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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 5 months ago

Bob Kendrick

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Joining me in the Huddle is the President of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, Bob Kendrick. Bob is the man to listen to if you love baseball and its history. Bob's appointment in 2011 marked a celebrated return to the NLBM. The NLBM is the world's only museum dedicated to preserving and celebrating the rich history of African-American baseball and its profound impact on the social advancement of America.

Bob became the museum's first Director of Marketing in 1998. He was named Vice President of Marketing in 2009 before accepting the post as Executive Director of the National Sports Center for the Disabled-Kansas City. Before his departure, Bob's leadership helped secure more than $15 million in financial support for the NLBM and widespread national acclaim. Kendrick is now responsible for the Museum's day-to-day operations and for developing and implementing strategies to advance the mission of the NLBM.

Bob began his association with the NLBM as a volunteer during his 10-year newspaper career with The Kansas City Star as a senior copywriter for The Star's Promotions Department.

While he doesn't fashion himself to be a historian, Bob has become one of the leading authorities on the topic of Negro Leagues Baseball history and its connection to issues relating to sports, race and diversity. He has been a contributing writer for "Ebony Magazine" and the National Urban League's "Opportunity Magazine."

His volunteer roots in the Kansas City community are deep and passionate. He has served on the boards of various Kansas City-area non-profit organizations and has worked with Kansas City youth for more than 20 years. He remains active in the community and spends a great deal of time in Kansas City classrooms giving motivational talks to area students and sharing the illustrious history of Negro Leagues Baseball with nearly 100 schools, social and civic groups annually.

In 2006, the Greater Kansas City Black Chamber of Commerce awarded him the Mary Lona Diversity Award. He was named "Citizen of the Year" by the Omicron Xi Chapter of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. In 2009, The Kansas City Globe named Kendrick to the papers' list of "100 Most Influential African-Americans in Greater Kansas City."

A native of Crawfordville, Ga., Kendrick received a basketball scholarship to attend Park College (Parkville, Mo.) in 1980, where he earned a B.A. degree in Communications Arts in 1985. 

Hey everyone, Welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback GusFrerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, somepeople say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read.16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latestnews, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favoritepodcast. Follow up with gusts. Check it out today at www. 16 31 digital newsdot com. Welcome to what surely will be a doozyof a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron atthe diamond or on the links, we can only say, yeah, welcome to this week's huddle upwith gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has takenhim on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchiseswith 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the gamesare. One. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterbackup. Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios,it's kick off time, so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle upwith us two left. Hey everyone, welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with Gusts. I'm your host, Gus Frerotte, 15 year NFLquarterback. As you know, I played for many, many teams in the NFL uh seven tobe exact. So that's a lot. I want to thank 16 31 digital news and theirstudio for having us. And also um sounder dot FM for for having us ontheir platform and especially want to thank Manscaped uh, for for joining usbecoming a partner, you can go to Manscaped dot com and you can use mycode Gus Frerotte, all capitals. That's F R E E R O T T E. And you can save 20on any manscaped products. Just remember when you go to man scape, theyalso donate a portion of whatever they sell for testicular cancer. So go tosupport landscape. It's helping all of us guys that I have a really goodfriend who had that and he survived. So I really want to support that. So thankyou man escaped. And uh, today we have two guests with us, which we haven'thad in a while, so I'm really excited. We have uh, my co host back, uh, MarnieSchneider who we've had on the show many times. She's written many books,um, football Freddie and fumble the dog as we know those, those books I thinkmarty, you just told me that you just finished, uh, one for Dallas Fort Wortharea or you? Re named it? I did. Well, we, you know, we've updated it a littlebit, so it's game day in Dallas and Fort Worth. So we're really excitedabout that, added in some really great hotspots in the Fort Worth area and ofcourse, lots of history and then uh, game day in Tampa Bay will be out inthe very near future probably within the next 6-8 weeks. So I'm reallyexcited about it will be a big Super Bowl trophy on top of that one. Right?I can see fumble just like sleeping right beside it. So yeah, but you know,actually, they probably weigh about the same amount because the Super Bowltrophy, the Lombardy only weighs £7 but the whole story goes, it takes anentire team, an entire city, an entire community to lift it up. Yeah. And ifif all of our guests aren't short, Marnie's grandfather was letter toeswho owned the philadelphia eagles. Her mom was one of the, you know women whobroke the glass ceiling, as we say, was the first GM in the NFL. So her mom hasdone so many great things and I'm so excited to have marty on and today wehave one of marty's good friends on joining us. Today is bob Kendrick, bob,Kendrick is the president of the negro League Baseball Museum. I don't knowhow many years you've been there bob because I think you were there for awhile, you left and you came back. But I am so excited to talk to you a littlebit about old school baseball. I collect old vintage baseball cards, soit's right up my alley. How are you doing today, bob? Because I'm doinggreat man. Thanks so much for having me on the show money. It's great to seeyou as well. It's good to be with both of you. Yeah, thank you bob. So, you know theshow is really simple. We want to ask you bob. I know you grew up in, I thinkit was crawford Georgia, right. Crawfordville Georgia. CrawfordvilleGeorgia. So tell me about growing up there. And what when's the first memoryyou have of how you fell in love with sports? Was it because of a relative?Or did you have an idol? What was that moment for you? It started early. I'mthe youngest of six boys. And so all of my brothers were involved in sports. Myfather loved sports. So it I think inherently it came down to me, You know,even though the brother that's closest...

...to me is 10 years older than I am, Igot to still watch them engaged and involved with sportscenter seeminglywas some kind of sports equipment going back to as early as I can remember. 45years old, shooting hoops on a bicycle rim or in this case also, there was anold as they would call it, a large can in the country that was nailed to theside of a wood framed house are old wood framed house that I would shootbasketball before I even ever had my first real basketball or basketballgoal. And so, but you know, the same thing, you made up your littleequipment growing up and you made up your games and everything else. Butsports have always been a prevalent part of my childhood and interestingenough now sports history makes up so much of my life today. Oh, it does. And I think that, I meanI've watched several interviews that you've done with people and it's beenamazing the knowledge you have that just rolls off your tongue and thehistory of the game of baseball and uh, the negro leagues. It's been amazing.And I love to watch all that history and all the videos that you guys havecreated there, so marty tell me a little bit about how, you know, bob andhow you guys met. So I was doing some work with minor league baseball andhelping them kind of build a program to get kids in different communities toenjoy the game of baseball. Obviously being a professional baseball player orsomething that is a big long shot, but getting the opportunity to go to gamesand experience, that was something that really excited me. And then once Ifigured like if they had a little taste of going to a game and enjoying it atthe minor league level, maybe they'd want to play it because I love whenkids place for it and it's always fun. And so I had the opportunity to reachout to bob and he was so gracious and said, okay, this is something that Ilove what you're doing. And here in Kansas city we've got, you know, agreat minor, great minor league teams and a great museum and bob and I hadstarted putting together some of the infrastructure to bring kids fromunderserved communities to Kansas city to experience what in my mind and Iknow what bob is building there in Kansas city, one of the greathistorical pieces of our country. And so while we didn't get to bring thekids there yet, we're still working on that part of it. I love hearing bobstories and he is a historian, whether it's male female. You know I've beenyou know doing some research also like on female baseball players in the negroleagues and it's so interesting and you know bob is such a gracious guy thatI'm like oh bob tell me about maybe Anderson or tell me that it was like ohshe's the best and you know I would probably keep him on the phone forhours and hours and he's got a lot of people to take care of. So uh you knowbringing kids and having them experience the museum that bob was puttogether in Kansas city is something really exciting for me and I know thatbob loves to be the host of this beautiful facility that he has rightthere in Kansas city and his shared with me a lot of the growth they've had.So I am lucky that between Major league Baseball and minor league Baseball thatbob and I came together, Yeah, we'll have to get a fumble. Thedog baseball book going, I think that would, that would be great. So, so bob,you mentioned the dog will be named bunt, not fumble. Yeah. Right, right. Ilike that, I like that. Uh so bob, you know, you talk about playing basketballand the old hoops like you were talking about, you know, just using a bicyclerim for that. I mean a lot of people have done that, I've seen that growingup, but we also played many other sports. My dad worked at a mill calledPPG here in Pittsburgh and he used to bring just broom sticks home and feltand we would cut, we'd cut balls out of felt and that's what we used to playwith a lot. Um, so tell me about your experience in all the sports that youplayed growing up well, primarily because we tried to play everythingthat was in season, and my town Crawfordville, keeping my Crawfordvillewithin, as we say, the city limits was only 500 people, so it's a very smalltown. And so my high school only offered basketball and tracking field.And so anybody who knows me knows that I don't believe in running just for thesake of running if there's not a ball in ball, I don't want to have any partof, uh, you know, I gravitated to playing basketball, but as a kid,whatever was in season, we played baseball, football, basketball. Youknow, we even tried to mimic and create our own version of golf, even though wehad no golf course and no nothing, no golf clubs or anything, but you justtry to emulate what you have seen and...

...over basketball was really how I endedup getting to Kansas city and so I was playing, I ended up playing a couple ofsmall year, couple of, a couple of years of small college basketball hereat Park College now part university, N A N A I level basketball, how in theworld they found me in Crawfordville Georgia, I will never know, but theydid ended up coming out to the midwest, but you know, again as a kid, you justwanted to play everything that was in season and we tried to emulateeverybody that we saw playing the game, you know when I played baseball, I wasHenry Aaron, that's who I want to be, I want your swing, is that your swing?You try to emulate? I tried to emulate the swing, I tried to emulateeverything I wanted to run like Henry Aaron and you know Henry Aaron was myall time favorite major league baseball player, my childhood idol as a kidgrowing up in Crawfordville Georgia and uh and still to this day, the onlyperson that I've ever been star struck around and, and and gus that's with theunderstanding that we've had. American presidents visit this museum. Firstladies of these United States of America visit this museum, otherdignitaries like general Colin Powell and a plethora of great athletes andentertainers and as are often times say with no disrespect to any of them, theyare not Henry Aaron in the eyes, minds and hearts of this kid fromCrawfordville Georgia and so every time I was around Henry Aaron, I was reducedit at almost 12 year old kid who circled the basis in his parents livingroom. When Henry Aaron hit record home run 7, 15, Almost 12 years old. Andwhen he hit home runs 7, 15, 80 miles away in Atlanta's Fulton County Stadiumas he's touching them all, I'm touching them all in my parents living room, somy mother had an old couch that was first base, her old tv with second base,she had another old couch that was third base and whole recliner was homeplate and so I'm touching them all, jumping for joy and then I get to meetmy childhood idol and you know, sometimes when we meet those who weidolize from a farm, they don't always live up to our lofty expectations. Butwith Henry Aaron, he far exceeded anything that this little kid, thislittle country kid from Georgia could have ever imagined. And and every timeI was around him, you know, from day that I gave you had the opportunity totour him through this museum And from that point on subsequently, every timeI was around him, I was always reduced to that nearly 12 year old kid Whocircle the bases when he hit record home run 7, 15. Yeah, I couldn't I couldn't imaginethat. I think that would be incredible. Um you know, for me growing up here inPittsburgh, I I loved Willie Stargell, Yeah, you know, and that was my lefthanded swing. My right handed swing was always trying to be Clementi, that wasmy dad's favorite. And then um you know, it's just, you know, just to my firstinterview I ever did for a podcast was Roberto Clementi junior, and you know,and he and I have been friends since then, and just and we talked about thison the show. Sometimes people want him to be his dad right? Where he's nothimself because he has the name and everything, so that's really tough forhim and I felt like that too right, Like man, this is a guy that just likemy whole family watched in love, but that's not you, that's your Junior,right? You're a whole different person, so, but I understand how you can feellike, because even when I met terry Bradshaw, that was my idol, because Iwas a Steelers fan, right? And when he came and I was playing for Washingtonand he interviewed me. I don't even remember the interview, I was juststaring at, right, because that was like my idol. So I I completely getthat and and everything I've heard about, Henry Aaron has just beenincredible. Just he was amazing guys and a lot of people did not know thathis career began in the negro v. Yeah, I started in Negro Leagues in 1952 whenhe left mobile Alabama, he was a skinny cross handed hitting shortstop. So inthe case of Henry Aaron, he was a right hand hitter who was hitting with hisleft hand on top. Yeah, that as you know is unorthodox. Yeah, yeah. Thefear is that you would break your wrist hitting in that manner. Well, HenryAaron is knocking the cover after baseball in a highly unorthodox fastand so when he gets to the clowns, they put the right hand on top, they didn'treally want to tinker with this kid swing, but they put the right hand ontop and the rest as they say is history,...

...is history there after discovered bythe boston braves who would become the Milwaukee Braves, who of course wouldbecome the Atlanta braves. But it all began in 1952 When this little skinnykid, he couldn't have weighed 150 lb. Leaving mobile Alabama to go join theIndianapolis clowns. and less than four months later he was gone. Here we go,embarking on what turned out to be a Hall of Fame, caliber major leaguecareer. He would become one of the greatest players in baseball historyand truthfully in a game of numbers. And as you both know, our sport is agame of numbers. No 1's numbers are better than Henry Aaron. He's gotrecords that I don't think we'll ever be broken. I don't think it's totalbased record will ever be broken and it is highly unlikely that R. B. I. Recordwill ever be broken. And so he was an amazing pillar of consistency in whathe did in this game. And of course, he carried himself in such a manner thathe would after this game become a civil rights icon of a man therapist, anastute businessman and someone who was always out on the front line of tryingto create civil rights for those who might have been marginalized in thiscountry. His place moves well beyond baseball history. You know, his placemoves into a level of humanitarianism that very few of us can even relate to.So he will always hold a special place in my heart. I love hearing you talkabout him bob. I mean, it gave me goose bumps because, you know, all theminutia of Mr Erin's life and what motivated him, and it's so beautiful to,you know, here you share his story and he unfortunately is not with us anymoreto do so, but you're such a great uh voice for him to carry on his legacyAnd that is so beautiful and that's why sports really is the universal languagebecause he did transcend just being an athlete. He transcended so many thingsabout giving back and truly making a difference and so thank you for beingable to pick up the, literally pick up the ball and run with it, you know, youknow, I'll never forget guys, I took him on that tour of 1999. Baseball,Major League Baseball is celebrating the 25th anniversary of Mr Aaron,breaking route, Babe Ruth's record and really guys, that was a record thatreally no one thought would ever be approached And certainly not by a blackman in the deep south. And and so it is sad to say that it took him literally25 years later before he finally was able to exhale and celebrate what manythought was the most prestigious sports accomplishment of all time. And thatwas the passing of Babe Ruth's record because it was such a tumultuous timefor help. This is 1974 and erin's family is in hiding. You know, hedoesn't know if he's gonna make it around the basis when his home run 7 15off. My good friend Al Downing, who was a great picture, you're a great picture.Everybody will remember him for giving up home runs 7 15, you know whatpicture out through, You know, I'm trying to remember if it was a fastballthat I think got up a little bit more than Al wanted it to and mr Erin'swrist was just so quick, you know, we're talking about we're probablytalking about the strongest and quickest risk this game has ever seen.And he would always say I never looked for a fastball because I didn't thinkanybody could get one body. You know, you know, I think about like just all these wonderful people that playedthe game, all these guys now, they're all data and analytics guys, right? Thelaunch point, launch angle and all this. Like can you imagine going back in theday and seeing all those guys from the fifties, sixties, seventies, just whatall this data, I don't know if they can go back and look at it all but I thinkit would have been over processing for them. It really would, you know uh theyhad a very simple philosophy. See the ball hit the ball hard somewhere, youknow? That's it. I don't think I don't really think Mr Aaron consideredhimself a home run hitter, he just wanted to hit the ball hard someplaceAnd it just happened to go over the Wall 755 times, you know? But I don'tthink he looked at himself as a home run hitter. And so I'm sure there'sthis this science to the way that they played it. But when you start talkingabout launch angle and exit velocity and all these things that we talk aboutnow and that stuff doesn't matter to...

...them. You just wanted to see that balland hit it hard somewhere and I think that's what really drove them, but theyweren't trying to swing up on the ball the way guys swing up on the ball today.That's why I think you see so many strikeouts in our game because they'retrying to help it up. I think these guys are trying to the bottom of theball and get that backspin on the ball. And it would you know, whether whetherpeople don't believe or not that the ball will rise, I think we've all seenthat ball rise when it squared up, right? It does rise, I guess. So afteryou go to park college or university, whatever it's called now, I can'tremember what you said, but tell us about your journey to get to the museumafter college, to where you are now. Tell me about that journey a little bit.It's an improbable journey. It really is. I graduated from Park University in1985 and my first job out of school was with the Kansas City, start the dailynewspaper here. And so at that point in time I was trying to make a decision onwhether I wanted to be a writer on the editorial side or if I was, I was alsotinkering with whether or not I wanted to try to move in to broadcast. And somy first job is at the Kansas City star. And so I just wanted to get my foot inthe door somewhere. And so I started in the composing room actually putting thenewspaper together, eventually moved over into the Stars promotionsdepartment, which function as its in house advertising agency. And therethere I became to see your copywriter, the promotions department. And I drewthe assignment of promoting the negro league Baseball museums first evertraveling exhibition, an exhibition called Discovered Greatness and Gus.That exhibit is still touring the country to this day. That was 1993. Itis that the Yogi Bera Museum right now and it was playing to rave reviewsbefore the bearer museum had to shut its doors because of the pandemic. Butthat was my first introduction to the negro leagues Baseball museum. And Iremember as part of trying to get a little back information about thehistory of the museum, history of the league so that we can put this campaigntogether. I remember coming down to the museum for the first time and this atthis point the museum was in a little one room office and I remember going inand the late Don Motley who was the executive director when this thingfirst started. And I said well I'm looking for Mr martin. He said I'm mrMotley and said, well I'm looking for the negro leagues Baseball Museum. Hesays, son, you're standing in it. It was it was a room by a fraction of thesize of my office and it has some pictures on the wall and that was thenegro leagues museum down the storefront space. We had created thistraveling exhibition And the campaign was really successful. We drew some10,000 people here to historic 18th and buying where the museum operates. Andat that time there was nothing at 18th and buying, it was one of those urbanareas that had died 10,000 people in the month of August of 1993 to see thisexhibition. And I think then The officials here really felt like, Okay,we do have something special here. And that's what prompted them to ask me ifI would join the board of directors and I did so in a volunteer volunteer role.So my involvement started as a volunteer in 1993. And now some yearslater here, I am trying to lead this organization, Uh, an organization thatI've been involved with now for 28 years. And so it became an instantpassion for me. It really did I tell you this story? Yeah. It's a greatstory. It's a great story. So, tell me about our our people sending you, uh,memorabilia objects all the time letters. I mean, those things like eventhe Clementine Museum is always getting, you know, they're always gettingartifacts coming in and it's a museum and you have to treat it like a museum.Museum quality. So, how, what are you doing to preserve that history? Yeah, Itell you, I wish gus we have started this museum 25, 30 years before we did,because we have a whole lot more stuff. Yeah, I do. And I would say that 95 ofthe items that are on display here at the museum in our gallery space, It wasall donated. Yeah, 95 of those items were donated by the players and ortheir families. And so we do get people who come across items and they'll calland say, do you have any interest in this? And the answer is always yesbecause there is no insignificant piece for us. There's always a story behindthe story and it's our job to bring...

...those stories to the forefront. And soit's only been over the last decade that we've actually started to try andgo out there and occasionally compete to bring memorabilia home becausethey're collecting business as you well know man, that is a high dollarbusiness and probably collectors have really kind of controlled these rareartifacts that do surface from time to time. As I tell people all the time,we've almost become our own worst enemy. The more we popularize the story, we'redriving up the price of these are to the point that we can't compete to goget them. Yeah, no, I hear you. And so sometimes you have to ask those peopleif they're willing to donate it and just, hey, it's still yours, butdisplay it in our museum. Exactly, exactly. So you have to be creative andfinding these avenues to bring these pieces home and tell those stories andI can tell you, we've gotten things in some of the most improbable ways. Oneof my favorite memories of getting an item, there was a guy here demolishinga home in Kansas city and in the process of demolishing this old house, he broke a mirror mirror on the wall,mirror falls and he breaks the mirror. Well on the whole, the mirror was backwith an original Kansas city monarch game day poster, wow. And so the, theyoung man gets the poster and he brings it down to me and says, do you have anyinterest in this? So oh man, we love to have it. And so he donated it to themuseum. Now you both know that it is always been believed. If you break amirror, that's seven years, bad luck, I don't know. I guess what happened tothe young man that gave us, suppose I hope nothing bad happened to him, butit was certainly good luck for us. Yeah, those are the great stories of wherepeople are, you know, going back to where they grew up, you know, their momnever changed their house. I mean I have my favorite card I have as aRoberto Clementi rookie card and a gentleman who was an attorney inNashville Tennessee. I went to dinner with them and he said, hey, I want togive you this. And he gave me an envelope and had the card in it and I'mlike, I opened it up and he knew him from Pittsburgh and I'm a huge piratefan, and he said, I want you to have this. And he said, I can't take thiscard from you, like this is like, he goes, no, I went home, My mom passedaway and I went to my bedroom where she hadn't been back there in like 25 years,he said, and everything was exactly the same, and he said, I wonder if my cardsare still in the shoebox and all his cards were still in a shoebox in thecloset, she never touched a thing, and he said, I want you to have this. And Isaid, are you sure? And he said, yes, I want you to have it. So I was like,that's like my greatest gift I've ever gotten, it's amazing, I'm sure that'show you feel all the time when you get those eyes so that I can think aboutall those cars that I added, I put in the spikes of my bicycle. You probablyhad some Henry Ayers. I know that you like, which had those now. That'swhat's so great about sports. Is that like a little piece of paper can bringso many memories and remind you of such beautiful times and fun times. So, youknow, to think about just I, you know, have my son stuff right here just to belike, just doing this action of throwing a ball into a glove and thenall the stuff that happens when you do that. It really is magic. I mean,obviously we all have, you know, ended weird. I, I grew up in philadelphia andat the time the eagles and the Phillies shared the stadium. So you know, I'm adaughter of a single working mother and yeah, her office happened to be at thevet. So in the dog days of summer when there's no football going on, I washungry and I, you know, wander over to the Phillies side and they would takeme in. And that's how I learned to love baseball by watching, having a cocacola and a hot dog and watching tug McGraw and Mike Schmidt and you know,bob boom throw a baseball around. And it just it just simple things like that.It really amazing. No, they are and that sports in general, but baseball inparticular, it's the romantic nature of baseball. It leads us to measure timesin our lives perhaps more so than any of the other sports. You know, that'sthe beauty and magic of baseball. You know, people remember the places andyou remember going to your first baseball game and typically whoeveryour favorite baseball player was as a kid, they're going to be your favoritebaseball player the rest of your life, You know, that's baseball, you know,And I think the negro leagues is part...

...of that lord and that romanticism aspeople are now learning about these leagues, you know, they didn't know.But as my mother would say, you don't know what, you don't know. And so it'sour job to bring this history to the forefront so that people get anopportunity to know about these legendary athletes who just loveplaying this game. Yeah. Hey everyone, uh, sorry guys. No,no, I'm gonna take a quick break. Hey everyone, I'm gonna thank you forlistening to up with Gus, we're talking with bob Kendrick, the president of theNEgro League Baseball Museum. We're gonna take a quick break, we'll beright back. Hey, how come up with us listeners?Manscaped. Well, they sent me, uh, they hooked me up with a bunch of tools andformulations for their package three point oh Kit. Uh, so, you know, I wantto show you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We all think we got aperfect package, but they sent me the perfect package, three point oh kid, Iwant to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It came in this great box.Uh, you know, and you can see what it says. They will thank you because theysent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us, uh, you know, stuff that makes yousmell better. And then, you know, they sent me this great, uh, some boxers,even what you get right, protect them. And then, uh, you know, they sent methis cool sack, I guess you want to call it to store all your stuff in. So,uh, it's been great. Manscaped sent me a bunch of product. Um, you know, andyou know, you can see it all on here. Uh, you know, you can go to Manscapeddot com and put in the code. Uh, Gus Frerotte, that's G U S F R E R O T T E.Get 20% off and free shipping when you use that code. But you can get a kit,you can get individual items like, uh, this way cool rumor that has a littleLED light, um, ceramic. These things come apart. They're waterproof. You cando a lot with them. So, you know, Manscaped is great. You know, it'sfunny, I remember when I was playing with the Denver broncos and I'm notgoing to mention any names, but there was a gentleman who was playing on ourteam and you know, if you ever hears the story, you'll know exactly what I'mtalking about. But uh, he brought his own clippers in one time and he used totrim his beard up, his goatee and everything and he had him there forabout two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner, he walks in andthere's a person, another player that is actually manscaping with his beardtrimmer. So, you know, one of the things is, you don't want to use thesame trimmer down there that you use up here. So uh, he kind of freaked out alittle bit and he said, hey, how long have you been using that tool there?And he said, well showed up here about three weeks ago and I've been using itever since. So, you know, there was a lesson learned that, you know, don'tleave things out and probably if it would have just said manscaped on it,we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probably one of the funniest, uh,taking care of your ball stories I've ever heard, or been around in thelocker room in the NFL, so, uh, it's a great story. Um, but you know, I alwayssaid there was no way to know, there's no name on it and the guy was justusing it and another guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heck of afunny story. So one of the best I've ever heard my 15 years playing in theleague, um, but you know, there's so many great things about manscaped andwhat they're doing, because guys, you got to take care of yourself eventhough I got great hair um and getting older, but you still have to maintainsome sort of grooming, right? And so uh you know, we all work out for me. Ilike working in my yard doing those things now that I'm retired. Get alittle sweat on and everything. You want to smell good. Uh you know, yougot to take care of yourself, They've got some great products. Um you know,this one, a little uh all deodorant, We'll need that here and there. Umafter, you know, working the yard, taking a hike, doing a walk, whateveryou do. Um It's a great thing. But uh there's so many great products. Um Iwant to thank Manscaped for sending them to me. Um The lawnmower 3.0.Obviously you can use it anywhere in your body, but I'm sure you guys haveall seen the commercials, but this is one just letting you know that thelawnmower three point oh comes with the perfect kit. You can buy the lawnmowerby itself by all these products...

...individually. They even sent me thiswonderful shirt, You can see the back, your balls will thank you. And thenhere's the front. So it's an awesome shirt. They have a great gear and youknow what? So sometimes you can just sit back, take care of your balls alittle bit and and read the paper. So Man's Cape even has their own DailyNews, so which is great. So don't forget that you can go to the Code GusFrerotte and that's G U S F R E R O T T E. Uh and you can save 20% on anyproducts. The complete the perfect uh package gift set and uh you know, youcan save 20% and get free shipping. So use the code Gus Frerotte, G. U S. F RE R O T T E. Hey, everybody spells my name wrong. They even spelled aroundthe back of my profile jersey. So you know, I gotta, I gotta help you guysout. So don't forget how important it is that you use these products, takecare of yourself down below and have some fun, right? There's nothing closerto you than your little buddies. So use the lawnmower. Uh use the Code GusFrerotte, save 20% and get free shipping and uh order some greatManscaped products. Mm mm. Yeah. Uh huh. Hey everyone, we're back. Thanks forjoining us again. Don't forget to check us out on how to up with gusts dot com.You can also find us at um 16 31 digital news. Um you're you're actuallyjoining us in the studio today. You can find us on Sounder FM or wherever youlisten to your favorite podcast and go to Manscaped dot com and put in thecode gus Frerotte get 20% off and free shipping on any products uh that thatthey sell and help, you know every part of what they sell goes to helptesticular cancer. So go to Manscaped dot com and check out all the greatproducts. So we were talking with bob Kendrick, we're back now. So marty goahead. I know you had a question for bob. Do you know what your mom said istrue? Like what? You don't know, You don't know. So you know my grandfatheralways say information is currency. So if you can inform, you know, everybodyout there about you know the music, about the museum for sure, but aboutsome of the sacrifices and hardships that the players were going through. Imean look, anytime you say I'm going to go become a professional athlete,people are like, oh yeah, sure. Right, okay, good luck with that. And thenwhen you add in truly the time of what was going on and you know, joining theleague that no one really was truly paying attention to it, you know, whenit first started. So it's just amazing. And I love that you can certainlyeducate us. And uh in the museum, what do you think when people, when peoplecome to the museum, what is their initial reaction? Like I know thatthey're surprised or they didn't know certain things? What would you say islike the takeaway When people leave you hit the nail right on the head, theyMarnie are amazed by what they learned. They really are. Because this is anamazing piece of baseball and Americana that most of us went through our formaleducations without knowing it's not in the pages of american history books. Sothere was no chance for us to learn this. So this is a brand new historyfor the more majority of the people who come to visit the police baseballMuseum. And yes, they are absolutely blown away by what they learn. They areamazed by what they learn. And to be quite frank guys. They leave a littlebit dismayed by the fact that I just now had an opportunity to learn this.Why didn't I know this when I was in school? You really do you leavequestioning? Why didn't I know this? And the answer is really simple.American historians did us all a tremendous disservice. They kept thiswonderful chapter of baseball and Americana away from us. And so it wasalmost like it didn't happen and we're here to tell you not only did it happen,it happened in grandiose, fascinating. And so yeah, it's an amazing placewhere you literally walk out of here cheering the power of the human spiritto persevere prevail. So it's nothing sad or samba about this story. I dothink people expect that it will be because we know that this story isanchored against the backdrop of american segregation, A horriblechapter in this country's history as as I always remind people, is the storyhere is out of segregation rose, this...

...wonderful story of triumph in conquestand it's all based on one small, simple principle. You won't let me play withyou and I just create a league of my own. Yeah, I love that. Like a littleflower, you know that I love the lotus flower because it really does bloomthrough all this, like, it's hard to, you know, lotus really has resilience,and then it blooms through the swamp, the boggs of whatever, and then youhave this gorgeous flower show, like, well, how did that happen? Well, youknow, I just wanted to, it really had a mission to be part of something andagain, created its own roots and its own legacy and then bloomed and I'm so,I was so excited, you know, to share with, to share you with guts because Iknow you're the truly the gatekeeper of a part of history that about, I'm soexcited that Gus is a Pittsburgh guy, We're talking about your city. Oh yeah,I'm getting ready to ask you, but give me the history lesson on the PittsburghCrawfords, Oh, man in your city guys, we're talking had as much blackbaseball history as any. And it goes back even prior to theCrawfords, to the legendary Homestead Grays, there's right down the road fromPittsburgh, The homestead grays came into existence in 1950 1915 through aguy named Cumberland posey and Cumberland Posey is a name that peopleprobably don't know, but should know because Cumberland posey holds thedistinction of being in two sports, major sports halls of fame, Common and Posey might have been thebest basketball player in this country At one point in time, and he is in theBasketball Hall of Fame in Springfield and he's also in the National BaseballHall of Fame in Cooperstown. And he builds that Homestead Grays team intoone of the greatest baseball franchises, not in black baseball history, but inbaseball history. And then Gus Greenlee creates the Pittsburgh, Crawfords andyou almost had damn near a civil war there in Pittsburgh, between those twostoried franchises and man, they were going after each other and Gus Greenleehad a lot of money and you know Cumberland posey had come into moneyand they were taking each other's players back and forth, so they werejumping ship and but the fan base in Pittsburgh, they were getting to seesome of the best baseball ever played and the star power, We're talking sheerstar power. That was there in Pittsburgh Black baseball history, whenyou start talking about between both teams, josh, Gibson, smokin joe, Williams,cool, papa bell satchel, paige buck Leonard, you know, Willie Foster teddouble duty Ratcliffe, I mean the names of mega stars, who called thatPittsburgh area home at one point in time and then the hill, the hill wasjumping. Yeah, Oh yeah, yeah, how the hell was jumping And so yeah soPittsburgh plays such a prevalent role in this story and while the Crawfordswere short lived they didn't have a long didn't have a long shelf life. TheHomestead Grays would become one of the greatest baseball franchises. Again notin black baseball history but in baseball history. one at 1.19consecutive Pendants, Negro League World Series. And then they wouldeventually lead the Pittsburgh area and and relocate to D. C. Another one ofyour one of your other stopping grounds. And so they were playing at GriffithStadium in Washington D. C. And they were out drawing the WashingtonSenators filling up the ballpark. Yeah they were filling up the ballpark. Butyeah your neck of the woods man has always seen great black baseball ofcourse you had the Pittsburgh courier there which was essentially the africanAmerican usa today it was a Pittsburgh based paper, but it was a nationalpaper that really brought this to life, you know, and it was special. Thatwhole scene was tremendously special. Yeah, I know that they're bringing backto Crawford Grill, which is a big jazz club in the Hill District and I know uhfranco Harris is part of that, you know, there's a lot of people august Wilsongrew up in in the Hill, you know, there's so many, there's so much richhistory that Pittsburgh is realizing...

...that we have to do more to save thishistory and I work right there. Uh, sometimes I'll go down there to abuilding, it's an old school um and they turn it into an energy innovationcenter, which is right in the Hill district and a lot of, lot ofincredible people went to school there. But uh yeah, the Hill District isincredible. The history of Pittsburgh baseball, I love it. And I just wishthat we could get some more history going back here in Pittsburgh right nowbecause our history is slowing down. I tell you that at the Pirates been boldenough to try and bring all of this star power that they had right there intheir backyard into the major leagues, Who knows how the pending on the powerwould have shifted. But the timing wasn't right for man. They had a lot oftalent right there in their backyard. You know, 1931, homestead grays is debatable, but was likely thegreatest baseball team of all time. They would have very easily rivaled The1927 New York Yankees. You had a 19 year old Josh Gibson playing for themat that time. And Oscar charleston and Willie Foster and smoking joe Williams.And you know, they had five Hall of Famers on that team in 31. And satchelwas with them. The great satchel paige was there, but he only played a coupleof games. He jumped ship because he was having contract contract squad. Yeah,yeah, No. And so satchel jumped ship. But man, that was a dynamite team. Thenegro leagues also weren't just for african americans, right? There werethere were people from the Dominican from cuba from Puerto rico, right? Theywere all over, you know, gus they opened their doors to anybody who canplay. The only criteria that the negro leagues had was can you play? That'sall that matters if you can play, you can play. So it opened its doors tospanish speaking athletes. It opened its doors to women. Yeah. So it doesn'tmatter what color you were and it didn't matter what gender you were, aslong as you can play and you got something to offer. Yeah. You know the one video I watchedthe story that I loved was like a lot of the people that you talk with joshGibson, satchel paige um you know, hank Aaron, Jackie Robinson, all these guyswe've heard about them, but the one I loved when I watched the video from themuseum was the um, what was the name from cuba martin? Did he go? Yes, yes.I don't want to name is also called the Homestead Grays home at one point intime as well. Really have the great bartender. He go nicknamed el maestro,the master because you can do it all played all nine positions, played allnine of them. Well guys, he is the only baseball player in the history of oursport To be enshrined into five different countries. Baseball halls offame. He's in the mexican, Cuban, Venezuelan Dominican and in Cooperstown,an extraordinarily talented baseball player. Uh, he, his arm was compared toRoberto clemente, you know, so he, he was a very, he's six ft 36 ft four gustwith movie star, good looks, you know, everything, everything that you neededto be a star. And, and, and and, and again, the versatility there were,there were likely never be a player who was as versatile and great as martinDiego was. And so even pinpoint which position he was better at. It's verydifficult to do because he did everything well. Yeah, he was anextraordinarily gifted and talented athletes who here at the museum, wehave these life size statues of negro league greats. Well, he's the batterhere at the museum. And as you can well imagine whenever I get the young majorleaguers who are from CUBA in particular, they come in and they seetheir fellow countrymen. That was part of this story. Yeah, it's just thatstory as well, you know, so yeah, if you are a spanish speaking athlete andplay this game, this is your story. You don't play this game, had it not beenfor the players who called in the Rolex home. That is awesome. Really, It'sincredible. I know bob you have such a, when you talk about obviously, you know,there's that expression when you love what you do, it's not work. I mean youare the shining example of that because hearing you talk about and educate usand I love hearing about different athletes that you know, really pavedthe way for others. But listening to...

...you share their story, they really, youknow, you're definitely uh in the right place because you light up the roomwhen you talk about how, you know, I can't even think about playing, youknow, nine different positions and being in that it's just how, I mean,how they were so talented and how they had such confidence to be like, likewhen I think about professional athletes these days, it's like they do,they have one thing that they can do really well, but back in the old daysyou had to do, I guess because it was you were under such, there was so muchadversity that you had to do everything really well, which is kind of a greatlife lesson. Like do everything really well, don't just do one thing well, doeverything really well. Yeah, and what the negro leagues gave them was a placewhere they could showcase this immense talent, you know, they needed a place,a place where they can express themselves and put this talent on fulldisplay and that's what the negro leagues gave them. And so it gave thebest black and Hispanic players an opportunity to do just that showcasetheir world class baseball abilities. But the negro leagues have whiteplayers that played in this league as well. And so you know, but again, ifyou were good enough as a white player, you're gonna play in the major leagues.But there were a handful of white players who did indeed played in thenegro leagues, so they really did not care what color you were. And there'ssomething, there's an underlying message even within their mindset, fromthe standpoint that they refuse to treat others the way they had beentreated, it would be easy for them to shine, anybody who was an american bornblack away from their league and then be in that same mean spirit thatpropelled and govern so much in our country during that era of Jim Crow.But they just refused to succumb to that notion. And and that's why to methe, I always say that the story of the negro leagues embodies the americanspirit. Unlike any story in the annals of american history. So yeah, it wasAmerica that was trying to prevent them from sharing in the joys of her socalled national pastime. But it was the american spirit that allowed them topersevere and prevailed. So bob, we talked about the players, tell us howthe coaching happened, right? Because we know that some great coaches canreally influence players to become better. Tell us about some of the greatcoaches that were part of the negro leaks. Oh yeah, it's a masterfulbaseball minds. You know, I mentioned Cumberland posey uh, there with theHomestead Grays, you had guys like Andrew rube Foster who is a brilliantnow route Foster would start the negro leagues. He formed the negro leagueshere in Kansas city, literally a stone's throw from my office rightaround the corner from where my office is the parcel Y. M. C. A. That's wherethey met to start the negro leagues in 1920. But Ruth Foster did everything.Great route. Foster had been a great player. Group Foster would organize thenegro leagues. He owned the Chicago american giants and he managed theChicago american giants and Gus as a manager, Ruth Foster was known to findhis ball players as much as $5 in the early 1900s. Now, if you were taggedoutstanding up. Yeah, you were supposed to slide and and Mani rude would draw acircle down the first base line and a circle down the third base line and ifevery one of his players couldn't drop a bunt inside that circle he would findthem. He was adamant about the style of play that became signal to a negroleagues baseball fast aggressive daring, they bump their way on, they stillsecond, they still third. And if you weren't too smart they were still inhome and fans were flocking to see this style of play because it was polaropposite to the way that the game was being played in the major leagues. Themajor leagues were a base to base kind of game, so I don't base you move themover to second and then the big hitters came up and drove a man cattle away.The game is played today but not in the negro leagues. The pace of the game wasso much faster, it actually held your attention. Or as my friend, the lategreat buck O'Neil would say you couldn't go to the concession standbecause you might miss something that you ain't never seen before. And theyhad these masterful minds who were teaching this game and I mentioned rubeFoster, ci taylor buck o Neil, you know, ted double duty, Radcliffe buster,Hayward, all these guys who...

...have the opportunity been there, theywould have been great managers in the major leagues, they just were nevergiven the opportunity. And so the kind of athlete, the style in which theyplayed the game, it was special, It really was. And fans black and whiteflocked to those games and they would be dressed up. Oh God oh well isincredibly well dressed guy. And you know on the, you put on the ladies puton their beautiful silk blouses and the men have their suits and just thepresentation of it is so spectacular that it's really the place to be whenyou, you know, but it was the social event of the week. It really was therebecause there was nothing recreational about the game. It was the social eventof the week. And then you have to remember that oftentimes we wereleaving church going to the gate because the negro League games wereplayed on Sundays, primarily because the major leaguers didn't really playon Sundays. And so the negro league would rip the ball park play thatsunday doubleheader. And we left church as they would say, dressed to the nines.Yeah, no, no, they everybody was there looking pretty. And you wanted to bepart of the show you went to see and you went to be seen. Yeah, I love that.I love that. And you know, one thing I wanted to ask you to is is tell usabout the innovations that have come out of the negro leaders. I think I sawa read an article or I watched a video on that as well as that. There are somany innovations that we still have in baseball today that came out of thenegro leagues. Yeah. And they never really would give him credit for. Sowhen we start to talk about advent such as the batting helmet, shin guards,offensive players like the button run, hit and run. These things all came outof the negro leagues. But perhaps the most significant innovation that cameout of the negro leagues. Night baseball. They were playing night gamesin the negro leagues five years before they ever played a night game in themajor leagues. Now, our history book is going to tell us that the firstprofessional night baseball game 1935 Crossley Field, Cincinnati, OhioCincinnati, Reds versus the philadelphia Phillies. Well, thehistory book is wrong. The First Professional Night Baseball Game 1930and it featured our very own Kansas city monarchs. J. L. Wilkinson, whoowned the monarchs, literally mortgaged everything. He had to pioneer nightbaseball portable generated like towers. So not only could they play a nightgame here, guns, they can load them up on the truck and play a night gamevirtually anywhere. And truth of the matter is, guys, Wilkie wasn't doingthis for survival. He wasn't doing this to be innovative. He was doing it forsurvival. Again, I mentioned more times than not. Negro league games wererelegated to playing on Sundays and so he was looking for a way to get theworking class fan into the ballpark night baseball became the answer nightbaseball became bigger. Then those sunday game. Now sunday gays were sopopular that black churches would move their service time up an hour. Now ifyou know anything about the black church you don't mess with. Yeah,that's not easy to do. Oh no, no, no. 11 o'clock sunday go to meeting. Butwhen the Crawfords or grazed or monarchs were at home, Sunday service,we start at 10:00 and everybody filed out going to that Sunday doubleheadernight baseball was even bigger than that. And see Wilkinson in 1929. Got a $50,000 loan. That's a lot and$50,000. Pretty good money now. But $50,000 in 1929. And it's still hardfor me to believe that Wilkie walked into a banker's office with a, yeah, hehad a model truck at a sketch of this flatbed, uh, portable lighting systemand said, I'm gonna take night baseball all over the country. And some bankersaid, That's a good idea. Here is $50,000. Well, he makes his investmentback In Year one. How popular night baseball was, you know, doing the studyhas always been ahead of its time when I was a young girl and we would go toArrowhead. I was always amazed. I mean, yes, the Eagles were playing atVeterans Stadium, which is a little...

...dated I guess at the time. But going toKansas City, there were so many things that were well ahead of its well aheadof the curve and certainly technology, obviously that's really does kind ofrepresent some of the things that I had seen even at the stadium when I was ayoung person and and witnessing what was going on there with technology. Soit's really fascinating. All right. I want to hear about charley pridebecause you know, you know, I wanted, I had this, this, which we're still goingto do, bob, this vision of without being, you know, my throat slit bygoose Gossage of recreating, take me out to the ballgame and doing it as afundraiser and you know, having charley pride singing. So now I'll have tofigure out what is next. But baseball, you know, singing was his backup plan.I mean, he really wanted to be a major league baseball there. He was, he did.And you know, another piece of my heart is missing after the passing of ourdifferent, the late great country Western music, singer charley pride and,and marty. A lot of people did not know that charley pride played in illegallyas a matter right guys, charlie was a pretty good picture in the negroleagues who made his way into the new york Yankees organization before hehurt his arm. And it was after he hurt his arm That he did indeed fall back ona pioneering country Western music career some 72 million albums. So later.And I tell people all the time, we should all have a fallback career mightstop. Yeah, that's a great fallback career. Amazing fallback career. Andthey say, guys, he used to be in the back of the bus picking is good to ussinging with this Twain and all the players are like, will you shut upthere? Like what is that? That's great. I love that. I'm waiting to see thatmovie, right. That movie needs to come up. And I am really surprised it hasn'thappened because when he breaks into country music, they're really one inthe black folks in country music and they do it because what he was doing inthat even I mean that's I want, I don't know for sure, but I would imagine thatthe confidence of doing something so unique, you know, athletically thensaid, well, if I can do that, I mean, you know, why not? I honestly believethat charlie product could have seen anything beautiful voice. He couldn'tsay anything and he gravitated to country music. But when he breaks intothe country music world, they would not put his photograph on the album coverbecause they didn't want the fan base to know that he was black. And it willbe later on that they really sprang it on him that, that he was black. And hesays, when he went to the Grand Old Opera for the first time and he walksout on stage and hear somebody say, well, he sounds like us, but he lookslike them. Oh man, wow. I mean, but that's kind of like the negro leagues,right? They just said, all right, you're not gonna let us join, you weregonna go do our own thing. And charlie said, I'm going to just do what I gottado it because he loved it gus and then doing their own thing, they changed theway the game was played, they changed the game and then eventually, becauseof the perseverance and the stick to itiveness that they demonstrated, theyultimately helped change our country for the better. And that's why thisstory is so compelling and so are inspiring for so many who areintroduced to it. Just because the thing about baseball, which I love, andI love listening to baseball, you know, in the car, you know, just listening toit because again, hearing the ball when you know when there's a home runhappening, you could hear the ball, you know, hit the bat and you're like, oh,it's such a great sound. So it doesn't really it doesn't matter who's doing itor how it's happened with that sound just brings such auditory pleasure. Imean if you're on the side of the team that you know, one otherwise. No, soit's really fun to listen to baseball is such a great thing. You know, youcan't football is much more, I like to listen to football and here theannouncers talk about what's going on with baseball, you can really hearwhat's going on without having to see it. I still know people who will watcha game on tv and listen to it on radio, they'll turn the sound down on the tvand listen to it on radio. You know, because that radio announcer, I don'tcare whether it's what sport it is that radio announcer has away of making youfeel like you were there, I would say all the radio announcers, some of themlisten to some bad ones and you're like going on, I can't understand one thing. Right? So, so bob if you had to gowatch a movie that kind of told the...

...story about um you know, becauseHollywood is has such a big appeal to everyone. Everybody was love to watchmovies. Is there a movie or a documentary or something that you loveto watch? That really kind of kind of brings some of that history into it andsays, you know, this this gives us a taste of what the negro leagues werelike and sad to say that really has not been a movie per se that has been done.That gives an accurate depiction of the negro leagues. So I lean to thedocumentaries, my favorite documentaries, one call there wasalways sun shining someplace and this predates ken Burns is epic baseballdocumentary, where he encapsulates some of that story of the negro leagues. Asa matter of fact, that is, it was through ken's documentary on baseballthat the great buckle Neil burst international startup. You know, afterbeing a big star in the negro leagues guns, he becomes an even bigger starafter his, his role, compelling role in narrating and kim Burns documentary onthe history of baseball, where one of the innings was called Shadow Ball. Andof course Buck makes appearances throughout the celebrated masterpiecethat ken Burns produced. But Shadow Ball was primarily about the history ofthe negro leagues. And then you, you had at that time an 82 year old bucko'Neil telling these wonderful stories aboutbaseball too, baseball fans that they've never heard before. And gus, hedid it with a twinkle in his eye And a smile that lit up the screen. AndAmerica fell in love with buck as I met him. He was 82 years old at that timeand God bless him to live another 12 years where he was literallygallivanting across this country, preaching the gospel of the negroleagues and the virtues of his museum to any and everybody who would listen.And so that documentary and then the one that I mentioned, there was alwayssun shining, someplace are the two that I always recommend. Um, but there wasalways sun shining. Someplace had negro leaguers in it who had long passed bythe time ken gets around to doing his documentary. Now there are a couple offilms, bingo, long traveling all stars and Motor Kings, which started anamazing, you know, an amazing black cast that had the late, great comedicgenius, Richard Pryor, Billy Dee Williams and James, Earl jones as theprincipal characters. And it's loosely based on the negro leagues, a filmcalled Soul of the Game, which was an HBO film. But that film creates afictionalized relationship between satchel paige, Jackie Robinson and joshGibson. And of course it was brilliantly acted though. Delroy lindo,who is one of the most underrated actors in, in the industry, playssatchel paige blair Underwood plays Jackie Robinson and Mykelti Williamsonis josh Gibson and they all do an extraordinary job in becoming thoselegendary stars from the negro leagues and bob. Aren't you working on a book?Isn't that what i isn't that what I think is next up? You know, we've beenpitching this idea about the book and we've been pitching tv series and andthen I'm following in gusts footsteps. We just lost my new podcast calledBlack Diamonds in partnership with Sirius XM Radio. And, and so I'vesigned up to do 20 episodes stories of the negro leagues and so God knows, Idon't know how I'm gonna find time to do that in the middle of everythingelse that we got going on. But it's a tremendous opportunity and a greatplatform, you know, just as it is to sit here and chat with you guys,because you are going to introduce the negro leagues and this museum to somepeople who probably have never heard of it. Yeah, no, that's great. And pleasetell us and all of our fans how they can follow you where they can go onlineto to find out more about the museum and follow what you're doing. Yeah. No,absolutely. Please. You can learn more about the negro leagues Baseball museumand we certainly hope that you will support the museum by logging on to wwwdot N L B M dot com. There's all kinds of information about what's going on atthe museum. You can become a member of the museum are online gift store if youwant some gear representing the negro leagues is all there at N L B M dot com.You can follow me on twitter at NLB impress pr easy and instagram under thesame user name and I you know, I'm...

...learning I'm learning marty. I cameinto this whole social media thing kicking and screaming, but I'm learningto you. I also want to tell you bob that we know a great producer that canhelp you with your podcast if you need it. All right, we got to we have asuper producer on our team. So uh so brian is is wonderful if you need somehelp with that, that he is awesome. But hey, I really appreciate this, this Uhyou spending the time with us taking the time out of your busy schedule andI hope that everything gets back to normal with you after 2020 because itwas a hard year on all of us and I know is especially hard on a lot of museumsbecause that's probably the thing that you miss the most is the live peoplecoming in and seeing all the great artifacts and items that you have inthere. Yeah, we, you know, it was a challenging time. Gus, there's no doubtwe shut down March 14 of last year, but we were able to reopen in three monthslater and so slowly but surely we've started to see people return to themuseum and I think there's a renewed spirit and a renewed hope. We just usethe museum over the last several weeks as a covid vaccination clinic. Wevaccinated over 2000 people in this museum and it was important for us todo that kind of outreach and to utilize this facility and particularly in thiscommunity that we operate in to make sure that we can find ways to keeppeople healthy and safe and empower them to do so. But people are comingback to the museum again. Uh We're excited About this year and picking upwhere we left off with the 100th anniversary celebration. Well, thankyou bob. Thank you marty, my co host. I appreciate you both of you joining metoday on huddle up with Gus. It was amazing having you both on. Thank youso much. Thank you. Pleasant. So great to see you monty. Great to see you aswell. And I hope as things continue to open up we'll see you both here inKansas city very soon, bob. Absolutely. Well, I know I know that you're goingto have a new member of your museum because I'm gonna get on there and Igotta get some cool t shirts because I know I love the way all those old, allthe vintage t shirts that you guys create, they're they're just amazingand please stick around for after the show, everyone. I want to thank you forjoining us on another episode of huddle Up, huddle up with gusts, join us athuddle up with disgust dot com and you can find all our previous episodes.Thanks to 16 31 Digital news. Thank you to sounder F. M. And I also want totell you, please go to Manscaped dot com and check out my, my code GusFrerotte all caps, you get 20% off and you can get free shipping on any itemsthey have uh they have the great lawnmower, all those things to help you.Uh so please go there and check it out and get some cool stuff but weappreciate bob joining us and monte. Thank you so much for coming back onand I'm sure we'll be seeing you in the near future. So everyone, thanks forjoining us on huddle up with us and have a great week and that's a wrapsports. Thanks for joining in the fun 31 digital studios for another tohuddle up with GUS featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus, Frerotte, huddleup with Gus is probably produced by 16 31 digital media and is available atthe music.

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