Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 10 months ago

Mario Andretti

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to the huddle with 15-year NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte! It’s a fast-paced, thrilling ride on today’s huddle as Gus interviews the one and only Mario Andretti! Gus and Mario go through what life was like for the record-breaking champion as he was “excelling” through his career at break-neck speeds. One of the most successful Americans in the history of motorsports, Andretti is one of the only two drivers to have one races in Formula One, IndyCar and World Sportscar Championship … and, of course, NASCAR! So sit back Gus fans, make sure your seatbelt is firmly fashioned and get ready for the flag to drop – it’s MARIO ANDRETTI TIME in the huddle.

Hey everyone. Welcome to another episode of Hello up with Gus, I'm your host. Former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, some people say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read. 16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latest news, sports music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favorite podcast. Follow up with Gus, check It out today at www. 16:31 Digital News.com. Huddle up with Gus is brought to you by Vegas sports advantage, clients of Vegas. Sports advantage are winning big in 2021 you can be a part of the winning two. As of june 1st $100. Bettors are up $3700 500 dollars betters are up $18,500 and $1000 betters are up $37,000 and $5000 betters are up. $185,000. Become a client today. By clicking the link in the description below and use promo code. Huh? Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a matchup Ryan here sports fans, Whether your game is on the gridiron at the diamond or on the links, we can only say welcome to this week's huddle up with gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents passion for sports has taken him on the Field and behind the Benches play for seven NFL franchises with 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the games are. One. Uh it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up. Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it's kick off time. So snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with Gus strange variety. Big play. Two left code, huddle up To take 25% off your package today. Thanks to our partnership. Hey everyone, welcome to huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, Gus Frerotte and uh we're on the new super platform, appreciate everyone joined. Sorry, we're a little late but I guess we are known for that over the last couple of weeks just because of issues with technology and everything and today my issue was with a plane. So uh I was a little delayed and I cannot thank my guest for being here and taking time and and being so patient with us. But um I want to thank all of our people, especially super uh sounder FM And thanks to my help that I have. It's incredible. I couldn't do without him. But thank you Terry Shulman. I appreciate you. And so um uh this is a great show. Uh we're on a new platform. So today is uh somebody that we've had on before. He's a great person. I'm trying to bring my son on uh as the moderator so he can run everything for me, but join us back back um, in the pit, I guess we'll say pit stop is Mario Andretti Mario, How are you doing today buddy? I'm great, gosh! But so I'm excited to talk to you because the last time we spoke we found out a lot about you growing up and your, how you fell in love with auto racing um today I want to get a little more into about your son and your family. I mean it's such a big name. You guys are worldwide and I first question I have for you because my sons played football, how did you feel when your son started racing? Well, obviously it was something that started when he was nine years old and I have two boys by the way, mike and Jeff and they both brings in and uh, you know, as you would expect, you know, just like your your football player, you put their football in the kid's hand right away. So I put a gold card. Yeah, and Michaels, Michael was the oldest one. So I took him to a parking lot, the high school parking lot and set up a little bit of a course. And I said, well let's see, I doesn't, I mean he took like duck to water, you know, and uh, And so I started racing at age nine And in fact he was running national events when he was like 11. And then I had to sign him off because there are those events that you had to be 14 and older. Yeah. And he was winning. I mean, Michael was winning right off the bat and uh, Jeff did the same thing and uh, you know, my wife kept saying you're really irresponsible daddy, you know, get him started so early, but nevertheless, uh, it was almost a natural thing for them to pursue. I, I hope that I'm not guilty...

...of pushing them into it all I did and made it available. And then I think I made it clear enough to say, you know what, uh, you make the choice, it's up to you if you want to continue this. And, and the message back was clear, you know, from, from Michael and both Jeff as well and they both went through all the, you know, the sort of, uh, the categories, you know, for, you know, the, that, this, uh, all the roads to say to, to India, if you will, you know, the little leaguers and all that is the, there are plenty of those categories, you know, that advance you up until you get to the top and, and the best thing is that, you know, looking back they all, they were winning going right through the different disciplines and uh, and Mike, Michael had a phenomenal career, Jeff was not as happy as, as lucky. Was fortunate just like my twin brother, although we both started together And I'm the guy that was dodging all the bullets and he was getting all the bullets. Uh, so his career was brief, you know, about 10 years and then, you know, he had to retire after the last accident. And Jeff did pretty much the same thing. But as a family, as you can see, you know, Jeff went on and then Michael went on and uh, and then his son, Marco, uh, the other end ready that took took up this, this game. And uh, and he pretty much started about the same age. Uh, he was nine or 10 and, and continue the same road as Michael did. Yeah, that's incredible that what about as being a dad? What was the first race where you really were nervous? You know what I mean? Because, like when my kids played, uh, kind of, youth football wasn't as nervous, but then I got up the high school ranks where guys are bigger, faster. What was the first time you remember being pretty nervous to watch them? I was always nervous. I'm nervous today. That never cheated. Uh, I'm the nervous nelly on the sideline. Uh, the only time that I was more relaxed was when we were on a race track together, you know? And uh, you know, Michael and I were even teammates toward the end of my career and, and his, and uh, and we actually, we were on podium 15 times in an indycar race, you know? So, uh, yeah, we had some good racing together and we started, uh, We started on the front row 10 times. And, uh, we were first a second five times. So it was 5, 10 and 15. So we had some great times together. What about, like if you and Michael, we're coming in together, right? Or you're in the last lap together, who's going to let the other one win? It? Always a competition. There's not letting anybody. Matter of fact, as I say, my wife, DM was always as she would, uh, reprimand us, me especially, uh, you know, uh, is your son? You've got to give him a break, you know, because every time we were just wheel to wheel, but there was always some touching, you know, like, uh, woman Nagy says, you guys, you know, you're crazy. And then, of course, you know, we would take care of each other, you know, we never crashed each other. Yeah, that would be good after that one. Right? I've been quite right home. But, uh, I know the one, the one race in, uh, Portland's 1986 Michael was actually, uh, way ahead and I was second and no chance to catch him about three laps from the end. The engineer is screaming in my ear, Michael's every, some fuel pickup problem. So, and I stood on that seat and, uh, we're coming along for the drive race to the finish line. I beat him by several, one thousands of a second. Oh man, I can't imagine. Was he human? Oh, he was fuming. Uh, yeah, on the podium. He was actually, uh, he was pretty upset. And uh, and one gentleman says, hey, Mike, is his, is it there? Cool off a little bit? He says his father's Day? Yeah. Happy father's day, dad? Yeah, That's funny. That's funny. What do you let him win? He's your son, is are you kidding? Right, Right. He's going to do this a lot longer than me. He's gonna be in it forever now. And you're probably saying, like, I got to get what I can, he's exactly. So how was it, when you would give them advice? Would they take it and say, oh yeah, dad, whatever, you know, because, you know, it's differently even when I...

...played football game, I try to give my boys advice and things. Sometimes I listen sometimes not, but as a father, they, it's, you know what I mean, you're their dad and not The Greatest F one Racer Ever. Formula One. Yeah, I mean, advice, you know, especially at the, at the beginning, you know, especially in golf carts, you know, I just would watch them different lines and so on and so forth. And whenever I would make a suggestion, you know, Michael or Jeff, they would, you know, take to it, that was pretty good, you know, they would they would kind of listen later on, you know, that was just a matter of discussion. There was not a lot, you know, direct. Okay, how do I do this? How do I do that? You know, we were just generally, we always talk shop obviously. So, um, uh, and, and you know, the, there were many times when we're Michael and I were teammates a lot of time. He was, he was, you know, he would hold things back from, right? Yeah. We always remember you always remember you beating him by what? 7th, 1007, 1 thousands of a second or something. He wasn't gonna give you any more help. You wouldn't give you any more help. So we have a lot of people on, if anybody has a question for Mario, let me know, put it into questions, claim a spot and you come and ask Mario question, I'm sure a lot of you have a lot of great questions for you. So Mario, I was thinking like, okay, what am I going to talk to you about? And I wanted to kind of compare because now you guys have your ownership of a team and you're always picking new people to race and how that happens. How do you see, uh, somebody who's been driving and see that they have better skill than somebody else. You know what I mean? Like we have rookies, we have people to go to the combine, we can see them in college and you can kind of see their skills, but how do you, how does that happen in racing? Well, I think it's the same way, the same as any other sport, you know, uh, when, you know the sport, you know what it's all about, then you pick those things are very quickly and very easily. But honestly, um, I want to put one thing, I want to make sure that, you know, that Michael, Michael is the only one that owns his own team. I don't, I'm not part of it. And I'll specify that because Michael actually, I think it came out of the cockpit as a driver When he was at the very top of his game and bitterly actually was only about 42 years old. You know, I, I raised like another 11 years, you know, Raised until I was 50 for actually, uh, years. Yeah, so the bottom line is this, uh, he looked at this thing, uh, very definitely than I did. Um, you looked at the business side of it, which is the ownership and uh, and he bought in on the team that actually he was driving for at the time. And uh, and, and that's it. I mean, it's, uh, from there on, he just cultivated his business and he's, uh, you know, is entering drivers has seven different disciplines, you know, even because Australia, you know, super was there. So, um, but anyway, this became his business and he, he's enjoying it tremendously. And going back to your question about how you pick drivers. Um, it's like anything else. You just go out there and you have some of your own people, they're doing some scouting and then then they bring them on and they test them, you know, they're testing drivers right now. They were testing a couple of drivers in Indianapolis and then in the last few days, um, and, and that's how you choose him. But also he's picking his drawing from his zone, uh, disciplines categories that he's driving. Like they called the road to Indy. Um, he said, uh, some of the most successful drivers really that he's had on his team came through that category. You know, that's just a step below the, the Indy cars and that they called the Indy lights and, and again, it's, so it's a process like anything else that, but as far as really trying to, to, you know, to depict some talent, Um, you know, I, I just loved, you know, to watch racist myself and not only in the car, let it be NASCAR Formula one. And you can really, you can see, you know, especially some of the young talent coming on that's got, they have the little extra, yeah, possess an ability. And uh, and that's really what you go for. You know, if you own a team, you...

...know, you want to surround yourself with the best you can possibly get and Mike Michael and, you know, this team, he's had some pretty good shoes, there's a pretty good drivers that brought him, uh, you know, it's really, and I was reading a couple of the young kids that they've picked up recently and it's pretty amazing how, and I was just wondering like there's a better, like a driver have 1/6 sense, like a, you know, quarterback just makes guys miss in the pocket. They kind of, it's like, how do you know that guy was coming? You know what I mean? You have like 1/6 sense when you're driving, like you just kind of have a better feel for it. All of it. I mean, it's an all of it plays, I mean, it's, uh, you know, each, you know, each sport has its own quirks, its own, you know, the specialties and, and uh, and you know, the guy that actually, uh, can predict certain things or can even, you know, the race car is a strange animals and animal that requires a lot of adjustments and, and, you know, just about anyone can drive a perfect race car that's really set up most of the time. You're not going to have that. So who are the ones that excel the best are the ones that actually can adapt. Yeah, I adapt to the car that's not 100%,, You know, a car that maybe it's 90%, and you try to make up, you know, because you just develop that skill to be able to just that maybe um do some of what the cars want rather than what you'd want sometimes and uh and still make make do and you can win some races that way where Some drivers that don't have that ability, you know, they pretty much, you know, they're done for that day. So yeah, no, I get I completely understand that you just, there's just guys that people that have a different skill set and it takes them a long way. All right, so we have some questions here. 1st 1 is from Terry, This one will be a chat. You've had an amazing racing career, but you are also an amazing chef. How much influence did your grandmother have? And your love of food, wow, Good question. I don't know where you found that out, but actually the amazing chef is my daughter Barbie. I'm the one that eats, I would need the same. Yeah, my, you know, my mother actually uh and my grandmother was the one that they had a restaurant was quite well known. We were, you know back in Italy and then of course my mom uh she was, she didn't love it, but but my dad loved us. So she had to be a good, you have to please him. And then my daughter Barbie really took her. She's got all the recipes and everything and yeah, Yes, he's the one that takes good care of me and uh every couple three days she invites me to her house to eat because she thinks I'm gonna be starving, you know, I bet you never say no. Right, Like Yeah, well, no, no, I bring a bottle of wine with me. So that's, that's my gift. What's your favorite wine? Well, you're a cab guy. Yeah, yeah, of course. I'm okay. You can go on and on and talk about ones. Yeah, I mean, I love to start with a nice started a quite honestly. And then I went up with cab Sangiovese and Merlot Syrah. You talking? I mean, you know, just uh, there's so much to choose from. There is so there's incredible wine everywhere now. It's like it's it's exploding. So it's a lot of fun to try everything. So we got another question from VJ VJ s um not quite related to racing, but for Mario, did you enjoy the Nazareth marching band in 2019? And do you think marching band is a sport? So I don't know if you know the answer to that one, but or what you VJ is talking about, but I'll let you take a shot at it? Well, in 2019 we were celebrating that the 50th anniversary of my win at Indianapolis and the Nazareth marching band was pretty much, you know, celebrating that, which was quite nice, uh, for me. And so I, I attended a few of the events and they were spectacular. You know, just the way they presented and uh, and of course, you know, there are hometown marching band and they're in competition. So any competition can be a sport, Why not? You tried to be better than the other team. And uh, and they showed tremendously, you know, they were winning uh, pretty much all of uh, all the events they entered. So I was very proud of that. Yeah, no, that's awesome. I would think that if I had to carry a tube around for an hour, that would be a sport, right? That'd be pretty good workout. That would be pretty tough. All right, we got one from Andrew Howard here Andrew wants to know f one drivers, looking at indycar...

...jimmy and Indycar, how important is this cross series engagement? Like your career to racing's growth? I, I love to see that. I love to see that some of the drivers again, like you said, even from Nascar's, we see just lately jimmy, johnson and then we have uh, you know, we have ruined Grosjean name the car, the latest again from Formula One and uh, uh, something that I've derived tremendous satisfaction throughout my career by crossing over and uh, and not only just racing there, I mean if you made, but also, you know, trying to win, you were trying to win somebody else's sandbox at the wrong game. Uh, but yeah, like I said, I just love the opportunities to do that. And uh, and whenever I see it happening now, just like, even couple of years ago and uh, you know, when we had some other experiences, uh, you know, with Fernando, Alonso coming to Indianapolis and driving for Michael and you know, he, by the time the race came on, you know, the race was on, you know, at the end, you have the luxury to, you know, to do, uh, you know, to have a lot of practice, you know, because you're a full week before you qualify. So by the time the race coming on, you know, even if you arrived at the first time you can be like a veteran, you know, we know what you're doing it and when the race came on, I mean, but race time, he was pretty much he was ready to win. He could have won that race technically the way he was driving and the engine let him down. But uh, so again, it's great for the sport, I think to see that because you have some fans are loyal to their specific discipline, but the crossover brings fans back and forth. You know, uh, you know, Formula One, looking at Indy car and vice versa. You know, so again, we're just, now, what we need is some, uh, an indycar actually, hopefully even an american, indycar driver in Formula One, that's what I'm trying for. Yeah, that'd be great. Is that kind of like, so I'm assuming it's like, like when we tell kids that just play one sport you should try them all because it makes you better, right? So I'm assuming if you're an indie car guy, if you um, that if you've done Nascar, there's different skill sets with all that, right? Yeah. Oh absolutely. That's the beauty of it. I think it expands, I mean your, your ability and, and, and, and your skills by having to really adapt again, you know, to a different type of car, different characteristics. And uh, and I felt that I benefited tremendously even even by having driven the dirt, you know, the dirt tracks where you do, you know, you basically steer the car with the throttle and all that sort of thing because you're always looking for a grip, you know, you're, you're always driving a different line through the corners and that helped me in the wet, you know, because sometimes the Europeans think that americans can drive in a wet, you know, and that probably gave me even more, you know, right? Because there and uh, and, and do it properly and you know, I want some good races in the wet, you know, and, and I benefited, I think a lot from driving a dirt track car. So I can imagine that so different over there is a crossover or skill that's required, you know to, to drive and recognize here again the different characteristics and be able to adapt one side or another. Yeah, I would think that like, if I'm a Nascar guy and I'm driving an oval all the time and then you have to do, um, you know, it's, it's indycar right, that you go through, like when they do the track in Indy, so you can do the oil, but then they do the inside of the course to, with the road courses. Well, yeah, that would be a lot different. Like I'm always going left and all of a sudden I got road courses, we're going to make turns and I got to learn how to do that in a different car. That would be pretty difficult. India's a series vis a vis a Formula one. Formula One is specific to just road racing and, and an Indy car that I think that indycar champion is a more complete driver even than the Formula one driver because, uh, in order to become champion, you better be able to, uh, better be good at superspeedway short ovals and then, you know, and then the street courses, we have quite a few street courses, that Formula One, you know, I had to have a couple as well, but uh, but like I said, there's just a variety of, uh, of, uh, layouts that you have to deal with, I...

...think, you know, makes you a much more complete driver, you know, skill wise. Um, and here again, that's something that personally, always attracted me a great deal to be honest with you, I love it. I mean, I, I think that is great that you can, because like you said, there's fans of different sports like Nascar Indycar, Formula One, there's different fans. And when you can cross promote, that helps the whole industry. Absolutely, definitely. So I got an Oscar on here, Oscar if you want to turn your camera and I'll bring you on live and you can ask those questions tomorrow yourself, which would be really cool. Uh, and so Mario, what country do you love driving in the most? I mean, I know you live over here in the States, but you've been all over the, what country do you love driving in the most? Well, to me, a racetrack is a racetrack, you know, I, you know, racing six continents, you know, and when you're on the race track, you know, it's, it doesn't matter, you know, even so, uh, as far as any country to visit. Well, that's another story. Well, that's what everyone has the best wine, correct or wherever your daughter's cooking, That's what I would say that. All right, let me bring, I'm gonna bring Oscar on, let's see, Hey, there is Oscar, nobody, I'm doing great. This is awesome. Yeah, yeah, I'm glad to have you here. So you guys got a question for Mario. I do. So tomorrow you were credited with implementing ground effect into the first cars on a race track. And I was curious because at that time Michael schumacher also mounted his radiator fan to the bottom of his car to create, you know, a sort of vacuum, further increased down force. So, well, you were creating that innovative technology and that was happening at the same time where they viewed in kind of parallel ways and both of them were very much disrupting like racing in a similar way or was it kind of perceived like there's no way that this fan thing is gonna last and that's cheating and we're not cheating. Like how is that kind of dynamic between the teams at the time? Well, the difference between the fan that you're talking about is, is the fan was just sucking up, you know, rocks and everything else from the track and spitting out the back and uh, that actually, that, that car was a Brabham was raised only once and it won the race, you know, and uh, with Niki Lauda in, in uh, underst or pin in Sweden and then after that it was ruled, you know, ruled out because I can imagine having the whole field with those cars. I mean, it would be dangerous among other things. But the art ground effect was natural. You were just, it was shaping the underneath of the car, you know, to, in other words, let me let me go back a little bit up to that point. You were just, we were using airfoils at the time, you know, where you have on the top surface to press the car down, obviously to give it more grip and, you know, more attractions to the corners. But with the air falls, you have a lot of front frontal area penalty. The more angle you put on the air foil, you know, to get more down force. You know, the story, you're going to go on the straightaway, but with the ground effects, you get free down force from the flow that creates a suction, a negative pressure underneath the car. And that was created almost by accident quite honestly. And it was developed, we're developing more and more in 1977 whereby, you know, we just, then, it's a long story, you know, how we develop more and more, uh, down force, but directing the air that we had so called movable skirts on the outside too to retain the air so the air wants slip and get out on the sides, you know, and then changing different angle of diffusers on the exits and, you know, so many things, it was actually very interesting, fascinating, uh, you know, going through all the, all that, and, and it was all part of what you would call that, uh, that the development uh, race guard throughout the different decades, you know, that, uh, you see, uh, you know, we're all started, you know, with some basic four, you know, four wheels and uh, it's very slim, you know, just an engine and so forth. and, and only with mechanical, uh, you know,...

...it's just suspension, Everything else until, you know, all of a sudden we started thinking, okay, now we can go to use the air, you know, to give it and the more you press it down or you know, obviously the more grip you get through the corners and there was an evolution, if you will, uh, there was for me just having lived through that period, you know, I feel so fortunate, you know, because I think I probably had a little more understanding and more appreciation for what's going on today, you know, where it came from, to where it is now and, and so again, all of this is uh, it was part of being with like you Colin chapman, you know, who was a real maverick, you know, the guy was very, very, were intelligent in so many ways, but uh, he really dedicated himself in so many ways to just create to give the driver, uh, this, you know, so called unfair advantage if possible, you know, uh, you know, I was, you know, it was phenomenal to be part of that with, you know, individuals like himself for Mr Ferrari and you know, these are icons of our sport that will probably never be duplicated. Right? So hey, Oscar, would you like to get a picture with Mario, check this out. So look, we got a selfie mode, here we go, let's see, we're gonna try it out here. Here we go. I love it. Alright. There you go then. I guess that will go right to your um that'll go right to your queue. Uh appreciate you, man. Thank you. Absolutely. Thank you too, for the yesterday. Thank you. Mr. Take care. All right, that's pretty cool. And then Mario we get to take yourself. Yeah, that's pretty neat. So, if All right, um I appreciate you for doing that. But what technology did you see where that came into racing? That you were like, okay, now this is gonna be amazing, it's going to change the sport. Do you think it's what you were just talking about? Do you think it's different, I think the aerodynamics aspect of it was probably the most powerful element in the race card to give a performance. I mean, give you, for instance, you know, let's take Indianapolis, for instance, uh when I uh, That was a rookie there in 1965, the car was just pure, there was no down force whatsoever. And, you know, the speeds were where they were, you know, he had to back off and, you know, in the race, you were even breaking for the corners. Uh and now, I mean, you just go flat out in 240 mph, you know, through the corners. And uh and the only thing is the only that slows down is the inertia, you know, that slows down, but the staying flat, qualifying at least not in a race, but qualifying. So it's it's an incredible feeling and you're depending on all that down force. I mean, if something would happen, I mean, the car would just take off and just fly over the grand stands, you know? Yeah, they lost a lead or something like any little thing that would happen to it to change all that. Yeah, incredible. But like I said, it's uh yeah, definitely, the aerodynamic aspect of the cars and it's quite regulated by the way, because gus with the knowledge that is available that we have today, you know, on the engineering side, you can make a car, you know, so easily drive a ble you know, that it would be ridiculous. So, I will not even be a sport. So, you're saying I could do this, the the rules actually, yeah, the rules actually are so you cannot really use everything that, you know, you know, you're, you're what? Right, they wouldn't want me driving because I'd slow the car way down, I'm way too big. No, no, no man, that's no excuse by the way. So, so I've seen the, you know, Ferrari Ford movie that, you know, that kind of gives you an over idea, an idea of what was going on then. Now, have you got to meet those gods were kind of where were you in that timeframe when all that was going on, because it's it's amazing, I was part of all that, that was, was in that series, I mean, I was, uh, I was one of the test drivers for, for ford at the time and I was part of the development of those cars with Bruce McLaren. Like we want the frustration with the Mark four. I was a woman when they were running. So, uh, and uh, you know, even, uh, you know, with, uh, uh, you know, when Miles was, was was killed, I was there that test at...

...riverside. They didn't show the track. I mean, they had someone left a lot to be desired, especially with somebody like me that was there, you know, but you know, a movie is a movie, but you know, ken Miles was, you know, it was like an engineer driver type of guy and, and there was a lot to be learned from a guy like that. And uh, and I was really in the time of my career that I needed to be learning from someone like him and uh, and I had a special appreciation for that for sure and he's in and he's depicted exactly that in the movie correctly. I'm not sure that they, but he was much calmer guy. I don't want to show it anymore. Yeah, like you said something to be desired about, you know what, how things have presented, you know? And uh, well, but, and I was trying to picture like they do a good job of showing like moving up in an engine and we're trying to beat this group and then all of a sudden, you know, I think it was forward, right? So, um, the actor that takes him for a ride in the, in the ford, the car, he gives them a lot of like, you know, they're like, he's like, surprised, let me show you what this can do, but for you, you've seen all the engines come through the time, what engine do you remember where you got into a car and you're like, man, this thing is killer, This is one of the best, like, most powerful engines I've ever like driven as it is. It like the newer stuff for the older times, you know, where it was like such a big jump that you just fell in love with it. Well, you know, here again, it's, I think for a driver, obviously you're always going for more power, more power, you know, that that's a mixture smile because you always want to go fast, what's gonna make you go faster, horse pop. And so I personally, I liked the, the era when the turbocharger engines came on the scene whereby, you know, you started, we were running were qualifying with engines, but by 11 on your horsepower, you know, and sometimes and that we didn't have a car that actually was capable really dealing with that. So we're getting a lot of wheel spin, even on the superspeedway, if you will, a lot of that is regulated and now you don't have as much but experiencing that was just amazing. Um, it's the ultimate satisfaction from a driver to really have, you know, The most powerful engines possible. I mean, I experienced that an indycar experienced that in Formula one you know, but uh, you know, interpret charge engine was, but if, you know, they have the hybrid engines now in Formula One, which they'll pump up, you know, in qualifying trim, you know, somewhere around 850 horsepower, you know, which is uh, you know, it's pretty good for the, the power generation would be just like, You know, if your family car you would have like 4000 horsepower. Yeah, that would be crazy. Do you remember, Do you remember the first time you broke? 200? Yeah, actually, uh, super speedways are the places, you know that you do that and that was actually at Indy, you know where uh, you know, because uh yeah, that's that's where you're gonna go the quickest. You know, do you want your team and your did you have like the headset and you can hear your, like the team in your headset telling you things, you know, you always, you always informed, you know, you have, there's a board and everything else, you know, you always know uh, immediately a fast you're going and, and many times even you have a speedometer in the car, you know, but you look at the red rpm, you know, you know, if you're really cooking, you know where the RPMs are. So uh yeah, that's even qualifying, you know, many times uh, you know, I, I knew that I had a really good luck going uh, usually when just watching that. Uh, so yeah, I think I got it, right, And most of the time that, that would be a pole position type of thing. Right? So would you say, so I'm looking at doing a new show about rivalries, right, Who would you say that your biggest rival was that you ever got to compete against? Like, okay, this guy got me, I'm gonna get him now, like there always is that little that, that makes you, Yeah, yeah, yeah, robberies, I think something is very healthy in sports obviously. Um, even, you know, with us, uh, robbery, uh, somebody that's better than you makes you better because it's gonna make you work harder for me when I came on the scene, uh, the guy that was really the yardstick at the time was a J. Foyt. And even when he was five years my senior, he...

...was already a champion, uh, in Indy cars and, and uh, and I was going on, I was pretty much a thorn on his side because I think I was doing pretty good as a rookie, you know, I won't buy one, you know, I was one of my first championship as a rookie, you know, and it didn't, you know, in the series Indianapolis series. So I was a thorn on the side. And uh, did he say anything to you though? Because you come up and give you a little night? Did say a lot of things, a lot of things you don't need to be said more honestly. I bet. I bet. Yeah. Hey bed. Yeah, I know. That is like, you know, when I was a rookie, there's a lot of vets looking at you and saying, all right, well, it took a long time for us to, to call each other friends, but all kind of goes by the wayside because you're both competed right for a long time and then you kinda at the end, you look back on your career and you can become friends. But while you're doing it, it's a little different. It's a little different. Yeah, I can tell you that just to be labored on that a little bit is, uh, I look at how fortunate, you know, I mean, age is not the only one. I mean, you move around there several other drivers, you know, the answers and so on and so forth that any given time they're better than you, you know, because they're good and uh, and that's what really elevates your, you know, your ability. I mean elevates your game if you will because, uh, you know, you never rest. You know, there's always somebody is going to be better you that day, so you just work hard and work harder and that's what, that's what makes you, you know that that's the positive side of uh, of the sport of sports period in my opinion, is it work hard, but also always learning, right? I feel like those things, yeah, like those two things go together. Like, hey, I want to learn what that car did. So like we can figure out how to make my car better, those kind of things. I felt, I was like, I felt I was learning until my very last race quite honestly. Yeah. So I heard from somebody that you have, like when you go into your driveway, you have a piece of a wall from one of the race tracks and I can't remember what they were saying. But when you go in there, it was like, um, one of the one racetrack Iran, there was a piece of wall instead of like stones and everything going up to your driver, you have a piece of this wall. Is that true? No, somebody was, I was fishing out in Harrisburg and this guy said, oh yeah, I've been past Mario and he has this thing, you know? And so I don't know. I had to ask him, like, I'm gonna interview him, I'll find out. And he said, oh, I swear I'll have to look for, I look for afterwards. I'll tell him you wouldn't look for it. It looked for it. Yeah. You know, I think that everything that is going on now, I feel pretty good that we're getting back to normal kind of and you know, even, you know, India is getting full, all these nascar venues are coming back now. How do you feel about everything getting back to normal? Loving it obviously. I mean just like in watching the football games, I mean, you know, 70 80,000 people, you know, elbow to elbow man, that's what we want. You know, and uh, and, and again, it's just we've been longing for that because uh, it was really tough in the last year and a half or so, especially last year, you know, that curtailing some of the events. And can you imagine like Indianapolis, uh, you know, the most of tennis sport, I would say. Uh, you know, anywhere, uh, you know, there was, there wasn't a soul in the stands, it was just eerie. Um, you know, yeah. Last year I had a, I was up on the pagoda, which is, you know, just a high part of the, you know, on the race track. And, and I was interview, you know, by abc at the time and, and I'm looking down on the cars are on the grid there on the track, There isn't, there wasn't anybody around there. It was like it almost like it was surreal. Yeah. This again in my, my life. Yeah. Like the car start up, but there's no, there's nothing that fan noise that buzz that's going on around, you, just hear the cars. That would be really eerie. Yeah, it was, we don't want to experience that again, right? We don't. So um Terry wanted to know, uh, you know, you've had all these incredible accomplishments in your life, you've won so many races, but is, you know, winning driver of the year, three different decades, would you say that's one of your was your favorite accomplishments? Well, of course it is. I mean, it's uh all of it, I mean, it's it's the ultimate thing that uh, you know, that you're looking for. I mean, at the driver to hear something that uh, it's a judge, something that you get...

...somebody voting for, something like that, you know? And uh, but I think just winning championships is it's the ultimate because they're, you know, you learn in earnest, I mean, you know, either finished for a second, it's not somebody judging, Oh, yeah, you're the best today. You've got to prove it, you gotta be there and, and uh, for me, you know, you gotta I gotta look back at that. We're all started for me. Uh, and and that is when I was just a young lad in Italy, you know, And, and I, you know, some of the very first big race, international race, uh, I was 14 years of age there And, and that's when my dream began to become a race driver. So I clinched the world championship right there in Monza, where I saw my very first big race in 1950 for and yeah, that's amazing on a personal level, can anything top that? No, you know, that I was uh, there's uh Goodwood in England every year. They have an incredible event with a lot of vintage cars from all different eras and uh, okay, this year I was there and I got to drive the very car than my idol, Alberto Scotti, the Ferrari, he was driving in that race, wow, yeah, take you back to, like when you were a kid, like you talk about going full cycle. Yeah, that's amazing, you know, coming back and I mean, the, the gentleman that owned that, he was, he was vibrating because, you know, if you go, oh my goodness, I mean, this is a priced possession, you know, and but he let me drive it and then it said on the hill climb and, and it was an incredible moment for me was, you know, the bit emotional as well, you know, but can you imagine that at 14 years of age, I was gonna say, you know, kid, when you're 80 years old, you're gonna be able to drive that car. Well, that was, that was, I guess it was like when I played football and I came back to Pittsburgh, where I grew up and got to play in the stadium here, you know, just being in there, where I watched all these Steelers when I was a kid play, you know, then you get to go back in that space, you know, you just look around and take a deep breath. It's amazing how just, it does come full circle. It's awesome. I'm glad you got to experience that. Yeah, it's amazing. All right, one last question we got Andrew on, um Andrew if you want to turn your, you're Cameron, you can ask yourself, I'd love for you to do that, but Andrew, I don't know if he's going to make it in here into the queue, but um, Andrew wants to know an indycar, they have an insane amount of young talent. Can you recall recall a group like this in the past? You know what, overall, I think this is unprecedented. And then, and it's exciting, as exciting as can be. Uh, I just, uh, as a fan, I can't wait for some of the races just to see some of the young talent here is up against, uh, you know, some of the veterans, they're still young enough, you know, but they're as good as, you know, as I've ever seen, and, you know, just, uh, you know, I'm looking at a young lad like, uh, you know, Colton Herta for instance, I always been driving from my son Michael and at the young age, you know, winning the way he has already, you know, you already won uh six Indycar races and he's only 21 years old, you know, amazing, it was seven pole positions, I mean, and he didn't win by strategy and he won by pure pure speed and uh and so that's exciting, but uh and you know the rookie champion this time, this Alex below uh there's another one, you know, that came out of pretty much nowhere if you will, but loads of talent and you know, the Chip Ganassi team, you know, and and you know, here it is, you know, he's the national champion is uh rookie here in Indy, you know, so uh and there's some others out there that you know, they're all gonna, you're gonna hear from them, you know, they got uh uh the award, they got potato award is another one, you know with the McLaren group there and again, you know, exciting stuff. I I agree with you Andrew, I think it's uh can't wait for the season to get started again. Thanks Andrew, appreciate that. So um what do you have...

...coming up, what are you looking forward to? You still seem very busy? I was watching you, you're all over the place, just like you talked about, you were over in uh England I think, but what do you have coming up Mario that people can follow you and and see what you're doing now. Well just you know, I'm gonna I'm gonna get some more uh Formula One races, I think before the season. And uh I don't have a specific plan yet, so, but we'll let you know, you know, I have quite a bit on my plate anyway, uh and look forward to whatever is coming up again. And we got quite a few Formula One races to watch. There's gonna be uh championship deciding race this weekend, you know, Nascar in phoenix and stuff like that will be interesting to see what Kyle Larson does there. He's been the revelation of uh, Nascar this year, you know, I think with the rick Hendrick uh equipment and we'll see how it comes off because uh, is against two already champions and then Denny Hamlin who is probably the winning, is that when I win Nascar drivers without winning a championship. So it's gonna be, you know, a lot to look forward to. And so that's what it is, that's our life. That is awesome. That is awesome. Well, I love that, you're one of the greatest ever and I thank you for coming on a second time and huddle up with gus what is for dinner tonight at your daughter's house actually, some, I have some pasta with non arena sauce, which is unbelievable what's known arena sauce, That's my, my, my my mother sauce, that's the name of, nobody knows that it's actually, but that's what my barbie calls it because it's her grandmother known as grandmother. Okay, Yeah, I love it because the known arena sauce. I love it. I love it. Well, thank you for coming on, enjoy your known arena sauce and I'm sure you're going to have a nice wine with that tonight. It all sounds like it's gonna be a perfect night you bet. Thanks Mario. I appreciate you coming on. Thanks again. Have a great night uh and thank you for being so patient with me on that late flight I had from florida. Hey everyone. Um that's another episode of huddle Up with Gus. Thank you for joining me. I want to thank super for hosting us. Uh I want to thank, I think it was Oscar coming on, taking a nice selfie and asking a great question and all you can catch me. I'll be back tomorrow with Darren Mccarty. Uh he was a four time Stanley cup champion from the Detroit Red wings will be on at two o'clock tomorrow, but I appreciate Mario, hope you guys got a little insight into what memorials life is like. But there's so many other questions that we all probably could ask them. Thanks to sounder and if you want to listen to this podcast again, check it out. It's under F. M or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. Thanks everyone go to huddle up with Gus and check me out. Have a great night. Thanks Mark, I'll see you buddy and that's a wrap sportsman. Thanks for joining in. The fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another. Actually, huddle up with Gus, featuring 15 year NFL quarterback. Gus parent huddle up with. Gus is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available on apple music.

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