Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Bobby Sewall

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Bobby Sewall (Robert) is a former American football wide receiver. He played college football at Brown University. Recognized as one of the best athletes in Ivy League Football history. Led by Head Coach Phil Estes, Sewall scored more points than any Ivy League player during his tenure at Brown. Prior to joining the financial industry in 2013, Robert played in the NFL for the Tennessee Titans and the Tampa Buccaneers. He is president of the NFL Former Players’ Chapter of New York/New Jersey. Robert grew up in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, and is the oldest of four children. He graduated from Brown University with a double major in economics and American history. Robert was a 4-year varsity participant in football, where he was named an All-American and 3-time All-Ivy League performer at the wide receiver position. After graduating, Robert signed with the Tennessee Titans, and spent three years in the NFL, most recently with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Robert was inspired to pursue a career as a financial professional after overhearing locker-room conversations from players unsure about how to manage their money. Players frequently consulted him for financial advice during his time as a player. Robert enjoys working with people and helping them achieve their goals. He views his client relationships as partnerships. Robert’s clients are confident the advisors at Sewall Financial Group work hard to build and protect their assets. Robert focuses on holistic wealth management, which goes beyond investing. He deals with private banking and developing deferred compensation strategies. He also fashions trust and estate plans. Robert firmly believes that financial goals cannot be achieved without a strategy, in the same manner as winning sports teams must develop game plans. Robert A. Sewall Jr. is the president and CEO of Sewall Financial Group. He manages the firm and conducts client meetings. Robert holds licenses for Series 7 and Series 66. He also holds insurance licenses in New York, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, California, and New Jersey. He is a Chartered Retirement Planning Counselor® and a Certified Plan Fiduciary Advisor®. https://www.sewallfinancialgroup.com Robert enjoys working out, studying history (specifically the Revolutionary War period), and going to the beach. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey everyone, we appreciate you joining us in the huddle. I'm your host, fifteenyear NFL quarterback Gust Rod alongside my longtime friend and Co host Dave Hagar, where we talked to guests about how sports shape their life. Be sure to check us out on our website, hod up with Gustscom, where you can listen to more episodes just like this. Now let's join the huddle. Hello Everyone, I'm your host, Gust Farrat, and welcome to Hodd off with gusts, our podcast, and usually I'm joined by my co host Dave Hagar. He is not here today, but you know you can find all of our shows and go to our website, hoddle up with gustscom. You can find all of our previous shows, see all of our guests. You can be a member subscribe to our store. If you go to huddle up with Gustscom, you can listen to huddle up with gusts anywhere you listen to your favorite podcast, or you can find us on our host radiocom and soon you can find us on sports circus presented by amp TV, so we're really excited about that. Today I have a stand in cohost. Her name is Marty Snyder. Martie, how are you doing today? Hey, thank you, guys, thanks for having me, thanks for joining us. I know we had a little snaff who I wasn't sure if you were coming on, but our great producer and engineer son Aar figured it all out and got us going. So Hey, Marnie, it's good to see you. I haven't seen you in a few weeks. How's everything going? Oh, thank you, everything's good. Happy Belated Birthday, Gus. Well, thank you. Yes, forty nine one, you're closer to the big five. Oh, I'm not show so sure how I feel about that, but it's got to be pretty exciting when I get there. I guess my hair is still getting gray's you can see. But, Marnie, we have a very good friend of yours, that's our guest today, that you met a few years ago, Bobby School. Bobby, you know what, played in the NFL for a few years with Tennessee and Tampa Bay. was a wide receiver, running back, at quarterback, you name it. He did it at Brown, you know. And Bobby now is reppin the NFLPA in New York City and he has he's also the President CEO of Seoul financial so, Marnie, we're bringing on your friend and I'm excited to get to know bobby. Bobby, how are you doing today? I'm doing well, Gust thanks, are sure? Yes, who glad to have you? Glad to have you. So you know where we always start. Bobby, want to go back to when you grew up in poor Smith Rhode Island, you know, and how you fell in love with sports. What's that first memory you have? Was It your dad? Is it bobby? Seniors at Robert Senior? What do you call them? Is it you guys going in the backyard? Think, what's that first memory? Big Bob loves memory. Yeah, first memory would be, you know, learning how to run routs in the backyard and my dad. You know, that was, you know, the first route ever learned. And you'll remember this the button hook, you know, and no one calls it in regular football anymore. It's a hitch, but that, you know, that was the first route I learned. And just playing in the backyard with dad and the friend from the neighborhood is how, you know, cultivated in my love for football. But we played every sport, Hey, bobby. So what was that first memory you had of you know where you fell in love with sports. We all have something different having our life, maybe than idle May. Mine was my dad, always playing with me in the backyard. What was yours? Oh, mine was my father as well. Big Bob Senior took me on the backyard and taught me how to run routes and make sure you catch the football with your hands and and and those kind of things. And you know, the first route I remember I'm teaching me was the button Hook, you know, Aka the hitch as we know it today, and obviously the fly route as you want to go deep in catch touchdowns. But playing in the backyard with friends and my my dad was...

...was the best and we competed in everything. Whatever sport it was, we played it and, you know, love growing up in Rhode Island. It was a nice place to grow up and it was definitely a sports town. So did you have a were you part of a big neighborhood? Did you grow up like? One of the things we love to talk about is is when we grew up we had this neighborhood that we drove a road or bikes and everybody went to a park or a backyard and we had all these crazy games. Usually it was whiffleball or something. And and so did you have that experience growing up? Yeah, so our neighborhood, you know, had a bunch of kids, you know, my age at the time, and we would play, you know, the backyards kind of conjoined, and so that made one big football field, soccer field. And then, you know, waiting for the school bus, you obviously shot hoops and, you know, played knock out and to on to and make sure you had a good sweat going before you went to school, which mom always loved. And the only rule, you know, coming back beach is you got to get your homeworked on first and got to change out of your school clothes, and that was always that always caught me. I don't know why. I hate changing out of my school close but then you could go play until I got darkkin and that's what we did, you know, we're outside. When did you start to think about like after when you were in high school, or when did you start to realize, hey, wait a minute, I maybe want to do this professionally? Or was it oh, I mean, how did that? When did that start to percolate in your head? So growing up, I mean that's always, you know, with the dream right. I really liked you know, I'm a New England kid but I was a Steve Young and Jerry Rice Fan, you know, growing up. I love the niners and then you also Peyton manning was a big one for me. But you know, obviously gusts to. I watched gusts play a bunch as well. Yeah, to those guys, I don't think so. Yeah, and so I listen. I didn't know it was a dream of mine. You know, I happen to Excel Sports, you know, and in high school and things like that and got fortunate enough to go to college and play and you know, over the course of time in college it you know, my sophomore year I had a pretty, pretty big game that, you know, is in the annals of history there and I thought maybe at that time, Hey, if I can do it at the one double a level, let me see as a sophomore, let me see how far I can take this thing. And you know, it was budles to my parents. You know, they always said, you know, football or sports can only last so long. So, you know, you know, help, let that help you get a good education to so I think choosing Brown was was a great, great call for me as well. So yeah, yeah, so, bobby, did you play multiple sports grown up? So, so, yeah, we play. I played everything. I'm from soccer to start off, basketball, you know, anything and we can play. I played it and, you know, humbly. I was, you know, all state and for sports growing up, which was, you know, in high school, which was pretty cool. You know how that works is, you know, baseball was a little slow for me. You sit out in center field because I had some wheels, but then, you know, the ball never really came to me. So we got into Lacrosse, which was fun, and then then from there, you know, the track coach convinced me that, Hey, will be best for a football if you're in track. So did that and fortune, you know, one a hundred meter dash for our state and two hundred and that was, I think, the right move for me. But that, you know, we just love to compete and fortunately was a small state cus. Well, yeah, Rhode Island, I would say, is not that big, but hey, that's amazing. Any state you being in with a state championship is pretty big. So were you Amitian Lacrosse? That's right. Yeah, I played center mid I. You know, I loved to make up guy and face off guy. Yep, face off guy. Took a lot of pride to my face off, you know, because you win the face off and then you're on a fast break right away and you know that's that was the best and just decided, hey, if...

I'm gonna, you know, dish it off at the Guy Slides, you know, to me and if not, on a rip of shot. So I I loved Lacrosse, played it for six years or so and, you know, still love it, still love watching it. Yeah, I my boys played it and then I coached a little bit when I had a coach three seasons at John Borrow. So I coach football, basketball and then Lacrosse in the spring. Because I'm with you, I couldn't I baseball. I love playing it, but coaching it and sitting there all game as was not my cup of tea. So I understand that. You know, a lot of people love it and it's a lot more fun playing it than it is sitting there watching it. So yeah, you absolutely lacrosse. You know, could go no. So then you go and you play multiple sports. You're into high school down and you do it all these things. What was the recruiting process like for you? So the recruiting process for me was, you know, coaches would come in from, you know, the one double a level right in New England, so the IVS, some of those nestcast schools, you know, good academic division three schools, and then you know the what was the Atlantic ten at the time, Hofstra, Delaware, Uri, you mass, would come through. It wasn't until I went to you know, different colleges camps that I was able to show what I could do right, because you're con competing against who they consider some of the best and if you're faster than them, jump high, get open. You know, I was a quarterback my whole life, Gust and and I would just pumpick the ball away down the field. That was not a thrower. So converted to receiver. Yeah, yes, that's what it was, you know. So converting the receiver was almost a foregone conclusion. You know, some the bigger schools like Boston College, want to be played defensive back and I really just like to score touchdown. So you know, that wasn't for me. And you know that's how the boss went. And if you would have ran my forty instead of your forty, you might have stayed at quarterback right. So I wasn't bast at all. So I was Tom Brady asked and I had to say a quarterback. You were actually pretty fast from seeing your forty times, so that conversion for you is probably pretty easy. I would say. Oh, I loved it it and you know, I do miss, or did miss, playing the quarterback position and having the ball in your hands every time. Fortunately, up Brown they let me do some of that. But you know, calling the plays in the huddle and all that. I thought that was just the most fun. And you know, guys and you'll do it from the receiver position. Is just you don't get the ball every play. So so, all right, so bobby's and I are in college and you're playing football, and how does that mean? How does that different like from when you were in high school? What is that experience like for you? Oh, wow, that it was completely different. It was like a job at that point and which I loved. I did not mind that at all and it was just so cool to be able to focus on on one sport for the entire year. I'd never done that before. So you know, fall, winter, workout, Spring Ball, I was the spring MVP are my freshman year. Our quarterbacks got hurt so they played. So I got to play quarterback all the spring and you know, it's fortunate enough we won our game and get that award. But you know, it was great to play one sport all year around, really focus on, you know, the receiver position and and was like a job and I loved it. So you know you're playing the league. You play in a league, bobby, that is one of the oldest football leagues in the country. You know, if you think about the engine eight, those guys go back the all those teams. And when did it hit you of about the history and the tradition, because I know you're a big history buff. So when did that like?...

Did you always know about the history? I did. I love history, you're right about that, and I did feel some sort of, you know, reverence about going to an ancient eight school like that. However, you know, wasn't till I got there that I saw how in trench and history we were in a in the in the Rose Bowl in the early nineteen hundreds. I mean guys like Joe Paterno, who still has the interception record at Brown and Fritz Pollard from from way back when, and it was just an I'm only just brown. Just the entire Ivy League has had so much to offer from, you know, throughout history, and it was that blew me away. Even going to class where some you know, JFK junior went to class and different places like that, was what's really cool. So, bobby, when you were in school, did somebody in particular take you under their wing and say, okay, Bobby, I'm going to mentor you, or I'm going to be your advocate or your champion and your cheerleader of sorts? Did someone do that for you? You know, we had great coaches and you know, my coach, Phil Astis, was always, you know, he was he was offensive mind at our heart, which I loved, and and he was all he's up for finding creative ways to get us the ball and to win games, and that made it really interesting to me and I would say he was, you know, the mentor that helped me, you know, keep getting making my game better. And but really I learned that, you know, it's a competition, so there wasn't a lot of you know, you got your now play some the older guys and you get a spot. You know they don't love that. So it was, you know, it was competitive, which I thrived on. And you know, ultimately you all come together when it's set an you're ready to play. But it was really, really grind and you got out of it what you put in. So what was your you know, you're playing in this league and you know whoever wins. Tell us a little bit about how the whole you know, I had Ryan Fitzpatrick on, is a good friend of mine. He went to Harvard. But explain how, like the whole championship works with you guys. It just who wins the most games. Is there playoff? How's that all work for you? So so I don't know what Ryan had to say about this, but I don't like the way we do it. You know, how we do is it's it's whoever wins the most games right here, as the best record gets it. And and here's a nod to Rhyan, we beat Harvard twenty two my junior year and we tied with them for the title because we had the same record at the end of year, but we beat them. So to me, to me that that was, you know, that was tough. And not only that, we were ranked, you know, and eleven at the time at the end of the season and one double a. But we the I mean a lot to go to playoffs. So you know, that was that was kind of tough for us too, but Brown's only one for ever, so for us to to win that one when we were there was was all. Well, tell us a little bit about you know, I know that you are man a median to say you know, it's make sure. Yeah, so tell us a little bit about this amazing game you had. I am not sure what year was. You had eighteen catches, fifteen rushes and you threw it up down. So tell us about this game. I mean that's those are amazing stats. That probably were the best ever that season. Yeah, so the week before we played Yale and we are quarterback got banged up a little bit and we put me in a quarterback for couple series and had some success, you know, running it and coach came up to me after the game at the bus and said, hey, we're going to start you at running back next week. Well, I never played running back before. Once in like my first game of junior pewee's I first played and that and that was it. So...

...said, all right. And well, the next game against Dartmouth, we we like to throw the ball, you know, it's throughout the ball. We go five or Spurs. I playing kind of the slot position, the be position, they called it, and we, you know, I kept getting, it was a hot day, to and ton of catches and I knew I had, you know, I said I think I had eighteen through three quarters and I know what Terry Rice's record was. So but we were up in the game and we had to start running the ball to preserve the lead. And then, you know, that's where all the Russian guards came. I think are in for over a buck forty in the third and fourth quarter. And in between that we had just got to turn over, you know how you know, and sudden change. You like to go up top or something like that. And it was right before the half and I told coach, let's run that reverse pass that we practiced, and so he called it and you know, they they hand me a jet sweep and I threw it for a touchdown. So it was I was exhausted, but it was a really, really cool experience and we won the game, which is most important, and it was just cool to be able to help the team and in the ways that I could that game. So, yeah, that was like your bully special, right. That was yeah, that was our philly special before, you know, not as high as stakes. But that kind of leads to the next question. So sports are obviously your passion, bobby, or one of them. You know, what have you learned, what kind of what have you learned from being able to play at the highest level in college and then certainly transition into the NFL? What are some of the things that you learn from being able to do that? Yeah, this is one of my favorite questions. I think sports, and particularly football, teaches you so many life lessons. I really do, and I from know those dog days of summer or when you have to get up and do double sessions on a they do that anymore, but doubles and used to not be able to drink that much water and all that stuff, and you got through with your buddies, and that was the coolest thing too, is you know, it didn't matter where you came from, what you did. When you part of this team, you have this one goal and all eleven guys have to do their job for a play to work, you know, so it's it's just remarkable. It can't be like baseball with a pitcher can just pitch you guys to a victory and things like that. So teach taught your team work, leadership, hard work, overcoming adversity. You could be down again, back can win, how to keep the those things to me or applicable and business and also into social life too. So it was I think poop was a great teacher. I agree. So, you know, Martie asked you the question about how was your transition from high school to College. Now you're out of you're leaving Brown. You play all four years. You know, you have aspirations, just like every person who's played college football. What was that transition like for you from going from college to the pros now? So, yeah, that was that was a fun one. So basically after the football season ended, you know, and November December, you start training for your pro day. You know, we, I really guys, seldom get combine invite. So that pro day is really, you know, what you're working towards. In March and so fortunately I was able to finish up my classes for my majors that semester, so I was able to go Austin Redifen name with James Delinn, who went on to win three super bowls with the pats. We would drive every day to Boston to train and treat it like a job, and so you're there all day and, you know, then getting the call and getting in the camp, going to Ota's and things. was was a where when they will get up at five, you got to bed at eleven. You had to learn the plays. But, you know, I think the Ivley condition to just as much for it as maybe a...

Georgia or anybody else in terms of, you know, treating it at a profession and understanding that you know, you got to be diligent with every minute of your time. So I think we were really prepared for in that regard. Hey, listeners, thanks for joining David I in the huddle. We invite you to join our excuse of huddle through Patreon, where you can get access to content made just for VIPs like yourself. Head to our website, huddle up with Gustscom and hit support our podcast on the pop up ad once again. That's huddle up with gustscom. Now let's get back in the huddle. Hey everyone, welcome back to huddle off with Gus. We're joined by Bobby School. Bobby is the president and CEO of school financial, former NFL player, Form Brown, university all star. And also, I didn't know this, bobby, you were a leap day baby. So tell us about what that is like, being a leap day baby. So, you know, my mom always convinced me that that made me special. You know that, you know, and I thought that I was a clever trick because had a birthday once every four years. So funny how that go. I'll special is that, you know, but she always would do something really, really special for me on that leap, Leap Day Birthday and embarrass me in front of this class or or something like that. So and she still does. So it's eight, you know, technically. Yeah, there you go. Well, which we could say that. Yeah, yeah, so what was that? What was the worst thing that she did to you that you remember the most? All, this is an easy one. So it was sixth grade and I really liked goofy from, you know, Disney, and we were going to Disney for the first time ever. We had never been and we were psyched up for that. And she has somebody dress up as goofy and come give me cake or something in the cafeteria in front of all my friends. And I'm sitting there, I didn't know this is happening, and somebody dressed up as goofy, yeah, comes in and gives me a cake or something in front of all my friends and I was so embarrassed. I secretly loved it because goofy was the man. But that, you know, I was a little too old, I felt, to have goofy come give me some birthday surprise. So that was a little tough. Well now, so does your family continue to play some kind of practical jokes on each other? Is that a theme that you guys do with one another, a little bit of civil family embarrassment? And if so, what have you done to your family or zibling? Oh, well, that's a day to day thank for us. You know, everyone's always, you know, shopping it up with one another on the Oles of for so there's never a day goes by where you know someone's joking with somebody else. But the birthday thing was just something mom always wanted to make special. So, you know, we we all get together for the birthdays, no matter whose it is, and that's that's a special day. So yeah, my kids would have been really upset if their birthday was once every four years. I would have liked it because I went had to get them that much, but I probably have done the same thing and it bears anyway I could. Yeah, yeah, I think that's what the parents do. Well, so you don't? You celebrate the day before, the day after. Bobby, celebrate March first, you know, because theoretically that would be the day that I was born, but I leap. Your babies do either one. So I guess I do the first. Right. So you know, and I love how you you came about...

...why finance and why you got into this. Tell us the story about what really started that when you're sitting in the locker room and you hear all these guys talking. We've heard all of heard these stories about guys losing their money. Right. So tell us about really what pushed you in the direction you're in now. Yeah, so, you know, I Brown, I made your a n Econ American history because you know, I always wanted to do I thought I want to do finance, you know, after football, and you know American history is more of an interest. And but it was in the NFL locker room where I'm, you know, listening to guys talk about, you know, credit cards. They don't trust their guy, they don't really know their guy, the guy that was helping them manage their heart earned money. And it's a lot of money for two thousand and twenty one, twenty two year old. You know, it's not of money for anybody. But never mind, you know, at that age and you know, there was a there was a guy who's talking about having credit card debt and I'm like, there's no way, there's no way. You know, you know you have a credit card to build credit. There's no way shold have s any kind of debt. And I'm like, you know what, maybe this is the area of finance I should go in because, you know, I could help help our guys and learn as much I can to help our guys to be financially independent and and successful, you know, long after their football careers. And and so for me, I love, like I told you, I love the locker room, I love the team environment, and I was like this is a way for me to extend this even further in my life. It was almost selfish. I could still be one of the guys and hang out with the guys and talk football and talk shot but also, you know, make sure we're going to be okay ten, twenty, thirty, fifty years down the line. And and it was instantly it became a passion for me and in a is to this day. How much did the NFL help you with that after you left, you know, after you were finished playing? Did you get some help from them or did you kind of go out and do this on your own? So that's a good question. So I was always tooking to palm myself to take internships and do different things in the offseason and plus I was an undrafted guy who, you know, if one person loves me, I can hang around for a long time. Maybe I don't, and so I knew my career could be over at any at any time. So I was always trying to learn as much I can. But the NFL actually got me an internship with Merrilynch New York City and that internship turned into a fulltime job. And so, you know, you would think maybe brown or something like that, and there were connections through that, but it was the NFL that, you know, they wanted to see their guys to be successful post football, and I commend them for that and they help me get that that role. So what was that recruiting process for you like? Then? Now you're going in and you learn some internship skills that when you go work for these companies, but now you're going to go out and do it on your own. So what was that like going to these players in the position that you played and saying, Hey, I think I can really help you. Yeah, for me it was a very delicate thing. I mean I think I had a reputation of being it a guy who was diligent, who is who is smart and on top of their stuff, but it wasn't. It was a kind of thing where, Hey, I'm here to help if you want to help, you know, because it's very much a partnership like anything else, just like football, where you know you got to trust one another. And you know, I want to coach our guys, to them on finance as much as they'll let me. You know, some guys, I see them, you know, their eyes clays over, their kind of tired of I no way that he's up. But I want our guys to know everything about what they're doing financially. And so for me, the recruiting process was just one of friendship and trust and that kind of happened, you know, fortunately naturally over time, and it wasn't like I don't like the sales aspect. I'm in like on it sales. To me it's more consultative and just just being there to help. What were the similarities, bobby, between working and Mary Lynch and being in the NFL? Well, it was certainly competitive. You know Mary Lynch, you know,...

...is a one of the big firms you know on the street and you know. So it was definitely competitive and you had hurdles you had to hit and those kind of things, and to me that was similar to the NFL. But but to me it was more similar to being a small town kid from Rhode Island. There's you guys been a small time kid from Urde island where you had to be diligent, you had to wear outwork everybody, and so it was on you too when you got to decide to get up, be the first one on the field the last one off. That kind of stuff gus and you know, that's what I think got me further at Merrill. Did you think when you were a merrill when you like listen, I'm just going to learn what I can learn and then go do my own thing with that kind of something that you would always thought in your head or you just how did that transition happen? Yeah, I always wanted to run my own business and I did learn a lot of Marylynch, I did, but I you know I say this, I did learn a lot of Marylynch, but I knew I was capable of, you know, manage my clients on my own. I knew it was best for them and and to me it was a no brainer to start so a financial group because we have the experience in the expertise and helping our guys and you know, was it's been a dream come true and it's gone really, really well and I'm so happy that I did it. So, you know, one of the things when you have people of managing your money like I do and the market tanks or it goes up and you know, I really try, I learned early, to ignore all that and let it, let it ride out. But how are those phone calls? How do you handle those phone calls, because you know you get them from those guys are saying hey, what's going on? You know you know and they don't know anything about the stock market, but they know they got to be in it right. So this year would be a perfect example of such right, we had a huge cell off in the spring and you know, it's guys who are who are it was so funny. My my vets, you know, the guys have been with me for a long time. You didn't, you know, you did. We call them. They didn't give us a call, you know. They they just said it, it's going to be all right. You got us. But yeah, the the rookies, and you know they would look at it every day and see sometimes they're up, sometimes they're down. Well, you know when they're down there, what am I down? And so it's kind of explaining to them how y'all stocks go at. The SP's up eighty percent of the time over the lifetime of and so just I tell it like this, it's like you're walking up the stairs with a Yo Yo, right, so the Yo Yo is going up and down, but inevitably, you know, you're getting up the stairs, and that's the analogy I like to use. But it's for us, whether it's good or bad, we're calling you and letting you know about it, especially when it's bad, because you know, that's the time where, you know, we need to be there for our clients. Do you think that that okay? So you have a lot of clients. Some of them have been in the professional sports world and some have not. So how do you do you communicate differently to somebody who's played professional sports versus somebody who has not, or is it just kind of a really just how you format your communication with people? That's a good question. Every single clients different. You know, we have clients who are sea level executives at at big time companies here in the city and we have clients who are, you were, new to managing their finances, and so everybody's different and you kind of you know, you have this philosophy about investing and how you think about the markets and you try to articulate it to these client the best you can. And you know, we have something called our financial playbook, which I think does a good job of just you know, Guss, we have our call sheet and know, you know, all the coaches have their call sheet and talks about the ways we help our guys and our clients. And you know, I think our athletes really get it. They know the purpose of planning they've had to plan their whole lives to get to where they're at and in anybody successful really understands that things. So from that matter the core what we do. They get it well, you know, in times of...

...change so much. I remember when I first was in the NFL in one thousand nine hundred and ninety four. You know, when you're meeting with these people and you start making money, they're like, Hey, you got to get these blue chip stocks, and to me now there's nothing like that. There's no blue chips that you know, stocks. I feel like it's that I'm going to wait it out for forty years for this thing to keep and steadily grow. There's so much turmoil now you need good people like you that can understand it, and I mean that's what I have and I've been lucky to have those people. But you know, it's also the ups and downs. It's that's no different than a game. I mean I've I've thrown four touchdowns and or for interceptions of five touchdowns in a game and that emotional roller coaster has been terrible. And I've also done it on the stock market, where I've watched it and that emotional roller coaster saying, oh no, I'm down, I'll know I'm up. So that has to be pretty hard for you. Does that feel a little bit like playing a game? Absolutely does. In the best way to combat that is to try to put our clients in a portfolio that's well rounded, right, like if you know, you have your high flyers, right, you have your your reverse passes and you know and hopefully you hit it, and that's a that's a big one. But you also, you know, I talked about you know, when Seattle through on on the one yard line in that Super Bowl set. are running it and get to why they did it. But you know, we try to run it if we can write like if if we need to get your ex return to you know, to make the rest of your life livable, and then then we'll get that, then we'll run it, you know. So it's it's about investing to what the clients you know, needs and wants are. And but you're right, it's like a game and that's why communication is key, just like on a football field. Sope, bobby, with all this. So when you go to a football game, now all right, and you're well, okay, maybe not now the second but when you've gone to the ball games as a spectator and being in the stands and cheering on your clients. How does that? You know, same thing for you guys, but like, how does that feel when you know you've had such an on the field experience and now you're in the stands, are on the sideline cheering? How does that work? How does that feel? I'm too intense, but it was weird at first because you're so used to be in the player. But I have a younger brother and and he played at Bryant University and he has been in a few NFL camps and you know, with this corona think is cleared up, will being another one, and so I love watching him. So I've learned a little bit of how to be a patient, you know, Calm Ish spectator, but but it's I prefer playing. But you know I'm getting there. Yeah. So so then, how do you stay in the game? Like it's a game that you grew up playing, just like I did. I played for twenty five years straight and they're still I still want to be a part of it, but I don't necessarily want to be coach or do these things. So what other things are you doing to be part of the game that you love. So, you know, Donovan Darius, who was a great safety for the Jags, told me, you know, there's not going to be one thing that replaces football for you. It might be five things, you know, a semblance of things, right, so working out and that kind of stuff. But for me was, you know, joining up with the NFL PA, you know, former players chapter of New York, was fantastic. It goes a way to experience that Brotherhood again. You know, shop it up and talk about old times and football and, you know, battles on the field, and for me that's been a tremendous outlet in terms of just being able to view with the guys again. Like I said, not one thing's going to replace it, but the being involved with the PAI has certainly helped. And I know that dirty work body. So what what makes you excited about giving back and lending your skills and talent and history and knowledge to other people? Yeah, so, you know, my father grew up from humble beginnings and worked his tailoff to the accomplssy American dream right of you know, working hard and...

...having it payoff down the line. And you started a charity called Bob's big give and I really love being a part of that. You know. So what we do it? We did it in conjunction with the NFLPA. That this past Christmas is we raised over tenzero at toys. I had to get a u haul truck to bring these toys to these families and schools and different things, and so you know, we love doing stuff like that and you know, tying it in with the NFL only makes it all the more special. And even the NFLPA WE GIVE A scholarship out to a boy and girl every year. This time two boys and two girls this year who go to play sports at the next level but aren't given a scholarship, because I think sports are just a huge part of maturity growth. So it allows these kids who don't have a scholarship to go to school and still play. So we love doing that too. So it is a part of maturity and growth in you know, I love to get your opinion on what's going on this year because it is such a big difference for so many kids, whether in high school, college or even the guys that are trying to go and play in the professional ranks. Now with covid and our new normal. You know, how what do you feel like it is going to be the new normal for everyone? Yeah, that you know, that's a tough question. I mean it's been a lot of you know, obviously for my brother who's him in a group of college and kids. Some kids in college and the kid trying to play in the pros get together on a football field. Maybe they go to Brown they get kicked off, they go to hope high school and other football field and try to throw on their own just to stay in shape. It's really hard and, you know, I think it's going to be a lot of a lot of that, you know, working on your own, you know, unfortunately, rather than being with the team like you're used to in that offseason. You know, the OTA's and the offseason activities. To me we're huge for me, I. for my personal growth as a football player, to learn to plays, learn how to run an NFL route, you know. So I think the new normal is going to be tougher for undrafted type guys in and the younger guys. Yeah, I was a seventh rounder and you know, Cam, Cameron and I used to go out every day. I'd throw hundreds of balls every day, every route and you know, if I found a route that I wasn't good at, I'd he'd stand out there and he'd say are let a rip, you know, seven step, drop, let's go all day. And it's it's not that way anymore because the CBA, and now it's really not that way because of the virus. So I think you're right that a lot of people are going to really struggle with how to be in shape, and that's what makes me nervous now to about the NFL coming up, is that guys aren't going to be in the shape that they use they normally are and there could be some more injuries. What do you think? Yeah, you took the words right out of my mouth. I played on Intwo CBAS, you know, two thousand and ten or on the older CBA, and then two thousand, you know, thirteen were on the newer CBA, which was far less practice time. You know, the two thousand and ten CBA was double sessions. We even practice, you know in Tennessee we even practice the national anthem in lining up for that. I mean that's you know how intrinsically involved it was. I think it's going to be. Football is all about timing. Fundamentals repetition. You know, I sure hope the product doesn't fall off a little bit, but it's going to be it's going to be hard with that lack of practice time and lack of cohesionists as a group to get together and work out. So would be interesting to see what happens. But these guys are unreal athletes, so I'm sure they can. I'm sure they'll figure it out. But sorry us, but good, no, I was going to. All right, so how would your brother or how would your best friend describe you? Oh, how would they describe you? Competitive, of hard working, I think, or to a couple things that would come up and then, and I also this kind of soft. But I was think caring, because you know, I think about my brother saying this stuff. But you know, I care about my clients, care about my family, care about my friends and...

...but one thing for sure is if it's a competition, I'm going to compete and and we'll say the caring part for after that. Maybe. So right, I'm gonna get your butt, then I don't care about you after that. Yeah, but it all ties into you know, everything you learned on the playing field, which is to you know, be prepared and to also care about what you're doing. So then that translates into also, in some ways, being a caring person and then wanting to give your teammates or your clients everything you have, which is so compelling and, truthfully, so unique, which is why I'm such a fan of yours. But you know why? I know that your clients probably love you too, because you're going to give them everything you have. Absolutely says right on our site. We know we get, we're delighted and determined every day to get up and work in the name of our clients. We love to outwork people and I think in life, you know, if you're a good person and you work hard, I think good things happen, and that's how my Dad's taught me. So I'm just trying to do that. All right, all right, bobby, I don't know when the last time is you've been in a two minute drill and I'm sure the last time you were in one you won. So we're going to go ahead, Sonar, and we're going to get this two minute drill roll on. You good with that? Let's do it. All right, so our two minute drill starts now. So in our put us up there. All right, let her rip with the first question. Marnie. All right, gas or electric car? Bobby, guess. All right, would you rather fly or drive? Like get there soon as possible? Your pet peeves. Oh, laziness, that's that's a tough one, right. or Or, in terms of flying, when people get up and stand in the aisle before they open the door. So you get off. That one bugs me. Yeah, where are you going? Where are you going here? Go over to go, we're gonna all right. So anyways. All Right, so you love football. You're an Ivy League guy, your big historian. Give me your Brown football, Mount Rushmore, Brown football, Mount Rushmore. Chris Berman is on it. Phil Estes, Brit's Pollard, Joe Perterurno, pretty good. It's pretty good one. I'm a dators. I love coach Preserna. All right, hotter, cold, bobby, hot. See, I like cold pizza myself. Yeah, Favorite Sports Movie, Oh, remember the titans. Good one. Quote the whole thing. Recreational sport that you play. Pick up basketball. I'll do you my knee. Yeah, my knees. I just had knee surgery, but I'M gonna get back into it once as soon as I can. Yeah, that's surgeries are tough. All right, I'm really excited about this one change. If you had a could change places, one person, any time in history, any person for a day. WHO WOULD THAT PERSON BE? Oh, I would like to. I really want to live back in the revolutionary time period. For whatever reason. I'm from Newport, Rhode Island. It's riddled with history. I love to see what it be like back then. So maybe George Wassonton had some parties back then in Newport. Maybe I try that out. All right, all right, your favorite quarterback? GUSS for out. That's an easy answer. Yeah, you can't say that. But as a light I'M gonna get one more ins on our beer, liquor, wine or other other I love. This is really unpopular. I love milk. You're not supposed...

...to like milk anymore. I love milk. Little Hershe's chocolate serp minute. There's nothing better that. Oh yeah, that's it. All right, there's our two minute drill. A bobby man, it was awesome getting to know you. I can't wait to get to know you a little more, especially when you come to Pittsburgh, Martie. Thank you for joining us, Bobby. Let us know where we're all of our fans can find you and how they can find you at Sul financial. Yeah, absolutely, you can find me at, you know, Sul Financial Groupcom and I'm on Instagram, be stool five and and facebook as well, bobby school. So thanks gus so much for having me. It's a lot of fun. Yeah, I know, we appreciate you have coming on with us and joining us in the huddle on huddle up with Guss Marny, thank you. What's your latest book out? Game Day and Dallas. So I'm getting a little bit of heat wake. Yeah, right there. I'm getting a little bit of heat from everybody in Philadelphia, but, like a true professional, I'm just rolling with it. So that's what a sports of toping. Just suit up and play and go out there and, you know, win the game. All right. So Game Day, Dallas, Marnie. Thank you for joining us, Bobby. Thank you for joining us. Everyone. You can listen to us on huddle up with gusts anywhere you you listen to your favorite podcast or on Radiocom or join us at huddle up with Guestscom and then you can also find a sports circus pretty soon at sports circus presented by amp TV, so have a great day. Thanks for joining us on huddle up with guests.

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