Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Bob Socci

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to Huddle Up with Gus, with 15 year NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte! You’re in for a real treat as Gus interviews “The Voice of the Patriots,” Bob Socci who gives his firsthand account of what life is like as the main play-by-play announcer for one of the NFL’s powerhouse teams. Gus digs down into what life was like for Bob growing up, what motivated him towards sports announcing and how his journey started in Annapolis, Maryland announcing the Navy games. Bob then details his departure from Annapolis and onto Boston – you’ll love his story of determination, drive and even some dreaming. Enjoy your time in today’s huddle with Gus and his special guest Bob Socci. 

Hey everyone, Welcome to another episode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, some people say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read. 16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latest news, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favorite podcast. Follow up with Gusts. Check it out today At www. 16:31 Digital News.com. Huddle up with Gusts is brought to you by Vegas sports advantage, clients of Vegas sports advantage are winning big in 2021 you can be a part of the winning two. As of june 1st $100 bettors are up $3700 500 dollars. Bettors are up $18,500 and $1000 bettors are up $37,000 and $5000. Bettors are up $185,000 become inclined today by clicking the link in the description below and use promo code. Huddle up To take 25% off your package today. Thanks to our partnership. Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron at the diamond or on the links, we can only say welcome to this week's huddle up with gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchises with 114 TVs under his belt, Gust knows who the players are and how the games are one. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up. Okay, Sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it's kick off time. So snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us two left. Hey, everyone, Welcome to another episode of huddle up with gusts. I'm your host, Gus Frerotte, 15 year NFL quarterback. And I want to thank all of our partners. I want to thank 16 31 digital news sounder FM in Vegas sports advantage. So, uh, please go to Vegas sports vantage, check them out and put in my code, huddle up and go and get there. Data and analytics I would say is the best way to put it because they're going to tell you what bets are working and where you can make the most money because they are just making people some phenomenal money on their bets. So you get a 25% discount, which would be great. Um, don't come to me because I'm terrible at betting, That's why I never do it. And uh, you know, it's kind of funny. Uh, I tried it before, I'm not good at it, so I have to go to these guys who are professionals and, and, and get the best odds. But today we're talking to a guy that you may want to listen to when it comes to anything patriots. He's been with the flagship station at, at 98.5 sports hub in, in um, in boston for a long time, talking about the patriots. He's now doing it with an old Pittsburgh guy, scott Zolak. Uh, as many of you may know, went to Maryland, played for the patriots now has been, he's had a great career after sports up there. But joining me today is bob um, soc right, is that, is that right, bob? Soc. So, uh, I had to I had to like take a minute there because I wanted to say sochi, So bad. But it's so see I'm glad you correct me because as I told you before, people screw my name up all the time. Yeah. I think my family must have screwed it up because everybody else looks at it and says, so it's your maybe sake once in a while, but you know, from the time that I was uh, you know, could, could could say my name, it was Soc in our household. So, uh, that's what it stayed as, you know, never never change the name for radio. Maybe it would have helped my career at an earlier age. But whether people get it right or wrong, I've been called a lot worse than Soc or Sochi. So if they ever called you the sake bomb, No, no, it's got to be a good nickname though. That there would be a good nickname. I'd have to live up to it though. Yeah, I've had many of those sake bombs. So that's, that's a lot to live up to. Its kind of kind of like gambling. I'm not a gambler either. I, you know, I don't make enough money, I don't have enough money to lose to be a better. So yeah, I'm as good as gambling as the slot. So other than that I'm not very good, you know, push the button, hope for the best. So this is awesome. I'm glad to talk to you. So you grew up in kind of middle of new york upstate new york. Like kind of, were you closer to the border of pennsylvania or or Canada for you. Auburn. Auburn is right in the, in the middle of the state, in the finger lakes region. It's about an hour and a...

...half north of the new york pennsylvania border if you if you do like, you know straight north and south. Uh not too far from from western P. A. About this about two hours east of Buffalo and auburn set between Syracuse and Buffalo. And you know a lot of people that I grew up with were giants fans or bills fans and when it came to the NFL very few jets fans in my neck of the woods. I was somebody though who was a fan of another Pittsburgh. I was completed by dan Marino and our kind of pile on the end of your name, we rooted for you. So marina and I was a fan of dance and began dreaming of being a sports broadcaster at a very early age there. So talk to me a little bit about growing up in auburn. What was sports like for you? Did you have like a big community like you know, a lot of people I talked to that are older that are our age kind of talk about you know we used to ride our bikes around, we go get all our buddies in the neighborhood, we play every sport. There was what was it like for you? Oh God, it was that way I lived in a neighborhood full of kids two blocks from a huge playground that had you know softball diamond, a large open field Basketball courts. In the summer. We played baseball all day. First we drove to our bike, rode our bikes to a local convenience store back then it was you know the term convenience stores didn't resonate back that you know there's there's pre-7-11 days I think. You know it was a place you went to buy your pack of baseball cards and take out that sugary stick gum and then stick those cards in the spokes of your bike with your glove on the handlebars and we would go to the store and get a drink, get baseball cards and then all rendezvous at the playground. We would play baseball in the summer. Yeah, it was completely a pickup situation. Oh yeah, totally unorganized by adults and organised by us kids. And then when the season changed, we started playing football. And then when the season gave way, of course it's no country up there. We played street hockey. I could never skate, I couldn't stand on skates, but one season to the next occasionally we try to play basketball and that's the way it was from sunrise to sundown in the summer. And from the time we got home from school until it was time to go back home for dinner During the other parts of the year. And it was it was a great childhood. I have two young kids now nine at 11 and you know they get together with some of the kids in the neighborhood but it's nothing like what I experienced as a kid and I often know it's them, you know, nothing like, well I mean I was, my child was almost the same, right? That that was like the three major sports we would go play, we didn't have soccer, we didn't have across you know, it had to be you know, maybe once in a while we get a sunny day uh and we go play basketball in the winter. But most of the time it was it was football hallway through till you know, and when I was growing up, Steelers were always in the playoffs. So you know, it was all the time. So we had it was the same thing, but it was great uh in the summer it was whiffle ball, it was baseball, it was, you know, dodgeball, we had a court like that as well, we just, whatever we could do to get outside, you know, auburn was a blue collar community and we had a minor league baseball team there, did you know, they they were the, the auburn Phillies when I was uh you know, first a baseball fan at the age of 345 and then eventually the auburn Astros and then became the auburn double days in the new york penalty. So there were people that had just gotten out of college, young young kids basically starting their pro careers and they would come to auburn new york. you know, some of the first auburn Phillies that I watched included Lonnie smith who went on to the big, there's very few of them made the major leagues from those days, but you know, I was a kid who I went to those games, I hung out by the visitor's bullpen, I chatted with the relief pitchers and the book backup catcher, you know, and eventually got broken bats and we take them back home and put the nails and the bats and you as you were saying, you know, if we didn't have the enough kids to play at the playground, we play with the ball in the backyard, we played hot box or pickle, you know, the run down Derby, home run derby. It didn't matter how many people we have, we found a way to play games back in those days. And like I said, it was a blue collar community, people loved sports, youth sports was very big there, particularly baseball, it was a lacrosse hotbed, you know one of the three parts of the country at the time where lacrosse was played. But I grew up in a household where my father loved baseball. He was the first generation american, He was a Yankees fan primarily because as an italian american, the Yankees of his youth had all the italian american star beira rizzuto and like and so you know that was our connection. My father was a lot older than most of my friend's dads but our our connection to span the...

...generation gap was baseball and it was very important in our household. Yeah, my dad was a huge baseball fan. I mean he taught me throw everything right, throw it hard, throw it at their head, you know that was how I was taught to bitch. And then the next one they won't even be close to the plate. But he, um, he he told me he had minor league trials, which I don't know, I guess, I believe him. But uh, he was the same way, you know, it was it was the same thing, He loved it. Um, you know, he he would get mad and I'd walk somebody or strike out or whatever, but he loved the game we talked about, he was one of 15 kids and I said, well, why didn't you pursue baseball? He said I made more money in a factory than I did playing baseball. You know, unless you were the top dog, you weren't making any money, which I get, you know, and it's probably still that way, kind of in the minor leagues, they probably can't make that much. But um, you know, everything you talked about really resonates and uh, you know, one of the biggest things is, is really how do kids today kind of get through because everything is so regimented And it's such a time schedule, you gotta pay. I mean if my dad had to pull 20 out of his wallet, I wasn't playing anything right, Everything was really cheap. We did fundraisers to raise the money to go play everything now. Everything is so crazy expensive. I don't know how parents can afford it. No question. You know, I have friends whose sons are an au baseball and the cost of playing a baseball would have been beyond our reach when I was growing up, uh football, you know, the equipment that's involved in all the sports hockey, especially I'm in an area of course in boston where youth hockey is extremely popular and I don't know how you know, even you know middle class family in a lot of cases can afford to keep up with the various au leagues and specialist camps. And I think the part of it that disappoints me the most about sports in general gus is the specialization that's associated with it because you know there are parts of the country, I have friends whose kids play high school baseball and they're required to stay on the team to go go to the high school coaches, indoor batting sessions during the winter and they're not playing other sports, they're giving them up so that they can play spring baseball and summer baseball and fall baseball. And you know I have people that work in professional baseball and the number of my friends, my best friend from Auburn was a scout, is a scout in the major leagues and you know, he he has a stepson who went to the Dominican republic to play down there at their teams academy because he thought it would be a better experience than paying thousands of dollars to play in a you and you know, for those who can do it and those who do, you reap the benefits of that. Hello. Certainly, you know, it's it's one of the paths to take, but for for a lot of people, it's one they can't take. And that disappoints me the most. I talked a lot of guys in the Patriots locker room bringing it back to football and so many of them played as many sports as they could. They were involved in a lot of different activities and they were allowed to play different sports. We have a son of an NFL Hall of Famer, Matthew slater, whose father exactly 20 years in the league as an outstanding offensive lineman for the Rams and Matthews one of the best of what he does on special teams. And he didn't play high school, they didn't play tackle football until he was in his teens I think was 14 in high school and he was allowed to do a lot of other things and he eventually followed his own love and passion for the game. But I see so many kids today who are specialist, they go down to one track, they don't play other sports and then they reach a point where maybe, you know, they, they're, they're size catches up to them or they lose the interest in the sport and you know, and eventually it doesn't turn out well and uh, in fact, you know, often backfires for them and their families and how you feel about that. Yeah, I think that, you know, when, when a parent has to dish out A lot of money, $600 to go play and then stay in hotels and everything. That puts a lot of pressure on a kid to go and try to be successful. Then how hard is it for a kid to go to his parents and say, you know what, I don't love this anymore. I don't want to do this. And one of our goals for our kids when they were growing up was just saying, look, we want you to play every sport, we want you to taste everything and try it right and then you'll figure out what you like. But to me, it was like, you have to play something because I think sports teaches you so much that you don't learn in a classroom or from your parents. You know, um, somebody asked me about that, um, you know what I thought about sports and said, look, it's another person watching them. Like why why do kids in sports do less kind of drugs and, you know, a smaller number of athletes will go and do, you know more of the bad things. I said, well, they have to earn the trust of their teammates, they have to earn the trust of their coaches, they have to earn the trust of their parents and then there's more people not to let down. And sometimes sports really can...

...emphasize what other things would never teach you. And that's why I loved it growing up. And the other thing too is when you grow up and like you said, there's no parents, there's no coaches, right? There's just you and your buddies and you figured things out and you figured out how to do things right and just play the game. And I think we lose a lot of track of that when, when kids don't get the chance to do that. If you understand what I'm saying, I do in another part of it too. I think another dimension to it as well is you have to, you know, there are so many cliches that are born out of sports and among them of course is rising when you fall, uh, taking another turn at the plate, when you have a failed at bat, when you strike out, going back up there the next time and you learn resilience and you learn determination and as you said, you learn accountability, you're accountable to your teammates and your coaches, to the other people on your team's regardless of the sport. And I do think in my own career it's helped me because in broadcasting, you know, unless you're one of the fast track stars that the, you know, enormous talents on our business who make it to the network level in their twenties and stay there for the duration of the careers. There are a lot of closed doors, a lot of rejection letters, at least for me. It took me many years to get to the NFL and I followed this winding path primarily initially through minor league baseball, and eventually landed an opportunity at the Division one level in college football. And partly that ultimately, years later into an opportunity with the patriots. But along the way, there were so many times when I was, I wanted a job and didn't get it. And I went back frankly, to, to the lessons learnt playing sports. I was in a very good high school baseball program. We were state runner up, my junior year state champion at the largest level in new york state. My senior year, I thought I could play college baseball. I went to the university of date and in the fall I played with the team and then got caught and it was enormously disappointing. And I was somebody who, with this best friend of mine, the aforementioned best friend from my hometown. We used to go and hit ground balls to one another, go to the batting cage. We did it on our own. Nobody required us to do it. I don't know, because of the passion for love of the game and he wanted playing professionally. I just wasn't good enough to play collegiately. But I took that passion and that work ethic and I started to use it in the direction of my ultimate career in broadcasting. And as I said, I faced, you know, many times where I struck out where I thought I had a chance to move up in minor league Baseball, or I thought I had an opportunity at another job in uh football or television, whatever it might have been, but I drew on what I had learned, playing sports to continue to persevere. You're disappointed, you're dejected, but you don't give up, you keep going, you keep pursuing your dream. Yeah, I mean, it just teaches you so many lessons in life, um and, you know, you don't really accept failure, but you understand that it's gonna happen, right? Nobody wins every game unless you're tom brady, I guess. Um and then, you know, you just kind of keep moving on. But uh, I love that. So, tell me, I have a friend who, who does radio now here in Pittsburgh and Katie K, I don't know if you've ever heard of that station, but anyway, so when the original Yeah, so Larry does, he's been doing radio, they call him the voice of Pittsburgh, he does steal their games and things like that. And I said, when you were a kid, um, were you the guy out there, like when somebody would come up to home plate and you would say, here comes Bobbi up to the home plate, you know, we got him, you know, and he said, yeah, I voice over the whole time we were playing, did you do stuff like that? Because I think when you do those things as a kid, it kind of carries over there in your adulthood. Always, always, I I used to watch games in the basement, turned the tv sound down and pretend that I was broadcasting the games at home, when I was playing with my buddies, I did the same thing. And again, you know, I was so fortunate. Speaking of my roots in auburn new york, I was in a community that had a really fantastic, literally baseball complex and people that recognized they had heard me announcing the games that I was playing with my friends, they knew that I wanted to be a broadcaster, people who were involved with our little League baseball complex in program and we had a press box with a P. A. System, we had light, so there were double headers and so I would play in one game at six o'clock, say. And then for the seven o'clock game, I would be invited by the commissioner of the league or someone else who was one of the league officials to come up to the press box and I'd sit next to the P. A. Announcer and he wouldn't let me, he would let me announce batters occasionally. Every time there was a foul ball hit out of play, I would say, please return all foul ball to the playing field immediately. It was, that was the beginning of my career in broadcasting. Let's say that's where I...

...started to develop that itch and I can still coons are not only 10 cents. Yes, yeah, absolutely. No. Yeah, absolutely. Snow cones are really popular back in that time. But, uh, you know, I think about those days and I've talked to so many of my colleagues and everybody kind of started in a similar way for us. You know, sports were always a passion, broadcasting an interest in broadcasting as well, you know, equal in terms of our interests and we played sports, we and we we talked out loud or we talk to ourselves calling the play by play, the games were participating in. Yeah, I mean I was never good. I can I just sit and watch but I can see like how that would change over like if you're watching a baseball game, a football game, whatever it was. You know, I could just see like announcers like you and and other people that's what they would do. They would just voiceover, they'd watch it watch to replace. There's a pretty funny comedian bob. Memory, have you ever heard of bob? He's pretty, he's like on twitter and then tick tock and things and and he takes place from different sports and he voices, everybody puts swear words to it. I laughed so hard because that's you know, it's like, man, you want sometimes you want to watch a game like that and I could just hear my dad cussing in the background like when he was watching the Pirates and the Steelers and like you want a little bit of that, like, like personality to it. Yeah. But as a broadcaster, if you do it, it could short circuit your career. At least somebody like me. But I have been on the airline for college football game when one of my broadcast partners unfortunately let out a four letter word that begins with F. It ends with K. Um, after the officials missed the pass, an offensive pass interference call on a late score. So I've been in a position where I've heard it on air gusts and yeah, it's certainly memorable. I'll never forget. I I'm gonna knock on wood and cross my fingers again. I hope that I never repeat that kind of mistake. Right. Right. I'm sure there's a lot of people in boston probably say it enough of the times that you don't need to say it. I see it so much to myself or out loud when I'm watching games as a fan. I generally, when I'm broadcasting you get emotional, of course, if something goes well for the patriots, when they win a Super bowl, when when, when they, when brady leads them down the field or when he did lead them down the field too late touchdown or they come back against the falcons. You get excited. Obviously you want your emotion to match that moment and you have to, you have a rooting interest in the team. Even if you don't root on the air and I'm not a broadcaster who has that style. It's over the top. I don't say we don't say they tried to be professional, but you're not, you're not impartial, you're there, you're the voice of that, that team, You're the voice of those fans. They want to hear you get excited and you have to, but when I'm watching games as a fan, uh, you know, I'm totally different. I'm somebody that does react if the Bruins are playing and a guy takes a silly penalty, I'm cussing if, if I'm watching a baseball game and a picture makes a bad pitch, you know, they give up a late lead, I might utter, you know, four letter word here or there. I try not because I have young kids, but you know, they hear them all too often, you know? Yeah. And, and um, it's just something that, you know, I learned at a very young age. My dad was one of many kids and was a mill guy and it's just was part of the household, that's kind of how it was and so you just kind of learned to live with it. But he always told me when I was a kid, he said, if you ever want to say that stuff, go to your room and say it, don't say it out loud because you might get some soap in your mouth anyway. That's how it was, right. He could say it, but I wasn't allowed anyway, you know, But it's interesting to me, like you talked a lot about baseball, you're on a state championship baseball team. I was as well in, in high school. Um, did you play football where you like, what was your fandom of football when you were younger? Because you became an announcer in the NFL? But you seem to have a really great love of baseball as well, and I'm wondering why it went to the NFL not to like MLB, you know, I love, I love the big three primarily, and then as I liked hockey as well, but baseball, football and basketball were my three favorites. Baseball was really the first love that I had and it was the sport that I played the best. I'm a very short guy, Which I hear about all the time by the way from, from my partner, it's got so like, I mean it's like 69 his, you know, he's a massive human being. Yes, with a mass event. He's a, he's a huge, I wasn't gonna say it. I'm glad you said it wasn't going to say it. I know he had a size eight helmet, you know, he's, uh, he's enormous. People are, people are taking it back. So I work next to him all the time we travel of course on the scene plan and he's always sending out snapshots on social media, talking about my, my height or lack thereof on the air. So I wasn't gifted with, with size necessarily, maybe in the wrong, wrong direction. I had a thicker waistline, uh, than than a lot of my...

...kids, the kids in my teams and my, my classes. So I was kind of on the pudgy side. I was sure I was slow. I was, I was non athletic for the most part, it was pretty good baseball player by, by sheer will and determination, but otherwise I just wasn't built to play other sports. Well, you know, I tried out for teams, I think I played football in 7th and 8th grade and a modified team and, and wanted to play linebacker and let them go to, well I tried to wrestle and I think I got pinned in the 1st 30 seconds and that, that was the end of my career there. I tried out, nobody wants to wear it will know, especially with my body. So I knew broadcasting was the first love, but with football, I was one of those kids. At the same time when the season shifted, I was in front of the television from sunday morning to watch. First had to watch the Notre dame highlights. Remember when Notre Dame football would really condensed our highlights, Lindsey NElson would, would voice the highlight package and said we move along to further action. I watched the Notre Dame highlights on sunday morning. Then I'd watch this is the NFL and this week in the NFL and then I would watch the, the pre game shows on CBS and NBC at the time and I would watch football yeah, the rest of the day on Sundays. And then on Mondays, my parents will allow me to stay up just in time to hear Howard Cosell do the halftime highlights on monday night football. So I love football. My dream was to be a broadcaster of all sports, primarily baseball, football, basketball. But in my career, because I got started primarily out of college on the minor league baseball path, I thought baseball would be the root for me. And I got the triple A at a relatively young age, but and and got a couple of big league opportunities in terms of interviews, but never got an offer for major league Baseball team. And then I started calling Navy football at the same time. And I fell in love with football. The build up from one game to the next. The excitement on a game day going into the stadium and seeing it come to life. The strategy involved, you know, the intricacies of football and and the team concept that didn't exist from where I, you know, where I saw it in baseball. I I fell in love with that. And I and I and I think I started to call it well enough to consider, you know, football broadcasting as a career after a number of years. And I started sending out football tapes. And one of them that I sent out was to the patriots announcer at the time, Gil Santos that was in 2008. So I've been doing navy for quite some time, about 12 years and Gil's very complimentary. And as it turned out, my wife and I, my wife is from boston. We ended up moving to the boston area. And so I was still keeping all my doors open. All the avenues open was broadcasting baseball in college football, college basketball. But we had moved to boston and made the decision that, you know, I wasn't getting to the major leagues in baseball. I wasn't getting that next job in the other sports. Let's go to boston. I base myself there continue to do the Navy games because they were caught enough to allow me to do that and then knock on doors and hopefully I can get a break and get on the air in boston. And that's exactly exactly what happened. It took a while I knocked down the door at the flagship of the Patriots 95 sports 7 2009 I went in, sat down with the program director and his assistant. I left a cd with samples of my work again. CDS. It was a little while ago and we heard some play by play of Navy versus Ohio State Navy versus Army. And this is a program director liked it and I didn't hear for them for three years. I want to just, I just wanted anything that some patients one shot a pinch hit appearance doing headlines. I didn't hear anything for three years and then Gil Santos retired in 2012 and I got an email out of the blue From 95, the sports hub. You know, they wanted to hear more of my work. I sent another batch of play by play samples. They listened to it. They liked it. They interviewed me and they hired me had baseball called first, I would've gone to major league Baseball, but the Patriots were the first team in 95 sports of the first big market station to give me an opportunity. And I'm so thankful Gaza. I'm so thankful that I wound up in the NFL and wound up with the patriots here in boston. I can't imagine being in a better situation for my family or me and yeah, yeah, because if you would have went to the Jets, it probably wouldn't have been the same story. You know, there have been a lot of more els than w that's for sure. What a franchise you went to everyone. Uh I want I appreciate you listening to huddle up with Gus, I'm your host just for uh we're gonna take a quick commercial break. We'll be right back with bob soc. Okay, fabulous. Alright, ready ready breed, yep. Go ahead. All right. Hey everyone, we're back after a commercial break. There were with bob soc, the voice of the patriots in 98 5, the sports hub. You know, he's been doing it since I...

...think you said about 2009, is that right or 13, 13 is when I got hired? 2009 was when I first knocked down the door of the Patriots flagship station 98 5 sports hub. Now, why did you go to the Patriots too? Were you trying to, were you always a patriots fan or were you just, you just kind of wanted to go up and that, that you thought that was a good place to go because you know, there are a lot of cities that could have used announcers right there. I'm sure there's people retiring all the time. So why, why the Patriot did you have it in there? Did you know somebody? Well, it's funny because whenever when I started broadcasting and I would bounce around from one minor league city to another in minor league baseball. And when I was calling the Navy football games, people would ask, what team do you want to broadcast for or what's your favorite team? And I always say the team that hires me. So that was my mindset. I grew up as a Mets fan first in baseball, but have your favorite player? I was a kid. Tom Seaver, uh, constantly uniform when I was three years old. Tom terrific was my favorite. Eventually rusty stomp. Uh huh. And then lee Mazzilli as I got older, lee Mazzilli, he was kind of the matinee idol out of the new york played in Brooklyn. I'm finding my fever. Look at this. I got my CVA right here. Oh, that's awesome. Yeah, my son's like my sons and I collect cards. So, uh, I got a bunch here. Yeah. Unfortunately my mother threw away all my tom Seaver baseball. So many people say that so many people say like mom, just through my whole shoebox out of all the cards. Can you imagine like what cards you would have? Like, I mean I remember as a kid, like I pulled some, my son's out by some old wax packs every now and then just because it just, it just brings back memories, right? You're pulling out the old piece of gum and there, you know, even if it's from the eighties or whatever, they, they weren't great, but it's so hard to get like a seventies carter, sixties card that like original like that and it just, I do it real slow. They're like, dad, why are you taking so long? I'm like, this is like my childhood right here, take, it brings me way back. Oh my gosh, no question. We go through the baseball card pack and you always wind up. There were like three or four players who were in every other pack of cards that you got. And uh you know when you hit on that one star player, it's just, it was an incredible feeling. But the only baseball cards that I have, I think with silver and I still have a binder, but I don't think they're worth very much. They were later in his career with other teams. And by then there were so many baseball cards and print. Nowadays. I think the industry is kind of uh diminished in terms of the value of baseball cards. His nickname, the franchise with the Met. He was, he was the franchise. I'm terrific. And I just finished reading his biography by Bill Madden was a good read and not kind of quite a guy. Uh, he was, somebody was a lot of times you're disappointed by your sports heroes. He was, he was a player that in the end and now that I know more about him even years later and following his death kind of validated those feelings that I have for him is my first sports hero, quote unquote. Yeah. Yeah. So who was that in football for you? Well, early on because I was a dolphins fan originally you were just Marino. It was eventually marina. I like the dolphins. It's a bizarre thing. I mean my brother was a Steelers fan at that time when I was a kid. The Steelers, the cowboys, the Raiders and the dolphins were the best teams in the NFL. The rams were good to back then in the seventies I think the Vikings. So my brother was a Steelers fan and in the A. F. C. I had to pick a rival and I couldn't pick the Raiders. I just didn't like the radio right? So I like the dolphins colors and became a fan of the dolphins and then they drafted dan Marino and in my house, you know, with my, my father particularly if you had a ball on the end of your name even though Don Shula might not have been an italian american. Well we're sure and then of course they can't, so there's no doubt about it. But as I got older and started broadcasting college football, any allegiances frankly to the NFL went out the door until while I was at Navy, Bill Belichick became the head coach of the Patriots and they won Super Bowl 36 because at the time Navy was awful. The football teams have gone through a stretch of 30 losses in 33 games from, I think 2000 through 2002 and steve Belichick was a long time Navy coach and Scout Bill's dad, Bill grew up in Annapolis and went to practices and watched joe Bellino, Heisman trophy winner and then Roger Staubach and his dad was a legend at the Naval Academy and was still around even in retirement every day. And because of the patriots success under Bill and I think coupled with the fact that Navy football at that point, at least on the field, you didn't have a lot to be happy about being proud about at the time. There's a lot to be proud about the mid shipment off field always. But they were going through a rough stretch.

People really cling to the success of the hometown kid, Bill Belichick and of course the association that the patriots and they were the team that took the field in the Super Bowl as a team not introduced individually. So I really became interested in the patriots. Obviously they were great underdog dog against the rams and back then they would, you know, I think viewed a lot differently than they would would be in future years. So I, I started reading a lot about Belichick and the patriots and I don't, I wouldn't say that I was a patriots fan, but that's how I first learned of Gil santos and started listening to his games because I would, I would buy the NFL films discs and and watch us three games to glory, the series on the Super Bowl champion patriots. And I've listened to Gil santos and I was enraptured. I went to Gillette Stadium for the 2003 NFC championship game when Ty Law picked off eight manning three times. And it's funny cause I had tickets through one of the colts. Marcus Pollard tied up his business person who handled some of his business interests, was a friend of mine and he got me a ticket to the game. And I flew from Baltimore to Foxboro to providence and then went to Foxboro and I was in the stands, in the cold family section listening to gil santos called the patriots and was just mesmerized. And so that's when I started to become a patriot fan in a sense. And then moved to boston, you know, started falling patriots of course on the news regularly. And so when I got the opportunity, because I'd come from navy, a lot of people associated, you know, the Belichick name with me being hired, but it really didn't have a lot to do with it. If anything at all. The station made the higher. But because I was living locally and because I had learned enough about the patriots recently, they thought, well this guy's kind of a local, we like his work. Maybe we can sell them as, you know, one of boston's ona. And, and, and it's funny because I was spending most of my time at that point traveling and going to the mid atlantic every week. But I was still a resident, I guess technically of New England and uh, knew enough about the patriots and of course with the Navy connection. You know, where I guess initially I had to prove myself. But that opened the door for me I think, well, yeah, you don't have the accent, right? You have the, you have the, you don't have an accent. So they're like, can we sell this guy as a boston person, Right? Because you always think of boston is such strong accent. But my question for you is, I mean, you did all these Navy games. How many years were you? Did you do Navy games? I did 16 seasons of Navy 16. So which army Navy game? Do you remember being like having the most energy because they're all special. Right? They're all incredibly special. And uh, you know, just all the men and women in uniform there and it's just, you know, it's a rivalry, but it's not, you know what I mean? Like it's just so special. What do you remember most about that game? Uh, you hit it on the head. It's a rivalry. But at the end of the day, their brothers in arms. I mean, they want to Army players want to be navy more than anything in the world. The same thing with navy players. There's nothing more they want to do in their athletic careers than beat army. That's the one thing you're measured by as an athlete at the service academies. How did you do against if you go to the Naval Academy and, and, and that's ingrained in them from day one, Everything around the academy yard in Annapolis says the army waits that they left in the weight room. The signs on the walls in the locker room. So many of the traditions outside of the military protocols and traditions revolve around that game and the passion and energy in the stadium. It's palpable. You can feel it at nine in the morning when you get there and it's electric from the time the midshipmen and cadets, everybody in the brigade of midshipmen, all the corps of cadets march onto the field pregame, they march onto the field and their company formations. There's a lot of people who've watched the game has seen it on television when you're there in the stadium. It's such, you're, you're gripped by the emotions, the pride that you feel, how impressive those young men and women are that are before you. They really are the best and brightest in this country. And they're called to a higher mission. They're called to do something that's more important than themselves and to pay any sacrifice toward that end. And and and and there's that feeling of reference that that feeling goes on throughout the day and then it culminates of course at the end of the game and they're going to hit each other harder than they've ever hit anybody in their lives. When they play that game, it's physical, it's all out effort regardless of the score, from the start of the game to the end of the game. And then when it's over the two teams stand side by side and they play their alma mater and they...

...sing their alma mater's and the winning team goes second and you know the losing team has to stand in front of the Korea, cadets of the brigade of midshipmen in the stands, their hands on their hearts and the players are singing their alma mater and the tears are flowing down there streaks probably never worse feeling in their athletic careers and then they have to run across the field and stand by the victorious team and probably never better feeling than the one that those winning players in that moment. It's just an incredible experience. If you ever have an opportunity to go to it in person, It's a bucket list event, it's bucket list game, but it evokes so much pride even when you watch it on television. And I can't say that there was one game more than any other that elicited more excitement than the others. I will say that the 2001 game, for obvious reasons, is extremely memorable for both teams. Both teams were mired in and I think double digit losing sees double digit losses That year. Navy hadn't won a game. I think army had 1 1 going into the contest. President Bush was there, visited both locker rooms and then presided over the coin toss. And uh, in fact it was a Pittsburgh kid, Eddie Malinowski who was the quarterback at the Naval Academy. You know, the story of how he was, he was kind of a quintessential midshipman went on to serve as an officer in the Marine Corps. But kid about my height, too short to play for your typical Division one team, probably too slow as well. But he was an option quarterback at the Naval Academy and when they flip the coin instead of saying heads or tails, I think, I think you might have called heads. He said heads sir, addressing the commander in chief, you know, with a kind of respect, you know, and uh, that always, it's one of the most memorable moments. It was, was, you know, that that scene on the field and john McCain was a naval academy graduate, the longtime senator and of course the prisoner of war was there as well. There is such a solemn feeling during that game throughout an army wound up winning that 2001 contest. So it wasn't memorable from that standpoint for me being the Navy announcer. But that's the one Army Navy game more than any other that I remember. It was incredible to walk to, to look back and see what happened to a lot of the players that were in that game. True heroes. Yeah, yeah. And so when you've seen all these players come through Navy, right. Obviously you remember their names, you've called their names, of course touchdowns, made interceptions, do all these things and then as they graduate and go on and you see their names and you know, for other things, do you remember that? Does that bring it back and, and uh, you know, what is that like for you? Because it's memorable calling football games because those games are always special. And then you see these guys go on to do amazing things that give us all the freedom that we get today. And so how does that feel like that? You remember? And you've got to know a lot of these guys, well, you're very proud of it. You know, you, you think about rewards in sports and I've had a chance to call three Super Bowl winds, four super bowls and all for the patriots. But you know, the feeling of pride and also sadness at times when I see, you know what happened to some of the players that I that I either broadcast as football players or other athletes that I interviewed during my time. Maybe someone like a wrestler, Travis Manion who was killed in combat who was interviewed as a halftime guest or lacrosse player like Brendan Looney. Uh, just to name a couple. There were football players who were killed as well. You know, I remember sitting next to a young linemen named Ron Winchester who was from Long Island. Ron's dream was to be a marine. Like his grandfather, Ron was an offensive linemen. You know, again quintessential, he was the quintessential navy midshipmen and a quintessential offensive linemen. You know, it's just heart and soul salt of earth, good guy, unselfish. You know the kind of guy that you want your son to be and Iran wanted to be a marine. He always dreamed of being a marine like his grandfather. I believe his grandfather's name was Dominic 80 Ron was later killed in the Marine corps. You know, and and then you know on the flip side of that is the pride you feel and I'll make a good you feel when you hear from other players who might have been listening to the Air Force Navy game because they woke up in the middle of the night in Iraq or Afghanistan and they pulled in the broadcast on their computers to listen on the internet. And I heard a number of guys that, that the connection to for for me with the players didn't really start until they graduated because when they're at the academy they have no idea who you are. You're just, you're just something so regimented. They're not like on their iphones all day, like a lot of kids, you know, in your interaction with them is pretty limited and you know, they just know you're one of the media, Maybe they know you're the football announcer travels with them, but they could care less. They just want to get, they get on the road away from the academy, they just want to get some sleep and then play the game. You know, they can enjoy their freedom a little bit, you know, in the hotel the night...

...before a game with their families. But after they graduate, you're, you're the connection when they go abroad because the games are brought may be broadcast on the Armed Forces network on television or they can't get them if they're stationed overseas, but they can listen on the internet. And I found that a lot of players who I really didn't have a relationship with an Annapolis, you know, eventually connected with me. Years later, there was a wide receiver that just recently was given his first ship command Tyree bonds. And he had actually come to the Patriots for a short time after he graduated uh for, for training camp work. I got a chance to work out with the Patriots and spend a little bit of time in a cap a number of years ago and went to the CFl for re file to audition there. The Toronto Argonauts didn't work out, but he stayed in the Navy and he is now in command of a ship of mine sweeper. And I just felt in years that you've been promoted. So that's, that's, that's awesome. So do you try to um, when you're calling a game, try to, you know, bring back plays or memories from in the past because you know, that, that, you know, midshipmen are listening to this all over the place. You know, you're related to a lot of your own experiences on the recent experiences in a game, which is what you do. I think typically with, with any team that you call, but there are times certainly where, you know, we, we did reminisce or recall things that were not football related per se, but more related to what you and I are talking about. But I think the big thing for me that I found two is that, you know, you're an escape for, for, for people there. You know, they want, they appreciate the fact that you treat the academy and its tradition and, and, and, and the mission that all those midshipmen have taken on with reverence and respect. That's very important. But at the same time, you know, they want to, they want to hear you say touchdown, navy. you know, they want you to get excited when there's a touchdown and, and they don't mind if you criticize when the teams playing poorly or coach makes a bad decision. Like I said, there was a stretch where they lost 30 games in, in a span of three seasons and there's no sugarcoating any of those losses. And uh, you know, for the place, they don't want to hear the players in particular. Some of the fans, you know, they appreciated the talk about how hard they tried and how dedicated they are. The players want to hear that, you know, they don't want to be seen as overachievers. I I found that out from talking to a number of players and coaches when they're playing, those games are the most important things in their lives in the moment. They don't, they don't love football or, or competing any less than, you know, a player at florida state and Clemson or Alabama, you know, in any of the traditional football powers, michigan Notre dame. You know, they're at the Naval Academy in a lot of ways because in a lot, in a lot of cases, because it's their chance to compete against the Notre dame's of the world themselves. So it's true. Yeah, that that offense is probably a lot of fun to call too. Because how many times have you watched that offense? You're calling the game and you have no idea who has the ball. I learned gus very very early to keep the binoculars on the quarterback, the fullback. Uh, you know, the the whole play because a lot of times you get confused, it's easy to go with the full back and the next thing, you know, the quarterback's running on the outside and he's pitching it to what they call a slot back. And it's funny, I went from broadcasting navy games with the kids, didn't even attempt a single pass To calling the Patriots where they would go up, Tempo, hurry up and Tom Brady throwing the ball 40 times. Hey, heading up with us, listeners manscaped well. They sent me, uh, they hooked me up with a bunch of tools and formulations for their package, three point oh kit. So, you know, I want to show you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We all think we got a perfect package, but they sent me the perfect package three point Okay. And I want to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It came in this great box. Uh, you know it and you can see what it says. They will thank you because they sent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us, uh, you know, stuff that makes you smell better. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this great uh, boxers what you get right, protect them. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this cool it sack, I guess you want to call it to store all your stuff in. So, uh, it's been great. Manscaped sent me a bunch of product. Um, you know, and you know, you can see it all on here. Uh, you know, you can go to Manscaped dot com and put in the code. Uh, Gus Frerotte, that's G U S F R E R O T T E. Get 20% off and free shipping when you use that...

...code, but you can get a kit, you can get individual items like, uh, this way, cool groomer that has a little led light, um, ceramic. Uh, these things come apart, they're waterproof. You can do a lot with them. So, you know, man scape is great. You know, it's funny g uh, I remember when I was playing with the denver broncos and I'm not going to mention any names, but there was a gentleman who was playing on our team and you know, if you ever hears the story, you'll know exactly what I'm talking about. But uh, he brought his own clippers in one time and he used to trim his beard up his goatee and everything and he had him there for about two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner, he walks in and there's a person, another player that is actually manscaping with his beard trimmer. So, you know, one of the things is, you don't want to use the same trimmer down there that you use up here. So uh he kind of freaked out a little bit and he said, hey, how long have you been using that tool there? And he said, well, showed up here about three weeks ago and I've been using it ever since, so you know, there is a lesson learned that, you know, don't leave things out and probably if it would have just said manscaped on it, but we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probably one of the funniest, uh, taking care of your ball stories I've ever heard or been around in the locker room in the NFL, so uh, it's a great story, um, but you know, I always said there was no way to know, there's no name on it and the guy was just using it and another guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heck of a funny story, So, one of the best I've ever heard my 15 years playing in the league. Um, but you know, there's so many great things about Manscaped and what they're doing because guys, you got to take care of yourself even though I got great hair. Um, and getting older, but you still have to maintain some sort of grooming, right? And so, you know, we all work out for me. I like working in my yard doing those things now that I'm retired, get a little sweat on and everything. You want to smell good. You know, you got to take care of yourself. They've got some great products. Um, you know, this one, uh, little uh, all deodorant. We'll need that here and there. Um, after, you know, working the yard, taking a hike, doing a walk, whatever you do. Um, it's a great thing, but there's so many great products um I want to thank Manscaped for sending them to me. Um The lawnmower 3.0. Obviously you can use it anywhere in your body, but I'm sure you guys have all seen the commercials, but this was one just letting you know that the lawnmower three point comes with a perfect kit. You can buy the lawnmower by itself, You can buy all these products individually. They even sent me this wonderful shirt. You can see the back. Your balls will thank you. And then here's the front. So it's an awesome shirt. Have great gear. And you know what? Sometimes you can just sit back, take care of your balls a little bit and and and read the paper. So the man's cape even has their own daily news do so which is great. So don't forget that you can go to the code Gus Frerotte on and that's G. U. S. F. R. E R O. T. T. E. Uh And you can save 20% on any products, the complete the perfect uh package gift set and uh you know you can save 20% and get free shipping. So use the code Gus Frerotte. G. U. S. F. R. E. R. O. T. T. E. Hey, everybody spells my name wrong, they even spelled wrong back my pro bowl jersey. So you know, I gotta I gotta help you guys out. So don't forget how important it is that you use these products, take care of yourself down below uh and have some fun right? There's nothing closer to you than your little bugs. So use the lawnmower. Uh use the Code Gus Frerotte, save 20% and get free shipping and uh order some great Manscaped products. Yeah. Yeah, 40 times a week. So it was a big adjustment from that standpoint. Yeah. No shotgun at Navy, barely know snow. Single wing shotgun there, that's for sure. Um, so then you go to the Patriots, right? And you've just seen, I mean, what an experience, what what a franchise. You see this success and you get to call these games. And there's been some incredible games since you've...

...been there in 2013 even and you've seen super bowls, you've seen NFC championship games. All that compare the Army Navy game to me to a Super Bowl. Like the feeling you get because both are exciting but has to be in a little different way. Yeah, absolutely. And it's funny that I did draw on my experience calling an Army Navy game or at least I told myself that was important to have called Army Navy before the First Super Bowl Super Bowl 49 When the Patriots played the Seahawks in 2014, January February 15. My first season was 13. The Patriots got to the F. c. championship. And then the next year, of course they won the Super Bowl against the Seahawks. Remember going into that game Thinking about all the games I had called previously. I was a guy in minor league baseball for 20 years. For a long time. Navy didn't play in a lot of big games outside of the Army Navy game. I called a few victories over Notre dame. But I did think to myself, you know, that Army Navy game, there was never a gameplay that's more important than that game to the fans and the players in it and the coaches and the audience. You know, that's a big game and that's, you know, that's a game that that's still As a national game with, with national implications. And I thought about that and it helped to ease some of the nervousness that I had going into Super Bowl 49. But you're right that the scale of the Super Bowl is, it's so different. I think they're both meaningful in their own ways. It's hard to compare the two because you know, the military dimension, The fact that so many of the army Navy games that I call to, we were in two wars. So you knew that those seniors were gradually and potentially could be in harm's way very soon. When in calling a Super Bowl though, the scale of it is you spend a week on site and you know, it's from one press availability to another one event that night to the next. So many fans, so much media such a long way to the stadium on game you because the securities, you know, immense. It's probably more than the Army, Navy army, Army Navy game, especially the president is going to be there. Obviously it's, it's, it's a long process to get into the stadium, but nothing like the Super Bowl because I think of the number of media who are at that game, it's crazy. And uh, you know, walking around a stadium, like I remember going to university of phoenix stadium at the time and around 10 in the morning and the game didn't kick off until, uh, you know, late afternoon pacific time. And you know, I had all this time to kill and I wanted to be there early cause I didn't want to, I don't want to be rushed. So I got to get to the booth and there's like 567 hours to kill before the Patriots and Seahawks are gonna kick off. And you know, I walked that stage, I want to walk around the stands and up and down the steps a dozen times, went to the gift shop was closed back to the booth, return to the dish, anything that guilt time and not think about how nervous I was because by then a lot of the preparation would be done had been done. But you know, just the scale of it. It's so their friend. And you know, naturally people remember the Malcolm Butler interception at the end of that game, I replayed over and over and over again here and the same thing with the Pats comeback in Super Bowl 51 their win in Super Bowl 53. You know, whereas for me, the Army Navy games, the highlights from those games. You know, I remember them but I don't hear, I don't hear them all the time. Like I do from the uh, the number of people know about the games too. It's just, and I know you do a podcast, you do a blog and all that stuff. Do you listen to yourself a lot to make sure that, do you do you edit yourself? I try to uh, unfortunately probably doesn't show and after as much as I'm sure it does, I'm sure. But it's hard sometimes for me when I do a show and I have to listen to myself, it's kind of difficult. It is I I cringe a lot of the time when I hear some of the calls in particular, I mentioned the Butler call, I still cringe now when I hear that, even though so many people locally, at least your voice goes, you get a little higher in your voice just yeah, I was in a bear hug. Our producer was bear hugging me in the middle of play and I just kind of started screaming. I, you know, I called it if I think about that too, I wasn't, it happened so fast. You remember the play shotgun? Everybody thinks they're going to run it, run it. Yeah, exactly. Lynch had just gotten stopped on the goal line, remarkable play by the patriots. Dont'a Hightower with one healthy shoulder was able to keep them out of the end zone. So you figure. And then, you know, that was that followed the german curse circus catch, you know, and I was upset about that because I thought that path was incomplete. Butler knocks it away, but Kirsten catches in after the ball is balancing on his legs and he bobbles and he gathers it in and so there's dejection about that, there's a handoff to lynch...

...and then there's a sense, okay, the Seahawks are going to hand it to him again, and this time he's going to get in the ball, snapped to Wilson and he throws it, he really doesn't take a step back, he's in the gun, he catches it, plants and boom, he's looking for Lockett. And the next thing, you know, there's this crowd and Butler drives on the ball and Zolak starts screaming, I can't believe it, my partner And I'm like, it's intercepted by Malcolm. Butler intercepted by Butler and I start screaming about the play, patriots half possession at the one with 20 seconds to go. And after the game, I turned to a producer and I kept asking, did I get it right? That I say Butler, that I get it right and bob, just enjoy it. Let's go to another field. You know, the confetti was still following, but you know, it's uh, yeah, you know, I listened to games that I listened to the regular season games, preseason games, gus, and I think it goes back to the conversation on sports. I've always wanted to be coached as a young announcer and still to this day, I'm very open to constructive criticism. So I would reach out to a lot of my heroes in the business, people, role models, people that are respected as broadcasters and eventually peers and colleagues and ask for their constructive criticism for them to be candid with me and tried to instill incorporate some of the suggestions and advice that I heard. I think you get better right. There's no question asked people that all the time. Please listen to my show, tell me what you think. You know, what can I do better? What kind of questions can I ask better? You know, I don't, I research, I don't write questions down because I want the show to flow. I just think that it's better just to have a conversation and and find out a little bit about you. Um, and so, so wrapping up everything here. You've told us your story, how you become the voice of the patriots. Tell me a little bit about everything that you're doing now because you know, football is just in the fall and you gotta stay busy all season. So tell me a little bit about that. Yeah, I'm in a situation here gus where I broadcast play by play for only the Patriots occasionally do some college basketball. But as a father of two young Children and with a wife who has a pretty busy career of her own and passions of her own. You know, we kind of have the best of both worlds and for me professionally, you know, I do like the lifestyle of the NFL and I mentioned this earlier about the difference between baseball and some of the other sports and pro football. I can have dinner every night with our family except for when we're traveling on a saturday on the road game. And I do work for the team and the station in the off season. Of course, Covid has changed a lot of what is done. You know, there's work for the team website. There's work, as you mentioned, involving podcasting, writing for the station blog on some of the other writing that I do separate from that and some of it is not football related or even sports related for that matter. I saw you wrote one on your cat. Yeah, it was leo, right leo. Yes, exactly. The late leo, the late leo, you're like me, you're a dog, person. I am. Yes. And we have a great dog and we have great cats doing. I've I've become a cat convert. We had a cat that passed away and I wrote about, you know what it was like with my kids. My family had been away for uh, for a week away from home and the cat got very ill and I'll attach the kids were to him and I just like, I like, and one of things I like about sports too. And you know, one of things I love about whether it's the naval Academy or the NFL, like our locker room with the patriots and there's so many good stories, so many good people that I've been introduced to and gotten to know. And I love telling the stories of those people as well. And, and the same thing with the stories of people are cats as it were outside of the booth. But there's a lot of charity work. There are a lot of client events, commercial work. Uh, that's ongoing. A lot of my counterparts, a lot of my colleagues around the league are farm busier than I am. Uh, and uh, you know, broadcast college football and the NFL in the same season, then do college basketball and major league Baseball. I just have a situation for me that that has worked well. At this point, I've been very lucky and uh, you know, I really appreciate where I landed and how it's gone so far. Yeah, no, it's awesome. And so please let her fans know how they can follow you and where they can go to find you. Yeah, I'm on twitter at bob soc and that's S zero cc I B O B S zero cc. I. And at 95 the sports sub dot com. We have a podcast, the Gridiron and beyond. And you do appear regularly on the station uh in the offseason, host of sunday football show with former linebacker ted johnson. We preview the draft, recap the draft, get into free agency and kind of a hot stove football season. So there is that work on air and then like I said, do a number of other events for the, for the station and the team as well. But 95...

...sports dot com is we will find most of our work archived. Yeah. So that that is awesome. You guys have a big game coming up when you the Patriots play Tampa Bay. I know that's gonna be crazy up there. You know, it's like, okay, what do we do? This is our rival, but yet this is a guy that built our franchise. So it's gonna be pretty interesting to watch. That week happened when you guys have to play Tampa Bay. Gus has been a topic on our, on our station for months. I mean, the brady, the brady story will never end here in New England, you know, his career and then the accomplishments and then of course, the departure and what he's done since leaving the Patriots for the buccaneers. So we're, you know, we're looking forward to it. Um, october 3rd, fourth week of the season. Everybody I know wants a ticket to that game. And I'm going to try to keep my, my emotions in check. I, like I said earlier, I I'm on the Patriots voice, but I certainly always so many thrills to watching brady. Uh, there's no doubt to ever do it. And, and a good guy to you as you may well know, Tom is generally a nice guy, very nice the patriots, but you know, life goes on. And we were both at Wes Welker's wedding with all the offensive lineman. So that was a fun night. That was, that was a lot of fun that night. So Tom is a great guy. Um, he's always been super nice to me and he's very, uh, you know, for as much success as he's had when you meet him, you just feel like he's a humble guy and you know what I mean? Like you can talk to him like you can have a beer with him and it's all good. But bobby, really appreciate you coming on, sharing your story with us. I hope everyone can follow you because I think the patriots are going to be a little bit better again this year. I think they've got some good parts back and it's going to be an exciting year up in boston. I hope so because I think so too. You know, they certainly spent a lot of free agency, uh, you know, the draft has been questionable in recent years. It looks like they have a draft class that, you know, they all come highly recommended. They all have a lot of potential. But it looks like this draft class with matt jones quarterback number 15, you know, certainly holds a lot of promise. But the quarterback position as you know better than I, uh, that's the position right now that really, I think their season hinges on, there'll be a lot better defensively with the two tight ends they've added and all the money they spent on free agency. They should run the ball well, be very good defensively, but it all comes down to the quarterback. Yeah. And you know, and they have a coach who doesn't like to lose. So, uh, you know, this guy prepares harder than anybody in the league. So it's gonna be very, I think he's gonna want to get back up on top. So bob. I appreciate you joining me on huddle up with gusts, all my friends and fans out there. Don't forget to tell everyone to like and subscribe the podcast. Huddle up with Gus, go to my website, huddle up with gusts dot com and check us out and all of our great guests uh including bob soc. So bob, I appreciate you joining me today and thanks for coming on guys. Thanks for having me enjoyed it. Yeah, it was great. I appreciate it. Thanks for taking the time. That's it folks. Another episode down, We want to thank all of our partners. 1631 Digital News when thanks Sandra. FMM And Vegas sports advantage. Don't forget to use my code, huddle up and get 25% discount when you join. They'll make you some real money. So have a great day. We'll see you again next week. And that's a wrap sportsman. Thanks for joining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another actually, Huddle up with Gus featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus, Theron, huddle up with Gus is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available on apple music.

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