could say my name, it was Soc in our household. So, uh,that's what it stayed as, you know, never never change the name for radio.Maybe it would have helped my career at an earlier age. But whether people getit right or wrong, I've been called a lot worse than Soc or Sochi. So if theyever called you the sake bomb, No, no, it's got to be a good nickname though.That there would be a good nickname. I'd have to live up to it though. Yeah,I've had many of those sake bombs. So that's, that's a lot to live up to. Itskind of kind of like gambling. I'm not a gambler either. I, you know, I don'tmake enough money, I don't have enough money to lose to be a better. So yeah,I'm as good as gambling as the slot. So other than that I'm not very good, youknow, push the button, hope for the best. So this is awesome. I'm glad totalk to you. So you grew up in kind of middle of new york upstate new york.Like kind of, were you closer to the border of pennsylvania or or Canada foryou. Auburn. Auburn is right in the, in the middle of the state, in the fingerlakes region. It's about an hour and a...

...half north of the new york pennsylvaniaborder if you if you do like, you know straight north and south. Uh not toofar from from western P. A. About this about two hours east of Buffalo andauburn set between Syracuse and Buffalo. And you know a lot of people that Igrew up with were giants fans or bills fans and when it came to the NFL veryfew jets fans in my neck of the woods. I was somebody though who was a fan ofanother Pittsburgh. I was completed by dan Marino and our kind of pile on theend of your name, we rooted for you. So marina and I was a fan of dance and begandreaming of being a sports broadcaster at a very early age there. So talk tome a little bit about growing up in auburn. What was sports like for you?Did you have like a big community like you know, a lot of people I talked tothat are older that are our age kind of talk about you know we used to ride ourbikes around, we go get all our buddies in the neighborhood, we play everysport. There was what was it like for you? Oh God, it was that way I lived ina neighborhood full of kids two blocks from a huge playground that had youknow softball diamond, a large open field Basketball courts. In the summer.We played baseball all day. First we drove to our bike, rode our bikes to alocal convenience store back then it was you know the term conveniencestores didn't resonate back that you know there's there's pre-7-11 days Ithink. You know it was a place you went to buy your pack of baseball cards andtake out that sugary stick gum and then stick those cards in the spokes of yourbike with your glove on the handlebars and we would go to the store and get adrink, get baseball cards and then all rendezvous at the playground. We wouldplay baseball in the summer. Yeah, it was completely a pickup situation. Ohyeah, totally unorganized by adults and organised by us kids. And then when theseason changed, we started playing football. And then when the season gaveway, of course it's no country up there. We played street hockey. I could neverskate, I couldn't stand on skates, but one season to the next occasionally wetry to play basketball and that's the way it was from sunrise to sundown inthe summer. And from the time we got home from school until it was time togo back home for dinner During the other parts of the year. And it was itwas a great childhood. I have two young kids now nine at 11 and you know theyget together with some of the kids in the neighborhood but it's nothing likewhat I experienced as a kid and I often know it's them, you know, nothing like,well I mean I was, my child was almost the same, right? That that was like thethree major sports we would go play, we didn't have soccer, we didn't haveacross you know, it had to be you know, maybe once in a while we get a sunnyday uh and we go play basketball in the winter. But most of the time it was itwas football hallway through till you know, and when I was growing up,Steelers were always in the playoffs. So you know, it was all the time. So wehad it was the same thing, but it was great uh in the summer it was whiffleball, it was baseball, it was, you know, dodgeball, we had a court like that aswell, we just, whatever we could do to get outside, you know, auburn was ablue collar community and we had a minor league baseball team there, didyou know, they they were the, the auburn Phillies when I was uh you know,first a baseball fan at the age of 345 and then eventually the auburn Astrosand then became the auburn double days in the new york penalty. So there werepeople that had just gotten out of college, young young kids basicallystarting their pro careers and they would come to auburn new york. you know,some of the first auburn Phillies that I watched included Lonnie smith whowent on to the big, there's very few of them made the major leagues from thosedays, but you know, I was a kid who I went to those games, I hung out by thevisitor's bullpen, I chatted with the relief pitchers and the book backupcatcher, you know, and eventually got broken bats and we take them back homeand put the nails and the bats and you as you were saying, you know, if wedidn't have the enough kids to play at the playground, we play with the ballin the backyard, we played hot box or pickle, you know, the run down Derby,home run derby. It didn't matter how many people we have, we found a way toplay games back in those days. And like I said, it was a blue collar community,people loved sports, youth sports was very big there, particularly baseball,it was a lacrosse hotbed, you know one of the three parts of the country atthe time where lacrosse was played. But I grew up in a household where myfather loved baseball. He was the first generation american, He was a Yankeesfan primarily because as an italian american, the Yankees of his youth hadall the italian american star beira rizzuto and like and so you know thatwas our connection. My father was a lot older than most of my friend's dads butour our connection to span the...

...generation gap was baseball and it wasvery important in our household. Yeah, my dad was a huge baseball fan. I meanhe taught me throw everything right, throw it hard, throw it at their head,you know that was how I was taught to bitch. And then the next one they won'teven be close to the plate. But he, um, he he told me he had minor leaguetrials, which I don't know, I guess, I believe him. But uh, he was the sameway, you know, it was it was the same thing, He loved it. Um, you know, he hewould get mad and I'd walk somebody or strike out or whatever, but he lovedthe game we talked about, he was one of 15 kids and I said, well, why didn'tyou pursue baseball? He said I made more money in a factory than I didplaying baseball. You know, unless you were the top dog, you weren't makingany money, which I get, you know, and it's probably still that way, kind ofin the minor leagues, they probably can't make that much. But um, you know,everything you talked about really resonates and uh, you know, one of thebiggest things is, is really how do kids today kind of get through becauseeverything is so regimented And it's such a time schedule, you gotta pay. Imean if my dad had to pull 20 out of his wallet, I wasn't playing anythingright, Everything was really cheap. We did fundraisers to raise the money togo play everything now. Everything is so crazy expensive. I don't know howparents can afford it. No question. You know, I have friends whose sons are anau baseball and the cost of playing a baseball would have been beyond ourreach when I was growing up, uh football, you know, the equipmentthat's involved in all the sports hockey, especially I'm in an area ofcourse in boston where youth hockey is extremely popular and I don't know howyou know, even you know middle class family in a lot of cases can afford tokeep up with the various au leagues and specialist camps. And I think the partof it that disappoints me the most about sports in general gus is thespecialization that's associated with it because you know there are parts ofthe country, I have friends whose kids play high school baseball and they'rerequired to stay on the team to go go to the high school coaches, indoorbatting sessions during the winter and they're not playing other sports,they're giving them up so that they can play spring baseball and summerbaseball and fall baseball. And you know I have people that work inprofessional baseball and the number of my friends, my best friend from Auburnwas a scout, is a scout in the major leagues and you know, he he has astepson who went to the Dominican republic to play down there at theirteams academy because he thought it would be a better experience thanpaying thousands of dollars to play in a you and you know, for those who cando it and those who do, you reap the benefits of that. Hello. Certainly, youknow, it's it's one of the paths to take, but for for a lot of people, it'sone they can't take. And that disappoints me the most. I talked a lotof guys in the Patriots locker room bringing it back to football and somany of them played as many sports as they could. They were involved in a lotof different activities and they were allowed to play different sports. Wehave a son of an NFL Hall of Famer, Matthew slater, whose father exactly 20years in the league as an outstanding offensive lineman for the Rams andMatthews one of the best of what he does on special teams. And he didn'tplay high school, they didn't play tackle football until he was in histeens I think was 14 in high school and he was allowed to do a lot of otherthings and he eventually followed his own love and passion for the game. ButI see so many kids today who are specialist, they go down to one track,they don't play other sports and then they reach a point where maybe, youknow, they, they're, they're size catches up to them or they lose theinterest in the sport and you know, and eventually it doesn't turn out well anduh, in fact, you know, often backfires for them and their families and how youfeel about that. Yeah, I think that, you know, when, when a parent has todish out A lot of money, $600 to go play and then stay in hotels andeverything. That puts a lot of pressure on a kid to go and try to be successful.Then how hard is it for a kid to go to his parents and say, you know what, Idon't love this anymore. I don't want to do this. And one of our goals forour kids when they were growing up was just saying, look, we want you to playevery sport, we want you to taste everything and try it right and thenyou'll figure out what you like. But to me, it was like, you have to playsomething because I think sports teaches you so much that you don'tlearn in a classroom or from your parents. You know, um, somebody askedme about that, um, you know what I thought about sports and said, look,it's another person watching them. Like why why do kids in sports do less kindof drugs and, you know, a smaller number of athletes will go and do, youknow more of the bad things. I said, well, they have to earn the trust oftheir teammates, they have to earn the trust of their coaches, they have toearn the trust of their parents and then there's more people not to letdown. And sometimes sports really can...

...emphasize what other things would neverteach you. And that's why I loved it growing up. And the other thing too iswhen you grow up and like you said, there's no parents, there's no coaches,right? There's just you and your buddies and you figured things out andyou figured out how to do things right and just play the game. And I think welose a lot of track of that when, when kids don't get the chance to do that.If you understand what I'm saying, I do in another part of it too. I thinkanother dimension to it as well is you have to, you know, there are so manycliches that are born out of sports and among them of course is rising when youfall, uh, taking another turn at the plate, when you have a failed at bat,when you strike out, going back up there the next time and you learnresilience and you learn determination and as you said, you learnaccountability, you're accountable to your teammates and your coaches, to theother people on your team's regardless of the sport. And I do think in my owncareer it's helped me because in broadcasting, you know, unless you'reone of the fast track stars that the, you know, enormous talents on ourbusiness who make it to the network level in their twenties and stay therefor the duration of the careers. There are a lot of closed doors, a lot ofrejection letters, at least for me. It took me many years to get to the NFLand I followed this winding path primarily initially through minorleague baseball, and eventually landed an opportunity at the Division onelevel in college football. And partly that ultimately, years later into anopportunity with the patriots. But along the way, there were so many timeswhen I was, I wanted a job and didn't get it. And I went back frankly, to, tothe lessons learnt playing sports. I was in a very good high school baseballprogram. We were state runner up, my junior year state champion at thelargest level in new york state. My senior year, I thought I could playcollege baseball. I went to the university of date and in the fall Iplayed with the team and then got caught and it was enormouslydisappointing. And I was somebody who, with this best friend of mine, theaforementioned best friend from my hometown. We used to go and hit groundballs to one another, go to the batting cage. We did it on our own. Nobodyrequired us to do it. I don't know, because of the passion for love of thegame and he wanted playing professionally. I just wasn't goodenough to play collegiately. But I took that passion and that work ethic and Istarted to use it in the direction of my ultimate career in broadcasting. Andas I said, I faced, you know, many times where I struck out where Ithought I had a chance to move up in minor league Baseball, or I thought Ihad an opportunity at another job in uh football or television, whatever itmight have been, but I drew on what I had learned, playing sports to continueto persevere. You're disappointed, you're dejected, but you don't give up,you keep going, you keep pursuing your dream. Yeah, I mean, it just teachesyou so many lessons in life, um and, you know, you don't really acceptfailure, but you understand that it's gonna happen, right? Nobody wins everygame unless you're tom brady, I guess. Um and then, you know, you just kind ofkeep moving on. But uh, I love that. So, tell me, I have a friend who, who doesradio now here in Pittsburgh and Katie K, I don't know if you've ever heard ofthat station, but anyway, so when the original Yeah, so Larry does, he's beendoing radio, they call him the voice of Pittsburgh, he does steal their gamesand things like that. And I said, when you were a kid, um, were you the guyout there, like when somebody would come up to home plate and you would say,here comes Bobbi up to the home plate, you know, we got him, you know, and hesaid, yeah, I voice over the whole time we were playing, did you do stuff likethat? Because I think when you do those things as a kid, it kind of carriesover there in your adulthood. Always, always, I I used to watch games in thebasement, turned the tv sound down and pretend that I was broadcasting thegames at home, when I was playing with my buddies, I did the same thing. Andagain, you know, I was so fortunate. Speaking of my roots in auburn new york,I was in a community that had a really fantastic, literally baseball complexand people that recognized they had heard me announcing the games that Iwas playing with my friends, they knew that I wanted to be a broadcaster,people who were involved with our little League baseball complex inprogram and we had a press box with a P. A. System, we had light, so there weredouble headers and so I would play in one game at six o'clock, say. And thenfor the seven o'clock game, I would be invited by the commissioner of theleague or someone else who was one of the league officials to come up to thepress box and I'd sit next to the P. A. Announcer and he wouldn't let me, hewould let me announce batters occasionally. Every time there was afoul ball hit out of play, I would say, please return all foul ball to theplaying field immediately. It was, that was the beginning of my career inbroadcasting. Let's say that's where I...

...started to develop that itch and I canstill coons are not only 10 cents. Yes, yeah, absolutely. No. Yeah, absolutely.Snow cones are really popular back in that time. But, uh, you know, I thinkabout those days and I've talked to so many of my colleagues and everybodykind of started in a similar way for us. You know, sports were always a passion,broadcasting an interest in broadcasting as well, you know, equalin terms of our interests and we played sports, we and we we talked out loud orwe talk to ourselves calling the play by play, the games were participatingin. Yeah, I mean I was never good. I can I just sit and watch but I can seelike how that would change over like if you're watching a baseball game, afootball game, whatever it was. You know, I could just see like announcerslike you and and other people that's what they would do. They would justvoiceover, they'd watch it watch to replace. There's a pretty funnycomedian bob. Memory, have you ever heard of bob? He's pretty, he's like ontwitter and then tick tock and things and and he takes place from differentsports and he voices, everybody puts swear words to it. I laughed so hardbecause that's you know, it's like, man, you want sometimes you want to watch agame like that and I could just hear my dad cussing in the background like whenhe was watching the Pirates and the Steelers and like you want a little bitof that, like, like personality to it. Yeah. But as a broadcaster, if you doit, it could short circuit your career. At least somebody like me. But I havebeen on the airline for college football game when one of my broadcastpartners unfortunately let out a four letter word that begins with F. It endswith K. Um, after the officials missed the pass, an offensive passinterference call on a late score. So I've been in a position where I'veheard it on air gusts and yeah, it's certainly memorable. I'll never forget.I I'm gonna knock on wood and cross my fingers again. I hope that I neverrepeat that kind of mistake. Right. Right. I'm sure there's a lot of peoplein boston probably say it enough of the times that you don't need to say it. Isee it so much to myself or out loud when I'm watching games as a fan. Igenerally, when I'm broadcasting you get emotional, of course, if somethinggoes well for the patriots, when they win a Super bowl, when when, when they,when brady leads them down the field or when he did lead them down the fieldtoo late touchdown or they come back against the falcons. You get excited.Obviously you want your emotion to match that moment and you have to, youhave a rooting interest in the team. Even if you don't root on the air andI'm not a broadcaster who has that style. It's over the top. I don't saywe don't say they tried to be professional, but you're not, you'renot impartial, you're there, you're the voice of that, that team, You're thevoice of those fans. They want to hear you get excited and you have to, butwhen I'm watching games as a fan, uh, you know, I'm totally different. I'msomebody that does react if the Bruins are playing and a guy takes a sillypenalty, I'm cussing if, if I'm watching a baseball game and a picturemakes a bad pitch, you know, they give up a late lead, I might utter, you know,four letter word here or there. I try not because I have young kids, but youknow, they hear them all too often, you know? Yeah. And, and um, it's justsomething that, you know, I learned at a very young age. My dad was one ofmany kids and was a mill guy and it's just was part of the household, that'skind of how it was and so you just kind of learned to live with it. But healways told me when I was a kid, he said, if you ever want to say thatstuff, go to your room and say it, don't say it out loud because you mightget some soap in your mouth anyway. That's how it was, right. He could sayit, but I wasn't allowed anyway, you know, But it's interesting to me, likeyou talked a lot about baseball, you're on a state championship baseball team.I was as well in, in high school. Um, did you play football where you like,what was your fandom of football when you were younger? Because you became anannouncer in the NFL? But you seem to have a really great love of baseball aswell, and I'm wondering why it went to the NFL not to like MLB, you know, Ilove, I love the big three primarily, and then as I liked hockey as well, butbaseball, football and basketball were my three favorites. Baseball was reallythe first love that I had and it was the sport that I played the best. I'm avery short guy, Which I hear about all the time by the way from, from mypartner, it's got so like, I mean it's like 69 his, you know, he's a massivehuman being. Yes, with a mass event. He's a, he's a huge, I wasn't gonna sayit. I'm glad you said it wasn't going to say it. I know he had a size eighthelmet, you know, he's, uh, he's enormous. People are, people are takingit back. So I work next to him all the time we travel of course on the sceneplan and he's always sending out snapshots on social media, talkingabout my, my height or lack thereof on the air. So I wasn't gifted with, withsize necessarily, maybe in the wrong, wrong direction. I had a thickerwaistline, uh, than than a lot of my...

...kids, the kids in my teams and my, myclasses. So I was kind of on the pudgy side. I was sure I was slow. I was, Iwas non athletic for the most part, it was pretty good baseball player by, bysheer will and determination, but otherwise I just wasn't built to playother sports. Well, you know, I tried out for teams, I think I playedfootball in 7th and 8th grade and a modified team and, and wanted to playlinebacker and let them go to, well I tried to wrestle and I think I gotpinned in the 1st 30 seconds and that, that was the end of my career there. Itried out, nobody wants to wear it will know,especially with my body. So I knew broadcasting was the first love, butwith football, I was one of those kids. At the same time when the seasonshifted, I was in front of the television from sunday morning to watch.First had to watch the Notre dame highlights. Remember when Notre Damefootball would really condensed our highlights, Lindsey NElson would, wouldvoice the highlight package and said we move along to further action. I watchedthe Notre Dame highlights on sunday morning. Then I'd watch this is the NFLand this week in the NFL and then I would watch the, the pre game shows onCBS and NBC at the time and I would watch football yeah, the rest of theday on Sundays. And then on Mondays, my parents will allow me to stay up justin time to hear Howard Cosell do the halftime highlights on monday nightfootball. So I love football. My dream was to be a broadcaster of all sports,primarily baseball, football, basketball. But in my career, because Igot started primarily out of college on the minor league baseball path, Ithought baseball would be the root for me. And I got the triple A at arelatively young age, but and and got a couple of big league opportunities interms of interviews, but never got an offer for major league Baseball team.And then I started calling Navy football at the same time. And I fellin love with football. The build up from one game to the next. Theexcitement on a game day going into the stadium and seeing it come to life. Thestrategy involved, you know, the intricacies of football and and theteam concept that didn't exist from where I, you know, where I saw it inbaseball. I I fell in love with that. And I and I and I think I started tocall it well enough to consider, you know, football broadcasting as a careerafter a number of years. And I started sending out football tapes. And one ofthem that I sent out was to the patriots announcer at the time, GilSantos that was in 2008. So I've been doing navy for quite some time, about12 years and Gil's very complimentary. And as it turned out, my wife and I, mywife is from boston. We ended up moving to the boston area. And so I was stillkeeping all my doors open. All the avenues open was broadcasting baseballin college football, college basketball. But we had moved to boston and made thedecision that, you know, I wasn't getting to the major leagues inbaseball. I wasn't getting that next job in the other sports. Let's go toboston. I base myself there continue to do the Navy games because they werecaught enough to allow me to do that and then knock on doors and hopefully Ican get a break and get on the air in boston. And that's exactly exactly whathappened. It took a while I knocked down the door at the flagship of thePatriots 95 sports 7 2009 I went in, sat down with the program director andhis assistant. I left a cd with samples of my work again. CDS. It was a littlewhile ago and we heard some play by play of Navy versus Ohio State Navyversus Army. And this is a program director liked it and I didn't hear forthem for three years. I want to just, I just wanted anything that some patientsone shot a pinch hit appearance doing headlines. I didn't hear anything forthree years and then Gil Santos retired in 2012 and I got an email out of theblue From 95, the sports hub. You know, they wanted to hear more of my work. Isent another batch of play by play samples. They listened to it. Theyliked it. They interviewed me and they hired me had baseball called first, Iwould've gone to major league Baseball, but the Patriots were the first team in95 sports of the first big market station to give me an opportunity. AndI'm so thankful Gaza. I'm so thankful that I wound up in the NFL and wound upwith the patriots here in boston. I can't imagine being in a bettersituation for my family or me and yeah, yeah, because if you would have went tothe Jets, it probably wouldn't have been the same story. You know, therehave been a lot of more els than w that's for sure. What a franchise youwent to everyone. Uh I want I appreciate you listening to huddle upwith Gus, I'm your host just for uh we're gonna take a quick commercialbreak. We'll be right back with bob soc. Okay, fabulous. Alright, ready ready breed,yep. Go ahead. All right. Hey everyone, we're back after a commercial break.There were with bob soc, the voice of the patriots in 98 5, the sports hub.You know, he's been doing it since I...

...think you said about 2009, is thatright or 13, 13 is when I got hired? 2009 was when I first knocked down thedoor of the Patriots flagship station 98 5 sports hub. Now, why did you go tothe Patriots too? Were you trying to, were you always a patriots fan or wereyou just, you just kind of wanted to go up and that, that you thought that wasa good place to go because you know, there are a lot of cities that couldhave used announcers right there. I'm sure there's people retiring all thetime. So why, why the Patriot did you have it in there? Did you know somebody?Well, it's funny because whenever when I started broadcasting and I wouldbounce around from one minor league city to another in minor leaguebaseball. And when I was calling the Navy football games, people would ask,what team do you want to broadcast for or what's your favorite team? And Ialways say the team that hires me. So that was my mindset. I grew up as aMets fan first in baseball, but have your favorite player? I was a kid. TomSeaver, uh, constantly uniform when I was three years old. Tom terrific wasmy favorite. Eventually rusty stomp. Uh huh. And then lee Mazzilli as I gotolder, lee Mazzilli, he was kind of the matinee idol out of the new york playedin Brooklyn. I'm finding my fever. Look at this. I got my CVA right here. Oh,that's awesome. Yeah, my son's like my sons and I collect cards. So, uh, I gota bunch here. Yeah. Unfortunately my mother threw away all my tom Seaverbaseball. So many people say that so many people say like mom, just throughmy whole shoebox out of all the cards. Can you imagine like what cards youwould have? Like, I mean I remember as a kid, like I pulled some, my son's outby some old wax packs every now and then just because it just, it justbrings back memories, right? You're pulling out the old piece of gum andthere, you know, even if it's from the eighties or whatever, they, theyweren't great, but it's so hard to get like a seventies carter, sixties cardthat like original like that and it just, I do it real slow. They're like,dad, why are you taking so long? I'm like, this is like my childhood righthere, take, it brings me way back. Oh my gosh, no question. We go through thebaseball card pack and you always wind up. There were like three or fourplayers who were in every other pack of cards that you got. And uh you knowwhen you hit on that one star player, it's just, it was an incredible feeling.But the only baseball cards that I have, I think with silver and I still have abinder, but I don't think they're worth very much. They were later in hiscareer with other teams. And by then there were so many baseball cards andprint. Nowadays. I think the industry is kind of uh diminished in terms ofthe value of baseball cards. His nickname, the franchise with the Met.He was, he was the franchise. I'm terrific. And I just finished readinghis biography by Bill Madden was a good read and not kind of quite a guy. Uh,he was, somebody was a lot of times you're disappointed by your sportsheroes. He was, he was a player that in the end and now that I know more abouthim even years later and following his death kind of validated those feelingsthat I have for him is my first sports hero, quote unquote. Yeah. Yeah. So whowas that in football for you? Well, early on because I was a dolphins fanoriginally you were just Marino. It was eventually marina. I like the dolphins.It's a bizarre thing. I mean my brother was a Steelers fan at that time when Iwas a kid. The Steelers, the cowboys, the Raiders and the dolphins were thebest teams in the NFL. The rams were good to back then in the seventies Ithink the Vikings. So my brother was a Steelers fan and in the A. F. C. I hadto pick a rival and I couldn't pick the Raiders. I just didn't like the radioright? So I like the dolphins colors and became a fan of the dolphins andthen they drafted dan Marino and in my house, you know, with my, my fatherparticularly if you had a ball on the end of your name even though Don Shulamight not have been an italian american. Well we're sure and then of course theycan't, so there's no doubt about it. But as I got older and startedbroadcasting college football, any allegiances frankly to the NFL went outthe door until while I was at Navy, Bill Belichick became the head coach ofthe Patriots and they won Super Bowl 36 because at the time Navy was awful. Thefootball teams have gone through a stretch of 30 losses in 33 games from,I think 2000 through 2002 and steve Belichick was a long time Navy coachand Scout Bill's dad, Bill grew up in Annapolis and went to practices andwatched joe Bellino, Heisman trophy winner and then Roger Staubach and hisdad was a legend at the Naval Academy and was still around even in retirementevery day. And because of the patriots success under Bill and I think coupledwith the fact that Navy football at that point, at least on the field, youdidn't have a lot to be happy about being proud about at the time. There'sa lot to be proud about the mid shipment off field always. But theywere going through a rough stretch.

People really cling to the success ofthe hometown kid, Bill Belichick and of course the association that thepatriots and they were the team that took the field in the Super Bowl as ateam not introduced individually. So I really became interested in thepatriots. Obviously they were great underdog dog against the rams and backthen they would, you know, I think viewed a lot differently than theywould would be in future years. So I, I started reading a lot about Belichickand the patriots and I don't, I wouldn't say that I was a patriots fan,but that's how I first learned of Gil santos and started listening to hisgames because I would, I would buy the NFL films discs and and watch us threegames to glory, the series on the Super Bowl champion patriots. And I'velistened to Gil santos and I was enraptured. I went to Gillette Stadiumfor the 2003 NFC championship game when Ty Law picked off eight manning threetimes. And it's funny cause I had tickets through one of the colts.Marcus Pollard tied up his business person who handled some of his businessinterests, was a friend of mine and he got me a ticket to the game. And I flewfrom Baltimore to Foxboro to providence and then went to Foxboro and I was inthe stands, in the cold family section listening to gil santos called thepatriots and was just mesmerized. And so that's when I started to become apatriot fan in a sense. And then moved to boston, you know, started fallingpatriots of course on the news regularly. And so when I got theopportunity, because I'd come from navy, a lot of people associated, you know,the Belichick name with me being hired, but it really didn't have a lot to dowith it. If anything at all. The station made the higher. But because Iwas living locally and because I had learned enough about the patriotsrecently, they thought, well this guy's kind of a local, we like his work.Maybe we can sell them as, you know, one of boston's ona. And, and, and it'sfunny because I was spending most of my time at that point traveling and goingto the mid atlantic every week. But I was still a resident, I guesstechnically of New England and uh, knew enough about the patriots and of coursewith the Navy connection. You know, where I guess initially I had to provemyself. But that opened the door for me I think, well, yeah, you don't have theaccent, right? You have the, you have the, you don't have an accent. Sothey're like, can we sell this guy as a boston person, Right? Because youalways think of boston is such strong accent. But my question for you is, Imean, you did all these Navy games. How many years were you? Did you do Navygames? I did 16 seasons of Navy 16. So which army Navy game? Do you rememberbeing like having the most energy because they're all special. Right?They're all incredibly special. And uh, you know, just all the men and women inuniform there and it's just, you know, it's a rivalry, but it's not, you knowwhat I mean? Like it's just so special. What do you remember most about thatgame? Uh, you hit it on the head. It's a rivalry. But at the end of the day,their brothers in arms. I mean, they want to Army players want to be navymore than anything in the world. The same thing with navy players. There'snothing more they want to do in their athletic careers than beat army. That'sthe one thing you're measured by as an athlete at the service academies. Howdid you do against if you go to the Naval Academy and, and, and that'singrained in them from day one, Everything around the academy yard inAnnapolis says the army waits that they left in the weight room. The signs onthe walls in the locker room. So many of the traditions outside of themilitary protocols and traditions revolve around that game and thepassion and energy in the stadium. It's palpable. You can feel it at nine inthe morning when you get there and it's electric from the time the midshipmenand cadets, everybody in the brigade of midshipmen, all the corps of cadetsmarch onto the field pregame, they march onto the field and their companyformations. There's a lot of people who've watched the game has seen it ontelevision when you're there in the stadium. It's such, you're, you'regripped by the emotions, the pride that you feel, how impressive those youngmen and women are that are before you. They really are the best and brightestin this country. And they're called to a higher mission. They're called to dosomething that's more important than themselves and to pay any sacrificetoward that end. And and and and there's that feeling of reference thatthat feeling goes on throughout the day and then it culminates of course at theend of the game and they're going to hit each other harder than they've everhit anybody in their lives. When they play that game, it's physical, it's allout effort regardless of the score, from the start of the game to the endof the game. And then when it's over the two teams stand side by side andthey play their alma mater and they...

...sing their alma mater's and the winningteam goes second and you know the losing team has to stand in front ofthe Korea, cadets of the brigade of midshipmen in the stands, their handson their hearts and the players are singing their alma mater and the tearsare flowing down there streaks probably never worse feeling in their athleticcareers and then they have to run across the field and stand by thevictorious team and probably never better feeling than the one that thosewinning players in that moment. It's just an incredible experience. If youever have an opportunity to go to it in person, It's a bucket list event, it'sbucket list game, but it evokes so much pride even when you watch it ontelevision. And I can't say that there was one game more than any other thatelicited more excitement than the others. I will say that the 2001 game,for obvious reasons, is extremely memorable for both teams. Both teamswere mired in and I think double digit losing sees double digit losses Thatyear. Navy hadn't won a game. I think army had 1 1 going into the contest.President Bush was there, visited both locker rooms and then presided over thecoin toss. And uh, in fact it was a Pittsburgh kid, Eddie Malinowski whowas the quarterback at the Naval Academy. You know, the story of how hewas, he was kind of a quintessential midshipman went on to serve as anofficer in the Marine Corps. But kid about my height, too short to play foryour typical Division one team, probably too slow as well. But he wasan option quarterback at the Naval Academy and when they flip the coininstead of saying heads or tails, I think, I think you might have calledheads. He said heads sir, addressing the commander in chief, you know, witha kind of respect, you know, and uh, that always, it's one of the mostmemorable moments. It was, was, you know, that that scene on the field andjohn McCain was a naval academy graduate, the longtime senator and ofcourse the prisoner of war was there as well. There is such a solemn feelingduring that game throughout an army wound up winning that 2001 contest. Soit wasn't memorable from that standpoint for me being the Navyannouncer. But that's the one Army Navy game more than any other that Iremember. It was incredible to walk to, to look back and see what happened to alot of the players that were in that game. True heroes. Yeah, yeah. And sowhen you've seen all these players come through Navy, right. Obviously youremember their names, you've called their names, of course touchdowns, madeinterceptions, do all these things and then as they graduate and go on and yousee their names and you know, for other things, do you remember that? Does thatbring it back and, and uh, you know, what is that like for you? Because it'smemorable calling football games because those games are always special.And then you see these guys go on to do amazing things that give us all thefreedom that we get today. And so how does that feel like that? You remember?And you've got to know a lot of these guys, well, you're very proud of it.You know, you, you think about rewards in sports and I've had a chance to callthree Super Bowl winds, four super bowls and all for the patriots. But youknow, the feeling of pride and also sadness at times when I see, you knowwhat happened to some of the players that I that I either broadcast asfootball players or other athletes that I interviewed during my time. Maybesomeone like a wrestler, Travis Manion who was killed in combat who wasinterviewed as a halftime guest or lacrosse player like Brendan Looney. Uh,just to name a couple. There were football players who were killed aswell. You know, I remember sitting next to a young linemen named Ron Winchesterwho was from Long Island. Ron's dream was to be a marine. Like hisgrandfather, Ron was an offensive linemen. You know, again quintessential,he was the quintessential navy midshipmen and a quintessentialoffensive linemen. You know, it's just heart and soul salt of earth, good guy,unselfish. You know the kind of guy that you want your son to be and Iranwanted to be a marine. He always dreamed of being a marine like hisgrandfather. I believe his grandfather's name was Dominic 80 Ronwas later killed in the Marine corps. You know, and and then you know on theflip side of that is the pride you feel and I'll make a good you feel when youhear from other players who might have been listening to the Air Force Navygame because they woke up in the middle of the night in Iraq or Afghanistan andthey pulled in the broadcast on their computers to listen on the internet.And I heard a number of guys that, that the connection to for for me with theplayers didn't really start until they graduated because when they're at theacademy they have no idea who you are. You're just, you're just something soregimented. They're not like on their iphones all day, like a lot of kids,you know, in your interaction with them is pretty limited and you know, theyjust know you're one of the media, Maybe they know you're the footballannouncer travels with them, but they could care less. They just want to get,they get on the road away from the academy, they just want to get somesleep and then play the game. You know, they can enjoy their freedom a littlebit, you know, in the hotel the night...

...before a game with their families. Butafter they graduate, you're, you're the connection when they go abroad becausethe games are brought may be broadcast on the Armed Forces network ontelevision or they can't get them if they're stationed overseas, but theycan listen on the internet. And I found that a lot of players who I reallydidn't have a relationship with an Annapolis, you know, eventuallyconnected with me. Years later, there was a wide receiver that just recentlywas given his first ship command Tyree bonds. And he had actually come to thePatriots for a short time after he graduated uh for, for training campwork. I got a chance to work out with the Patriots and spend a little bit oftime in a cap a number of years ago and went to the CFl for re file to auditionthere. The Toronto Argonauts didn't work out, but he stayed in the Navy andhe is now in command of a ship of mine sweeper. And I just felt in years thatyou've been promoted. So that's, that's, that's awesome. So do you try to um,when you're calling a game, try to, you know, bring back plays or memories fromin the past because you know, that, that, you know, midshipmen are listening to this allover the place. You know, you're related to a lot of your ownexperiences on the recent experiences in a game, which is what you do. Ithink typically with, with any team that you call, but there are timescertainly where, you know, we, we did reminisce or recall things that werenot football related per se, but more related to what you and I are talkingabout. But I think the big thing for me that I found two is that, you know,you're an escape for, for, for people there. You know, they want, theyappreciate the fact that you treat the academy and its tradition and, and, and,and the mission that all those midshipmen have taken on with reverenceand respect. That's very important. But at the same time, you know, they wantto, they want to hear you say touchdown, navy. you know, they want you to getexcited when there's a touchdown and, and they don't mind if you criticizewhen the teams playing poorly or coach makes a bad decision. Like I said,there was a stretch where they lost 30 games in, in a span of three seasonsand there's no sugarcoating any of those losses. And uh, you know, for theplace, they don't want to hear the players in particular. Some of the fans,you know, they appreciated the talk about how hard they tried and howdedicated they are. The players want to hear that, you know, they don't want tobe seen as overachievers. I I found that out from talking to a number ofplayers and coaches when they're playing, those games are the mostimportant things in their lives in the moment. They don't, they don't lovefootball or, or competing any less than, you know, a player at florida state andClemson or Alabama, you know, in any of the traditional football powers,michigan Notre dame. You know, they're at the Naval Academy in a lot of waysbecause in a lot, in a lot of cases, because it's their chance to competeagainst the Notre dame's of the world themselves. So it's true. Yeah, thatthat offense is probably a lot of fun to call too. Because how many timeshave you watched that offense? You're calling the game and you have no ideawho has the ball. I learned gus very very early to keep the binoculars onthe quarterback, the fullback. Uh, you know, the the whole play because a lotof times you get confused, it's easy to go with the full back and the nextthing, you know, the quarterback's running on the outside and he'spitching it to what they call a slot back. And it's funny, I went frombroadcasting navy games with the kids, didn't even attempt a single pass Tocalling the Patriots where they would go up, Tempo, hurry up and Tom Bradythrowing the ball 40 times. Hey, heading up with us, listenersmanscaped well. They sent me, uh, they hooked me up with a bunch of tools andformulations for their package, three point oh kit. So, you know, I want toshow you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We all think we got aperfect package, but they sent me the perfect package three point Okay. And Iwant to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It came in this great box.Uh, you know it and you can see what it says. They will thank you because theysent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us, uh, you know, stuff that makes yousmell better. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this great uh, boxers whatyou get right, protect them. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this cool itsack, I guess you want to call it to store all your stuff in. So, uh, it'sbeen great. Manscaped sent me a bunch of product. Um, you know, and you know,you can see it all on here. Uh, you know, you can go to Manscaped dot comand put in the code. Uh, Gus Frerotte, that's G U S F R E R O T T E. Get 20%off and free shipping when you use that...

...code, but you can get a kit, you canget individual items like, uh, this way, cool groomer that has a little ledlight, um, ceramic. Uh, these things come apart, they're waterproof. You cando a lot with them. So, you know, man scape is great. You know, it's funny guh, I remember when I was playing with the denver broncos and I'm not going tomention any names, but there was a gentleman who was playing on our teamand you know, if you ever hears the story, you'll know exactly what I'mtalking about. But uh, he brought his own clippers in one time and he used totrim his beard up his goatee and everything and he had him there forabout two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner, he walks in andthere's a person, another player that is actually manscaping with his beardtrimmer. So, you know, one of the things is, you don't want to use thesame trimmer down there that you use up here. So uh he kind of freaked out alittle bit and he said, hey, how long have you been using that tool there?And he said, well, showed up here about three weeks ago and I've been using itever since, so you know, there is a lesson learned that, you know, don'tleave things out and probably if it would have just said manscaped on it,but we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probably one of the funniest,uh, taking care of your ball stories I've ever heard or been around in thelocker room in the NFL, so uh, it's a great story, um, but you know, I alwayssaid there was no way to know, there's no name on it and the guy was justusing it and another guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heck of afunny story, So, one of the best I've ever heard my 15 years playing in theleague. Um, but you know, there's so many great things about Manscaped andwhat they're doing because guys, you got to take care of yourself eventhough I got great hair. Um, and getting older, but you still have tomaintain some sort of grooming, right? And so, you know, we all work out forme. I like working in my yard doing those things now that I'm retired, geta little sweat on and everything. You want to smell good. You know, you gotto take care of yourself. They've got some great products. Um, you know, thisone, uh, little uh, all deodorant. We'll need that here and there. Um,after, you know, working the yard, taking a hike, doing a walk, whateveryou do. Um, it's a great thing, but there's so many great products um Iwant to thank Manscaped for sending them to me. Um The lawnmower 3.0.Obviously you can use it anywhere in your body, but I'm sure you guys haveall seen the commercials, but this was one just letting you know that thelawnmower three point comes with a perfect kit. You can buy the lawnmowerby itself, You can buy all these products individually. They even sentme this wonderful shirt. You can see the back. Your balls will thank you.And then here's the front. So it's an awesome shirt. Have great gear. And youknow what? Sometimes you can just sit back, take care of your balls a littlebit and and and read the paper. So the man's cape even has their own dailynews do so which is great. So don't forget that you can go to the code GusFrerotte on and that's G. U. S. F. R. E R O. T. T. E. Uh And you can save 20%on any products, the complete the perfect uh package gift set and uh youknow you can save 20% and get free shipping. So use the code Gus Frerotte.G. U. S. F. R. E. R. O. T. T. E. Hey, everybody spells my name wrong, theyeven spelled wrong back my pro bowl jersey. So you know, I gotta I gottahelp you guys out. So don't forget how important it is that you use theseproducts, take care of yourself down below uh and have some fun right?There's nothing closer to you than your little bugs. So use the lawnmower. Uhuse the Code Gus Frerotte, save 20% and get free shipping and uh order somegreat Manscaped products. Yeah. Yeah, 40 times a week. So it was a bigadjustment from that standpoint. Yeah. No shotgun at Navy, barely know snow.Single wing shotgun there, that's for sure. Um, so then you go to thePatriots, right? And you've just seen, I mean, what an experience, what what afranchise. You see this success and you get to call these games. And there'sbeen some incredible games since you've...

...been there in 2013 even and you've seensuper bowls, you've seen NFC championship games. All that comparethe Army Navy game to me to a Super Bowl. Like the feeling you get becauseboth are exciting but has to be in a little different way. Yeah, absolutely.And it's funny that I did draw on my experience calling an Army Navy game orat least I told myself that was important to have called Army Navybefore the First Super Bowl Super Bowl 49 When the Patriots played theSeahawks in 2014, January February 15. My first season was 13. The Patriotsgot to the F. c. championship. And then the next year, of course they won theSuper Bowl against the Seahawks. Remember going into that game Thinkingabout all the games I had called previously. I was a guy in minor leaguebaseball for 20 years. For a long time. Navy didn't play in a lot of big gamesoutside of the Army Navy game. I called a few victories over Notre dame. But Idid think to myself, you know, that Army Navy game, there was never agameplay that's more important than that game to the fans and the playersin it and the coaches and the audience. You know, that's a big game and that's,you know, that's a game that that's still As a national game with, withnational implications. And I thought about that and it helped to ease someof the nervousness that I had going into Super Bowl 49. But you're rightthat the scale of the Super Bowl is, it's so different. I think they're bothmeaningful in their own ways. It's hard to compare the two because you know,the military dimension, The fact that so many of the army Navy games that Icall to, we were in two wars. So you knew that those seniors were graduallyand potentially could be in harm's way very soon. When in calling a Super Bowlthough, the scale of it is you spend a week on site and you know, it's fromone press availability to another one event that night to the next. So manyfans, so much media such a long way to the stadium on game you because thesecurities, you know, immense. It's probably more than the Army, Navy army,Army Navy game, especially the president is going to be there.Obviously it's, it's, it's a long process to get into the stadium, butnothing like the Super Bowl because I think of the number of media who are atthat game, it's crazy. And uh, you know, walking around a stadium, like Iremember going to university of phoenix stadium at the time and around 10 inthe morning and the game didn't kick off until, uh, you know, late afternoonpacific time. And you know, I had all this time to kill and I wanted to bethere early cause I didn't want to, I don't want to be rushed. So I got toget to the booth and there's like 567 hours to kill before the Patriots andSeahawks are gonna kick off. And you know, I walked that stage, I want towalk around the stands and up and down the steps a dozen times, went to thegift shop was closed back to the booth, return to the dish, anything that guilttime and not think about how nervous I was because by then a lot of thepreparation would be done had been done. But you know, just the scale of it.It's so their friend. And you know, naturally people remember the MalcolmButler interception at the end of that game, I replayed over and over and overagain here and the same thing with the Pats comeback in Super Bowl 51 theirwin in Super Bowl 53. You know, whereas for me, the Army Navy games, thehighlights from those games. You know, I remember them but I don't hear, Idon't hear them all the time. Like I do from the uh, the number of people knowabout the games too. It's just, and I know you do a podcast, you do a blogand all that stuff. Do you listen to yourself a lot to make sure that, doyou do you edit yourself? I try to uh, unfortunately probablydoesn't show and after as much as I'm sure it does, I'm sure. But it's hardsometimes for me when I do a show and I have to listen to myself, it's kind ofdifficult. It is I I cringe a lot of the time when I hear some of the callsin particular, I mentioned the Butler call, I still cringe now when I hearthat, even though so many people locally, at least your voice goes, youget a little higher in your voice just yeah, I was in a bear hug. Our producerwas bear hugging me in the middle of play and I just kind of startedscreaming. I, you know, I called it if I think about that too, I wasn't, ithappened so fast. You remember the play shotgun? Everybody thinks they're goingto run it, run it. Yeah, exactly. Lynch had just gotten stopped on the goalline, remarkable play by the patriots. Dont'a Hightower with one healthyshoulder was able to keep them out of the end zone. So you figure. And then,you know, that was that followed the german curse circus catch, you know,and I was upset about that because I thought that path was incomplete.Butler knocks it away, but Kirsten catches in after the ball is balancingon his legs and he bobbles and he gathers it in and so there's dejectionabout that, there's a handoff to lynch...

...and then there's a sense, okay, theSeahawks are going to hand it to him again, and this time he's going to getin the ball, snapped to Wilson and he throws it, he really doesn't take astep back, he's in the gun, he catches it, plants and boom, he's looking forLockett. And the next thing, you know, there's this crowd and Butler drives onthe ball and Zolak starts screaming, I can't believe it, my partner And I'mlike, it's intercepted by Malcolm. Butler intercepted by Butler and Istart screaming about the play, patriots half possession at the onewith 20 seconds to go. And after the game, I turned to a producer and I keptasking, did I get it right? That I say Butler, that I get it right and bob,just enjoy it. Let's go to another field. You know, the confetti was stillfollowing, but you know, it's uh, yeah, you know, I listened to games that Ilistened to the regular season games, preseason games, gus, and I think itgoes back to the conversation on sports. I've always wanted to be coached as ayoung announcer and still to this day, I'm very open to constructive criticism.So I would reach out to a lot of my heroes in the business, people, rolemodels, people that are respected as broadcasters and eventually peers andcolleagues and ask for their constructive criticism for them to becandid with me and tried to instill incorporate some of the suggestions andadvice that I heard. I think you get better right. There's no question askedpeople that all the time. Please listen to my show, tell me what you think. Youknow, what can I do better? What kind of questions can I ask better? You know,I don't, I research, I don't write questions down because I want the showto flow. I just think that it's better just to have a conversation and andfind out a little bit about you. Um, and so, so wrapping up everything here.You've told us your story, how you become the voice of the patriots. Tellme a little bit about everything that you're doing now because you know,football is just in the fall and you gotta stay busy all season. So tell mea little bit about that. Yeah, I'm in a situation here gus where I broadcastplay by play for only the Patriots occasionally do some college basketball.But as a father of two young Children and with a wife who has a pretty busycareer of her own and passions of her own. You know, we kind of have the bestof both worlds and for me professionally, you know, I do like thelifestyle of the NFL and I mentioned this earlier about the differencebetween baseball and some of the other sports and pro football. I can havedinner every night with our family except for when we're traveling on asaturday on the road game. And I do work for the team and the station inthe off season. Of course, Covid has changed a lot of what is done. You know,there's work for the team website. There's work, as you mentioned,involving podcasting, writing for the station blog on some of the otherwriting that I do separate from that and some of it is not football relatedor even sports related for that matter. I saw you wrote one on your cat. Yeah,it was leo, right leo. Yes, exactly. The late leo, the late leo, you're likeme, you're a dog, person. I am. Yes. And we have a great dog and we havegreat cats doing. I've I've become a cat convert. We had a cat that passedaway and I wrote about, you know what it was like with my kids. My family hadbeen away for uh, for a week away from home and the cat got very ill and I'llattach the kids were to him and I just like, I like, and one of things I likeabout sports too. And you know, one of things I love about whether it's thenaval Academy or the NFL, like our locker room with the patriots andthere's so many good stories, so many good people that I've been introducedto and gotten to know. And I love telling the stories of those people aswell. And, and the same thing with the stories of people are cats as it wereoutside of the booth. But there's a lot of charity work. There are a lot ofclient events, commercial work. Uh, that's ongoing. A lot of mycounterparts, a lot of my colleagues around the league are farm busier thanI am. Uh, and uh, you know, broadcast college football and the NFL in thesame season, then do college basketball and major league Baseball. I just havea situation for me that that has worked well. At this point, I've been verylucky and uh, you know, I really appreciate where I landed and how it'sgone so far. Yeah, no, it's awesome. And so please let her fans know howthey can follow you and where they can go to find you. Yeah, I'm on twitter atbob soc and that's S zero cc I B O B S zero cc. I. And at 95 the sports subdot com. We have a podcast, the Gridiron and beyond. And you do appearregularly on the station uh in the offseason, host of sunday football showwith former linebacker ted johnson. We preview the draft, recap the draft, getinto free agency and kind of a hot stove football season. So there is thatwork on air and then like I said, do a number of other events for the, for thestation and the team as well. But 95...

...sports dot com is we will find most ofour work archived. Yeah. So that that is awesome. You guys have a big gamecoming up when you the Patriots play Tampa Bay. I know that's gonna be crazyup there. You know, it's like, okay, what do we do? This is our rival, butyet this is a guy that built our franchise. So it's gonna be prettyinteresting to watch. That week happened when you guys have to playTampa Bay. Gus has been a topic on our, on our station for months. I mean, thebrady, the brady story will never end here in New England, you know, hiscareer and then the accomplishments and then of course, the departure and whathe's done since leaving the Patriots for the buccaneers. So we're, you know,we're looking forward to it. Um, october 3rd, fourth week of the season.Everybody I know wants a ticket to that game. And I'm going to try to keep my,my emotions in check. I, like I said earlier, I I'm on the Patriots voice,but I certainly always so many thrills to watching brady. Uh, there's no doubtto ever do it. And, and a good guy to you as you may well know, Tom isgenerally a nice guy, very nice the patriots, but you know, life goes on.And we were both at Wes Welker's wedding with all the offensive lineman.So that was a fun night. That was, that was a lot of fun that night. So Tom isa great guy. Um, he's always been super nice to me and he's very, uh, you know,for as much success as he's had when you meet him, you just feel like he's ahumble guy and you know what I mean? Like you can talk to him like you canhave a beer with him and it's all good. But bobby, really appreciate you comingon, sharing your story with us. I hope everyone can follow you because I thinkthe patriots are going to be a little bit better again this year. I thinkthey've got some good parts back and it's going to be an exciting year up inboston. I hope so because I think so too. You know, they certainly spent alot of free agency, uh, you know, the draft has been questionable in recentyears. It looks like they have a draft class that, you know, they all comehighly recommended. They all have a lot of potential. But it looks like thisdraft class with matt jones quarterback number 15, you know, certainly holds alot of promise. But the quarterback position as you know better than I, uh,that's the position right now that really, I think their season hinges on,there'll be a lot better defensively with the two tight ends they've addedand all the money they spent on free agency. They should run the ball well,be very good defensively, but it all comes down to the quarterback. Yeah.And you know, and they have a coach who doesn't like to lose. So, uh, you know,this guy prepares harder than anybody in the league. So it's gonna be very, Ithink he's gonna want to get back up on top. So bob. I appreciate you joiningme on huddle up with gusts, all my friends and fans out there. Don'tforget to tell everyone to like and subscribe the podcast. Huddle up withGus, go to my website, huddle up with gusts dot com and check us out and allof our great guests uh including bob soc. So bob, I appreciate you joiningme today and thanks for coming on guys. Thanks for having me enjoyed it. Yeah,it was great. I appreciate it. Thanks for taking the time. That's it folks.Another episode down, We want to thank all of our partners. 1631 Digital Newswhen thanks Sandra. FMM And Vegas sports advantage. Don't forget to usemy code, huddle up and get 25% discount when you join. They'll make you somereal money. So have a great day. We'll see you again next week. And that's a wrap sportsman. Thanks forjoining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another actually, Huddle upwith Gus featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus, Theron, huddle up withGus is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available on applemusic.

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