Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Barry Katz

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Barry Katz joins us in the huddle this week. Barry has worked with some of the greatest comedians in the industry but we find out his love for sports and specifically baseball. He has been to many World Series and still enjoys the game.  We had a great conversation and could have continued our discussion for hours. Check out Barrys website, https://www.barrykatz.com  for more information on his clients, podcast and company, BKE!      His company, Barry Katz Entertainment, is a full service management company that specializes in comedy, representing all types of artists generated from this area of the business. This includes Stand-up Comedians, Sketch Performers, Actors, Actresses, Writers, Directors, Hosts, Internet Content Creators, and Multi-Hyphenates. BKE has always specialized in taking artists' careers to the next level in very unique and remarkable ways that have been well documented during the past 25 years.     Barrys podcast, Industry Standard is a one-of-a-kind insiders look at Hollywood from a totally different perspective. This inspirational weekly series provides an “all access pass” to the entertainment business through the eyes of comedy manager/producer Barry Katz and the industry's biggest "behind the scenes" players who candidly reveal the risky decisions they made that led to the most groundbreaking internet, television, radio, music, and film content in the world. Combining humor, insight, and motivation; Katz provides the blueprint for the audience to take their careers to the next tier, while showcasing each guests’ extraordinary journey from humble beginnings to the highest levels in their field. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey everyone, we appreciate you joining us in the huddle. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback gusts rot, alongside my longtime friend and cohost Dave Hagar, where we talked to guests about how sports shape their life. Be sure to check us out on our website howd up with Gustscom, where you can listen to more episodes just like this. Now let's join the huddle. Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddle up with Gusts. I'm your host, guests far at fifteen, your NFL quarterback, and I'm usually joined by my cohost Dave Hagar. Dave is not with me today, so I'm flying solo today. So I am really excited to go down a path today that we haven't been able to go down, where we have somebody from the comedy world, somebody from film TV. He's a record producer, he's a talent manager, he's he's had a podcast for over seven years. I'm so envious and I can't wait to pick his brain about all this. But you know, Barry Cats is just one of the legends that you know of from the comedy world. I'm super excited. I'm a huge comedy fan. I can't remember everything that I've seen in my life, but I know I've laughed a lot, and you know, probably at a lot of the people that you've launched their careers. Barry, and joining us today in the huddle, Barry Cats, very welcome to huddle up with guess I'm so honored to be here. I haven't been in a huddle since flag football, so this is this is really the incredible. All right, buddy, hey, we're going to take you back to when you grew up in Springfield, mass and when you were a kid, and so tell us about when you were a kid, you know, I know that your dad passed when you were young and so you raised by a single mom and and that had to be hard. And what did a lot of single moms do back in the day? There was an automatic babysitter. was going out and playing sports. So tell me about your first memory of going out and playing sports and if you fell in love with it. I did fall in love with it. And before I get started, I just want to say I am so, so grateful for you having me on. I have so much respect for you. And again, you know, it's it's it's always great to speak to somebody who made their mark who, I always say, you know, everyone starts in their bedroom with nothing, you know, nothing, no money, no blue print, nothing, and to go from that bedroom to Tulsa, to the NFL, to the Allstar game, you know, to be a starting quarterback for so many teams, it's you know, it's it's something that you know. You want to tell everybody that just just you all start off at the same in place. You might be poor, you might be richer, you might have a room mate, you might be sleep on the couch, but it all starts with nothing. And for me, you know, just like you had started in a bedroom with Shag carpeting, and I do and and and nothing and and sports really shape my life and I we will talk about the entertainment stuff and how it relates, but sports and entertainment really are a big focus of my life because to me they always seem to go together. There's always these situations that happened that that blow you away and and in my life they were an example of things. So the first thing that I did sports wise was play Little League Baseball. And what shocking is you know, all parents today who are listening you know your kid goes to Little League Baseball or whatever the sport is, do you know? You have the schedule, you remind him of the schedule, you wash as uniform, you get his bag ready for them, you get them in the car, you drive them there, you stay there for the game, you pick them up afterwards and get his bag in the car, you drive back home. And one of the things I want to share with your audiences. Back then, I mean I was, you know, eight years old. I had my own bicycle and I had my own uniform. I was responsible for everything. So I watched my uniform, I got it ready, I had the mimiograph schedule of where the Games were, there the practices were, and I would ride my bicycle all over town to go to these places. So I was extremely independent. Now, today, if you said your eight year old was riding their bicycle...

...alone, you would probably put in jail for ten years. But for me that that's the way it was, and so I was very independent. So the first thing sports gave me was independence. The second thing sports can give you specially baseball, and no disrespect the football, but you know, baseball is a game of failure and and that's that's what it is. If you really analyze it. It's a game of more failure than success, and so you're in a situation where you learn to deal with failure, but also as a means to getting to success. So it's okay if you strike out three times, but if you hit the double that wins the game or the walkoff home run, you experience that too. You learn how to do things a certain way and you learn how to act like you've been there before, even if you haven't been there before. So you learn that if you strike out with the bases loaded, try to have the same appearance to your adversaries as you do when you hit the Grand Slam to win the game, you know. So what moment did you have like that? My first confidence building a moment was in a Littaly game. I had three doubles in one game and I threw out or runner at second. So that was the first confidence builder, the one that took my confidence away, as when the starting team was announced, I wasn't on the starting team and so I was the the next person and that if somebody came out. So I learned also that, you know, it was a blow of the confidence, but it let me know that where I needed to go and what I needed to do to get there, and and I eventually did and and I think that's what it's all about in that sense. And then, if segueing to professional sports, I had a crazy cousin named ricky, and he would always offer to take me to games because I was, you know, I was that had no father and my earliest memories were him in a a car. If your audience remembers this, it was a called a lancer. It was the first car that had a pushbutton transmission, right, so these buttons on the thing you press park, drive, whatever, and he would drive like ninety miles an hour on the Massachusetts Turnpike to Fenway Park. He would have a place where he would always park. That was illegal. And then he would never go with tickets. He always bought tickets from scalpers. So I'm following all around like a puppy follows the man. Got Any tickets, got any tickets, got new tickets and that's how we went to games. And the first game I went to was in one thousand nine hundred and seventy three at Fenway Park. He was the first game back for Tony Connigliero after he was beamed by I'm going blank on the guy's name was Nolan Ryan, but it was somebody else on the angels, I think. And and then he came back and he was playing first base and he got to hit that game and I remember that. And the second and I believe that same game was against the Boston, I'm sorry, the Milwaukee Braves. They weren't the brewers. I think they were the and Willie use was. Willie mays was playing on that team for some reason in the latter years of his life, I believe, if I'm not mistaken right then the you was yeah, and then we started going to these games, and then we started going too important games likes. We went into the Celtics game. When was it? Willis read, in one thousand nine hundred and seventy three that came out of a locker room and and he was injured and he came out on a certain to play the rest of the game and win a series or something. We'd go to New York, we go to Boston, we go to Pittsburgh, the sea hockey games and so the weird thing like that. So you've had this great experience. You know with Ricky. Now, when you were in little league, did your mom come to any games and if she did, how did you feel about that? This is what's so strange gust that I know when I say this everybody listening will think that's horrible. My mother never came to a game. My mother never knew really when a game was or whatever. Now, my mother was an incredibly present mother to me growing up, but I've heard of, you...

...know, friends of mine my mom came every game, or if they're a comedian, my mom came to every performance. My mom came the one sweet later in my college career at Springfield College when it was there. And and that's it. So I wasn't I didn't have my mom and my life in that way and I didn't share the sports with her or whatever. And I keep going back to the professional sports, but I think it's important because it leads to certain things that I really learned a lot about what it's like to be the favorite in life and what it's like to be the underdog and how you can do things to rise to the occasion. And in one thousand nine hundred and seventy five, my cousin said we're going to the world series. It was the Boston Red Sox versus the Cincinnati reds, the big red machine right at and cus. So many things tie in here about my life and the first things I saw, certain things so so. Game One it's down gullet versus l Tiante, Lewis Tunt. We're SCALPING, we're trying to buy tickets. He's a mad man one around the park RNA SCALP tickets. A man in a trench coade comes up to him. He's probably like fifty years old with his wife, with the buff on hair, has like an interesting accent that I can't really place. US accent somewhere, and he says to my cousin, listen, I have two tickets. I'll give them to you for the face value of the tickets, but you have to promise me, look me in the eye and promise me that you will not sell them, you will use these tickets. And my cousin said, you have a deal. And so we go inside. We're so excited sighted and we sit down and who sits down next to us? That couple and my cousin Rick is sitting next to me on my right. I'm sitting next to the guy in the trench coat. He's sitting next to his wife. And this is the first time I learned about something else. Well, I leaned over at one point in the game and I said, excuse me, sir, can I ask you question? To sure? So I said, why was it so important for you that when you sold the tickets to us, that that I would be sitting next to you and my cousin? And he looked at me and he said because I didn't want any colored sitting next to me. Wow, and and then he later told me that he was personally hired as a scout by marge shot and later on I found out about large. So that was the first time I learned about racism. Yeah, and so, and then seeing the Boston Red Sox in the sixth game. I was at the sixth game with Carlton Fisk and Bernie Carbo, the hairdresser who writes a bit all player, and I was there when they won that game. And you know, it's unbelievable life. You know, you always go up against no matter who's listening, what job you're in, you always enter that job where you're not at number one. You can't enter anything at number one gus. You know your show. You know in the huddle you can't enter number one. You enter like the kid in his bedroom who has nothing. You have no listeners, you have no fan base and you're in and so but as you go you start exceeding all expectations, you start being undeniable, you start over delivering and then before you know it the guests build and then you overtake the people who were bigger than you before. And in sports, you know, the Red Sox didn't deserve to be there technically against the big red machine, but they went seven games and if it wasn't for the manager putting in a guy who never even made the team the next year, Jim Burton, you know, they might have won the whole series. But the fact is they garnered respect in losing. It's okay to lose as long as you exceed expectations. And so that's another thing I learned as well, because in the entertainment business, you know, not like sports. In the entertainment business there's a ninety seven percent failure it or I'm going to three percent business. You know, if I'm trying to sell television show now, grant and my percentages are greater than that. Obviously right, you have better percentages, but all...

...those people that come up on stage that you got to watch and go perform, I mean you've launched a lot of people's careers, but I got to think that there's so many people that you watched it you can't even remember their names now. I mean they come in through, they want to do this, they're inspired to do this and they fail. They fail, they failed. It just doesn't not going to happen for him. And then you know, you do get you see those people. So it's the same thing. You're seeing that talent, just like that manager that puts that player in that last year wasn't on a team. He saw some talent in him and then it's going to let him come back the next year and play for the Red Sox. So that always happens. Where do you think you got that ability to really look at talent and see if it has a chance to make it right? Because you know, you you may think somebody is funny, but you also have to understand that there's three hundred and, you know, a world, there's seven billion people in the world. Can this person and make everyone laugh and make help, you know, make it in comedy. So you had to get that ability to see through people at some point. Yeah, and the answer I'm going to give you is not the answer you want. I think you know why you became a starting quarterback. I think you know the politics, I think you know the navigation. I think you know had an understanding of the people who are trying to take you out, the people who weren't on your side, and the people who were on your side. For me, I've always had this almost bizarre psychic intuition when it comes to WHO's going to do well and who isn't. Now, obviously you know I haven't, you know, been had that feeling around every person I've been around in my entire life and Oh, does this person have it or does that person have it? But generally speaking, like just to give you an example which again to your audience and you will not even make sense. So Dave Chappelle, I represented for eight years. He's eighteen years old. The manager my club says there was this kid who came in on the open mic night from Washington DC. I'd like you to take a look at him. On Tuesday, I coming on Tuesday and I just the worst night at the comedy club and then they might have been twenty people there and I walk in and I see him in the middle of the room, you know, as people are walking in. I go to shake his hand. I say, how you doing? I'm bury some Dave. I said, I know. I just want you to know that I want to represent you. I think you're going to be one of the biggest stars and comedy. You're going to win Emmy Awards, you're going to change the face of our profession and you're going to be at the top of the mountain when all is said and done and films, television, everything, and I think if we work together we can do great things, because that's where I see you. And he looks at me like the dog looks at the answering machine and says right, and man, you never you never even seen me perform. You never even seen the video of me. I said, I don't need to. I shake your hand. It's like the movie The dead zone. I feel it and I have that feeling with a lot of people that I work with and I don't know why. And I say to myself sometimes when I'm not on podcasts right, I think to myself, when I'm sitting in the fetal shine. Okay, well, you know when it happens one time. You know when somebody goes from a studio aparliament, which is I love Maronzi advance as joke. He said, when you're in a studio apartment, your one room away from being homeless. All right, but when you when you do it over twenty times, you meet somebody who has nothing but a real you know, what you feel is a gift for the talent, for the comedy business. And Twenty Times, or actually it's probably twenty three times, they become household names and multimillionaires. You know, after the first time you say, okay, well, that was lock. Second time, okay, that's a flute. Third Time, that's a coincidence. But then when it happens over twenty times, you're like, okay, well, something's happening here, something's going on that's bigger than me and and I've always felt that the universe was was taking me in the right way and the right path. Now I know again.

It doesn't make sense. Why would? But if that's it makes sense, I mean my wife and I've been together for twenty six years. Look and she's she's a therapist. She works with women in Behavioral Health. She's a nurse, but she also does moon rituals and she believes in a lot of spiritual things. So we've been through a lot of that and and I understand what you're going through. You know what you feel really when you meet somebody, usually your first impressions are not wrong, and whether it's somebody that you understand the business or it's just somebody that you meet and say, man, I want to get to know that more, usually your first intuition is not wrong and I'm assuming that you have a pretty good feel of that. Yeah, the stories that I have regarding that are to me, they're just I'm still shocked by them. Like I used to go to Harlem all the time to watch black comedy because, you know, in New York it was the only place to see shows with African American comedians and I was like the only white person who was in the show. Is I felt entirely comfortable in that environment, even though I grew up in Longmeadow, Massachusetts, right next to Springfield, where the basketball hall of fame is, and I, you know, was from an all white town at fifteen thousand people. Might town they're probably two African American people in the town, but I would go to Harlem and I would just love it. And why? When I saw Tracy Morgan, immediately I knew something with Special Whitney Cummings was a correspondent at the Sundance Film Festival. She was just interviewing directors. I met her again, similar to Chapelle. I said, listen, have you ever acted now? Have you ever written anything now? Have you ever done stand up now? Well, I don't tell you this, but I see you as somebody who can create shows, be an actress, do you stand up, do everything? And I really believe that you can do this and if you're willing to, I love to represent you. And six years later, she's the only person I know of in my history, or probably anybody's history, who created three television shows in one year or they got on the air, I mean including two wow. So when you when you go to them, when you go to them and you feel that right and you see somebody like that, and I got assume they're wondering like, what is this guy talking about? So then how does that relationship build for you? Do Do you just come in and you say, okay, look, we're going to support you. Let's hear your ideas, let's hear what you want to do. What are your dreams? How do you take that next step? Well, the next step for me is, to be honest with you, it's really simple. I know that what I do is in simple, but the process of getting there, to me, is simple and me a great manager is a dreammaker. And I want the artist to tell me what their bucket list is. What do they want, one of the things they want to achieve, and my job is to check off everything on that list and help them with their talent and mine. May could happen to me. That's the simplicity of it all. And throughout that process I need to make them feel safe, like you make your wife feel safe, like when you go off to Chicago and she calls the hotel that you told her you were at. She wants to know that they say yes, let me connect you to Mr Fara. She doesn't want to hear there's nobody by that name here exactly. Wants to know that you remembered her birthday and anniversary. She wants to know that when she gets up to the go the bathroom at for in the morning, she doesn't fall into the toilet because you left the seat up. And so, in the most simplest terms, throughout checking off the things on the boxes on the buget list, simultaneously being in a situation that where they know that they have a net. I mean I would ask you this question, that I would ask your audience this question, and I think it's a really interesting one. So we take two trap he's artists. Okay, they both are twins. They both are equally talented, they both can do everything perfectly the same way.

We give them both a triple somersault on the trap peas you practice for a final Judgment Day. A week later. One has a net, one doesn't have a net for the whole week. WHO's the better trap P's artist? I think I can answer that one, but hey, let's let her audience think about that and, you know, think about would you rather have a net or no net? Which one's going to make you the better person? So we'll be right back. Thanks for listening. To huddle up with gusts. Hey listeners, thanks for joining David I in the huddle. We invite you to join our excusive huddle through Patreon, where you can get access to content made just for VIPs like yourself. Head to our website, huddle up with Gustscom and hit support our podcast on the pop up ad once again. That's huddle up with gustscom. Now let's get back in the huddle. Welcome back to huddle up with gusts. I want to remind everyone where you can find us. On radiocom or at the sports circus presented by AMPTV. You can also see us one thousand six hundred and thirty one digital news. I hope everyone figured out whether they like the net or no net. We're talking with. You know, I don't even know how to describe you, Barry. I mean you've done so many things for your industry. You're in. You have bury cats entertainment. You've done so much and I really want to get to the heart of why you have such a big heart for this. You know, back when you were in high school, before you went to college after High School, I think you spent five years as a special needs counselor. Tell me a little bit about really what that taught you and and and what that made what kind of person that made you. was fantastic. I'll tell you how not to describe me. You don't describe all star NFL quarterback. That's not how I get to introduce I don't. I can you throw a spiral? I could never throw a spiral in my life and my kids can throw it. I can. I'm like the worst example ever of a dad with a football. But Anyway, I'll go at the story about that. Boys, or how old? IFTEEN and sixteen, it's only a matter of time before the bag of marijuana falls out of their pockets. So are they? They play sports. Yeah, well, my youngest son fifteen. He actually last summer won the home run Derby at the CAL ripken tournament in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. I believe it was hers there, North Carolina, I can remember. And my other son played baseball. But now he produces a music full time and he's got fl studios, which is a full program of creating every musical instrument on earth on a computer. And and that's another thing just for the old people listening. Young Kid, you know, it's like I get my son the FL studios. Okay, this is like, you know, you look at this thing, you open it on the box that comes on. It's like it's like looking at hieroglyphics in a cave, in a cave, you know, it's like right. And and within an hour my son is making beats on the computer that sound like he's Dr Dre and I'm like, how did you know how to edit this? How do you know, dad, come on, this is, this is, you know, I do with this, what we do? I'm like, and then I thought that myself. Have you ever seen a kid get a remote control for a yeah, right, and ever look at instructions on how to use it? Now? No, there's no, it's in here. And so so are you a dad? Are you like your mom, or you just kind of stay away from that stuff? But you're present, or are you there supporting them all the way? I'm very, very present. I'm extremely present and I'm really involvement. Again, like one of the things with sports, you know, that's really really important is that, you know, it shows you things, but also in real life. So my son just took his drivers exams, permit. You know, when I just kept telling him over and over again, you know, because he was freaking out a little bit, I said listen, you know, calm, calm, confidence. So success, they go together, you know, anxiety, and you know anxiety doesn't go together with success. Hey, Barry, tell him that you had to learn like what. I think your favorite car was a sixty seven Chevy Camaro. I had a seventy seven Chevy Camaro. That was my first car, and you know, there's sometimes it had a...

...power steering sometimes, most of the time it didn't, the brakes rarely worked and I still got my license on ethics. So tell your son. I'm sure the car he's driving is a lot more prepared and a lot more able than the ones we drove grown up. That's true. And I remember when I you were talking about the special needs thing, and so what happened there was when I went to a guide in this counselor in college and, I'm sorry, in high school, and I took one of these tests that you know, because I didn't know what I wanted to do, and it was a sting where you'd still out this multiple choice thing and then at the end he tell you what your interests were, and he told me my interests were working with the disabled and entertainment. I was like shocked, I had no idea and he said, well, listen, I don't know about anything in the entertainment business, but I do what we know of a camp called Camp Allen in Bedford, New Hampshire, coincidentally, the hometown of Seth Myers, Sarah Silverman and Adam Sandler, where my good friend Chris Carpenter. Yeah, where they have a where they have a camp for disabled kids and you know, you can apply. I applied. I had a job as a counselor and training and I was working with every disability that you can ever imagine. Blind, deaf, cerebral, Paul's, the find a Biffita, you know, special needs, every single thing. And I'm fifteen and I'm living camp and I became great at it and I worked five years doing that and then I went to Boston University, at Sergeant College at Bu which was for that kind of thing. But what was weird was during that time I had found some old comedy albums in my dad's Baseman and I started memorizing one of the routines from the BOB new heart album, button down mine, the driving instructor, and I started performing it at college and in high school and and that's where, during the blizzard of seventy eight I was in Kenmore Square was to federal emergency and I heard laughter and I was ironically, the name of the pub that I heard laughter coming from was called crossroads and as I was working with thesabled, I was doing my thing. I was great at it. I was like a phenom at that. And I walk up the stairs and I see a guy on stage, about thirty people. It's a blizzard. There's Belwin anywhere. Right, right, you calm, and he looks like Larry from the three stood is any strumming a guitar and I remember he said Rachel, my dear wish you were here. Oh how I loved her. Having sex with Rachel was amazing. It was like a concert, a rock concert. FRISBEES would fly around the room, beach balls would hit me in the head and every time Rachel wanted more she'd light a match. And then he said thanks and he just walked out and then I followed him. I couldn't see him anywhere. It's like a movie. I went back upstairs as it was that they said that was Stephen Wright. So Stephen Wright was the first comedian I ever saw no like, and so I went back there to do an open mic night. I did the bomb new hard routine killed. The host chases me down and says, listen, I was amazing. Listen, let me give you some advice. Whenever you're doing somebody else's bid, just take the bit. Don't mention their name. That's not good. You got to steal the bit. And I looked at again, like in a weird way, and I started writing my material and then I started doing stand up in Boston and I got a job as a doorman and a comedy club called play it again Sam's, which was a movie Bar, this is before dvd, and downstairs was a comedy and then I got they fired the guy and I'm in college and I'm booking a huge comedy club during the boom with bobcat gold, Wade, Stephen Wright, Dennis Leary, Lenny Clark from rescue me, Anthony Clark from Yes, Dear Jonathan Ads, who created Dr Cats, Paula poundstone, rose rightnald. So, so, wait. So, so you're you're finding this new area that you love, but you were in the other area love of working with all these these kids, and so you go to college for that. Who was your mentor who was that person that helped you figure out this is what maybe you should think about doing this instead of that. Did you have a mentor like that or did or did you just figure out on your own and say I really enjoy this over that? You know, you just said something that's really struck a chord with me, because sometimes you make realizations in your life about what makes you happy. You know what ultimately makes you happy, and if your audience thinks about this you can come up with the answer. And when I came up with the answer...

...just a short while ago is the things that make me happy are making other people happy and being a mentor to people and helping them, you know, get to a point where they're happy and they're excited about things. And so I never really had a mentor. You know, there was a guy at the comedy club called Chance Langton who gave me the doorman job, but I never had a mentor in the working with the disabled or in the interer came in business. I was all trial and error for me and and learning thing my own way, and I figure out a blueprint print early on. And I found out also that tragedy and fate are the things that we rely on that we have no control law over. And I'll give you an examples. I was in Boston, I was married, I was twenty five. My wife was twenty three. She passed away, you know, twenty three years old, man. Now, the the tough part about that, obviously for her, is she lost her life. For me, I lost where I considered to be my future right. But the happening in tragedy or things that happened that which I try to impress upon clients and my kids and anybody who listen, is the fact that these things take you where you want to go. I'm talked about my children. I'm looking into the eyes of my children. They wouldn't be here if that person hadn't left this earth plane. I would never have gotten in a car and driven to New York and got an apartment in New York and open the Comedy Club in New York and the business in New York and had six clients on Saturday night live and the guy host twice if I hadn't gone through that tragedy. And so everything takes you where you want to go, and that's one of the things that I learn about sports and I learn about business and I learn about everything is said. It's these things that we look at and we say to ourselves or to others, why did that happen? How come that happened to me? What? Why? Why did that happen? And you might not know the reason now, but later on you will know the reason and you just got to trust the process and follow the path and why it is like you've been married for twenty six years. I lost my wife and my first wife, she died. I was married for thirteen years. I got divorced. You know, if I'm going to sit around and say, okay, well, why is this happening? Why it's in that happening? But you know, I look at the divorce and I'm still great friends with my ex and I look at the wife who passed away and Diane and I think to myself, you know, these are horrible things that happen, but I'm I going to sit around and just think to myself, okay, what was me? Life is over, or am I going to figure out why? Is there a reason why this happened and what's the path it's taking? It me to look, I'm in the entertainment business. I've been fired. I've been fired by many comedians and I've been hired by many comedians when you get fired, you know it's bone crushing. Right then you requires okay, well, this guy just hired me. Let me go out to the clubs and see if I can find somebody else. Oh there's dame cook. Oh well, do you think? Do you think very is I want to make this one. I'm sorry to interrupt, as you are, but I want to make sure I don't forget this. So you go in the club, you find Dane Cook and then Dane Cook becomes like the biggest comedian in the world that you are aligned with, that you help start and create social media for artists, the first person ever in the entertainment business to create social media to advance their career. The only person where he pressed a button and he sold out Madison Square Garden and Boston Garden twice, and to walk on that floor of Boston Garden Gus after I'd gone there and watch the Celtics on many occasions play many, many games and win a championship ultimately, and the beyond that floor for a comedian, when I work these shitty basement comedy clubs and Boston, it just shows you that fate has a strange way of happening. I wouldn't gone the see Dane Cook if something bad that hadn't happened to me. And and that's why I wanted to interrupt you there, because it's a really important point that the world takes you where you need and want to go. Just trust right the process and...

...roll with the wave and give it your best shot and the law happen. Well, you know, and I think that you've been through a lot in your life. You know, from Losing Your Dad when you're for and then how you had to be independent for so many things that you wanted to do when you were young. I think your mom put a put a lot of that that you probably didn't even realize. You said, this is just what I got to do, but I think it taught you a lot subconsciously that when you got later in life, that when you had tragedies, when you had things, you just pick yourself up by the bootstraps, which a lot of our parents taught us, and you keep moving on. Yeah, you're your uniform may be dirty. You got to go wash it right now. That's not comparing to losing your wife at twenty three. But I'm just saying mentally, somewhere in there what she taught you and what she did for you. She sounds like she really gave you some steps in life that really led you to where you are today. She did my wife and my mom something I didn't mention, again, not to make this the tragedy podcast right. My mom married her childhood sweetheart when she was nineteen. He died at thirty, and then she married my dad and he died at thirty seven. So my mom experienced to deaths in relationships as well. But again, not to be the dead horse, but at that first husband, the love of her life, hadn't died at thirty, I wouldn't be on huddle up with Gus Right, we wouldn't have the Great Barry Casts on hot up with guests. But you know, and I think that everything you've done for all your people, I think it all comes from understanding what others need. And you know, you say you have this intuition, which I completely understand what that is, and you know, when you meet people, you understand that. Like when you met those kids at that can't you understand they needed something from you and you were there and you were willing to help them and give it to them. And I feel like all of the people that you've represented in your time are there's there's no difference right. They need something from you because they have a dream, whether it's a smaller big dream, day, have a dream and you were that, that that common thread that really helped them find it. And and thank you for that, because you brought us a lot of laughter and and you brought a lot of people the stage that really help people get through tough times. Thanks man. That it really when you think about it, it's kind of crazy. I Like I started my podcast industry standard, because I thought, you know, I'm in these rooms with the president of Netflix having hard Dr Pail and people don't get the hear the things that I hear about that can help people. And and I always said, you know, when you manage somebody, you only really help one person. Yes, somebody Getsessana, will you help Lauren Michaels and helps end BC? Right, it helps the country laugh, but in the end you're only giving your mom. I'm to that one person of how to get the next level and with the podcast that I do, industry standard, I get to get to share things that can help people get to the next level and it doesn't necessarily have to be entertainment people. There's there's pastors. Was You know this guy mark and forty, who reached out to me and he has his own podcast and he listened to it, said it helped him with his sermons and then he started his own podcast. So it's I've gotten everybody. So I'm glad that. I'm glad that I could. Well, Adam, you started it before really podcasts for Popular Ha, you know, and I think about all the sites now where you could put your podcasts on too, and then you can send it to apple podcast. I can't imagine what it was like seven years ago, in two thousand and thirteen when you started. Where was it two thousand and twelve? You know, where did you put like what? Where were you sending your podcast out to? I had to pay womp them to get smoke signal go out tode across the world. There were only a few, you know, is on itunes and maybe stitcher and that's that's it. You know, I said to you before we came on, I said every time a steel milk closes there's five thou new podcast. But it's true, you know. But there's a lot of great podcast and a lot of things that are really impactful and and the I'm proud that I got in when I did. I love it, I love making the impact, love doing the interviews and it's really it helps. It helps people in the business because I give a lot of information. I tell people where the bodies are buried and I tell them a lot of incredible stories about some of the comedians that they know as household names, who who at one points started where they...

...are right now. So what is it like when you're with the comedian, R and I'm sure you've been on planes with them, you've been in rooms with them and you've known so many. Now you probably don't think this, but I think a lot of people would feel like when they're in the room with the comedian. You know, do I may try to make him laugh? Do I say think funny? It's like, you know, and I know they're not like that all the time, right. They have it on stage and offstage Persauna, but do you find them like cracking jokes? How are you or they all different? You know what, what do you see similarity wise, and in every comedian that you've represented? The biggest similarity that I find in every comedian is that there's a percentage of them that's broken, that's that's in some kind of pain over something that happened, you know, in their life. The majority of them, you know, like, for instance, a person who I never saw that in throughout my life, but he might say Barry. Well, I have that too, was Jerry Seinfeld. You know, I never really saw that in Jerry and he was one of those guys that you just felt was okay in. Same with Jay Leno. You always felt like everything was okay right. But for the most part the reason why comedians are funny and have such an amazingly strong and powerful voice and point of view is because there's something that blew a hole in them and and the performing art that they do fills the whole and as soon as they get off stage the whole starts opening up again and they need to fix to go on again, and they become better and better and a lot of them become a voice for their generation or the next generation. Yes, there is a great comedians. I represented Frank Kelly Endo for ten years and amazing, amazing performer and impressionist, one of the greatest you'll ever see. You know, and and it doesn't mean that he doesn't have demons. Maybe his demons are hidden through the impressions, because you really never get to know who who frank is. You only get to know him being funny further from these voices. And then when you do ask personal questions, a lot of times you know the Robin Williams will come out or the John Madden and then you forget that you asked them that question or whatever it was. But so everybody has things that they're they're going through. Look, you've been married twenty six years. You don't. You don't. You can't be married twenty six years and not have moments in your life where you're reevaluating your life. It just not possible. It's also that's why they have therapy. Yeah, but but when people look at you and they talk to you and they're doing an interview with you and your audience, it would be hard for them to believe. They stay see you as like, Holy Shit, he did it, he's successful, he's a successful person in business and he successful in his relationship. He did it twenty six years. He's a guy's unbelievable. But well, if anybody asked you, you say it's not easy, it takes work, just like anything else, and it's to live with someone else day in and day out. If you can't listen, you know, and it goes from my wife to we both had therapy that to do with each other when we were in our you know, kind of late S, early S, and you know, I didn't understand what she was going through, she didn't understand where I was. So and and we had therapy and we had couple therapy and it really pushed us to the next level. But I think you have to do that any walk of life. You have to understand where you are and if you're broken, you have to see, you know, if there's a way you can fix it. And it seems like the Comedians that you know a lot of times how they fix it. They go up and stage and or that personality comes out. But one of the things I wanted to get to you was on you. You signed with you did these roast on comedy central. Okay, yeah, Ross and I brought the roast to comedy central the Friars Club in New York and we launched the franchise that way. And you know, I've watched the old ones, like when Richard Pryor would do some you know, and different things like that, and then these new ones are pretty they're pretty tough. If you're the person sitting in the chair in the middle, you you you have to have some really thick skin. And was that the whole concept that you and Jeffrey came up with? Well, the concept was done the way long before that at the friar style. We...

...just wanted to update it and make it more edgy. Now again I say more edgy, but we really didn't do anything because what would happen was on the roast that you saw, the old roast that with Dean Martin and and the guest of honor. Those were network television, so those were clean and the jokes were like a joke that you'd see on threes company between John Ritter and Roper right. When you went to a friars roast event that wasn't telecast, it was just as harsh as gloves came off. All the gloves came off. Now I remember Jeffrey Ross's first roast on television, which I loved, and he rolled out. One of the first jokes he rolled out with was something that was edgy but it wasn't dirty, and he just rolled out and he said. We got up there, he said, you know, wow, look at the day as Milton Burl, norm Crosby, a Vagoda. I've seen younger faces on cash. Yeah, and so that was a great joke, but it was clean and it got them liking him and then he got dirty, or dirty are supposed to. Milton borough the first roast I saw him do without a televised audience, and I don't know if I'm allowed to swear on this broadcast. Yeah, it's a podcast. So Milton burls opening line was he said it was twozero people. They're dressed in the nines, older people, and he said I've been instructed not to say the word Fuck, and I agree with them because I don't want to be reminded of what I can't do anymore. And how that opening, but so well. I mean he has some people on there that are known, like the comedic wise are pretty out there, like Lisa Lampanelli, you know, one of the first times I ever saw Anthony Jezle nick was on a roast, you know, and Amy Schumer. I mean there's there's been some you know, Patrese O'Neil Ros, you know, like Saturday night live for a different and you they've launched a lot of people. Whitney Cummings. I remember one of Hers First Jokes when Joan Rivers. It was so simple. Joan, it's great to see you. I loved you in the wrestler because she had gotten plastic surgery and she was you know. And again it was edgy, but there were no swears. And and I think the thing about what we're finding in the art form, and I think you'll agree with this in your audience will even if you listen to music now, one of the number one songs and music right now is I'm not going to go into it, but it's WAP. I'll just tell Ye. To female singers. You can figure out what it means. But when you find out what it means you'll be shocked. But the fact is is that, well, a lot of you be shocked someone, but the fact is is that they're they're shaking it up and it's the same like in anything, in sport and in in in comedy. You know when Jim Jefferies does the gun control bid and it's ten minutes of like performing this bid where you know you have both sides in the room and your tell her side and your crushing and you're making a statement and how it should be and what happen it's on. Or you look at Chappelle's sticks and stones. You know, is it? If that's not an argument for the guy being on the Mount Rushmore of comedy, I don't know what is. It's like George Carlin when he made that statement and one of the specials. You know, these activists, they're trying to have his recycle. Well, you know, the world will, the world will flick us off at like a dog flicks all fleas. I'll never forget that. So Carl and evolved and got to a certain way, and it's the same with anything. You have to figure out how to evolve or else you're eliminated. And you have to figure out make a statement and do things the right way and figure it out and and that's why there's so many millionaires out there who are doing technology things or youtube channels or tick tocks or whatever it is. It's just, it's just you have to figure out how to evolve and and and and and make it work. And in the NFL you figured out how to navigate for a long time until the time came where you know if I don't know your life as well as you do, but my I presume there came a time when you just said, you know what, I'm not capable of navigating anymore. I can't seem to. I've turned every no into a yes. I can, and now there's five of six nose in a row and maybe...

...fade is telling me I got to go in this next thing. You know, yeah, you're when you're thirty, when you're thirty eight and you're running sprints. Was Twenty two year old and you know it's some point you say to yourself, you know, I'd love to do this longer, but father time catches up with you and you know, you just realize that there's there's another part of life. But the other part of life is very scary because I only known this life and so now I'm going into a new world where, luckily, I've had my family, and that was the most important thing for me. A lot of people don't, right because they've had two or three or they've not cherished it as much, and so when they leave that one thing that's been that common denominator for them for so long, which was football, they really lost and I was lucky to have the support. But I'm known so many guys and when you see all these stories about these guys that have these tragedies after they've left the game or they lose all their money or you know, it's that's part of it. It's just what you're saying and I'm assuming you know it's the same way for for Comedians. You know they hit the top. I was so good for so long and you know, no offense Dan Cook, but we haven't heard from Dane Cook in a while, you know. So how does that transition? What does he do in that next step of life? Because you can have a lot of money, but you know that's not satisfying when you're just laying around. Barry. Yeah, I like to say respect out last cash and but you know, if your Dane Cook, you know you bought your mansion at the hey day, put some money away and even when you're not at the level you want to be, you can still do it to her once every three years and make about hill at five and million dollars and you go out do your in and that's just it. You know, there's you can't go back on a football field. That's that's you know, like place. Pyson is going back in the ring. How is he going back in the ring? How does Mike Tyson stay relevant? How does Tom Brady stay relevant? How does Tom Brady, you know, compete with people younger? It's the same thing if you're a lawyer. You know your lawyer in your firm and then there's a young lawyer comes in. Does that mean he's going to be better than you? Maybe he will be, maybe you won't be. But the fact is is that there's always a situation where somebody behind the scenes is trying to take your job and might not be evident. They might be hugging you and saying, Hey, great job, Gus, really wonderful, were really wonderful and that, yeah, the practice so great, I'm really rooting for you, Buddy. And then behind the scenes they're planning your demise, because it only takes one sniper in a tree to take down a whole army, right. You know, that's actually and and that's how it is wherever your audience is, you always have to figure out how to overdeliver, be undeniable and be in a situation where you fuck people up. And if you're all doing that and always recreating yourself and figuring out a different way you're going to be great. Look, the nation and the world is designed to work for the man. You know, get out there in the workforce and work for the man. There's no classes in grade school or high school how to be an entrepreneur, how to be your own laws. You know, there's been four network presidents that have been fired in the past, I think, two months. Huge, huge guys who are wildly successful, and they've all told me, when I interviewed all of them, I'm renting this chair. When I get this job. I may get paid millions of dollars, but I'm renting this chair right and the thing you doing your own podcast, you know, and you doing your own thing. You own that chair. No one can. There is something very freeing about that, and that's the thing. When you work in the NFL, you're renting the chair and you have it for as long as you can hold the mantle and hold on. But as your whole holding on, people are fucking just banging on your knees every day. They're hitting you load, they're hitting you high and they're laying on top of you. So you gotta get up and keep moving. There's only thirty or thirty two or whatever, of those people who can start. Think about that. Think about any profession in the world where there's only thirty two people who get the start. Thirty two. And if you were to rank those thirty two quarterbacks today, even you, who is a compassionate, Nice Guy, in...

...the privacy your own home and a soundproofd booth, you would say the twelve of them were bums and should it. Shouldn't do it. Another names. No, I don't want to hope, I don't want to I don't want to criminate you, but I'm just saying that you know, and thirty two. It is only thirty two starting jobs. And how many of those people are extraordinary? I know I'm taking a long time on this, but in comedy, how many people are geniuses that are alive? Think about you can count it on half a hand. In the NFL and the quarterback circles, how many people are top tier, like, Holy Shit, that's the man? Well, and that's it. There's not many. I would never put myself in that category because the ones who I think are the man, that's a very small group. One Thousand and one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven. You were on that list baby one point. I was. At one point it was all right, right, before we get we're going to get to the two minute drill here, Barry. But one thing I want to ask is can you open up and bring some really good comedy at Pittsburgh, because I think the city of Pittsburgh is looking for a great comedy club. My wife and I've been trying to find one and it's been tough. Now. Wasn't there an Improvin Pittsburgh that the people went to that I close down? Yeah, they closed down. So it's been tough. Now we did see Dave Chappelle here. Every time he comes a Pittsburgh we go and see him and there are comedians that come in town and we try to regularly go. But you know, Pittsburgh, it feels like it's not one of the stopping points for for many people. We can. By the way, big memory for me when I was fifteen, I'm gonna I believe I was fifteen or sixteen, my cousin Ricky again, we drove the Pittsburgh to the seventh game of the New York Islanders Pittsburgh Penguins series. Now, I believe, if I'm not mistaken. The islanders went up three nothing. I'm sorry, the Pittsburgh Penguins went up three nothing, wasn't it? And then the islanders came back on one. Four in a row, or right first. We were right inside, I think it was. I think it was. The islanders came back right. Yeah, yeah, I mean that was the old Eggloo to the Old England man, a place are gone. Now now it is ppg paints arena. But all right, man, we're going to put you on the spot. We got the two minute drill where to see how far you get. Maybe you can score touchdown, maybe you can't. So now, are you ready? Put two minutes on a clock, buddy, let's do it. All Right, here we go, gas or electric car? Electric? Would you rather fly or drive? Drive, biggest pet peeve podcast hosts, some of them, let's just say some of them. All right, Mount Rushmore of Comedy, Oh boy, living or dead. Either living. I'M gonna go chappelle, I'm gonna go with Ellen Degeneres, I'm going to go with Bill Burr, I'm going to go with Chris Rock, honorable mention. I'm going to go to Louis K and I know I'm forgetting somebody one. The pykesist coming on strong. Oh yeah, she's coming out trying, all right. Hot or cold? Hot, all right. Favorite sports movie, I would say that would have to be God, Oh, field of dreams. All right, all right. What recreational sport do you play? Now? Recreational sport would be I work out a lot. I've lost close to forty pounds during the pandemic. Well, that's awesome. Congratulation. All right. What person, if you could change places with them for one day, who would that person be? A living or dead? Gus F Ros? Oh No, you'd be bored out of your mind. Who's your favorite quarterback? Favorite quarterback is Tom Brady. I love it, all right, beer, liquor, wine or other? I would say other. All right. Travel to? Where where do you want to go? At you haven't been Belize. I've been there. It's awesome. All right. What's the most exciting Olympic sport? I like swimming. I shaved my wife, gave my head twice and was captain of the swimming team. would be you. You were really what was your what did you compete in? Freestyle Sprinter. Freestyle Sprinter. You were any tiny shorts and the and the one, two, yeah, twenty two, three hundred, forty eight four,...

...and when I wore a bathing suit you could tell what religion I was. All right, all right, well, you didn't get in the end zone, but we're going to let you try and kick a field goal here. All Right, what is your hidden talent, Berry? I think my hidden talent is recognize using the extraordinary qualities in the people that I'm blessed to come in contact with and helping them to develop those extraordinary qualities. I would agree with that. You have a talent for that, my friend, and please let everybody know. What is the next evolution of Barry Cats? Well, I think the next evolution is a bunch of different ways to deliver entertainment to people and comedy the people. You know my friend who owns the Wilber Theater in Boston. You Know He. He's a promoter and he has the theater and for four months there's no live performance. My other friend is the drummer for Lenny Kravitz. You just got the call after thirteen years saying look, I'm not going to tour for Prini a year and a half. So you have to be able to deliver comedy in a different way now and figure out how to get the message to the people. And there's many different ways with the Internet and marketing and subscription base services and holograms. Believe it or not, that will take things to next level. I'm always looking at that and figuring that out and how to help artists get the next level. And in the end I get to go along for the ride and enjoy things and hopefully I make a contribution and people remember me as a good man. All right, how can our fans find you? Barry, can reach me at Barry Cat that's a twitter instagram, or you can check out the podcast industry standard on any platform. I know you'll like a lot. There's some really inspiring interviews and I'm really proud of that and and I'm really proud that you had me on the show as well, and I'm really, really truly grateful. Well, I am really happy that somebody of your statric was kind enough to come on and, you know, appease my show and and I loved hearing your sports stories. I don't know how many people know that about you, but props to cousin Ricky for taking you everywhere and introducing you to the exciting world of sports when you were young and and there's nothing like it when you're in a crowd of Seventyzero people and there's something great going on and and you can pick out all of that. So, Barry Cats, you know, you can find them at you know, like you said, I think it's Barry Catscom. You have an entertainment group. You know, there's so much that you're doing. I look forward to your next evolution in life and thank you for joining me on huddle up with guests. Thank you for joining David I in the huddle. We hope you enjoyed our podcast. If you'd like to hear more podcast just like this, go to huddle up with Gustscom, where you can find our social channels, subscribe to hear more by our merchandise and join our excuse of huddle through Patreon. Please join us next week when we talk to more guests about how sports shape their life.

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