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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Barry Katz

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Barry Katz joins us in the huddle this week. Barry has worked with some of the greatest comedians in the industry but we find out his love for sports and specifically baseball. He has been to many World Series and still enjoys the game.  We had a great conversation and could have continued our discussion for hours. Check out Barrys website, https://www.barrykatz.com  for more information on his clients, podcast and company, BKE!      His company, Barry Katz Entertainment, is a full service management company that specializes in comedy, representing all types of artists generated from this area of the business. This includes Stand-up Comedians, Sketch Performers, Actors, Actresses, Writers, Directors, Hosts, Internet Content Creators, and Multi-Hyphenates. BKE has always specialized in taking artists' careers to the next level in very unique and remarkable ways that have been well documented during the past 25 years.     Barrys podcast, Industry Standard is a one-of-a-kind insiders look at Hollywood from a totally different perspective. This inspirational weekly series provides an “all access pass” to the entertainment business through the eyes of comedy manager/producer Barry Katz and the industry's biggest "behind the scenes" players who candidly reveal the risky decisions they made that led to the most groundbreaking internet, television, radio, music, and film content in the world. Combining humor, insight, and motivation; Katz provides the blueprint for the audience to take their careers to the next tier, while showcasing each guests’ extraordinary journey from humble beginnings to the highest levels in their field. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey everyone. We appreciate you joiningus in the Huddle, I'm your host fifteen year, NFL quarterback Gasprat,alongside my longtime friend, and Co, host Dave Hager, where we talk toguests about how sports shape their life be sure to check us out on ourwebsite Howdo up with Guscom, where you can listen to more episodes. Just likethis. Now, let's join the huddle, hey everyone welcome to another episodeof Huddle up with Gus, I'm your host Gus Forot fifteen year NFL quarterbackand I'm usually joined by my co host Dave. Heggar Dave is not with me today,so I'm flying solo today. So I am really excited to go down a path today that we haven'tbeen able to go down where we have somebody from the comedy world.Somebody from film TV He's a record producer he's a talent manger, he'sHe's had a podcast for over seven years, I'm so envious, and I can't wait topick his brain about all this, but you know Berry. Cats is just one of thelegends that you know of from the comedy world. I'm super excited, I'm ahuge comedy fan. I can't remember everything that I've seen in my life,but I know I've laughed a lot and you know, probably at a lot of the peoplethat you've launched their careers bery and joining us today in the huddle.Barry cats very welcome to huddle up with Gus, I'm so honored to be here. I haven'tbeen in the huddlesince flag football, so this is. This is really incredible. All right, buddy, hey we're going totake you back to when you grew up in Springfield mass and when you were akid and so tell us about when you were a kid you know. I know that your dad passed when youwere young and so youer raised by a single mom and that had to be hard andwhat did a lot of Simgle moms do back. In the day there was a automaticbabysitter was going out and playing sports. So tell me about your firstmemory of going out and playing sports, and if you fell in love with it, I did fall in love with it and before Iget started, I just want to say I am so so grateful for you having me Onn. I have so much respect for you and again you know it's. It's always greatto speak, to somebody who made their mark, who I always say you know everyone starts in theirbedroom with nothing. You know nothing, no, money, no blue print, nothing and to go from thatbet, drom to Telsa to the NFL, to the All Star game. You know to be a starting quarterbackfor so many teams. It's you know it's something that you know.You want to tell everybody that just just you all start off at the same place,you might be poor, you might be richer, you might have a roommate, you might besleeping on the couch, but it all starts tot nothing. And for me you know just like you. It started in abedroom with Shag, carpeting and ag to and and nothing and and sports really shape. My life and wewill talk about the entertainment stuff and how itrelates, but sports and entertainment really are a big focus of my lifebecause to me they always seem to go together. There's always thesesituations that happen that that blow you away, and in my life theywere an example of things. I the first thing that I did sportswise was playlinleague baseball and what shocking is you know all parents today who arelistening? You know your kid goes to Little League Baseball or whatever thesport is to? U Know You have the schedule, you remind him of theschedule. Yeah Washes Youin the form yet get as bag ready for hem you getthem in the car. You drive them there. You you stay there for the game, Yeupick them up afterwards and get his bag in the car. You drive back home and one of the things I want to sharewith your audience is bag. Then I mean I was you know, eight years old, I havemy own bicycle and I have my own UNIFOR. I was responsible for everything, so Iwatched my uniform. I got it ready, I had the mimeograph schedule and wherethe games were ther, the practices were, and I would ride my bicycle all overtown to go to these places. So I was extremely independent now today, if yousaid your eight year old was riding their bicycle alone. You would probablyput in jail for ten years, but me...

...that's that's the way it was, and so Iwas very independent. So the first thing sports gave me was independence. The second thingsports can give you specially baseball and no disrespect to football. But youknow baseball is a game of failure and- and that's that's what it is. If youreally analyze it, it's a game of more failure than success and so you're in asituation where you learn to deal with failure, butalso as a means to getting to success. So it's okay. If you strike out threetimes, but if you hit the double that wins the game or the walk off home run,you experience that to you learn how to do things certain way and you learn how to act like you've beenthere before. Even if you haven't been there before so you learn that if youstrike out when the base is loaded, try to have the same appearance to your adversaries as youdo. When you hit the Grand Slam, the win the game, you know. So what momendid you have like that? My first confidence building a momentwas in a littly game. I had three doubles in one game and I threw out arunner at second, so that was the first confidence builder, the one that tookmy combience awayis when the starting team was announced. I wasn't on the starting team, and so Iwas the next person and if somebody came out so I learned also that you know it was a blow in theconfidence, but it let me know that where I needed to go and what I needed to do to get thereand- and I eventually did and- and I think that's what it's all aboutin that sense and then, if seguing to professional sports, I had a crazycousin name ricky and he would always offer to take meTho Games, because I was you know I was tha. Had No father and my earliest memories were him in a car.If you're audinrememberces it was a called a Lancer, it was the first carthat had a pushbutton transmission right, O an I these buttons on thething you press park drive whatever and he would drive like ninety miles anhour on the massachus turnpipe to fen way park. He would have a place wherehe would always park that was illegal and then he would never go with tickets.He always bought tickets from scalper. So I'm following them all around like apuppy follows a met. Younow got any tickets, Gon, he tickets, gotme ticketsand that's how we went to games and the first game I went to was in one thousand nine hundred andseventy three at fenway part. It was the first game back for Tony Canigliero after he was beaned by I'm going blank on the guy'snames. It was Nolan Ryan, but it was somebody else on the angels, I thinkand and then he came back and he was playing first base and he got ta hitthat game, and I remember that and the second and I believe that same game wasagainst the Boston. I'm sorry the Milwaukee Braves theyweren't the brewers right they were the pos a willie use was milly. Maz wasplaying on that team for some reason in the latter years of his life, I believe,if I'm not mistaken, right and the he was yeah, and then we started going tothese games and then we starte going to important games like we went into theCeltics game. When was it Willis Reed in on thousand nine hundred and seventythree that came out of locker room and and he was Injureng and he came out UNa certain to play the rest of the game and win this series or something we'dgo to New York. We go to Boston, we go to Pittsburgh to see hockey games, andso there was weird thing like that. So you've had this great experience. Youknow with Ricky. Now, when you were in little league, did your mom come to anygames and if she did, how did you feel about that? This is what so strange gustthat. Iknow when I say this, everybody listening will think that's horrible. My mother never came to a game. Mymother never knew really when a game was or whatever now my mother was aincredibly present mother to me growing up,...

...but I've heard of you know, friends ofmine, my mom came eevery game or if they were comedian, my mom came toevery performance, my mom Ame, the one ee later in my college career atSpringfield College. When I was there and and that's it so I wasn't. I didn'thave my mom and my life in that way, and I didn't share the sports with heror whatever, and I keep going back to the professional sports, but I thinkit's important because it leads to certain things that I reallylearned a lot about what it's like to be thefavorite in life and what it's like to be the underdog and how you can dothings to rise to the occasion and in one thousand nine hundred andseventy five. My cousin said we're going to the world series. It was theBoston Red Sox versus the Cincinnati, reds, the big red machines right, a and cus. So many things tie inhere about my life and the first things I saw certain things so so game one. It's Don Gullet versusltiante Louis tiont, we're scalping we're trying to buy tickets, he's amadman Gong around the park. CRINOSCALP tickets, a man in a trench code, comes up tohe's, probably like fifty years old, with his wife with the Boofon hair haslike an interesting accent that I can't really place e usxcent somewhere, andhe says to my cousin. Listen. I have two tickets I'll give them to you forthe face value of the tickets, but you have to promise me look me in the eyeand promise me that you will not sell them. You will use these tickets and my cousin said you have a deal and so we go inside we're so excitedand we sit down and who sits down next tous that couple and my Cousi Rick is sitting next to meon my right. I'm sitting next to the guy in e trench coat he's sitting nextto his wife, and this is the first time I learned about something else Bo I leaned over at one point in thegame, and I said, excuse me, sir, can I ask you question said your son. I said why was it so important for you that when you sold the tickets to us tothat, I would be sitting next to you win my cousin, and he looked at me and he said because I didn't want any color and sittingnext to me. Well and- and then he later told me that he waspersonally hired as a scout by Mard, shot and later on. I found out about marge,so that was the first time I learned about racism, yeah and so and then seeing the Bostonred socks in the sixth game. I was at the sixth game, with Carlton Fisk andBurnie Carbo, with a hair dresser, who writes a bi all player, and I was therewhen they won that game, and you know it's unbelievable life. You know youalways go up against no matter WHO's. Listening what jobyou're in you always enter that job, where you're not at number one. YouCAN'T ENTER ANYTHING IN NUMBER ONE GUS! You know your show, you know in thehuddle. You can't enter number one. You enter like the kid in his bedroom. WHOhas nothing? You have no listeners, you have no fan base and you're in and so, but as you go you tar exceeding all expectations, youstart being undeniable. You start over delivering and then before you knowwhat the guests build, and then you overtake the people who were biggerthan you before and in sports. You know the red sox didn't deserve to be theretechnically against the big red machine, but they went seven games and if itwasn't for the manager putting in a guy who never even made the team the nextyear, Jin Burton you know they might have won the whole series. But the factis that Garner respect in losing it's okay to lose as long as you exceed otsexpectations, and so that's another thing I learned as well, because in theentertainment business you know not like sports in the entertainmentbusiness, there's a ninety seven percent failure- life, I'm oing tothree percent business. You know if I'm trying to sell television show nowgrant and my percentages are greater than that. Obviously, right you havebetter percentages, but all those...

...people that come up on stage that yougot to watch and go perform. I mean you've launched a lot of people'scareers, but I got to think that there's so many people that you'vewatched that you can't even remember their names.Now I mean they come in through they want to do this they're inspired to dothis and they fail. They fail, they failed it just doesn't not going tohappen for him, and then you know you do get you see those people. So it'sthe same thing you're, seeing that talent, just like that manager that putthat player in that last year wasn't on a team. He saw some talent in him andthen is going to let him come back the next year and play for the red sock. Sothat always happens. Where do you think you got that ability to really look attalent and see if it has a chance to make it right? Because you know you maythink somebody is funny, but you also have to understand thatthere's three hundred- and you know a world ore's, seven billion people inthe world. Can this person make everyone laugh and make help you knowmake it in comedy, so you had to get that ability to see through people at some point yeah and the answer I'm going to give. You isnot the answer you want. I think you know why you became astarting quarterback. I think you know the politics, I thinkyou know the navigation. I think you know had an understanding the people who aretrying to take you out the people who weren't on your side and the people whowere on your side. For me, I've always had this almost bizarrepsychic intuition when it comes to WHO's going to do well and who isn'tnow? Obviously you know I haven't, you know been had that feeling aroundevery person I've been around in my entire life and oh does this personhave it or does that person have it, but generally speaking like just togive you an example which again to your audience- and you will not even makesense so Dave Chapel, I represented for eightyears, he's eighteen years old, the manager myclub says there was this kid who came in on the open like night fromWashington DC I'd like you to take a look at him on Tuesday I coming on Tuesday and nighthat's theworst night of the comedy clumb and h. They might have been twenty peoplethere and I walk in, and I see him in the middle of the room.You know as people are walking in I go to Shakehis hand. I say how you doingI'm bearing te some Davi said. I know I just want you to know that I want torepresent you. I think you're going to be one of thebiggest stars and comedy you're going to win my awards, you're, going tochange the face of our profession and you're, going to be at the top of themountain. When all is said and done, and films, television, everything and I think if we work together, we can dogreat things, because that's where I see you- and he looks at me like thedog- looks at the answer. Machine Han says: RESTOFME Youev, you've, nevereven seen me perform you never eveen. Seen the video of me. I said I do. Idon't need you. I shake your hand, it's like the movie, the Dead Zone. I feelit and I have that feeling with a lot of people that I work with, and I don'tknow why- and I say to myself sometimes when I'm not on podcast right think to myself when I'm sittingin the feedal CN okay. Well, you know when it happens. One time you know whensomebody goes from a studio apartment which is, I love, Maronziobancas joke.You said when you're in a studio, partment your one room away from beinghomeless allright, but when you, when you do it over twentytimes, you meet somebody who has nothing but a real. You know what youfeel is a gift for a talent for the comedy business and Twenty Times, oractually it's probably twenty three times they become household names andmultimillionaires. You know, after the first time you say: Okay! Well, thatwas luck second time. Okay, that's a flu! Third Time, that's a coincidence,but then, when it happens over twenty times, you're like okay, wellsomething's happening here, something's going on that's bigger than me, and andI've always felt that the universe was was taking me in the right way in theright path. Now I know again, it...

...doesn't make sense why Wulo, but that'sit makes sense. I mean my wife and I've been together fortwenty six years, Lok and she's she's a therapist. She works with women inbehaviral health she's a nurse, but she also does Moonwik rituals and shebelieves in a lot of spiritual things. So we've been through a lot of that and-and I understand what you're going through, you know what you feel reallywhen you meet somebody. Usually your first impressions are not wrong andwhether it's somebody that you understand the business orit's just somebody that you meet and say man. I want to get to know thatmore usually your first intuition is not wrong, and I'm assuming that youhave a pretty good feel of that yea. The stories that I have regardingthat Aur to me, they're, just I'm, still shocked by them like I used to go to Harlem all the time towatch black comedy because you know in New York, it was the onlyplace to see shows with African American Comedians, and I always likethe only white person who was in these shows. I felt entirely comfortable inthat environment, even though I grew up in long meadow Massachusetts right nextto Ri, fiel were the basketball hall. Fame is- and I you know, was from anall white town and fifteen thousand people in nitown theyre, probably twoAfrican American people in the town, but I would go to Harlem and I wouldjust love it and why, when I saw Tracy Morganimmediately, I knew something was special. Widnneycomings was a correspondent at the Sundance filmd festival. She was justinterviewing directors. I met her again similar to Chapel, I said: listen, have you ever acted now? Have you ever written anything? No.Have you ever done stand though? No well, I don't knowt tell you this, but I see you as somebody who an createYouis, be an actress to stand up. Do Everything- and I really believethat you can do this and if you're willing to I love to represent you andsix years later, she's, the only person I know of in my histry or probablyanybody's history who created three television shows in one year they goton the air I mean, including to out so when you, when you go to them when you go to them, and you feel thatright and you see somebody like that, and I gotta assume they're wonderinglike what is this guy talking about so then, how does that relationship buildfor you do? Do you just come in and you say: Okay, look! We're going to supportyou. Let's hear your ideas, let's hear what you want to do. What are yourdreams? How do you take that next step? Well, the next step for me is to be honest with you. It's really simple. I know that what I do isn't simple, butthe process of getting there to me is simple and to me a great manager is a dreammaker, and I want the artist to tell me whattheir bucket list is. What do they want? One of the things they want to achieve and my job is to check off everything on that list and help themwith their talent and mine. May It happen to me, that's the simplicity of it all andthroughout that process I need to make them feel safe, like youmake your wife feel safe like when you go off to Chicago and she calls thehotel that you told her. You were ad, she wants to know that they say. Yes,let me connect you to Mr Ferrop. He doesn't run it here. There's nobody bythat name here exactl. He wants to know that youremembered her birthday and grantmersary. He wants to know thatwhen she gets up to the go the mathroom at four in the morning, she doesn'tfall into the toilet because you left the seat up and so in the most simplest terms,throughout checking off the things on the boxes onthe buggind list, timultaneously being in a situation that where they knowthat they have a net, I mean I would ask you this question than I would askyour audience this question and I think it's a really interesting one. So we take two trappes artists. Okay, they both are twins. They both areequally talented. They both can do...

...everything perfectly the same way. We give themboth a triple sommersault on the trappees to practice for a finalJudgment Day. A week later, one has a net, one doesn't have a net for the wholeweek, who's the better trap, pies artist. I think I can answer that, one but hey.Let's let our audience think about that and you know think about. Would yourather have a net or no net which one's going to make you the better person, soweuld be right back thanks for listening to howtoloe gun, hey listeners, thanks for joining Dave,and I in the huddle we invite you to join ourccusive huddle through Patreon,where you can get access to content made just for VIPs, like yourself, headto our website huddle up with Guscom and hit support our podcast on thepopup ad. Once again, that's huddle up with guscom. Now, let's get back in thehuddle, welcome back to Huddl up with Guss, Iwant to remind everyone where you can find us on Radiocom or at the sportcircus presented by MTV. You can also see us on sixteen thirty one, digitalnews. I hope everyone figured out whether they like the net or no netwe're talking with you know. I don't even know how todescribe you berry. I mean you've done so many things for your industry.You're in you have bery cats, entertainment, you've done so much, andI really want to get to the heart of why you have such a big heart. For this.You know back when you were in high school before you went to college afterhigh school. I think you spent five years as special needs. Counselor tellme a little bit about really what that taught you and and what that Mad, whatkind of person that made you? I was fantastic, I'll! Tell you how notto describe me. You don't describe Allstar NFL quarterback, that's not howI I get the introduce. I know I can you throw a spiral, I could never throw a spiral in my lifeand my kids can throw it. I can I'm like the worst example ever of of a dad with a football, but anywayI'll go ea the story, Bon that Voysar hold fifteen and sixteen it's only a matterof time before the bag of marijuana falls out of their pockets. So are they they play sports yeah? Well, my youngest son fifteen. Heactually last summer won the homerun Derby at the CAL ripkin tournament inMyrtle Beach, South Carolina. I believe it was or theere North Carolinarememberand. My other son played baseball, but now he produces musicfulltime and he's got fl studios, which is a full program of creating everymusical instrument on earth on the computer and and that's another thingjust for the old people- listeing young kid- you know it's like. I get my son, the FL Studios. Okay,this is like you know you look at this thing, you open it on the box. It comeson. It's like it's like looking at hyeroclyphics in a cade in a cave. Youknow it's like right and and within an hour my son is making beats on thecomputer that sound like he's Dr Drey, and I'm like how did you know how toedit this? How do you know dad come on? This is Thisa. You know I do it this.What we do I'm like and then I thought that myself have Ou. Have you ever seena kid going, a remote control for a I geh right and ever look at instructionson how to use it. Now? No, never now it's anerrant! So so are you a dad? Areyou like your mom or you just kind of stay away from that stuff, but you'represent or are you there supporting them all the way, I'm very, verypresent and extremely present and really involvedment again like one ofthe things with sports? You know. That's really really important is thatyou know it t shows you things, but also in real life, so my son just tookhis drivers examis permit. You know when I just kept telling him over andover again you know because he was freaking out a little bit. I and listen.You know, calm, calm, confidence, success they gotogether. You know anxiety and you know, enxitly doesn't go together withsuccess. Hey Barry tell him that you had to learn like what I think yourfavorite car was a sixty seven Shevy Camero. I had a seventy seven Chevycamerothat was my first car and...

...you know there's. Sometimes it hadpower steering sometimes most of the time it didn't the brakes. Rarelyworked and I still got my license on that thing. So tell your son, I'm surethe car he's driving is a lot more prepared and a lot more able than theones we drove grown up. That's true, and I remember when youwere talking about the special needs thing, and so what happened? There waswhen I went to a Guidan, this counselor in college and and I'm sorry in high school, and Itook one of these tests that you know, because I didn't know what I wanted todo, and it was this thing where you'd fill out this multiple choice thing andthen at the end he tell you what your interest were and he told me myinterests were working with t a disabled and entertainment. I was likeshocked. I had no idea and he said well, listen. I don't know about anything inthe entertainment business, but I do oe know ove camp called Camp Alin inBedford, New Hampshire, coincidently, the hometown of Sethmyer, SarahSilberman and Adam Sandler, Wer, O my good friend Chris Carpenter, yeah,where they have a where they have a camp for disabled kids, and you knowyou can apply. I applied, I got a job as a counttor and training and I wasworking with every disability that you can ever imagine blind death, cerevral,palls e Pineadiffinat. You know special needs every single thing and I'm fifteen andI living camp and I became great at it and I worked five years doing that andthen I went to Boston University at Sergeant Collegeat t, which was forr. That kind of thing. But what was weird was duringthat time I had found some old comedy albums in mydad's Baseman and I started memorizing one of the routines from the BobNewhart album button, downmine the driving instructor and I startedperforming it at college and in high school and and that's where, during the blizzardof Seventy Eight II was in cen, Mor Square was tofederal emergency and I heard laughter- and there was ironically, the name ofthe pub that I heard laughter coming from was called Cross roads and because I was working with the table.That was doing my thing. I was great at it. I was like a female at that and Iwalk up the stairs and I see a guy on stage about thirty people, IR's ablizzard, there's beling anywhere right com and he looks like Larry from thethree stooges and he strungng a guitar, and I remember he said Rachel. My dearwish, you were here, oh how I loved her having sex with Racher was amazing. Itwas like a concert. A rock concert. FRISBEES would fly around the room.Beach Balls would hit me in the head and every time Rachel wanted more she'dLihe a match, and then he said thanks and he just walked out and th N. Ifollowed him. I couldn't see him anymore s like a movie. I went backupstairs as it was that they said that was Stephen Wrynyn to stepen right wasthe first cometiane I ever saw I, and so I went back there to do an open likenight. I did the bomb new hartwautime killed. The host chases me down andsays: Listen. That was amazing. Listen. Let me give you some advice. Whenever you're doing somebody else'sbed just take the bid, don't mention their name, that's not good! You got tosteal the bit and I looked at again like in a weird way, and I startedwriting my material and then I started doing standup in Boston, and I got ajob as a doorman and a comedy club called play. It again. Sam's, which wasa movie Bar, listened before dbd and the pounstairs was a comedy, and then Igot the they fired, the guy and I'm going to college and I'm booking a huge comedi club during the boom,with Bob Cab, golf waite stepen rid Dennis Leary Lenny Clark from rescue meAnthony Clark from yes, dear Jonathan Cats, who created Dr Cats, Paula poundsdone Roserig Onal, so so Mait, so so your you're finding this new area that you love,but you were in the other area in love of working with all these, these kids,and so you go to college for that. Who Was your mentor? who was that personthat helped you figure out? This is what maybe you should think about doingthis. Instead of that, did you have a mentor like that or D, or did you justfigure out on your own and say I really enjoy this over that? You know you just said: somethingsreally struck accord with me, because sometimes you make realizations in yourlife about what makes you happy. You know what ultimately makes you happyand if your audience thinks about this,...

...you can come up with the answer andwhen I came up with the answer, just a short while ago is the things that makeme happy are making other people happy and being amentor to people and helping them. You know get to a point where they'rehappy and they're excited about things, and so I never really had a mentor. You know there was a guy at the comedyclub called Chancelangthon, who gave me the Dorman job, but I never had a mentor in the working itthe disable or in the entertainment business. That was all trial and errorfor me and and learn thing my own way and I figured it out a blue p printearly on and I found out also the tragedy and fate are the things tat we rely on that we have no controlaloverand I'll give you an example. I was in Boston. I was married. I was twentyfive. My wife was twenty three she passed away, you know twenty three years old and how the the tough part about that,obviously for her as she lost her life. For me, I lost where TI considered, tobe my future right, but the happening in tragedy or things that happen thanwhich I try to impress upon clients and my kids and anybody who listen is thefact that these things take you where you want togo. I'm talked about my children, I'm looking into the eyes of my children.They wouldn't be here. If that person hadn't left this earthplane, I wouldnever have gotten in a car and driven to New York and got an the apartment inNew York and open the comedy Clemen New York and the business in New York andhad six clients on Saturday night live and the guy host twice. If I hadn'tgone through that tragedy, and so everything takes you where you want togo, and that's one of the things that I learn about sports and I learn aboutbusiness, and I learn about everything o said it's these things that we look at andwe say to ourselves or to others. Why did that happen? How come that happenedto me? What why? Why did that happen, and youmight not know the reason now but later on, you will know the reasonHan you just got to trust the process and follow the path and why it is likeyou've been married for twenty six years I lost my wife, an my first wife. Shedied. I was married for thirteen years. I got divorced, you know if I'm going to sit around and say:Okay well, why is this happening? Why isn't that happening? But you know Ilook at the divorce and I'm still great friends with my x and I look at thewife who passed away and Diane and I think to myself. You know these arehorrible things that happen, but a'm I going to sit around and justthink to myself. Okay, what was me life is over, or am I going to figure out?Why is there a reason why this happened and what's the path it's taking, it meto look. I'm in the entertainment, business, I've been fired, I've beenfired by many comedians and I've been hired. My many comedians when you get fired. You know it's bone,crushing right and you reaiz okay. Well, this guy just fired me. Let me go outto the clubs and see if I can find somebody else. Oh there's dame cook. Well, do you think you think very? I want to make this Onei'm sorry Thante,because you are the UI. I want to make sure. I don't forget this, so you go inthe club, you find Ame Cook and then Dane Cook becomes like the biggestcomedian in the world that you are aligned with, that you help start andcreate social media for artist. The first person ever in the entertainentbusiness to create social media to advance their career, the only personwhere he pressed the button and he sold out Madison Square Garden, an BostoanGarden twice, and to walk on that floor, a Boston Garden Gus after I'd gonethere and watch the Celtics on many occasions play many many games and whenthe champion ship ultimately and to be on that floor for a comedian. When Iwork these shitty basement comedy clubs in Boston, it just shows you that fatehas a strange way of happening. I wouldn't gone twith, see Game Cook. Ifsomething bad t a hadn't happened to me and and that's why I wanted tointerrupt you there, because it's a really important point that the worldtakes you where you need and want to go, just trust right. The process and rollwith the wave and give it your best...

...shot and the'll all happen. Well, you know, and I think that you'vebeen through a lot in your life. You know from Losing Your Dad when you'refour and then how you had to be independent for so many things that youwanted to do when you were young. I think your mom put. U Put a lot of thatthat you probably didn't even realize Hou said this is just what I got to do,but I think it taught you a lot subconsciously that when you got laterin life that when you had tragedies when you had things, you just pickedyourself up by the bootstraps which a lot of our parents taught us and youkeep moving on yeah your your uniform may be dirty.You got to go wash it right. Now, that's not comparing to losing yourwife at twenty three, but I'm just saying mentally somewhere in there,what she taught you and what she did for you. She sounds like. She reallygave you some steps in life that really led you to where you are today. She did my wife and my my mom somethingI didn't mention again not to make this th tragedy. Podcast right, mom marriedher childhood sweetheart when she was nineteen, he died at thirty and thenshe married my dad and he died at thirty seven. So my mom experienced twodeaths in relationships as well, but again not to be the dead horse, but afthat first husband, the love of her life Hadn died at thirty. I wouldn't beon hone lop with Gus Right. We wouldn't have the great burid cats on Hoddl upwith Gus, but you know- and I think that everything you've done for allyour people. I think it all comes from understanding what others need, and youknow you say you have this intuition, which I completely understand what thatis, and you know when you meet people. You understand that like when you metthose kids at that camp. You understand they needed something from you and youwere there and you were willing to help them and give it to them, and I feel,like all of the people that you've represented in your time are tha.There's there's! No difference right, they need something from you becausethey have a dream, whether it's a small or a big dream, but tay have a dream,and you were that that that common thread that really helped them find it,and thank you for that, because you brought us a lot of laughter and youbrought a lot of people to stage that really help people get through toughtimes. Thanks man, it's it's really when you think about it'skind of crazy. I Like I started my podcast industry standard because Ithought you know I'm in these rooms with the president of Netflix Hevin Hard, Dr Phil and people don'tget the hear. The things that I hear about thatcan help people and- and I always said you know when you manage somebody- youonly really help one person. Yes, somebody gets Essanel help LARNMICHAELS and help send TC right a helps the country laugh, but in the end,you're only giving your mind to that one person Ove Hod, to get the nextlevel and with the podcast that I do industry standard I get to. I get toshare things that can help people and get to the next level and it doesn'tnecessarily have to be entertainment. People th's, there's pastors, as youknow, this Guy Markin fordy, who reached out w t to me and he has hisown podcast and he he listened to. It said it helped him with his servons andthen he started his own podcast. So it's I have gote everybody. So I'm gladthat I'm glad that I cand Adl, you started it before really podcastwere popular. You know and I think about all thesites now, where you could put your podcast on to and then you can send itto apple podcast. I can't imagine what it was like seven years ago in twothousand and thirteen when you started, or was it two thousand and twelve, you know. Where did you put like what e?Where were you sending your podcast out to? I had to pay Womhum to get snoke signalgo out to across the world bout. There were rolling a few, you know as onitunes and maybe stitcher and that's that's it. You know I said to youbefore we came on. I said every time a steel mill closis, there's five sandnew podcast, but it's true. You know, but there's a lotof great podcast and a lot of things that are really impactful and- and I'm proud that I got in when I did. I love it. I love making the impat lovedoing the interviews and it's really it helps. It helps people in thebusiness, because I give a lot of information. I tell people where thebodies are buried and I tell them a lot of incredible stories about some of thecomedians that they know as household names who, who hat one point started where theyare right now.

So what is it like when you're with thecomedian right, I'm sure you've been on planes with them? You've been in roomswith them and you've known so many now youprobably don't think this, but I think a lot of people would feel like whenthey're in the room with the comedian you know. Do I may try to make himlaugh. Do I saything funny? It's like you know, and I know they're not likethat, all the time right they have an on stage and offstage Persana, but do you find them like cracking jokes?How are are they all different? You know what what do you see similaritywise, an en in every comedian that you've represented the biggest similarity that I find inevery comedian? Is that there's a percentage of them? That's broken? That's that's in some kind of pain over somethingthat happened. You know in their life the majority ofthem. You know like, for instance, a person who I never saw that inthroughout my life, but he might say Berry will I have that to was JerrySeinfeld. You know. I never really saw that in Jerry and he was one of thoseguys that you just felt was Okan same with Jay Lena. You always felt likeeverything was okay right, but for the most part, thereason why comedians are funny and have such an amazingly strong and powerfulvoice and point of view is because there's something that blew a whole inthem and and the performing art that they do fills the whole and as soon asthey get offstage, the whole starts opening up again and they need to fixto go on again and they become better and better, and a lot of them become avoice for their generation or the next generation. Yes, there is GreatComedians, I represented Frank Kelliando for ten years, an amazingamazing, performor and impressionist one of the greatest you'll ever see you know, and and it doesn't mean thathe doesn't have demons. Maybe his demons are hidden through theimpressions, because you really never get to know who hoink? Is You only get to know him being funnyfor the from these voices? And then, when you do ask personal questions alot of times. You know the Robin Williams will come out or the John Madd,and then you forget that you ask them that question or whatever it was, butso everybody has things that they're they're going to look you'e beenmarried. Twenty six years. You don't you don't you can't be married twenty six yearsand not have moments in your life where you're reevaluating your life, it'sjust not possible, it's a! So that's why they have therapy yeah. But butwhen people look at you and they talk to you and they're doing an interviewwith you and your audience, it would be hard for them to believe they'd staysee you as like Holy Shit. He did it. He successfully he's a successfulperson in business any successful in his relationship. He did at twenty sixyears he's a the guys unbelievable. But well, ifanybody ask you, you say it's not easy. It takes work just like anything elseand it's to live with someone else day in andday out. If you can't listen, you know, and itgoes for my wife to we both had therapy to deal with each other. When we werein our you know, kind of late S, earlys, and you know I didn't understand whatshe was going through. She didn't understand where I was so and and wehad therapy and we had couples therap and it really pushed us to the nextlevel. But I think you have to do that. Anywalk of life. You have to understandwhere you are and if you're broken you have to see. You know if there's a wayyou can fix it, and it seems like the the Comedians that you know a lot oftimes how they fix it. They go up and stage and or that personality comes out,but one one of the things I wanted to get to you was on you. You signed withyou. Did these roast on comedy central okay, yeah t dey Ross, and I brought the roast thecomedy central of the Friars Club in New York and we launched the franchise.That way- and you know I've watched the old oneslike when Richard Prior would do some. You know and different things like that,and then these new ones are pretty they're, pretty tough. If you're theperson sitting in the chair in the middle, you you, you have to have somereally thick skin and was that the whole concept that you and Jeffrey cameup with. Well, the concept was done way longbefore that at the Frias silb. We just...

...wanted to update it and make it moreedgy. Now again, I say more edgy, but we really didn't do anything, because what would happen was on the roast thatyou saw the old roast that with Dean Martin a and the guest of monor, those were networktelevision, so those were clean and the jokes were like a joke that you'd seeon three's company between John Riter andn prope right when you went to a Friar's roastevent that wasn't telecast, it was just as harsh as gloves came off. All thegloves came off now. I remember Jeffrey Ross's first roast on television, whichI loved and he rolled out. One of the first jokes he rolled out with wassomething that was edgy, but it wasn't dirty and he just rolled out and he said H,we got up there. He said you know, wow, look at the dais Milton borough norm,Crosbie a Vagoda I've seen younger faces oncash yeah, and so that was a great joke, but itwas clean and it got them liking him, and then he got dirti or dirty orsopposed to Milton burough. The first roast I saw him do without a televisedaudience, and I don't know if I'm allowed toswear on this broadcast yeah, it's a podcast, so miltonburgh's opening line was, he said:Andwas twohousand people hare dressed in the nines older people, and he saidI've been instructed not to say the word fuck and I agreewith them because I don't want to be reminded of what I can't do anymore andbut. So well I mean you had some people onthere that are known like that. comediwise are pretty out there likeLisa Lam Pinelli. You know one of the first times I ever saw AnthonyJezzelnick was on a Ros, you know and Amy Shumer I mean. There's, there'sbeen some. You know Patriso Neil well, you know, like Saturday night live for adifferent Enu they've launched a lot of people, whitne comings. I remember oneof hers. First Jokes, when John Ribvers, it was so simple, Joan it's great tosee you, I loved you and the wrestler, because she had gotten plastic surgeryand she was you know and again it was edgy, but there were no swearers and-and I think the thing about what we're finding in the yard form-and I think you'll agree with this in your audience- will even if you listen,the music mat one, the number one songs in music right now is I'm not going togo into it, but its wap I'll, just av yea up to female sayinger. You canfigure out what it means, but when you find thot what it means you'll beshocked, but the fact is is that well a lot of you be shocked, someone. Thefact is, is that theyrethey're shaking it up and it's the same like inanything in sport in in comedy, you know when Jim Jeffriesdoes the gun control been it's up? Ten minutes of like performing this bid,where you know you have both sides in the room and your teler side and you're,crushing and you're, making a statemen N and how it should be, and whatactit'sor you look at Chipel, sticks and stones. You know, if that's not an argument for the guybeing on the Mount Rushmore of comedy. I don't know what is it's like George Carlin, when he made thatstatemant and one of the specials you know on these activists, ow they'retrying to have US RECYCLE! Well, you know the world. Will the world willflick us off at like a dog, flicks offfule I'll, never forget that soCarlin evolved and got to a certain way, and it's the same with anything. Youhave to figure out how to evolve, or else you're eliminated, and you had afigure out, make a stateent and do things the right way and figure it outand and that's why there's so many millionaires out there who are doingtechnology things or youtube channels or tick tocks or whatever? It is it'sjust it's just you have to figure out how to evolved and and and make it workand in the NFL you figured out how to navigate for a long time until the timecame where you know. If I don't know your life as well as you do, but my Ipresume there came a time when you just said you know what I'm not capable of navigating anymore.I can't seem to I've turned every know into a yes. Ican and now there's five of six nose in...

...a row and maybe fage is telling me Igot to go this next thing. You know your in Youre thirty, when you'rethirty, eight and your running princs was twenty two year olds, and you knowit at some point. You say to yourself: You know, I'd love to do this longer,butfather time catches up with you, and you know you just realize that there'sthere's another part of life, but the other part of life is very scary,because I've only known this life, and so now, I'm going into a new worldwhere luckily, I've had my family, and that was the most important thing forme- a lot of people don't right, because they've had two or three orthey've, not cherished it as much, and so when they leave that one thing:that's been that common denominator for them for so long, which was football, they really lost, and I was lucky tohave the support, but I've known so many guys and when you see all thesestories about these guys, what have these tragedies after they've left thegame or they lose all their money. Or you know it's that's part of it. It'sjust what you're saying and I'm assuming you know it's the same way forfor Comedians. You know they hit the top. I was so good for so long and youknow no offense at den Cook, but we haven't heard from daing cookin a whileyou know. So how does that transition? What does he do in that next step oflife, because you can have a lot of money, but youknow that's not satisfying when you just laying around Berry yeah, I like to say, respect out lastcash, and but you know, if you're Dane Cook, youknow you bought your Mansion Eha Day put some your way and even when you're, not at the level youwant to be, you can still do a tour once every three years and make aboutbillet five and million dollars and Yougo out a do yourn and that's just it.You know, there's I can't go back on a football field. That's that's! You know. Likplason is going back inthe ring. How is he going back in the ring? How does Mike Tyson stay relevant?How does Tom Brady stay relevant? How does Tom Brady, you know, compete withpeople younger? It's the same thing: If you're the lawyer, you know your lawyerin your firm and then there's a young lawyer who comes in. Does that meanhe's going to be better than you? Maybe he will be? Maybe I won't be, but thefact is is that there's always a situation where somebody behind thescenes is trying to take your job and might not be evident. They might behugging you and saying: Hey great job, Gus, really, wonderful, weare, really!Wonderful in that the PRAG is so great. I'm really rooten for you buddy andthen behind the scenes. They're planning your demins because it onlytakes unsniper in a tree to take down the whole army right. You know exactlyand and that's how it is whereever your audience is. You always have to figure out how tooverdeliver be undeniable and being a situation where you fuck people up andall doing that, and always recreating yourself and figuring out a differentway. You're going to be great. Look the nation and the world is designed towork for the man. You know get out there in the workforce and work for theman. There's no classes in grade school or high school how to be anentrepreneur, how to be your own bod. You know: There's been four networkpresidents that have been fired in the past. I think two months huge, hugeguys who are wildly successful and they've all told me when I interviewedall of them, I'm renting this chair. When I get thisjob I may get paid millions of dollars, but I'm renting this chair right andthe thing you doing your own podcast. You know and you doing your own thing. You owny that chair no way- and thereis something very freeing about that and that's the thing when you work inthe NFL you're, renting the chair and you have it for as long as you can holdthe mantle and hold on, but as you're holding on people are fucking just banging on your knees. Every day,they're hitting you low, they're, hitting you high and they're, laying ontop you, so you gotta get O and keep moving, there's only thirty or thirty,two or whatever AF those people who can start think about that think about anyprofession in the world. Where there's only thirty two people who get theSTARV thirty two and if you were to rank those thirty two quarterbackstoday even Youwho, is a compassionate NiceGuy...

...in the privacy, your own home and asound Proov booth. You would say that twelve of them were bums and shouldn'tyou want to know their names. No, I don't want O, I don't want. I don'twant to primidate you, but I'm just saying that you know and thirty twothere's only thirty two starting jobs and how many of those people areextraordinary and don't taking a long time on this, but in comedy how manypeople are geniuses that are alive. Think about it. You can count it onhalf a hand in the NFL and the quarterback circles, how many peopleare top teer like Holy Shit? That's the man! Well and that's. I there's notmany, and I would never put myself in that category because the ones who Ithink are the man, that's a very small group, one thousandnineted, fine, onethousand nine hundred and ninety seven. You were on that list. Baby. One Point I was at one point: it wasall right right before we get we're going to get to the two minute rolehere Berry, but one thing I want to ask is: can you open up and bring somereally good comedy in Pittsburgh, because I think the city of Pittsburghis looking for a great comedy club. My wife and I've been trying to find oneand it's been tough. Now wasn't there an Ame Prom inPittsburgh that the people went to te that close down yeah? Then it closeddown. So it's been tough. Now we did see Dave chapellihere every time hecomes to Pittsburgh. We go and see him and there are comedians that come intown and we try to regularly go, but you know Pittsburgh O. It feels likeit's not one of the stopping points for for many people. We can, by the way,big memory. For me when I was fifteen, I'm Goingna, I believe I was fifteen orsixteen, my cousin Ricki again, we drove to Pittsburgh to the seventh gameof the New York. Islander is Pittsburgh Penguin series. Now I believe, if I'mnot mistaken, the islanders went up three, nothing, I'm sorry. ThePittsburgh Penguins went up three, nothing wasn't it and then theislanders came back and on four in the Rollerli Perso we were S. I think itwas. I think it was. The islanders came back right, yeah yeah I mean that wasthe old Eglok to the old e good man. That place is gone. Now now is PPGPAINTTARENA, but all right man we're going to put you on a spot. We got thetwo minute drill were to see how far you can get. Maybe you can scoretouchdown. Maybe you can't son. Are you ready put two minutes on aclock? Buddy? Let's do it all right here we go gas or electriccar electric. Would you rather fly or drive drive biggest pet peeve podcast host some of them? Let's just say some ofthem all right: Mot, rushmore of comedy Ahboy living or dead, either living I'm Goinno go chapel, I'm Goinnago with Ellen degenerus, I'm going to go with Billbur, I'm Goinna go with Chris Rockhonorable mention I'm going to go to Louis CK, and I know I'm forgetting somebody on thePSYKES is coming on strong, Oh yeah, she's coming Os, trying all right, hotor cold hot, all right, favorite sports movie. I would say that would have to be o God field of dreams, all right all right.What recreational sport do you play now? Recreational sport would be. I work outa lot. I've lost close to forty pounds during the pandemic. Oh that's awesome.Congratulation all right what person, if you could change places with themfor one day? Who would that person be a living or dead gus for wroth? Oh noyou'd be bored out of your mind. Who's your favorite quarterback favorite quarterback is Tom Bravy. Ilove it. Allright beer, liquor, wine or other. I would say other all right travel where, where do youwant to go at, you haven't been believes I've been there. It's awesome all right.What's the most exciting Olympic sport I like swimming, I shave my tat Whit. A Mi had twice inwas captain the swimming team would be you you were really. What was your? What did you compete in free style, sprinter, priestyle,sprinter? You were any hiny shorts and the and the ONITA yeahtwenty two threeforty eight four, and when I were a...

...bathing suit, you could tell whatreligion. I was all right, all right! Well, you didn't get in the end zone,but we're going to let you try and kick a fiel go here all right. What is yourhidden talent, Berry? I think my hidden taent is recognizing the extraordinary qualities ind, thepeople that I'm blessed to come in contact with and helping them todevelop those extraordinary qualities. I would agree with that. You have atalent for that. My friend and please let everybody know what is the nextevolution of Berry cat. Well, I think the next evolution is abunch of different ways to deliver entertainment to people and comedy topeople. You know my friends who owns the Wilber Theater in Boston. You know he he's a promoter and he hasthe theater and for four months, there's no live performance. My otherfriend is the drummer for Lenny cravits. He just got the call after thirteenyears saying. Look, I'm not going to tour for for Noa year and a half, soyou have to be able to deliver comedy in a different way now and figure outhow to get the message to the people and there's many different ways: Woilhthe Internet and marketing and subscription based services andholograms. Believe it or not. That will take things to the next level and I'malways looking at that and figuring that out and how to help artists getthe next level and in the end I get the go on along for the ride and enjoythings, and hopefully I make a contrimution and people. Remember me asa good man, all right. How can our fans find you berry can reach me at Barry Cats? A twitteror instagram or you can check out the podcast industrystandard on any platform. I know you'll like it a lot, there's some really inspiringinterviews and I'm really proud of that, and- and I'mreally proud that you had me on the show as well, and I'm really reallytruly grateful. Well, I am really happy that somebodyof your static was kind enough to come on and you know appease my show and,and I loved hearing your sports stories. I don't know how many people know thatabout you, but props to cousin Ricky for taking you everywhere and andintroducing you to the exciting world of sports when you were young and andthere's nothing like it when you're in a crowd of seventythousend people andthere's something great going on, and you can pick out all of that, so barrycats, you know you can find them at you know, like you said, I think it's BarryCatcom. You have an entertainment group. You know there's so much that you'redoing. I look forward to your next evolution in life and thank you forjoining me on how to WAC. I go. Thank you for joining Dave and I in thehuddle. We hope you enjoyed our podcast if you like, to hear more podcast, justlike this go to huddle up with Guscom, where you can find our social channelssubscribe to hear more by our merchandise and join our excusivehuddle through patreon. Please Jon US next week when we talk to more guestabout how sports shaped their life.

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